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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 30, 2019 6:00am-10:01am GMT

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good morning welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today: the london bridge attack — passers by are praised for their bravery as its revealed the attacker is a convicted terrorist. two people, a man and a woman, were killed. police patrols have been stepped up across london. the attacker who was shot dead by armed officers is named as usman khan. overnight, an address in staffordshire linked to him was searched. the attack overshadowed the latest televised election debate which brought together senior figures from seven parties. and in sport, new zealand are in control once again.
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england are chasing new zealand's first innings score of 375 in the second test in hamilton as their hopes of levelling the series fade. are bitterly cold start to the weekend with a hard frost and some fog out there. but, it is going to bea dry fog out there. but, it is going to be a dry story for many of us this weekend with lots of sparkling winter sunshine. all the details coming up shortly. it's saturday the 30th of november. our top story: the man who carried out a terror attack on london bridge yesterday was a convicted terrorist. two people, a man and a woman, were stabbed to death. the attacker named as 28—year—old usman khan was shot dead by an armed officer. he had beenjailed in 2012 for a plot to bomb the london stock exchange and set up a terrorist training camp, but was freed on licence a year ago. simonjones has this report. terror returns to the streets of london. a man and a woman killed.
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now the question is, how was this allowed to happen? fit —— pictures of film from the bus showed police moving in on a figure who had been held down by members of the public was not a man takes a knife and runs away so that we have blurred his face at the request of police. they wrestle with the attacker and then opened fire. this was the man shot dead. osman khan, 28 years old from staffordshire. he was jailed in 2012 for his part in a plot to bomb the london stock exchange but was released on licence last year. ahead of the meeting of cobra last night, the prime minister made his thoughts clear. i have long had an belief that it clear. i have long had an belief thatitis clear. i have long had an belief that it is a mistake to let serious criminals come out of prison early. and it is very important that we get out of that habit and that we enforce the appropriate sentences
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for dangerous criminals, especially for dangerous criminals, especially for terrorists that i think the public ought to see. it is believed osman —— usman khan was at fishmongers' hall and he was pursued onto the bridge after chaotic scenes. please arrive at three minutes past two and fire three shots fearing he was wearing an explosive vest. politicians are calling on communities to stand together to reject hatred. we have together to reject hatred. we have to remember that we live in a democratic society and those which seeks —— those that would seek to silence us will not succeed. our democracy must be alive and vibrant. the police have praised the public ‘s response. the police have praised the public 's response. i also want to thank the members of the public who have
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helped either by showing extraordinary courage and stepping in to tackle this attacker or indeed by following the instructions they have subsequently been given by officers at the scene and in the area. while the police believe there is no outstanding threat to the public, they have been searching a property in staffordshire and many have been asking what was being done to monitor the terrorist who went on to monitor the terrorist who went on to kill. in a moment, we'll hear from our reporter in stafford, where police have carried out a search of a house overnight. first to london bridge and our correspondent, simonjones. bring us the very latest in what is going on with the police investigation. the police investigation. the police investigation has continued at pace overnight. the key development is the naming of the man who carried out the attack, it is usman khan.
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elisa said he was working alone but they are carrying out further investigations to make sure. —— police said. the cordons remain here at london bridge and that is likely to continue for some time to come in police patrols are being stepped up in london and other parts of the country to act as reassurance but in all of this awful event, the one thing that has emerged are these stories of bravery from members of the public. we understand that the conference usman khan was attending after carrying out his attack, one member who was there grabbed an ornamental tusk from a wall and used it to try to fend off the attacker. another rubbed a fire attacker and let it off in the attacker‘s face on london bridge to stop him carrying out even more carnage. of the three
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people who were injured, they remain in hospital. they were two women and a man and we are hoping for an update on their condition later this morning because let's speak to our reporter liz copper who's in stafford for us. what's been happening there? usman khan was well to the authorities in staffordshire. and he had been known to them for some considerable time. he was convict ed backin considerable time. he was convict ed back in 2012 along with a group of men and they were involved in a plot to carry out an attack on the london stock exchange. following his trial at woolwich crown court he was sentenced to serve at least eight yea rs sentenced to serve at least eight years and we believe he was released on licence in december last year. the terms of that license would have been pretty strict. we believe that he returned back to staffordshire at the time of his trial. he lived in stoke—on—trent and we believe more
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recently he returned back to the cou nty recently he returned back to the county and overnight we understand there has been arrayed on the premises that is linked to him but details of that are yet to emerge. our political correspondent tony bonsignore is in our london newsroom. tony how have politicians reacted to yesterday's events? inevitably this has had a huge impact on the election campaign. events cancelled by all the main parties. the conservatives had an event today plant in london which is cancelled. labour was supposed to have an nhs summit in yorkshire and that too has been cancelled. and the lib dems have an event not too far from london bridge in east london and that has also been cancelled today. we have heard from priti patel, the home secretary, who praised the emergency services, as have all the political leaders. but borisjohnson has said he has long
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argued it is a mistake to allow serious and violent criminals to come out of prison early and went on to say it is very important we get out of that habit and enforce the appropriate sentences for dangerous criminals, especially terrorists, that i think, he says, the public will want to disable. we also know that boris johnson will want to disable. we also know that borisjohnson spoke to the labour leaderjeremy corbyn last night who has also expressed his shock at what happened. we'll be speaking to the security minister, brandon lewis, at around 7:10 this morning. we will also be talking to sadiq khan, mayor of london. the london bridge attack overshadowed the latest televised debate, which brought together senior figures from seven parties. our political correspondent, nick eardley, has more. welcome to cardiff and the national assembly for wales... in a fractious political period, last night's legal debate started on a sober note. once again, london and the country as a
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whole are having to come to terms with a horrific terrorist attacks adopt to members of the public are now dead as with a man who attacked them. paying tribute to the london bridge first responders and discussing how to tackle the security threat. soon, though, things turned to other election issues. there were 1016 —— exchanges between labour and the conservatives about how they will spend money if they win power and questions about whether boris johnson they win power and questions about whether borisjohnson can they win power and questions about whether boris johnson can fulfil they win power and questions about whether borisjohnson can fulfil his promise to get that done if he wins power. the tories say yes but the summer say power. the tories say yes but the summer say it is not true. michael barnier said it could take up to three years and that is before you had trade talks with the us or other organisations or country which would potentially put our nhs on the table. we are in episode one of a ten season box set and if you don't like what you have seen up until now, you don't have to watch the rest. critics of the conservatives set a no—deal exit will be back on the table if they win because they said they won't extend the next part of talks for future trade john
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said they won't extend the next part of talks for future tradejohn 2020 but their representative last night said a deal could be done. you said he couldn't get a brexit deal, it wasn't possible but he did, he got a great new deal and got it in three they were less than impressed with very cold and's planned to stay neutral. no wonder people don't have faith in politicians when the labour of the labour party the candidate to be prime minister, won't even tell us be prime minister, won't even tell us where he stands on this central question. while the greens were critical about lib dems proposal to cancel brexit even though the parties are working together in some seats. i do think to go for a lieu —— unilateral revocation is a slap in the face of 17.4 million people who voted to leave and that is why i think it is important that people have their say in a democratic process. they were tense exchanges over the nhs, too. the tories said claims it with the sale were a conspiracy theory. labour insisted they were general. —— genuine.
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nicola sturgeon agreed. they were general. —— genuine. nicola sturgeon agreedlj they were general. —— genuine. nicola sturgeon agreed. i am going to be pretty blunt. when that boris johnson says the nhs is on the table, isimply johnson says the nhs is on the table, i simply do not trust him and ido table, i simply do not trust him and i do not believe him. two nothing is for sale in the nhs. it provides incredible frontline care and great outcomes so i would say to lucy, the nhs is not failing and what we do need to do, as well as investing more money, we have to manage it better, that is crucial, we have to cut out the waste. no game changer but a reminder of the big election issues and the choice we all face when we go to the ballot box in a couple of weeks. three people have been stabbed in an attack on a busy shopping street in the hague in the netherlands. police said they are still searching for a suspect. images and videos on social media show dozens of black friday shoppers running away from the scene. the three people that were stabbed were treated in hospital, but were later able to go home. millions of commuters will have to pay an average of two—point—seven percent more for rail tickets
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from january. this could mean the cost of an annual season ticket increasing by more than 100—pounds a year. the body representing train companies says the majority of money will go back into running the railway, but passenger groups say users don't get value for money. all morning we will keep you up—to—date on the attack on london bridge. the man responsible for yesterday's terror attack on london bridge, was previouslyjailed for plotting to blow up the london stock exchange. he'd been released on licence a year ago. usman khan stabbed two people to death and injured three others. let us get a little bit more detail on the immediate aftermath of the event. tour guide stevie hurst was on the bridge at the time and helped bring down the attacker. he's been speaking to 5—live. his account contains some graphic details. we saw, a handful of people running away from the direction to the left of us, on the left—hand side from
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south to north. and i don't know why but i felt compelled to jump out of the car to go and see what the situation was that we saw a guy being sort of accosted to the floor so being sort of accosted to the floor soi being sort of accosted to the floor so i obviously went over there to investigate what was going on and the guys were just screaming, he stabbed a couple of women. i am guessing from the fishmongers' hall. they were screaming that so they we re they were screaming that so they were trying to jump on top of him and bundle him to the ground. we saw the knife was still in his hand so i just put a foot into try and kick him in the head. we were trying to do as much as we could to try and dislodge the knife so he couldn't hurt anyone else. the guys that were there were just amazing. absolutely incredible people. heroes beyond belief. the police were there within minutes which was incredible. they tried to drag us all off and that is when you see the guy that had the knife with a suit. it went down the
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side of the pavement. he picked it up side of the pavement. he picked it up and took it away because we wa nted up and took it away because we wanted to make sure that was all he had and we wanted to make sure we dislodged that so he couldn't harm anyone else. but as the police dragged him off, he rolls back and thatis dragged him off, he rolls back and that is when they screamed bomb. so we know he has a bomb vest of some kind, he had a bomb device connected to him and that is when everyone sta rts to him and that is when everyone starts to step back and my long green in all the videos ijust realised is very obvious stop we have all stepped back and he tries to get up. the funny thing is, when we are all holding him to the ground, the guy was constantly screaming, get off me, get off me, as if everybody was going to let him go and do his thing. we wanted to make sure he wasn't going to do this again and not harm another human being on this planet. the police put three rounds into his chest from his back and he is still laying on the floor putting the coat over him too, i don't know, keeping himself warm knowing he is about to die? so that was a first—hand account of
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what happened. we will throughout the morning be speaking to more eyewitnesses, also speaking to sadiq khan at ten past eight and brandon lewis the security minister at ten past seven. we will keep you up—to—date on any developments in that story. here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. but at least it will be dry and sunny. we will wake up to scenes like this, not only a hard frost but we also have some dense fog, particularly close to the midlands, just to the north of london, stretching into parts of east anglia and lincolnshire so this fog may well be slow to lift in places and thatis well be slow to lift in places and that is certainly worth bearing in mind. dense fog, visibility less than 100 metres, so it could cause issues if you are on the roads and
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tune into your local bbc radio station for points of interest on travel and traffic. the fog lift in one or two spots crossed —— but across parts of east midlands and lincolnshire it could stay through the day. a scattering of showers and running down the east coast and further south and west this is the only exception to the rule, a mild afternoon in the south—west because there is rain around, pushing into there is rain around, pushing into the channel islands, the isles of scilly and across cornwall, so it will linger through the evening but overnight, it gradually clears away. a bit more of a breeze as it does so and it should prevent any fog reforming across southern england overnight. elsewhere, some patchy frost but with a bit more breeze through the south, not as a night, harder frost likely to be further north and west. it will still be a cold start to sunday morning with temperatures below freezing. a high pressure then just starts to squeeze
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in from the north—west, keeping things quieter. a bit more of a breeze possibly on sunday. then generally we could see a few more scattered showers again up into the far north of scotland but it is a dry story, a better day in terms of sunshine across the south—west, and largely fine afternoon for many, but you will certainly need a couple of extra layers as the temperatures are just below where they should be for the first of december. once you have had your advent calendar chocolate, gone out for a walk, you will need an extra walk. to summarise, you haven't got the message, sunny but cold, harsh frosts around and some fog but at least it is a dry story and that certainly is welcome news after what we have seen of late. looking ahead, quite a theme of weather, for much of the week it will stay with us but something a little bit more mild and potentially more unsettled later. louise, thank you. we got all the bitsjust
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more unsettled later. louise, thank you. we got all the bits just before she went. it is 17 minutes past six. now on breakfast, it's time for the travel show. we are starting off in iceland this week. it is one of the best places in the world to see whales in their natural habitat. but it's also now providing a home for a pair of these amazing mammals who spent their lives in captivity. they are now looking forward to their retirement in an environment that is closer to their natural home. and cat has been to meet them. here, just off the coast of iceland, we are searching. because, apparently, there is something in the water. notjust one of them, either — there are 23 species of them.
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so every now and then, someone points in a direction and the whole boatjust rushes over, trying to see what is going on. and then someone points in another direction, so we rush over there. so it is like playing whack—a—mole. you never know when things are going to pop up. we are watching boats cast off to sea each day in iceland in the hope of catching a glimpse of these mammals. you've a great spot up here! it's the best one on the boat! minke whale, two o'clock. alright, and it is a minke whales that we have at our two o'clock. how do you even try to find a whale in such a vast area? what are the tell—tale signs? tell—tale signs. the easiest one is the body — so when their black body comes up and you see the triangle—shaped dorsal fin. but also the blows.
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so just when you see their breath, you know what species you have. really? you can tell the species from the breath? yes. that's incredible. how often do you see whales on these tours? we basically see them almost every trip that we go out. in the end, it's the food. both laught. we have nutrient—rich waters because it is cold. the colder the water, the more oxygen. and with that, the more life that you have. elsewhere in the world, travellers' contact with whales is often in captivity, where they are kept for public entertainment. globally, hundreds of whales are thought to live this way. but public appetite for holding these intelligent and social animals appears to be shifting. just last year, greenpeace drew attention to dozens of beluga whales
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and orcas that had been caught and kept in poor conditions in russia, destined for entertainment parks in china. but in recent weeks, they were released after a public outcry. fortunately, these whales had only been captive for a short time so they could cope with life back out at sea. but what happens when theme park owners agree to release their whales who are unable to defend for themselves in the ocean? so the next morning, i travel to the south of the island and out to the westman islands, a short ferry ride off the mainland. i had heard that here in iceland, a new kind of sanctuary was being created.
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audrey, there are so many beautiful coves and little inlets around iceland. why this particular place? it is a beautiful surrounding for them. with the cliffs kind of protecting them from the wind and the icelandic weather, and then also having the water temperature more like the arctic and subarctic, where they would be found in the wild. two beluga whales, called little white and little grey, will soon be the first released into the bay. they had until recently been performing at an entertainment park in china, but after the operators decided to end the practice, they tried to find new homes for the animals where they could live out their lives. what is the plan for tourists, so they are not too overwhelmed? yeah, so the plan with tourists is to manage boat trips. we have a partner who will be bringing visitors out. they will not get out on these pontoons, but they will be able to see them from a distance — like a whale—watching trip — and hear about the project and learn why little white
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and little grey are here. little white and little grey were carefully flown on the long journey from china to iceland, but they could not be released straight into the bay. they have, for the last few months, been acclimatising in the nearby centre and working with handlers to learn how to take the final journey into the bay. oh, my goodness! wow! these are incredible. yeah, hi. can i come down? yeah, of course. hello! they are so graceful in the water, aren't they? what do you love about them? you know, beluga whales are a kind of friendly animal. they will not hurt you and you can work with them peacefully, and so it is great fun
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to work with them. they're beautiful, gentle giants. yeah. so which is the naughty one? this one? yeah. look at theirfaces! this country's relationship with whales is complex, being one ofjust a few places in the world that still legally allows some hunting of the animals. but projects like this, and the various whale—watching experiences on offer, are ways to encourage understanding and protection. laughs. would you like some more fish? yum! iwillgive you... burps. oh, was that a burp? she keeps wanting more. oh, if you insist.
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if you insist. there we go. burps. oh, there is another little burp! chuckles. up next, we meet two women who are part of the unique team that took on an incredible journey across america. so, race across america is 3,070 miles from the west coast of america to the east coast of america. it was a different kind of cycling to anything i'd ever done before. so from california to maryland, and had to be completed in nine days. it was an idea that i'd had in the back of my mind, that i wanted to put
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a team together. i'd seen two teams of wounded warriors do it, and seeing that there had been no females in that team, i wondered why not. there was eight riders, all who had different health challenges — be that physical or psychological or both. half the team were civilian and half them were military. i met sally through some invictus training camps. the one main concern i had was the fact that i'm visually impaired. i had a brain injury when i was injured in the army, quite some time ago now — 1996 — so for me to be cycling on the other side of the road when i am completely blind to the left was always going to be something i had never done and, quite frankly, didn't really know how that was going to go. we all went over the start line together. what then had to happen was as a non—stop race,
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we — the team of eight riders broke down into two parts, so there were four people in each pod, and the support crew. the first team carried on cycling for a nine—hour period. so within that nine hours, every 20 minutes, we would change riders. the other pod, in that time, had moved forward and they were having to get their rest in — which is quite difficult when you have just had the adrenaline at the start and then suddenly go, "right, you need to go to sleep". i can remember seeing a lot of road. to be honest, when you're cycling, you're concentrating on covering as much as you can. looking up is not something you necessarily do. and i looked up, and i'm so glad i did. we were the pod that was very, very fortunate to cycle through monument valley. a lot of colour, a lot of red rock formations thatjust stand in this vast array of countryside.
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i — it's almost indescribable. cani can i put a camera in your face? do you want to take that? good stuff. they had been a lot of doubts on everybody‘s mind. there is often times when you wonder if you can carry on because things are hurting, and for me, i look back and reflect on the time when my depression was at its worst, when i didn't think there was any reason to live. i look back on that time and think, "this isn't as difficult as that, to try to overcome." the race finished in annapolis, maryland. eight of us cycled down the road. and everybody was cheering. i'm incredibly proud to have been able to have had an opportunity to take part in such an extreme event. it has forced me to sort of go out of my comfort zone,
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i suppose. cheering and applause. we were able to achieve something really quite incredible, and hopefully, others will be able to look back on what we have achieved and inspire them to go and take on their own race across america. hello, this is breakfast. good morning. this is a summary of today's main stories. here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. morning. this is a summary of today's main stories. two people, a man and woman were stabbed to death on bridge overnight. agro two was shot dead by an officer. he had been
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jailed but was afraid unlicensed one year ago. simonjones jailed but was afraid unlicensed one year ago. simon jones reports. terror returns to the streets of london. a man and a woman killed. but now the question is, how was this allowed to happen? pictures filmed from a bus show police moving in on the attacker who'd been held down by members of the public. a man takes a knife from the suspect and runs away, we've blurred his face at the request of police. officers pull away another man wrestling with the attacker and then opened fire. this was the man shot dead. usman khan, 28 years old, from staffordshire. he was jailed in 2012 for his part in a plot to bomb the london stock exchange but released on licence last year. ahead of the meeting of the government's emergency committee cobra last night, the prime minister made his feelings clear. i have long argued that it is a mistake to allow serious and violent criminals to come out of prison early. and it is very important that we get out of that habit and that we enforce the appropriate sentences for dangerous criminals, especially for terrorists that
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i think the public will want to see. it's believed usman khan was attending a conference on prisoner rehabilitation at fishmongers' hall at the northern end of london bridge when he started attacking people. the alarm was raised just before 2:00 yesterday afternoon. he was pursued onto the bridge where he was tackled amid chaotic scenes. police then arrive at 2:03 and fire two shots, fearing khan was wearing an explosives vest. politicians are calling on communities to stand together to reject hatred. we have to remember that we live in a democratic society and those that would seek to silence us will not succeed. our democracy must be alive and vibra nt. the police have praised the public‘s response.
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i also want to thank the members of the public who have helped, either by showing extraordinary courage and stepping in to tackle this attacker or indeed by following the instructions they have subsequently been given by officers at the scene and in the area. while the police believe there is no outstanding threat to the public, they have been searching a property in staffordshire and many are asking what was being done to monitor the convicted terrorist who went on to kill. simon jones, bbc news. let's speak to our correspondent simonjones, who's at london bridge. you have been following this closely. more details are emerging about the events leading up to this attack. the police investigation very much focusing on the attacker was mankind, his history and how attack broke out. he was attending a
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conference organised by the university of cambridge and we are told by people there a short way into the conference he started attacking people. that is when people, members of the public stepped in. we understand one person pulled off an ornamental tusk from a wall, from a whale, and used that to try to stop the attack. the attacker was then pursued onto london bridge and members of the public held him down on the bridge. one of them had a fire extinguisher and was letting it off in the attacker‘s face to try to keep him from carrying out any more attacks and after around five minutes, the police arrived and they managed to get members of the public out of the way and that is when they shot was mankind. the real questions about why he was released from jail when he was initially sentenced he was given an indeterminate sentence and that was changed on appeal and then was ultimately able to take out
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this attack —— carry out this attack. some general election campaign events have been suspended in response to the london bridge attack. the stabbings overshadowed the latest televised debate, which brought together senior figures from seven parties, who discussed issues including brexit, the nhs and climate change. three people have been stabbed in an attack on a busy shopping street in the hague in the netherlands. police said they are still searching for a suspect. images and videos on social media show dozens of black friday shoppers running away from the scene. the three people who were stabbed were treated in hospital and later discharged. millions of commuters will have to pay an average of 2.7% more for rail tickets from january. this could mean the cost of an annual season ticket increasing by more than £100 a year. the body representing train companies says the majority of money will go back into running the railway, but passenger groups say users don't get value for money.
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holly, you have all the spot for us this morning. yes, and we're going to start with cricket because that has just been happening to start with cricket because that hasjust been happening in the to start with cricket because that has just been happening in the last few hours. is england doing any better? i wish i could bring you some good news but it does seem like they have run themselves into a bit ofa they have run themselves into a bit of a cul—de—sac. another impressive score from new zealand. when you consider england won the toss and they would be really disappointed that they didn't manage to get any better than that. england's cricketers are facing a real battle if they're to win the second and final test against new zealand and level the series. they've lost two early first innings wickets in reply to new zealand's 375 all out. dominic sibley and joe denly both made just four. england finished the day on 39—2, so they trail by 336. the day started well enough with england's bowlers on top. tom latham made a century yesterday but he added just four to his overnight score before he was bowled by stuart broad. new zealand recovered well, though. daryl mitchell made 73 and bj watling — who you'll remember frustrated england with a double century in the first test — also scored a half century to put
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the hosts in control on day two. england and wales will find out who they'll face at next year's euros later. scotland, northern ireland and the republic will be watching the draw keenly, too, as they can still qualify through the play—offs. for england, though, they go into the finals as joint favourites. and our sports editor dan roan spoke to manager gareth southgate to get his thoughts ahead of today's draw. final preparations in bucharest where those competing in european's foot all tournament next year are about to learn their fate. after an impressive campaign, england are among the favourites for euro 2020 and here at the training base the manager told me their perception of the team has shifted. it is always a
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decisive moment for everybody, knowing when the dates are, knowing the roots. the country have been more engaged with the team over the last few years and that is one of the biggest highlights for me. never more so the biggest highlights for me. never more so than at the last euros when in abject england were ameliorated by minnows iceland two years later, southgate's young side surpassed all expectations, reaching the semifinals in russia. the growing sense that his team are now genuine contenders. i think we have gained some respect and i think people would view us as a threat which certainly wasn't the case ahead of russia. we also know that we have to improve. euro 2020 kicks off in rome but the tournament will be spread across the continent with 12 host cities. wembley will stage both semifinals and the semi—final —— and the final itself. it england get that far, they will have raised —— played five of their seven matches at home, raising hopes of a trophy.
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whenever you see the national team in any sport doing well, people get behind it. sport is about taking people from the day—to—day into dreams, into hopes, into aspirations and pride and that is what we have got to provide. next summer will evoke memories of the last time england enjoyed such home advantage was not euro 96 when the hosts shone and southgate's semi—final penalty miss was and —— was the end. and southgate's semi—final penalty miss was and -- was the end. it is not about redemption. the team is about our players and our fans and it is more important that we make them proud and we have to win matches as well. whales have also qualified at having reached the last four euros in france, will go into the draw with confidence. they have belief, they have had experience of getting to a semi—final. they will enjoy it, no doubt about that. and
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when the draw is made they won't wa nt to when the draw is made they won't want to wales because they have matchwinners. northern ireland, scotla nd matchwinners. northern ireland, scotland and the republic of ireland all have to go through the job at have to go through the play—offs to secure their place at european football's showpiece event. former arsenal manager unai emery has written a letter to fans in his first message since being sacked yesterday. he was relieved of his duties following a series of poor results and performances with arsenal currently on their worst run in nearly 28 years. in a letter released on the club's official website, emery said he wishes he could have achieved "better results" and thanked fans for helping him to understand the greatness of arsenal. the premier league is searching for a new chief executive after table pencil resigned before starting the job. —— the premier league is searching for a new chief executive after david pemsel resigned before starting the job.
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pemsel has stepped down from the post following newspaper allegations about his private life. he was only appointed last month and was due to start in february. he was the third person to be offered the job following the departure of richard scudamore a year ago. richard masters will now stay as interim chief executive. slowly but surely saracens are moving back towards zero in rugby union's premiership. remember they've been docked 35 points for breaching the salary cap but six penalties from england's owen farrell and this try from scotland's sean maitland helped them beat bath 25—12 last night. they're now on minus 18. meanwhile in the pro 14, ulster picked up a bonus point as they beat scarlets 29—5. this spectacularfinish from matt faddes was the first of their five tries. in the other match edinburgh beat munster to go second in their group. great britain had a very productive day at the trampoline, tumbling and dmt world championships in tokyo yesterday winning four medals. the women's tumbling team took gold — just watch this!
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it looks like me coming to work... ifi it looks like me coming to work... if i hadn't seen it, i wouldn't believe that could be done. remarkable. this finaljump from megan kealy sealed the gold medal ahead of russia and france. the women also won silvers in the double mini trampoline team final and the trampoline final. in the trampoline final, i love watching it, i can't get enough of it. and not to be outdone, the men also joined in for the medal haul. they won gold in the tumbling team final. the lastjump was from jaydon paddock, and it was enough to get ahead of both russia and the usa to seal first place. what a reaction! can you imagine the relief after doing something like that. the buildup to do it and know you have to execute it absolutely
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perfectly. can't imagine how it feels to be tumbling. i would be lucky to not fall on my face letter not —— let alone not fall on my face and not get a medal. 18 months ago, life after rowing was just the beginning for three time olympic gold medallist pete reed. he'd announced his retirement from the sport and returned to a job with the royal navy. but at the beginning of september this year, something happened that changed his life for ever. pete suffered a one in a million spinal stroke which left him paralysed from the chest down. his friend, rower and broadcaster sir matthew pinsent, went to visit him in hospital for his first interview. his friend, rower and broadcaster sir matthew pinsent, went to visit him in hospital for his first interview. hello. how are you. i'm good. we are
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at the duke of cornwall spinal treatment centre in salisbury. you've been here for three weeks now and is the new boy coming in, you have to introduce yourself. i am pete reed, whatever your condition is. i walked into hospital in uniform. i had weak legs and a strange gate but then i had a big stroke in the same area and that is really scary. i had such big pain that i felt nauseous. i went back into bed and the pain was extraordinary, like nothing i have felt, across my face —— a lot across my chest. i could feel the life drain out of my lexus of my wife jeannie was holding my feet because i asked her to as i was wiggling my feet up and down and slowly they came toa feet up and down and slowly they came to a stop and with about —— within about 45 minutes the pain had gone and i couldn't move my legs. the first thing i did was try to sit
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up the first thing i did was try to sit up and! the first thing i did was try to sit up and i couldn't as i grabbed the sides of the bed to pull myself up andi sides of the bed to pull myself up and i fell forward is sides of the bed to pull myself up and ifell forward is like sides of the bed to pull myself up and i fell forward is like a sides of the bed to pull myself up and ifell forward is like a rag doll and then fell backwards because i've got no core strength and that was the first time that that is really scary. and your athlete mentality, does that help at that point? there is nothing more beneficial to me now and my athlete mindset, nothing. my mindset is, although it is scary, you have to stretch yourself, you have to get up. for me, i have to have a shave, have to clean my teeth as the big goal is how quickly i can get back to that scary world out there that is more scary to that scary world out there that is more scary now to that scary world out there that is more scary now that i am in a chair but it shouldn't be. you mentioned jeannie. it must be so difficult for you together. mentioned jeannie. it must be so difficult for you togetherlj mentioned jeannie. it must be so difficult for you together. i think it is hardest for her because she stuck by me, she is incredible and i think everybody in this situation needs people like herbert she is handling it brilliantly and we are a great team. in this situation, i
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don't know what you're gold medal is and maybe you don't and maybe it is and maybe you don't and maybe it is an unfair question. rather than a 20 kilometre rowing machine and a session every day, it is get up, morning routine and while it is not as physical as before, it is still is demanding and still tiny little baby is demanding and still tiny little ba by ste ps. is demanding and still tiny little baby steps. and i am up for that challenge and if the aim is walking again rather than a gold medal, the target is even bigger than before, for me. and the motivation is even bigger than before for me. and i didn't ever think i would be able to say that again after london 2012, he thought that i would have a bigger challenge and more motivation to achieve it. he isjust he is just remarkable. he isjust remarkable. so positive, so he isjust remarkable. so positive, so optimistic and from day one, ever since he first announced this had happened to him. he has been such an effort —— inspiration, a wonderful story. here's louise with a look at this morning's weather.
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are you trying to warm yourself up there? it feels so cold! it is a great morning for sound effects this morning. it is cold, real crisp winter's morning. how cold? temperatures are fallen to lows of minus nine degrees in sheltered rural areas of scotland. but on top of the hard frost, we have also got some fog around this morning so if you are setting off in the next 30 minutes or so, let's take note, dense fog in places that is hazardous out on the roads with visibility less than 100 metres to keep tuned to your bbc local radio stations for updates. we have weather warnings out and these are the affected areas, is 12 to the north of london, oxfordshire, and the midlands, east anglia and lincolnshire, the fog will lift for many but if it lingers in some areas, it is going to have an impact on those temperatures, temperatures barely climbing just above freezing inafew barely climbing just above freezing in a few spots but generally speaking, yes, a cold, frosty start
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but a dry start and it is a dry day for many with some sunshine coming through. a few scattered showers in the far north of scotland than here, temperatures struggling but by contrast into the south—west, a milder start, temperatures in double figures at the moment, and not moving very far very fast because there is some rain around across the channel islands, the isles of scilly and into parts of cornwall but it will readily drift south, through the night, and a bit more of a breeze here so overnight, frost and fog further south should stay at bay. to the north, we keep the clear skies and again, the temperatures are likely to fall away. that is the theme as we go through the weekend, cold and frosty start on sunday morning across scotland and northern england, may be rural parts of northern ireland as well. so chilly for many of us, high pressure though built in from the west, so it's quite an things done nicely, and it does look as though it is going to stay dry. and that is certainly welcome news after the miserable november we had. tomorrow, december
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one, the start of the month and you can see smuggling some trying to look out for and a few isolated showers along the coast but generally speaking, it will be fine and quietand generally speaking, it will be fine and quiet and a bit more of a breeze maybe tomorrow so temperatures may be just below where they should be for the time of year. we're looking at 3-6d for the time of year. we're looking at 3—6d into the north and eight celsius further south. if you have not already guessed, the weekend is going to be a sunny one but a cold one, harsh frosts very much a feature with some fog around as well but at least it is a dry theme and that dry theme is possibly going to continue throughout the week as well. a little more unsettled later on in the week but if you can see, it stays cold and dry and quiet. back to you two. louise, thank you so back to you two. louise, thank you so much. we'll be back with the headlines at 7:00. now it's time for click.
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i lost my sight seven years ago. navigating the world can feel like a huge challenge, even with my gorgeous guide dog, olga. i usually use my guide dog willow to get around, but today, we're trying out a new device — the wewalk smart cane. i think olga's a bit confused with the cane. laughs. the device has a round sensor to detect obstacles. i've paired it with my smartphone and airpods to send me directions. so my airpods pick up the information from my phone and the navigation system reads it out to me. when we got there it said, "starbucks now on your right". and, yeah... by then we could smell it anyway, couldn't we? when i was using the cane,
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it was always vibrating. that's buzzing a lot. is it? yep. yeah, the buzzing got really quick. so i knew that i was in front of something that was quite a large obstacle. this might be an improvement for some cane users, but personally, i've found the feedback slightly overwhelming. i could imagine it could probably get quite difficult to detect what's important and what's not important. i was excited to show maisy an app named microsoft soundscape that uses 3d sound to point you in the right direction. you can hear the sound as if it's around you and it's like you're in the software almost. phone: facing south-west along world piazza. when you're tuned in to the app, it will name nearby shops and restaurants. it even highlights what's on the pavement. is there bike parking in front of us? one useful tool is the ability to set an audio beacon, say, if you want to find your local supermarket...
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65 metres west. it's making this tip—tap sound. tapping sounds help guide us in the right direction, although we did manage to walk past the shop door. i think you don't quite believe it's to the right of you. at least we had our guide dogs to help us find the entrance. at home, some of the simplest tech can actually be the most useful. beeping. but big tech companies, like apple, google and amazon are also trying to make their technology better for people like me. most of the time, i use my smartphone and apple watch. it's so great that it can connect to my apple tv and you can get it to play your favourite moments. lots of smart speakers now have audiobook services. one new and particularly unusual audiobook is called unseen, it's the first ever audio comic book. when you hear this sound... that is so cool.
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cover — the word "unseen" in bold letters. oh, amazing! no—one ever does that — that's the typeface... describing the pictures and each panel, which is the big part of comic books. i can't wait for unseen's creator, chad allen, to release the next segment. i don't know who the hell you are... i do not know who the hell you are! imitates: i do not know who the hell you are! i was also excited to try a new device from bristol braille technology. this device that i have in front of me is called the canute and this is the very first ever several—line braille display. it sounds like a typewriter! using buttons at the base of the device, you can upload books, pdfs and documents. the multi—line layout is great forfeeling diagrams. it's an easier and quicker way to read. that's nice that you can use something like this
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and not have audio on, constantly all the time. are we reading braille? yes. i was even more impressed with the next device we tried. a pair of orcam smartglasses. these use a camera and artificial intelligence to read the text around you. and you can use touch, voice and gesture commands to change its setting. so what are you doing, maisie? so i have a magazine and if i point ata line... reads: i always say that there are... it's reading it! we surprised maisie with a book from one of her favourite authors. kaitlyn dunnet. cool! the orcam tells you the time. the time is 3:29 pm. yay! and can name who is standing in front of you. of course, i wanted to see if we could get it to recognise maisie.
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the device does this by remembering the unique points of a person's face, a bit like a map. maisie. oh, yeah! high five, blind girl high five. we also tried a new feature — the ability to scan food product barcodes. this was a hit. tomato cup—a—soup! remember to hold your item about a foot above the counter top. alexa, what am i holding? i was really excited to test the new amazon echo show feature. you hold a food item in front of the screen camera and move it around until the device tells you what the item is. it was difficult knowing whether the item was centre screen and this threw up some less than accurate results. show me another side. it looks like vanilla coca cola... oh, my god. that's cool. i have done that so many times — like, i've picked up cherry
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diet coke by mistake. yeah! we also have been told that that wasn't vanilla coke, and just regular coca—cola. you would have to really nail getting your snapshots correct to find this useful. it was so great to try all the technology throughout the day. the wider the choice of tech, the better for everyone. not everything today was a complete success, but the impact that blind technology can have continues to surprise me. i am really excited about the future of accessibility tech. some fantastic innovations there. one thing becoming clear in this programme isjust how much is out there enabling people to be more empowered and to live more independently. and for people with learning disabilities, for example, there are plenty of innovations to help them do just that. paul has been to meet someone for whom the internet of things is helping to make life just that little bit more easy.
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this is adam. adam has down syndrome and lives in his own home, which includes some specially designed technology to allow him to live more independently. here he is using a tablet that contains a range of bespoke applications to help him with tasks in everyday life. in this instance, cooking. so can you show me what you've got on here, adam? sift three cups of plain flour into a big mixing bowl. make a well in the centre of the flour. it shows step—by—step instructions with pictures. but the technology goes much further than just recipes. it's part of a project called connected living — a partnership between the learning disability charity mencap and telecoms company vodafone. the platform utilises a range of technologies bundled together under one roof — literally.
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iam afraid. from smart home devices and iot—based sensors to more simple reminders, to—do lists and instructions. a lot of it is stuff that people are familiar with. smart lighting is not a particularly new concepyt, smart locks are not a particularly new concept, but what we have done is we have packaged it altogether and put it into this user interface which has been tailored very specifically so it is user—friendly and it is intuitive to use. we started off with a very, very long list of things — these can be quite small things — but things that people might want to achieve and then we gave the list to vodafone and we said "what are solutions to that?" we whittled it down to the things we felt and we heard were most commonly going to be of importance to people. technology is in all our lives, really, at the moment nowadays and will continue to be so, so we want to make sure people with learning disabilities are not disadvantaged by not being able to access technology.
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it is designed to be customisable to each individual user, with the hardware and software tailored to their needs and personal abilities. iam i am thirsty. the platform blends smart home technologies with things adam can use outside the home too, such as video calling a support worker if he needs assistance, or as a communication aid. hi there, you all right? yeah, you? good. what would you do with the options on this screen? ok, so you can tell them where you want to go. which are your favourite? what do you like to do the most? app: let's go to the pub. sounds good to me. is that good? do you like that? laughter. that's good! we like tech too!
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there are 4.1 million people in the uk with learning disabilities who could use this, but also there are wider applications if you think about people who go into homes as they get older, they still want to be independent, they still need their flexibility, this can help them. you and i, we want to be independent, we want to do our own thing and actually, if technology can help people to do that, then it means that you have greater control, you are feeling more independent, and the amount of confidence that is really increasing in people is fantastic. most importantly of all, though, how does adam feel about his smart connected home? supported, yeah. that was adam and his mum. truly lovely. and we will continue to keep across all of this area of inclusive
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design and technology throughout the year, as we always do on click. this is the short version of this week's click. the full version is on iplayer. in it, you can see paul in iceland, looking at the design and execution of the iconic prosthetic running leg. in the meantime, you can contact us on instagram, youtube, twitter and facebook. thanks very much for watching and we will see you soon. good morning welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today: the london bridge attack —
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passers—by are praised for their bravery as it's revealed the attacker is a convicted terrorist. when we were kicking him and holding into the ground, the guy was just saying get off me, get off me, as if we we re saying get off me, get off me, as if we were just saying get off me, get off me, as if we werejust going saying get off me, get off me, as if we were just going to let him and do and —— do his thing but we wanted to make sure he was never going to harm another human being. two people, a man and a woman, were killed, police patrols have been stepped up across london. the attacker who was shot dead by armed officers is named as usman khan — overnight an address in staffordshire linked to him was searched. the attack overshadowed the latest televised election debate — which brought together senior figures from seven parties. england's hopes of levelling the series fade. the visitors are chasing new zealand's first innings score of 375 in the second test in hamilton with the black caps firmly in control. good morning. a bitterly cold start to the weekend with a hard frost and
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some fog out there. but it is going to bea some fog out there. but it is going to be a dry story for many of us this weekend with lots of sparkling winter sunshine. all the details coming up shortly. it's saturday the 30th of november. our top story: the man who carried out a attack on london bridge yesterday was a convicted terrorist. two people, a man and a woman, were stabbed to death. members of the public have been praised for restraining the attacker named as 28—year—old usman khan who was then shot dead by police. he had beenjailed in 2012 for a plot to bomb the london stock exchange and set up a terrorist training camp, but was freed on licence a year ago. simonjones has this report. terror returns to the streets of london. a man and a woman killed. but now the question is, how was this allowed to happen? pictures filmed from a bus show police moving in on the attacker
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who'd been held down by members of the public. a man takes a knife from the suspect and runs away, we've blurred his face at the request of police. officers pull away another man wrestling with the attacker and then opened fire. this was the man shot dead. usman khan, 28 years old, from staffordshire. he was jailed in 2012 for his part in a plot to bomb the london stock exchange but released on licence last year. ahead of the meeting of the government's emergency committee cobra last night, the prime minister made his feelings clear. i have long argued that it is a mistake to allow serious and violent criminals to come out of prison early. and it is very important that we get out of that habit and that we enforce the appropriate sentences for dangerous criminals, especially for terrorists that i think the public will want to see.
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it's believed usman khan was attending a conference on prisoner rehabilitation at fishmongers' hall at the northern end of london bridge when he started attacking people. the alarm was raised just before 2:00 yesterday afternoon. he was pursued onto the bridge where he was tackled amid chaotic scenes. police then arrive at 2:03 and fire two shots, fearing khan was wearing an explosives vest. politicians are calling on communities to stand together to reject hatred. we have to remember that we live in a democratic society and those that would seek to silence us will not succeed. our democracy must be alive and vibra nt. the police have praised the public‘s response. i also want to thank the members of the public who have helped, either by showing extraordinary courage and stepping in to tackle this attacker or indeed by following the instructions they have subsequently been given by officers at the scene and in the area.
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while the police believe there is no outstanding threat to the public, they have been searching a property in staffordshire and many are asking what was being done to monitor the convicted terrorist who went on to kill. simon jones, bbc news. let's speak to our correspondent simonjones, who's at london bridge. simon, more details are emerging about what happened in the lead up to this. yes, the police investigation has continued at pace overnight. the key thing that has emerged as the name of the attacker, usman khan. police have said they are not looking for anyone else in connection with what happened and they believe he was acting alone they believe he was acting alone they are carrying out inquiries to make sure that is the case, to make sure there is no further danger to the public. these cordons remain here at london bridge and that is likely to remain that way from —— for some time to come and police patrols are to be stepped up in
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london and in other parts of the uk to act as reassurance. we have because are talking about the terrible events of a terror attack that cost to people their lives one thing that has emerged are the stories of heroism in the run to what happened. after usman khan began his attack at a conference, we understand one of the delegates took an ornamental task from a whale which was on the wall and use that to try to fend off his attack. the attacker was then chased onto london bridge and members of the public held him down. one person used a fire extinguisher and let it off in his face to try to keep him at bay and people held him on the bridge for around about five minutes until the police arrived and they shot him dead, fearing he was wearing some sort of bomb. as for the people who we re sort of bomb. as for the people who were injured, three of them remain in hospital this morning.
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let's speak to our reporter liz copper who's in stafford for us. what's been happening there? may have been some searches going on there? well, he was well-known to there? well, he was well-known to the authorities here staffordshire and had been well known for some considerable time. it was back in 20 time —— 2012 when he was convicted with other men in carrying out a plot on the london stock exchange was of his eventual sentence for those offences was to serve a minimum of eight years injail and he was released on license in december of last year. at the time of his arrest he was living as an addressed in so —— stoke—on—trent north of here and it was thought that when he was released, he came back to live in the staffordshire area. we have heard overnight that police have carried out a raid at an address in staffordshire that is linked to him. i think as long as,
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there are also questions in london there are also questions in london the questions here in staffordshire to about the terms of his licence and to about the terms of his licence a nd exa ctly to about the terms of his licence and exactly how he was being supervised. liz, for the moment, thank you. our political correspondent tony bonsignore is in our london newsroom. tony how have politicians reacted to yesterday's events? yeah. all the leaders have so far given their response. we will come to the prime minister in a moment but of course, general election campaigning heavily affected by the events of london bridge yesterday. the conservatives have cancelled the event today. the liberal democrats had a rally planned for today, not farfrom london bridge and that has also been cancelled and labour had a big nhs summit in yorkshire and that has been cancelled today, given the events. all of the party leaders express their shock and support and admiration for both the emergency services and the actions of some
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members of the public but also boris johnson giving a little bit more. you heard on the news bulletin. he said last night he had long argued it was a mistake to let serious and violet —— violent criminals to come out of prison early and said it was very important we got out of that habit and enforce the appropriate sentences for dangerous criminals, especially terrorist, and he said it is what he thinks the public wants to see. we also think borisjohnson spoke tojeremy corbyn last night and has also said he is deeply shocked at what happened. we'll be speaking to the security minister, brandon lewis, at around 7:10 this morning. some general election campaign events have been suspended, in response to the london bridge attack. the stabbings overshadowed the latest televised debate, which brought together senior figures from seven parties, who discussed issues including brexit, the nhs and climate change. welcome to cardiff and the national assembly for wales... in a fractious political period, last night's debate began on a sober note.
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once again, london and the country as a whole are having to come to terms with a horrific terror attack. two members of the public are now dead, as is the man who attacked them, others are injured, some seriously. politicians paying tribute to the london bridge first responders and discussing how to tackle the security threat. soon, though, things returned to other election issues. there were tense exchanges between labour and the conservatives on how they'd spend money if they win power, and questions raised about whether boris johnson could fulfil his promise to get brexit done if he wins power. the tories say yes but some say it's not true. michel barnier said it will take up to three years and that's before you add us trade talks or trade talks with any other organisations or countries that will put, potentially, our nhs on the table. we are in episode one of a ten season box set and if you don't like what you've seen up until now, you don't have to watch the rest. critics of the conservatives say a no—deal exit will be back
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on the table if they win because they said they won't extend the next part of talks on future trade beyond 2020 but their representative last night, rishi sunak, said a deal could be done. you said he couldn't get a brexit deal, it will be possible, but he did, he got a great new deal and got it in three months! plaid cymru, meanwhile, were less than impressed with jeremy corbyn's plan to stay neutral. no wonder people don't have faith in politicians when the leader of the labour party, the candidate to be prime minister, won't even tell us where he stands on this central question. while the greens were critical of a lib dem proposal to cancel brexit even though the parties are working together in some seats. i do think that to go for a unilateral revocation is a slap in the face of 17.4 million people who voted to leave so that's why i think it is important that people do have their say in a democratic process. they were tense exchanges over the nhs, too. the tories said claims it was for
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sale were a conspiracy theory. labour insisted they were genuine. and the snp's nicola sturgeon agreed. i'm going to be pretty blunt here, when borisjohnson says that the nhs is not on the table in a future trade deal, i simply do not trust him and i do not believe him. nothing is for sale in the nhs. it provides incredible frontline care and great outcomes so i would say to lucy, the nhs is not failing but what we do need to do, as well as investing more money, we have to manage it better, that's crucial, and we have to cut out the waste. no game changer but a reminder of the big election issues and the choice we all face when we go to the ballot box in a couple of weeks. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. three people have been stabbed in an attack on a busy shopping street in the hague in the netherlands. police said they are still searching for a suspect. images and videos on social media show dozens of black friday shoppers running away from the scene. the three people who were stabbed were treated in hospital and later discharged.
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millions of commuters will have to pay an average of two—point—seven percent more for rail tickets from january. this could mean the cost of an annual season ticket increasing by more than 100—pounds a year. the body representing train companies says the majority of money will go back into running the railway, but passenger groups say users don't get value for money. it is 7:13. the man that killed two people and injured three others in a terror attack on london bridge yesterday, had previously been jailed for plotting to blow up the london stock exchange. at the time of his sentencing in 2012, thejudge said usman khan should not be released until he was "no longer a threat to the public". let's talk now to the security minister, brandon lewis, who joins us from westminster. thank you for your time this morning. i want to firstly get into some of the detail over the attacker in the moment. —— in a moment that we have heard from passers—by and i just wonder what you may have what
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you saw. you are absolutely right. we saw yesterday were not just the west but the absolute best in humanity. not just our emergency services but some unbelievably heroic actions from members of the public and i think in the right time and space we will all owe a huge tank you and have a chance to make that thank you public to the individuals whose courage yesterday were, well, words fail me to really do itjustice. just were, well, words fail me to really do it justice. just on were, well, words fail me to really do itjustice. just on a technical note, three weeks ago, uk reduced the terror threat from severe to substantial and what is happening in relation to the terror threat this morning? quite an important technical point here. that is set by an independent body, independent of ministers that it does not change what we call the posture that the police take. there has been absolutely no change whatsoever as a result of that threat level in the posture that the police take. the
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actions they take, the way the police manager around the company —— country, nothing changed. how concerned are you that usman khan who had originally been given an indeterminate sentence, that was in february of 2012, part of a plot to bomb the london stock exchange, said was even an indeterminate sentence in february 2012 and later on appeal that was reduced to serve a sentence of at least eight years of a new 16 year sentence. but yesterday, of at least eight years of a new 16 yearsentence. but yesterday, he of at least eight years of a new 16 year sentence. but yesterday, he was free to carry out this attack. how concerned are you about that happening? once the police have all of the fa cts once the police have all of the facts and information they need, there is not just facts and information they need, there is notjust a criminal case to look at but also the lessons learned andi look at but also the lessons learned and i think it is understandable that people will want to question, asi that people will want to question, as i think the prime minister
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recognised in his statement quite what they last night, are we having tough enough sentences for people who have the most violent offences in our culture who have the most violent offences in ourculture and who have the most violent offences in our culture and i think we do need to look seriously to make sure that we have got the right and tough long sentences for people who commit these kind of crimes and that agencies and the police have all of the powers they need to do their job. to a degree, i did not want to make a more generic point about it, which is what you made, i am interested in this particular case and i'm assuming by now in your role you have already looked at how it was that that came about, how it was that he was free at this point in time. while i understand that but i have to say, i hope you appreciate that this is a very, as the police have said, fast moving and dynamic case and there is a huge amount of work for the police to do and it will take time and i think it would be inappropriate for me to comment on the moment about the information we have already got, with the investigation ongoing, in terms of the specifics of some of the information in the case but i do absolutely accept we have to look long and hard at the top of
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sentences we are using for these kind of violent offenders. can you tell us, brandon lewis, in your role as security minister, we understand he was electronically tagged and on license, so can you give us an understanding of what it meant in practice? if somebody is released under licence there are a range of conditions that are put upon them that they have to fulfil. i think again, i'm afraid it would be difficult and inappropriate for me to comment on the specifics in this case because it is an ongoing case and there are a whole range of licensing requirements that are put on an offender in that kind of situation but all of it is being reviewed as part of the investigation and will be reviewed as part of the lessons learned as we go forward. what people would be thinking this morning, having reviewed, seen what happened yesterday, and of course it is a sensitive time to be talking about it but it is an inescapable other people would be thinking this man was on license, at the more severe end of what a judge at the time, passing sentence, this is the
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justice wilkie, said this is a serious, long—term venture in terrorism they can also result in a —— in atrocities in the uk. his offences were at the more severe end offences were at the more severe end of terrorism related charges. and yet, he was free. so people will be thinking today how many more people may be out who have similar instincts and possibly related incidents, and i'm not talking about specifics, you will understand that people would be concerned that this has happened, we understand your caution about speaking about it specifically, it has happened, he was found guilty of those offences and was freed, what assurances do you have that there are not others like him? i understand that, it is a fair question, but as i say, the reality is that viewers would understand that is an awful lot of information the police have to go through and investigation to do and i think it is inappropriate for me to comment on the specifics but... let me ask you. crosstalk. we are
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not in that kind of interview situation. if i may just not in that kind of interview situation. if i mayjust say... the public, it is important to say is the police have said they are not at this moment looking for any other suspects, they are confident about the suspect, they have named him, they are not looking for other suspects in terms of peoples ability to be secure in the knowledge that actually all of us quite rightly should go about our lives today as we would on any other day. you are the security minister and in the light of what happened and what we have established, a sequence of events has been established and whether or not we can talk about it at great length, a sequence of events here is fact as to when he was jailed, the offences he was jailed for and he is now out. can you reassure people that there is any kind of review that will be happening, has it made you reassess what you think is appropriate? oh, absolutely, yes. as i say, there is no doubt after any incident like this, there has to be and always is a full review of lessons learned exercises taking forward then we have to let the investigation completed its first but it will
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absolutely happen, and it ties into this point around i'll be dealing with these sentences in a proper way, giving sentences that are properly appropriate for the most violent crimes? but i would again stress to people as the police and prime minister said yesterday, we have all and we should all continue to go about our lives today as we would on any other day and people can be secure about the fact police at the moment are confident they are not looking for any other suspects. there is a very uncomfortable reality and i think people have commented on this in relation to the licensing in these situations which is once somebody like this is unlicensed, may wearing a tag, —— is on license, wearing a tag, there are little checks if any on their mental state beyond that, it is geography where they are, possibly a curfew but we do not know when this incident, but there is very little if any checks on someone's mental condition, given where he was originally. but depends on - that is an issue on a case—by—case basis, different licensing requirements in
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different licensing requirements in different requirements for different offenders as they come out. i think, ido offenders as they come out. i think, i do not think it is accurate and fairto make i do not think it is accurate and fair to make that point but because it does depend on the particular offender and on the specifics of this case it will come through once we get to the point of the investigation being completed and the review of the case and what happened over the last few months that happened with the lessons learned review after the fact. just again ona learned review after the fact. just again on a technical note, will there be further cobra meetings?“ that scheduled? we had a cobra meeting last night which the prime minister chaired and there will be further meetings today and updates for both the prime minister, home secretary and myself during the course of today and the next few days. brandon lewis, security minister, thank you so much for your time this morning. my pleasure. let's talk to louise. morning, the picture says it all, doesn't it? it will take you a while to defrost this car! this was sent in about half—an—hour ago in worcestershire. as you can see quite clearly, a hard
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frost across the country. if you have not stepped out already, certainly take note, temperatures falling below freezing, as low as minus in sheltered rural parts of scotla nd minus in sheltered rural parts of scotland and also fog around as well. it could have an impact if you are out and about early on this morning. since in places with visibility less than 100 metres and the worst affected areas at the moment are likely across lots of east wales, also stretching its way through the midlands over into lincolnshire, east anglia and down to the north of london. so whether warnings remain in force here, some of the fog may be slow to miffed and it may linger all day across parts of the east midlands and lincolnshire and if that happens, the temperatures are going to struggle, perhaps just a the temperatures are going to struggle, perhapsjust a degree or both above freezing but it could then and break, we're looking at a quieter theme of whether for much of the country, dry with just a few isolated showers across the northern isles, lots of cycling sunshine coming through, but a cold feel, three orfour coming through, but a cold feel, three or four degrees perhaps double
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digits in the south—west, and that is because there are outbreaks of rain here. a mild start here this morning, temperatures into double figures already, but look at the rain. through this evening across the channel islands, across parts of cornwall, will gradually start to drift away so it is a slow improvement and it does mean a better picture for you as we go into tomorrow. because of the breeze around through the night, that is going to prevent those temperatures from falling too far across southern england but further north overnight, going to see those falling away again. below freezing and frost is likely. the high pressure is building in from the west, it means a quiet theme of whether continuing. not only for sunday but into next week as well generally. and it means a quiet day for the second half of the weekend. lots of sunshine coming through for many of us. a few scattered showers close to the coast but it is plain sailing in comparison to the weather we have seen comparison to the weather we have seen three november. the first of december is not going to disappoint if you like gold, cycling winter
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sunshine. temperatures will pick just below where they should be for this time of year, top temps 3—8d. asi this time of year, top temps 3—8d. as i alluded to earlier, high pressure will stay with us for the bulk of the country so it is going to stay quiet, this summarises our weekend story but as we go into the weekend story but as we go into the week ahead, dry, settled and sunny, and indications of something a little bit more unsettled but a little bit more unsettled but a little bit more unsettled but a little bit milder as the wind changes direction by the changes direction by little bit milder as the wind changes direction by the end of the working week. back to you two. louise, thank you. it is 24 minutes past seven and more on our main story now. among the witnesses to yesterday's terror attack at london bridge was mike finnerty, who was selling cheese on a borough market stall nearby. mike and his colleagues sought safety in their refrigerator, along with several customers. we can speak to him now from the scene. thank you very much for talking to us this morning. how are you feeling this morning? it is a pleasure, naga. really determined to get to
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work. really proud to work at borough market. totally solid with our colleagues at the market. people have been, many of them working late into the night and a lot of them have been there since, like, a lot earlier than now, getting things ready, and the traders, you know, i am sure were a little bit shaken but you would be surprised how calm people were in the heat of the moment. and now, they are open for business. they really want to send the message and we really want to send the message that you should come, if you want to be solid with us, and show you care and be proud about us getting back on our feet, then come and buy some stuff at borough market this morning! tell me what happened when the incident was unfolding, where you were and what you ended up doing. so we were selling cheese, it was the middle of the afternoon on friday, and it was a reasonably busy day and at a certain point, itjust seems like
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there was a flow of people in front of the stall and they seemed alarmed and we thought ok, maybe it was something silly but then my colleague looked at me and i looked at him and we thought it was a bit weird so we went to the back of the stall and we took the customers through there with us to the back and then the thought of the tone of the way people were behaving seemed to rise a couple of notches. and so, he thought we should go in the fridge so we went and we closed ourselves in one of our cheese fridges. it was pretty close quarters but myself and him and there was a couple of seniors about in their 60s or 70s and this young american guy and we took them into the fridge and closed the door and just try to wait it out and heard what sounded like some pretty aggressive noises on the other side of the door. did you manage to contact the police? yeah, i called the police pretty much straight after closing the door. and the police said there is an attack and that we should stay put. so at that
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point,... yeah, you are a little bit worried, obviously, concerned, but! was just surprised at how come eve ryo ne was just surprised at how come everyone does —— was and may become is infectious but we were there and we we re is infectious but we were there and we were think —— together and we had everyone's backs and i said if worst comes to worst, if someone opens the door, we are closing it shut and we will be fine. the message that you had about people's supporting you and other businesses in the area, mike, isa and other businesses in the area, mike, is a powerful one. iam and other businesses in the area, mike, is a powerful one. i am glad you are safe and thank you for telling us your experiences of the attack yesterday. more of course on that story throughout the morning and worth saying at ten past eight we will speak to sadiq khan, the mayor of london. it is 27 minutes past seven. the energy supplier npower has announced a radical restructuring plan which will lead to the loss of up to 4,500 jobs in the uk. one of the three call centres under threat of closure is in houghton—le—spring, and businesses on the town's high street have told us they fear
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the impact it might have. stuart fegan from the trade union gmbjoins us now from our london newsroom. you for your time this morning. i wa nted you for your time this morning. i wanted you to first of all tell us a little bit about how this news has been received for those —— by those workers whose jobs are on the line. i think you would understand, charlie, that the news has been greeted by pretty much with devastation. at houghton—le—spring in the north—east. let's not forget this is an area that has already seen this is an area that has already seen quite a lot of economic decline in recent times with the shipbuilding, kind of shipbuilding industry in sutherland and what we we re industry in sutherland and what we were promised and we have seen is call centres, energyjobs sprouting up call centres, energyjobs sprouting up in their place and so, with the announcement of these job losses and the probable closure of the call centre, this is a double whammy for the north—east and i completely understand the fears, notjust of the people who work for npower but
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also the whole community and eve ryo ne also the whole community and everyone affected by it. what dialogue has there been between the union and npower, after the announcement itself? there has not been any formal dialogue as yet. next week, we are waiting for the formal notification, the hr one, section one, the notice it is referred to, which will start the formal consultation period. ourselves in the union, as with our sister trade unions, are fully committed to obviously assessing this proposal, looking to reduce that impact as much as possible but clearly, we' re that impact as much as possible but clearly, we're talking the end of the cuts that they are facing npower with the probable loss of many thousands of jobs by with the probable loss of many thousands ofjobs by the end of 2021. npower have talked about outplacement, i think the phrases, and reskilling. how realistic is that in any consequence in terms of the numbers that will be affect it? well, like i said, with the economic situation in the north—east and
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potentially 4500 — and let's not forget these are predominantly female workers that work at the call centre, about 75% now into the job market, looking for work that possibly fits around family commitments, other commitments that people have, but is obviously going to put considerable strain on the localjobs to put considerable strain on the local jobs market and to put considerable strain on the localjobs market and lots of people are already looking for work and i think the most important thing to remember here is also clearly, npower has not been a very successfully run business over the last four years, it has recorded losses for the last four years, this is totally the responsibility of the energy price. we have seen in the uk since the price cap has come is reasonably well, good payjobs being migrated out into the industry and people losing theirjobs in the big six. it was promised that this would ring more benefits to customers across the industry but we have seen some of the newer brands go out in
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business in the last two years and nobody is winning from this, we are losing jobs, well—paid jobs, most of which i going abroad and ultimately, there is no benefit to the customer. there is a real emergency in the retail energy market which the government must wake up to, the energy price cap is having unintended consequences. thank you so unintended consequences. thank you so much for your time. talking about those job losses, 4500 job losses as pa rt those job losses, 4500 job losses as part of those new plans for npower. it is just after 730 and we will be back with headlines shortly. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt
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and naga munchetty. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the man who carried out a terror attack on london bridge yesterday was a convicted terrorist. two people, a man and a woman, were stabbed to death. the attacker, named as 28—year—old usman khan, was shot dead by an armed officer. he had beenjailed in 2012 for a plot to bomb the london stock exchange and set up a terrorist training camp, but was freed on licence a year ago. earlier, the security minister, brandon lewis told us that he was confident in the police response so far. it is important to say, the police have said, they are not looking for any other suspects. they are confident that they have the suspect they have named and they are not looking for anymore. in terms of people to be secure in the knowledge that actually all of us, quite rightly, should be going about our day as we on any other day. —— as we
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would. let's speak to security specialist will geddes, who joins us now from the scene. we were hearing from the security minister a short time ago. clearly it is early stages in terms of the reaction but what insight can you give us into the sequence of events yesterday and the questions it poses? well, i think there are a lot of questions it poses. in terms of the fact that osman khan had been related —— released on license, that the control of him out in the general population was obviously something that we needed to be concerned with and whether the rehabilitation programme that he should have gone through prior to any sanctioning of his release, been effective and there were a number of other individuals that he was incarcerated with in regards to that previous plot and whether they also pose a potential threat on their release. so there are procedures in place in terms of when people are out on license. any give people a sense, particularly with someone who
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is convicted on a terror offence, are they different? it doesn't work considerably different to be honest, charlie. thejurisdiction considerably different to be honest, charlie. the jurisdiction system enables obviously an individual to serve a particular time from when they will be perhaps qualifying for license. if it is an individual that quite rightly should be —— would be suppressing certain radicalisation is it is sometimes difficult to get through that and raises questions about the strategy which is part of our counterterrorism initiative to tragedy radicalise individuals and it raises questions also about the uk prison system and how effectively they are segregating and preventing that radicalisation process also taking place in prison. but when usman khan was released, he was bylaw unable to be released but it is the control of that individual and the communications they may have with others touk potentially create plots or generate plots and cause
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harm to the general public. talk to us about some of the images many people have seen by now of the immediate aftermath and we know that police were on the scene i think within five minutes of the initial call but those people, the passers—by who immediately stood in in what was clearly a very terrifying situation. the members of the general public were immensely brave to get involved. the general rule of thumb and advice that is really to be followed by anybody thatis really to be followed by anybody that is witness or caught up in a potential terrorist inserts —— incident is to run away as quickly as you can that it will be within the individual dna of each of us as to whether we may run, we may freeze or we may potentially fight and in this instance, we can only commend those members of the general public intervening and i think it also shows an intolerance by us as a nation and particularly here in london against terrorism and that we
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won't tolerate it and we won't stand for it. usman khan was of course shot dead by police at the scene and they will be no information to gain from him, clearly. in terms of how police investigate from this point on, what are your thoughts on that? welcome to be honest, although usman khan is now deceased, that doesn't necessarily mean they won't be a treasured —— treasure trove of intelligence that can be gleaned, certainly from not only his devices but his activities, his social circles, who has —— who he has been communicating with. and things that they can utilise to try to join the dots between him, others and to try to understand that when he was released on license, what exactly happened and how was he not able to be controlled? thank you very much. some general election campaign
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events have been suspended, in response to the london bridge attack. the stabbings overshadowed the latest televised debate, which brought together senior figures from seven parties, who discussed issues including brexit, the nhs and climate change. three people have been stabbed in an attack on a busy shopping street in the hague in the netherlands. police said they are still searching for a suspect. images and videos on social media show dozens of black friday shoppers running away from the scene. the three people who were stabbed were treated in hospital and later discharged. millions of commuters will have to pay an average of 2.7% more for rail tickets from january. this could mean the cost of an annual season ticket increasing by more than 100—pounds a year. the body representing train companies says the majority of money will go back into running the railway, but passenger groups say users don't get value for money. 7:37. holly has all of the sport for
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us. is it warm? sunny? it is definitely sunnier climes than here but a bit of rain was call —— causing problems on day one. and afraid that cricket is not too sunny either as far as england is concerned. it is the second day and things aren't getting any better. this time for england's bowlers who allowed new zealand to score a pretty impressive score. remember they do need to win in hamilton if they do need to win in hamilton if they want to level this series. now they want to level this series. now they have a real uphill battle. england's cricketers are facing a real battle if they're to win the second and final test and level the series. they've lost two early first innings wickets in reply to new zealand's 375 all out. dominic sibley and joe denly both made just four. england finished the day on 39 for 2 — so they trail by 336. the day started well enough with england's bowlers on top. tom latham made a century yesterday but he added just 4 to his overnight score before he was bowled by stuart broad. new zealand recovered well though. daryl mitchell made 73 and bj watling — who you'll remember frustrated england with a double century
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in the first test — also scored a half century to put the hosts in control on day two. now, staying with cricket, you'll remember the ashes last summer. australia opener david warner was in dreadfulform. he could barely score a run. well, overnight in adelaide, he's managed to score 335 — on his own. australia eventually declared on 589—3 with warner unbeaten. warner's innings is the tenth highest score in the history of test cricket. how's that for a return to form? a triple century? and is only the highest score? suddenly we're going
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to need to know the number one. you don't have it on the top of your head? maybe we can get that in later on. we will have it for you later on. former arsenal manager unai emery has written a letter to fans in his first message since being sacked yesterday. he was relieved of his duties following a series of poor results and performances with arsenal currently on their worst run in nearly 28 years. in a letter released on the club's official website, emery said he wishes he could have achieved "better results" and thanked fans for helping him to understand the greatness of arsenal. the premier league is searching for a new chief executive after david pemsel resigned before starting the job. pemsel has stepped down from the post following newspaper allegations about his private life. he was only appointed last month and was due to start in february.
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he was the third person to be offered the job following the departure of richard scudamore a year ago. richard masters will now stay as interim chief executive. later today, england and wales will find out who they'll face at next year's euros. scotland, northern ireland and the republic will be watching the draw keenly, too, as they can still qualify through the play—offs. for england, though, they go into the finals as joint favourites. our sports editor dan roan has been speaking to manager gareth southgate to get his thoughts ahead of today's draw. final preparations in bucharest where those competing in european football's flagship tournament next summer are about to learn their fate. after an impressive qualifying campaign, england are among the favourites for euro 2020 and here at the training base the manager told me that the perception of the team has shifted. the draw is always a decisive moment for everybody, knowing when the dates are, knowing what the route looks like. i think the country, it feels as if they've been more
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engaged with the team over the last two years and that's one of the biggest highlights for me. never more so than at the last euros when an abject england were humiliated by minnows iceland, but two years later, southgate's young side surpassed all expectations, reaching the world cup semifinals in russia. the growing sense that his team are now genuine contenders. i think we've gained some respect and i think people would view us as a threat which certainly wasn't the case ahead of russia. we also know that we have to improve. euro 2020 kicks off in rome but the tournament will be spread across the continent with 12 host cities. wembley will stage both semifinals and final itself. it england get that far, they will have played five of seven matches at home, raising hopes of a first major trophy since 1966. we saw this with the rugby team and the cricket boys, whenever you see the national team in any sport doing well, people get behind it. in sport it's about taking people
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from the day—to—day into dreams, into hopes, into aspirations and pride and that's what we've got to provide. next summer will evoke memories of the last time england enjoyed such home advantage. euro 96 when the hosts shone and southgate's semi—final penalty miss was the sad end to an unforgettable campaign. the tournament next summer is not about me and redemption. the team is about the players and the team is about our fans and it's more important that we make them proud and, like i said before russia, to do that we have to win matches as well. wales have also qualified and having reached the last four of the last euros in france, will go into the draw full of confidence. they'll have a belief, they've had an experience of getting to a semi—final. they'll enjoy it, no doubt about that. and when the draw is made people won't want wales because they've got matchwinners. northern ireland, scotland and the republic of ireland are also in the draw, but they still have to go through the playoffs to secure their place at european football's showpiece event. dan roan, bbc news.
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so that draw takes place in bucharest at 5 o'clock this evening, and you can watch it live on bbc two. great britain had a very productive day at the trampoline, tumbling and dmt world championships in tokyo yesterday, winning four medals. the women's tumbling team took gold. just watch this. this finaljump from megan kealy sealed the gold medal ahead of russia and france. megan is back in action this morning, pitted against shanice davidson in the individual tumbling finals. and not to be outdone, the men alsojoined in for the medal haul on day one. they won gold in the tumbling team final. the lastjump was from jaydon paddock, and it was enough to get ahead of both russia and the usa to seal first place. i love that moment when they have
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made the jump and landed their feet and they would just breathe out. they just wouldn't breathe for the whole thing. the world tumbling for mejust doesn't whole thing. the world tumbling for me just doesn't cover how impressive is. it used to be called power tumbling. what was that sound effect you made? was that me? i honestly can't remember. it might be a different noise next time. we will see what he does in the next hour? here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. the picture says it all when we're clearing the frost male windscreens, anyone who has drive today. tumbling for me means slipping on ice, i'm afraid! 20 of it around at the moment. a hard frost, temperatures fall to —10 degrees and sheltered rural parts of scotland and on top of that, you have some fun around as well. some of dents in places. the
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met office has issued warnings for that because of visibility in places less tha n that because of visibility in places less than 100 metres so east wales across much of the midland, oxfordshire just to the north of london and also into east anglia and lincolnshire as well so the east midlands and lincolnshire, we may see some of the fog lingering for quite a time today. but will have a considerable impact on the feel of the weather. but for most of us, hopefully the fog will lift, it is a quiet story, dry story with just a scattering of showers in the far north of scotland but there is some rain down into the south—west, preventing it from being too cold and infact preventing it from being too cold and in fact bridges double—digit at the moment but as you can see, the wet weather will be an issue. as a go through the evening, still some rain across the channel isles, still through the isles of scilly and into parts of cornwall but it is slowly drifting as a self which will clear. the breeze picking up as it does so—and—so that may well prevent a fog or frost forming across southern england but elsewhere, we keep the clear skies, temperatures likely to
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fall away again through the night and perhaps not quite as severe, the frost, first thing on sunday morning but nevertheless, it is still going to bea but nevertheless, it is still going to be a cold, frosty start. the high pressure stays with us, building and from the west, another quiet story. a little bit more of a breeze around perhaps on sundays are some subtle differences but the general overall picture stays the same. dry, settled, beautiful winter's morning with lots of sunshine coming through. a scattering of showers perhaps across the far north and east of scotland. temperatures little subdued for where they should be for the first of december tomorrow. three or four degrees perhaps generally through scotland but around 6— eight elsewhere. as we move out of sunday into next week, the high pressure willjust start to move its way a little bit further south and that is going to allow frontal systems to push into the far north—west by the end of the week so it means we start of quite promising
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actually, a lot of dry, settled, sunny weather around the by the end of the week in potentially the far north—west, little bit more in the way of rain but as the wind changes direction, it will get a little milder as well. back to you. thank you, louise. see you later. we'll be back with the headlines at 8 o'clock. now, it's time for newswatch. hello, and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. as the general election campaign gets mired in hotly disputed claims from politicians, how well is the bbc‘s reality check doing in establishing the truth? and... i think it's — i think it's absolutely vital. applause. ..the bbc apologised for cutting question time audience laughter at borisjohnson in a news report, but why did they edit it out? first, the big media confrontation of the week making newspaper headlines the next day was tuesday's interview by andrew neil with jeremy corbyn. here's the labour leader's response
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when invited to make an apology to the britishjewish community. i don't want anyone to be feeling insecure in our society and our government will protect every community... so no apology? ..against the abuse they receive on the streets, on the trains, or in any other... so no apology for how you've handled this? ..or in any other form of life. try one more time. no apology? now, hang on a minute. andrew, can i explain what we're trying to do? you have! and you've been given plenty of time to do it. i asked you if you wanted to apologise, and you haven't. andrew, i don't want anyone to go through what anyone has gone through... and you've said that several times. i understand that, mr corbyn. i was asking you about an apology. it was, by all accounts, a robust encounter — too much so for some reviewers, including pat tinker, who recorded her response to andrew neil's approach on video for us. i was left feeling ashamed of the way in which he hectored and badgered him, didn't let him answer any questions, and ifelt that he had did not represent at all the bbc in a good light.
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in fact, he was a bully. it was an opportunity missed, i believe, for people in the country to become better informed. and andrew neil, as a journalist, has the experience to have done that. shame on him and shame on the bbc for not having done so. others disagreed with that verdict, though, with graham otter writing: it's not only professional interviewers who ask tough questions. here's an audience member on last friday's question time leaders' special putting boris johnson on the spot. how important is it for someone in your position of power to always tell the truth? i think it's... laughter. i think it's absolutely vital! applause. and — and i think it's absolutely vital.
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but when that excerpt was played on the following day's news at one, the audience laughter following the question was cut out, eliciting these responses from caroline abrat and first, duncan ba mford. unfortunately, when the bbc changes or edits some footage, all it does is undermine its objectivity and its independence. bbc news, on that lunch—time bulletin, did boris johnson a huge, huge favour. the excuse given that they needed to shorten the clip doesn't make sense at all, as it was only a couple of seconds. but cutting that out actually completely changed the context. it's actually quite startling watching question time, to see the audience feel comfortable laughing at a prime minister discussing the importance of truth. i think it's really important this is investigated because it actually undermines our confidence in the bbc's impartiality, and how much we can trust them. well, as mentioned there, the bbc did point to reasons
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of timing in its explanation for what happened. its statement said: disputes over facts and figures are part of any election campaign but this time around, the arguments seem more numerous and acrimonious than ever — hence the need for independent and neutral verification of the claims made, by organisations such as the charity full fact, channel 4 news's factcheck, and reality check on the bbc.
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the latter is usually fronted by chris morris, and recently, he's been very busy man. here he is on wednesday scrutinising labour's claims that the nhs was at risk under a post—brexit trade deal with the us. of course, there's going to be pressure — that's what trade talks are all about. there will also be trade—offs. if the uk turns down some of these american requests, then we can expect the americans to reject some key british demands for access to their market. but none of this is really proof that the nhs is somehow for sale, even if the us would like it to be on the table. but producing a definitive verdict on what the politicians are saying is not a straightforward affair. the adjudications of chris morris have themselves faced judgement, with journalists from the daily mail and the daily telegraph over the past fortnight criticising his findings. and, of course, the whole business of fact—checking has come under the spotlight since the conservative party entered this area for last week's leaders' debate on itv,
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asjessica parker reported. looking online, what to take at face value? last night, a brief rebrand of a conservative party twitter account to factcheckuk. the conservatives say it was still clear who is running the account, but one senior labour figure said twitter should have taken it down. well, undeterred by such self—styled entrance into the fact—checking market, chris morris from bbc reality check is with me now. thank you for making the time. i know it's busy. hi, samira. has this election already been particularly angry and more contentious when it comes to doing reality check? yeah, probably. i mnea, elections are always times when there's a lot of attention on exactly what politicians say — a lot of numbers come out in manifestos, and obviously, this election is seen as one of the most important for decades. so there's been an awful lot to check, and what we try and do basically is if we see things which we think —
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where we think politicians have either misspoken, said something that's incorrect, said something that's misleading, we'll write about it. do we spot all of them? no, because there are a lot of them and there are only so many hours do we get it right all the time? possibly not. you know, no—one is infallible. but i think the point is we are trying to hold them to account for what they say. and if somebody says something and then keeps repeating it, then we will try and go back and say again, "we still think this is wrong. we said it last week, we're saying it again now". well, as you've hinted, there are a lot of claims being thrown around out there, so how do you choose which ones to investigate? it's partly things which do get repeated. i mean, politicians have their stump speeches, whether it's borisjohnson orjeremy corbyn. if there are numbers in there which we think clearly don't really stand up to scrutiny, those are things will we investigate. so this might be something like nurses, or something? numbers of nurses, numbers of police officers. and the thing about statistics as well is that you can present them in different ways. so one of the things you can do is say we are putting another 20,000
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police on the streets, but maybe not mention the fact that in the last nine years, 20,000 — the police numbers have gone down by about 21,000. so it's partly putting numbers into context, as well, because numbers don't always tell the whole story. 0k. are you happy to say something is a lie, or to call someone a liar? a lot of people get very exercised about this on social media. my personal view is it doesn't actually help that much for us to call people liars. i think what we should do is say, "this is what somebody said. here is what we believe are the facts of the situation". and i think the audience is smart enough to decide whether somebody is lying or not. i think me going on, into a studio like this and pointing at a politician and saying, "liar, liar, pants on fire" — that's more reality tv than reality check. it is interesting, because obviously the editorial policy director david jordan has said exactly that — it's not the bbc's job to be calling out politicians as a liar. well, i don't think it is. and i think that's partly because i think a lot of what we're dealing with at the moment —
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and other people disagree. the head of channel 4 has made the point that we should be calling people liars, dorothy byrne. my point is a lot of what we're dealing with at the moment is not necessarily so much lying. it's bluster, it's smoke screen, it's — i probably can't say to the full word on a family show like this — but it's bs. and the thing about that is it's not so much trying to conceal the truth, it's about not quite caring what the details of the truth are. and i think if you start throwing around labels like "liar," it almost gets in the way of saying it's really difficult sometimes to pin people down on these things. that, of course, then raises a whole other question of well, is there any point in fact—checking if they're gonna keep saying things? and i think there is a debate to be had about how usefulfact—checking is. but i do think our primary purpose has to be to focus on the facts as we see them. you will know that your fact checks themselves have been disputed by some newspaper commentators. is it also the reality that some fact checks are disputable, they‘ re not just black—and—white? they can be.
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there's always been political spin, and so there should be in any vibrant democracy. there's always gonna be people trying to persuade their part of the electorate that as look at the numbers and you lean this way, or you look at these numbers and lean that way. so spin is part of the process. but i do think it's increased in recent years — that's partly because social media amplifies everything. partly because also social media means parties can very easily sort of put out little bits of video or audio, little bits of — which are almost unfiltered. now, they might say "that's good — we can get past the bias of the media". we would say "actually, it's bad, because then you can spin it too much without us being able to say — and it's ourjob — to say ‘we think you've gone too far with this one'." well, you mentioned the filter of the media. a lot of viewers are concerned that reality check masks a failure in the first place by bbc news journalists to adequately analyse before reporting politicians' promises. and by the time reality check gets to dealing with them, these claims have been out
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there for several hours. oh, you know, this leader has promised this, and that has not been challenged until you get around to it. i don't think any presenter can be expected to be an expert in absolutely everything. so one of the roles i have is to come after and say "we heard all of that but those numbers there, we don't think whether it be a labour claim of you're gonna be spending £500 million extra a week on nhs medicines after a trade deal with united states, or whether it be the tories saying labour's spending plan adds up to £1.2 trillion. you know, there are numbers you can dispute, and i think it's very difficult for a presenter to interrupt every time somebody gives a number, otherwise an interview would never get anywhere because as well as numbers, you do want to hear opinions. chris morris, thank you. thank you for all your comments. on next week's programme — the last before the general election — we'll be speaking to a senior bbc executive about the corporation's coverage of the campaign. please do send us your comments and questions to put to them, by e—mail or on twitter.
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you can call us. and do have a look at our website for previous interviews. that's all from us. we'll be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today... the london bridge attack... passers—by are praised for their bravery as it's revealed the attacker is a convicted terrorist. when we were all kicking him and holding him to the ground, the guy was just constantly screaming, "get off me! get off me!", as if everyone wasjust going to let him go and do his thing. but we wanted to make sure that he's never going to do this again, that he's not going to harm another single human being. two people — a man and a woman — were killed. police patrols have been stepped up across london. the attacker, who was shot dead by armed officers, is named as usman khan. overnight an address in staffordshire linked to him was searched. the attack overshadowed the latest televised election debate, which brought together senior figures from seven parties. england's hopes of levelling the series fade... the visitors are chasing new zealand's first innings score of 375 in the second test in hamilton with the black caps firmly in control.
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good morning, a bitterly cold start to the weekend with a hard frost and some fog out there. but it is going to be a dry story for many of us this weekend, with lots of sparkling winter sunshine. all the details coming up shortly. it's saturday the 30th of november. our top story... the man who carried out an attack on london bridge yesterday was a convicted terrorist. two people — a man and a woman — were stabbed to death. members of the public have been praised for restraining the attacker — named as 28—year—old usman khan — who was then shot dead by police. he had beenjailed in 2012 for a plot to bomb the london stock exchange and set up a terrorist training camp, but was freed on licence a year ago. simonjones has this report. terror returns to the streets of london. a man and a woman killed. but now the question is, how was this allowed to happen? pictures filmed from a bus show police moving in on the attacker
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who'd been held down by members of the public. a man takes a knife from the suspect and runs away, we've blurred his face at the request of police. officers pull away another man wrestling with the attacker and then open fire. this was the man shot dead. usman khan, 28 years old, from staffordshire. he was jailed in 2012 for his part in a plot to bomb the london stock exchange but released on licence last year. ahead of the meeting of the government's emergency committee cobra last night, the prime minister made his feelings clear. i have long argued that it is a mistake to allow serious and violent criminals to come out of prison early. and it is very important that we get out of that habit and that we enforce the appropriate sentences for dangerous criminals, especially for terrorists that
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i think the public will want to see. it's believed usman khan was attending a conference on prisoner rehabilitation in fishmongers' hall at the northern end of london bridge when he started attacking people. the alarm was raised just before 2:00 yesterday afternoon. he was pursued onto the bridge where he was tackled amid chaotic scenes. police then arrive at 2:03 and fire two shots, fearing khan was wearing an explosives vest. politicians are calling on communities to stand together to reject hatred. we have to remember that we live in a democratic society and those that would seek to silence us will not succeed. our democracy must be alive and vibrant. the police have praised the public‘s response. i also want to thank the members of the public who have helped, either by showing extraordinary courage and stepping in to tackle
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this attacker or indeed by following the instructions they have subsequently been given by officers at the scene and in the area. while the police believe there is no outstanding threat to the public, they have been searching a property in staffordshire and many are asking what was being done to monitor the convicted terrorist who went on to kill. simon jones, bbc news. let's speak to our correspondent simonjones, who's at london bridge. please bring us up—to—date with the latest in the police investigation. as you can see, behind me, much of this area is cordoned off. that is likely to remain the situation for the rest of the day. we have heard from the government that there will be further meetings of the emergency committee cobra, that is where they bring together the police, politicians, the security services, the authorities to assess whether there is any further risk. we have also heard from the government, as
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well as the immediate criminal review, there will be a wider review as to what our lesson should be learned about this case, about the release of usman khan, given that he was a convicted terrorist. a short time ago bespoke to the security minister ben wallace. he didn't want to talk about the intricacies of this particular case and said that the police investigation needed to ta ke the police investigation needed to take its course. but he said on a wider scale of the public should not be alarmed. it is important to say, as the police have said, they are not at this moment looking for any other suspects. they are confident about the suspects that they have named and they are not looking for other suspects in terms of the ability of people to be secure in the knowledge, all of us, should be quite rightly going about our day as we should be on any other day. well, brandon lewis also told us that what we saw yesterday was some of the worst of humanity in this attack, but also some of the best of humanity, because what we have seen is the way that members of the
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public tackled the attacker. we saw on london bridge, once he had gone out there, that one person had a fire extinguisher and tried to set it off in the face of usman khan. we saw people pinning him down until the police arrived. ed took the police five minutes. it was a swift response, but without the efforts of those members of the public, ultimately, more people could have lost their lives. simon, thank you very much. ijust remind you, coming up very much. ijust remind you, coming up we will be speaking to the london mayor, sadiq khan. some general election campaign events have been suspended, in response to the london bridge attack. the stabbings overshadowed the latest televised debate, which brought together senior figures from seven parties, who discussed issues including brexit, the nhs and climate change. welcome to cardiff and the national assembly for wales... in a fractious political period, last night's debate began on a sober note.
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once again, london and the country as a whole are having to come to terms with a horrific terror attack. two members of the public are now dead, as is the man who attacked them, others are injured, some seriously. politicians paying tribute to the london bridge first responders and discussing how to tackle the security threat. soon, though, things returned to other election issues. there were tense exchanges between labour and the conservatives on how they'd spend money if they win power, and questions raised about whether boris johnson could fulfil his promise to get brexit done if he wins power. the tories say yes but some say it's not true. michel barnier said it will take up to three years and that's before you add us trade talks or trade talks with any other organisations or countries that will put, potentially, our nhs on the table. we are in episode one of a ten season box set and if you don't like what you've seen up until now, you don't have to watch the rest. critics of the conservatives say a no—deal exit will be back on the table if they win because they said they won't extend
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the next part of talks on future trade beyond 2020, but their representative last night, rishi sunak, said a deal could be done. you said he couldn't get a brexit deal, it will be possible, but he did, he got a great new deal and got it in three months! plaid cymru, meanwhile, were less than impressed withjeremy corbyn's plan to stay neutral. no wonder people don't have faith in politicians when the leader of the labour party, the candidate to be prime minister, won't even tell us where he stands on this central question. while the greens were critical of a lib dem proposal to cancel brexit, even though the parties are working together in some seats. i do think that to go for a unilateral revocation is a slap in the face of 17.4 million people who voted to leave, so that's why i think it is important that people do have their say in a democratic process. they were tense exchanges over the nhs, too. the tories said claims it was for sale were a conspiracy theory. labour insisted they were genuine. and the snp's nicola
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sturgeon agreed. i'm going to be pretty blunt here, when boris johnson says that the nhs is not on the table in a future trade deal, i simply do not trust him and i do not believe him. nothing is for sale in the nhs. it provides incredible front—line care and great outcomes so i would say to lucy, the nhs is not failing but what we do need to do, as well as investing more money, we have to manage it better, that's crucial, and we have to cut out the waste. no game changer but a reminder of the big election issues and the choice we all face when we go to the ballot box in a couple of weeks. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. the time is eight to 10am. let us return to our main story. last night the prime minister chaired a meeting of his cobra committee. sadiq khan, the mayor of london, joins us now. can you tell us what was discussed at the meeting yesterday? the
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various security service experts, the police and others brought the politicians up—to—date with the investigation. lots of questions we re investigation. lots of questions were asked from the politicians, making sure that we are doing all we can to keep the public safe. i can reassure your viewers is that according to the police, it appears as if this man was working alone. it appears that there were no further threats from this man or this operation. the police will carry out further work today, but all of us have a duty in my view to be vigilant. if anyone sees anything vigilant. if anyone sees anything vigilant airon vigilant. if anyone sees anything vigilant air on the side of caution and please report it to the police. over the course of this weekend and the next few days they will be more police officers in london from the met office force and the british transport police. some will be unarmed and there will be plain clothes officers. they are there to keep us safe and to reassure us, not
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because there is an additional heightened threat. you are making clear there is no heightened threat about the security level has been dropped in the last few weeks, will that be under review? can i explain this? it is quite normal for the joint terrorism analysis centre to regularly review the threat levels. they are independent, rightly so, from politicians. they decided a few weeks ago to reduce the threat level from severe, which means that an attack is highly likely, to substantial, which means that an attack is likely. they will carry on reviewing those threat levels. there is nothing from the attack yesterday to give the centre any reason to increase the threat levels. the police and the security services, all of us will continue to make sure that we are vigilant. none of us are complacent. to reassure your viewers, there was no complacency brought about by the change in the threat level two weeks ago.|j
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brought about by the change in the threat level two weeks ago. i want to come to usman khan, the identity of the attacker that we have learned about shortly. do you want to take this opportunity to talk about how you felt that the amount is re—services responded and to this ebullience will help to bring down the attacker? —— how you felt that the attacker? —— how you felt that the emergency services responded to this emergency and how the members of the public help to bring down the attacker? yes, this man represents the worst of humanity. i think all of the bravery and outrageousness of ordinary londoners and others was exceptional and i thank them for that. although you will have seen the bravery on the bridge there was bravery inside fishmongers' hall. they ignored all of the advice, which is to run away from danger. the advice is to please make yourself safe and let the professionals deal with the bad guy. what you saw yesterday was people running towards danger. we don't have the benefit of hindsight. —— we
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have the benefit of hindsight. —— we have the benefit of hindsight. —— we have the benefit of high site, they did not. there was a man with a big knife and we saw another man with a belt around him, it could have been an explosive belt. they ran towards him to stop him hurting others. i am so him to stop him hurting others. i am so proud and we should be really proud of these people. within minutes, an armed response team arrived and again, they had no idea whether this man had a bomb that he could destine it by pressing a button. they had no idea how many others were involved. what did they do? they ran towards him and they made sure that they made all of us safe by taking him out. it is very important that we recognise that we prepare and plan and be practice for these things. but the public don't, but what you saw was the best of humanity. we should pause sometimes and reflect upon that and give those londoners a pat on the back. and i
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am sure overthe londoners a pat on the back. and i am sure over the course of the next few weeks and months they will be duly recognised for their bravery and is the london mayor, i say thank you to them. let us talk about usman khan. we have learned his identity as the attacker. i don't know if you discuss this last night and it is something you might go into any more detail he was convicted in 2012 for terrorism offences. thejudge ordered that he serve at least eight yea rs of ordered that he serve at least eight years of this sentence, yet he was released early. you have said that people should feel safe and reassured. it becomes a wider issue if people are being convicted of terrorism offences and judges have said it needs to be a minimum sentence, it is not served, he was released on licence one year ago with an electronic tag. he was free to do this. to segregate the individual investigation taking place now, because it is really important that the police do their job and! important that the police do their job and i do not want to prejudice that investigation. there are many
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questions to answer. i was unhappy andl questions to answer. i was unhappy and i opposed the decision from the government to get rid of a sentence that he has had which is in ipp, an indeterminate sentence for the protection of the public. what this meant was that the judge could give the sentence, which would mean that someone the sentence, which would mean that someone who was convicted of a serious offence like this terrorist offe nce, serious offence like this terrorist offence, could not be released until the present had persuaded the probation service that he was no longer a danger to the public. the government got rid of that, which means that the judge does not have all of the tools at his disposal when there is a serious person found guilty of a serious offence. that is one of the concerns i have. another is that i have personally seen as a former lawyer and a former justice secretary and as the london mayor, the consequences of huge cuts in the ministry ofjustice, the probation service being privatised, aside from the cuts in police and that must have an impact on the ability of the
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supervision and rehabilitation of such men. it is really important that there is a proper review to see whether lessons can be learned, because are correct, we must make sure that we are doing all that we can to keep us safe and that includes sentences available to judges, other it was right to remove the ipp and bother the cuts that have made consequences on this issue. i don't really want to go too much down the political line this morning, the focus must be...” much down the political line this morning, the focus must be... i am really sorry, but you asked me the question about the sentence given to this man, and that sentence was in ipp. it would originally have been available to the judges, what happened was he was given a determinate sentence which has a length of time being given and he was released at the halfway point under supervision on a license. the point that i make is that i am
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deliberately not mentioning the individual case and what happened, i am seeing in general terms, individual case and what happened, i am seeing in generalterms, you must appreciate the consequences of changing of government policy. what do you know in your practice and your understanding, how close would this supervision have been for someone this supervision have been for someone in this situation? again, not mentioning the case of the individual, but what normally happens is that someone released on licence, often they have an electronic tag, that means he or she is monitored by the authorities. they are often in regular contact with it could be a probation officer or someone with it could be a probation officer or someone else from the probation service. normally what would happen asa service. normally what would happen as a commission of the license could be not to go to an area and if you do, you must make sure that your supervisor knows about this. there has been concerns in relation to changes made to the probation service a few years ago, which have led to a concern from experts in the probation service being worried about their ability to properly supervise dangerous people, and you will have seen in previous press reports concerns about the
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consequences of that. one of the things i know that will happen in this case is to see what happened with this individual, to see what happened before he was released last december, to see what happened after december, to see what happened after december, because it is really important, so important that we learn the lessons. we spoke to the security minister brandon lewis earlier and we have mentioned on this programme the election campaign has been suspended in light of this. what will you be doing today? there will be further corporate meetings, i understand. what are your plans in terms of being in london?” i understand. what are your plans in terms of being in london? i was in touch with the counterterror leads discussing the investigation. there are a few things i want to say, firstly, it will be important that we have our thoughts and prayers with the families of the two people who lost their lives, a man and a woman. they lost their lives prematurely and the families will never be the same again. there are three people in hospital, one is any critical but stable condition, the other two are stable and they will be in our thoughts and prayers and
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we will respect their privacy. on the one hand what happened yesterday is devastating and we must make sure that we are sensitive and respect to those affected by the attack. on the other hand, what we must not allow to happen is for our way of life to be disrupted by this terrorist. that is what they want. what i am proud about is that last night outside recording area in parts of central london, there were people enjoying bars and restaurants, going about their business as normal, i hope people come to london to shop for christmas and go about their normal business. they will see more police officers, some armed, son not, not in uniform, no reason to be alarmed by that. they are keeping a safe and i will be keeping abreast of developments in this investigation. the met police service, government ministers and myself are putting out responsible messages to londoners and the message is simple, please be vigilant, airon the and the message is simple, please be vigilant, air on the side of caution. if you see anything suspicious, report it to the police. if someone that you know fours has
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changed, report it. contact our counter terrorism hotline. help to keep us all safe. the mayor of london, siddique khan, thank you very much for your time this morning. —— sadiq khan. very much for your time this morning. -- sadiq khan. let's get the weather now. thank you, charlie. bitterly cold in the glens of scotland, —10 degrees. this is the picture in the borders of scotland. beautiful sunshine. there is an issue elsewhere with fog at the moment. some is dense and freezing fog, really quite treacherous on the roads. keep abreast of your local radio stations for traffic and travel updates. this is the latest in terms of the met office warning. the east of wales down to oxfordshire, east anglia and
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lincolnshire. some of that fog could be slow and could linger into the afternoon, so temperatures will be subdued. for most, it will lift and allow the sunshine to come through. for most, it is a dry day, if few scattered showers into the far north of scotland, one or two through the east coast. except for the far south—west, look at the difference and the feel of the weather, tempt is at the moment already into double figures but there is some rain around the channel islands, parts of the isles of scilly and cornwall. it will linger for the isles of scilly and cornwall. it will lingerfor much of the isles of scilly and cornwall. it will linger for much of the day but ease away overnight and it will push steadily southwards. the breeze picking up and that will prevent some fog and frost forming across the south of england through tonight. elsewhere, clearer skies, light winds, temperatures likely to fall and it will be a cold and frosty start to sunday morning. particularly for scotland, northern ireland and northern england. perhaps not quite as cold as the morning we got at the moment, but nevertheless, a frosty start, a dry
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start, lots of sunshine with building in from the far north—west. and as we go through sunday, it will continue to stay pretty quiet. a week weather front enhancing a few showers in the far north, but the generally speaking dry for all. welcome news, settled, sunny winter's day for many. it is the 1st of december of course, tomorrow. top temperatures are struggling, a little subdued for the time of year, we are looking at highs of between three and 8 degrees. looking ahead, the high pressure will slowly start to drift its way eastwards, and that will allow weather fronts through the week to drift into the north—west but they will take the time to do that. generally speaking, the quieter theme of weather remains across the country, cold, dry, settled on sonny until the end of the week, when we could see more in the week, when we could see more in the way of rain into the far north—west with a change of one direction for something a little bit milder. back to you.
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thank you, louise. let us return to the main story. we are getting a clearer picture of the aftermath today as to what happened. we can speak to the chairman of the metropolitan police federation, ken marsh. thank you forjoining us this morning. many people will have already seen the images of what happened as passers by then police officers reacted to what was unfolding. can you just give us your understanding of the timeline and what happened ? good morning. obviously, you have seen good morning. obviously, you have seen what has been played out on the screens. seen what has been played out on the screens. members of the public first tried to stop this individual in the way that he was attacking them. my couege way that he was attacking them. my college responded very, very quickly toa college responded very, very quickly to a live situation. and i have to tell you, the way that they acted out, what they did was absolutely
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incredible and they stop for the people from getting injured. in the immediate moments when they were trying to control the attacker, they did not know what he was armed with and there were real concerns at that point that he was wearing an explosives vest. absolutely and you know, this is what we see over and overagain, my know, this is what we see over and over again, my colleagues have no idea what they are running towards or walking towards, and this individual as you quite rightly say, he had some sort of apparatus around his waist. they did not know at that time that it was or wasn't a live explosive advice. they had to respond like it was. the public, again, they werejumping respond like it was. the public, again, they were jumping around and trying to assist not knowing that this individual could have had a live explosive device upon him.” this individual could have had a live explosive device upon him. i am not sure if you had any contact directly with any of the officers involved or heard second—hand from
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our —— from others about that moment. have you had any contact?” haven't spoken to any of the office rs haven't spoken to any of the officers who were directly on the scene officers who were directly on the scene because they will be dealing with notes and other issues that they have to deal with this morning, but i have spoken to officers who we re but i have spoken to officers who were on the scene after and officers who were doing the cordons and so on, and they have all said that the response was amazing. sadly, of course, it is through bitter and painful experience that many lessons have been learned about response times about how to deal with these scenarios. that has happened over a period of time. yes, it is ever—changing in london, and this is what is so fantastic. i am always blown away by my colleagues and how they respond amazingly all the time to situations that are very different. although they look the same, they are not, this is a completely different scenario to the previous london bridge and westminster attacks, but they
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responded immediately to what has been put in front of them and deal with what is in front of them without any fuss. it isjust incredible. mr marsh, please give us a sense because many people have been traumatised, members of the public in and around that area, obviously, those who are most directly involved and very sadly we know that one man and one woman were killed in this incident. for your officers, themselves, when they are involved with something like this, what kind of care do you give them in the immediate aftermath and perhaps over the longer term, over what, as you have said yourself, even those that are trained, is a very traumatic experience? you are quite right, charlie. we have a full package available that we will be laying out for our officers. we have welfare for them, this will be put in place by my colleagues in the federation, and by the senior management of the mps so that we can make sure that there is no officer who has any issues in relation to
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this and to make sure that they are looked after afterwards, because we have a duty of care towards them. times have changed when we fully understand what is required and that will all be put in place for all of my colleagues who have been involved in any incident that you saw yesterday or further on. ken marsh, thank you for your time this morning, that is ken marsh, chairman of the police federation. speaking at london bridge. the headlines are coming up, we will be back shortly.
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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. good morning. a summary of this morning's main news. the man who carried out a terror attack on london bridge yesterday was a convicted terrorist. two people, a man and a woman, were stabbed to death. the attacker, named as 28—year—old usman khan, was shot dead by an armed officer. he had beenjailed in 2012 for a plot to bomb the london stock exchange and set up a terrorist training camp
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but was freed on licence a year ago. in the last hour, we spoke to london mayor sadiq khan. he said the bravery of those who confronted the attacker made him proud. they had no idea whether this man had a poem he could detonate by pressing a button, they had no idea how many other people were involved —— a bomb. they run towards him and make sure they made us safe by taking him out. it is important we recognise we prepare, we plan, we practice for these things, but the public don't, and we saw the best of humanity. earlier on breakfast, we spoke to the security minister, brandon lewis. we asked him what reassurance he could give the public. it is important to say, as the police have said, they are not at this moment looking for any other suspects. they are confident about the suspect they have named and they are not looking for any further suspects. in terms of people's ability to be secure in the knowledge that, actually, all of us, quite rightly,
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should be go about our lives today as we would on any other day. craig heathcote was on the bridge at the time and saw what happened. he joins us now on the phone. good morning. thank you for speaking to us. can you just establish for people first where you were and how it was you witnessed what happened? i was on the east side of london bridge and ended up being directly parallel to what happened. a man, basically, kind of came streaming out of nowhere saying someone had a knife —— screaming. i saw it unfolding. over the other side of the bridge. take us through the sequence the bridge. take us through the sequence of events. we are seeing some images of people running away. take us through what happened as it unfolded. after the man came running towards me shouting someone had a
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knife, i could see there was a massive bundle of people on the other side of the bridge and by that point, lots of people were screaming, it felt like hundreds on the bridge, getting out of cars. quite early on, i remember looking ata man quite early on, i remember looking at a man and i haven't said this to anyone yet and thinking, he looks terrible. i realised that was the man holding the knife from the attacker. i dialled 999, ifelt like no one else was doing it, people we re no one else was doing it, people were running around screaming, i don't know where that came from, i just did it. a police car appeared on the bridge ten seconds after i did that almost and offices started to intervene —— officers. felt like
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an extremely long period of time, shouting at the attacker, and then took over and obviously ended up firing their guns. really appreciate you taking us through this and i am sure people will recognise it has been very traumatic for everyone, people who witnessed it, as you have. what we have heard from many people, and you alluded to this a moment ago, as people were realising what was happening and there was an attacker, people were running in from the other side of the road to get involved, did you see that?” did. honestly, ifeel like it is quite important that people have the clear picture and there is no sensationalising it, really. yes, they were, and i don't really have
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they were, and i don't really have the words to say how incredible that is. i saw this man that clearly had been involved, his coat was half off him and having watched the footage late last night when i got home, realising he was the man who took the knife off the attacker, who was involved in that, those people are heroes. absolutely incredible, really. one of the things maybe you are thinking and a lot of people listening, hearing the story, thinking, ina listening, hearing the story, thinking, in a way, what might you do if you are in those circumstances? we were speaking to sadiq khan, mayor of london, and he very much was saying, it is at those points in time when you have to praise the people prepared to do that, along of course with the police who reacted so quickly. you are absolutely right. i thought a lot about that. not unfortunate
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because people were doing it, but if i was ten seconds earlier, if i had frost on the other side, i would have been right in the middle of it. very bizarre surreal feeling. you never know how things are going to kick in, i don't think i have thought i would be able to call 909 because it was extraordinarily tense hyper situation and the noises will probably stay with me forever. all i can say is those people are heroes andi can say is those people are heroes and i hope they are ok because it has been quite traumatic. and they we re has been quite traumatic. and they were right in the thick of it.” would like to say a big thank you to you, craig. i hope you get whatever help you need because everyone involved is facing some kind of trauma. thank you very much.” involved is facing some kind of trauma. thank you very much. i am going to be fine, thank you. an
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eyewitness from the events last night, craig. we can now speak to chris phillips, former head of the national counter terrorism security office. thank you very much forjoining us this morning. obviously, now the details of the attacker have been released, we are learning about the fa ct released, we are learning about the fact he was a convicted terrorist, out on licence for a year. he did not serve the recommended jail time, thejudge had not serve the recommended jail time, the judge had recommended. not serve the recommended jail time, thejudge had recommended. we are getting these details and people are now going to be asking questions about how someone like this was able to be ina about how someone like this was able to be in a position to do something as horrific as he did. yeah, this is as horrific as he did. yeah, this is a question we will be asking because he is not alone. there are a number, many convicted terrorists have been released into society. some of those well act properly but someone like him will harbour the grudge and want
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to go and kill people. i think it is incredible if you listen to the sentencing of thejudge incredible if you listen to the sentencing of the judge that heard the trial, he did not think this person really should ever be released again and yet on appeal the sentence was changed which allowed him to be released back into society. former head of the national counterterrorism security, what is the role of that? how can that body protect us? there is no 10096 protection and if our criminal justice system is allowing people on the streets who are dangerous like this, you can ask the police and security services to keep us safe. pretty much an impossible task. they will do their best. if you are talking about a 10—20,000 people perhaps quite risky from the terrorism perspective, it is too many. we have to be realistic. what we expect our security services to
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do. but surely we want our criminal justice system, people convicted of terrorism, they should not be released unless they have been de—radicalised. released unless they have been de-radicalised. what happens now? we spoke to the mayor sadiq khan, there will be an increased presence of police officers, armed and unarmed, clothed, plainclothed, he reassuring the public in londoners and those in london that they are safe, what are you saying? that is exactly what will happen and it happens every time and we are now on the run up to an election and we know there was an increased security issue then, run—up to christmas, all of these things are an extra strain on the police officers we have got. much to reduce numbers of police officers we have got. but there is no 100% security, no such thing. but we do expect the criminal justice security, no such thing. but we do expect the criminaljustice system, i will say it again, we do want
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people convicted of terrorism to stay in prison. if you release them back into society, really, the criminal justice system back into society, really, the criminaljustice system is doing nothing more than playing russian roulette with our lives and i think we deserve to be protected from these people. sadiq khan alluded to these people. sadiq khan alluded to the fact, made very clear, did not allude to it, the determinant sentences given to people like this man should be fixed and —— indeterminate sentences. and that has changed. what are your thoughts? he was not fit to be released, quite clearly. how many others have been released exactly the same as this? people should be kept in prison. i think thejudge really people should be kept in prison. i think the judge really anticipated him being kept in prison for 20 yea rs. him being kept in prison for 20 years. and yet we have him released after such a short period. let us be quite honest, this man was almost certainly paid to go to the
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conference yesterday, he travelled from another part of the country into london, and he brought a potential explosives and a knife with him to do that. he was always going to commit another terrorist atrocity, he was keen on that, that is what he wanted to do years ago, and the criminal justice is what he wanted to do years ago, and the criminaljustice system allowed him to do that and it is just disgusting. strong words. chris phillips, former head of the national counterterrorism security office. thank you for your views this morning. more of our coverage through this morning. the events at london bridge. but right now, holly is with us and in a moment a glimpse into a changing room with gareth southgate? a bit of changing room banter. later today, england and wales will find out who they'll face
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at next year's euros. scotland, northern ireland and the republic will be watching the draw keenly too, as they can still qualify through the play—offs.. exciting day for england, they are thejoint exciting day for england, they are the joint favourites with france. they have come a long way when they think back to their last performance at the euros, but the young side have exceeded expectations, fascinating interview with gareth southgate. cricket first. cricket ongoing overnight. the latest from hamilton. england are facing a real battle if they're to win the second and final test and level the series. they've lost two early first innings wickets in reply to new zealand's 375 all out. england finished the day on 39—2 so they trail by 336 and the day started well enough
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with england's bowlers on top. tom latham made a century yesterday but he added just four to his overnight score before he was bowled by stuart broad. new zealand recovered well though. daryl mitchell made 73 and bj watling — who you'll remember frustrated england with a double century in the first test — also scored a half century to put the hosts in control on day two. back to the interview with south glass —— gareth southgate. later today, england and wales will find out who they'll face at next year's euros. scotland, northern ireland and the republic will be watching the draw keenly too, as they can still qualify through the play—offs. england go into the final as joint favourites with france. and our sports editor, dan roan, has been speaking to manager gareth southgate to get his thoughts ahead of today's draw.
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final preparations in bucharest where those competing in european football's flagship tournament next summer are about to learn their fate. after an impressive qualifying campaign, england are among the favourites for euro 2020. here at their training base, the manager told me the perception of the team has now shifted. the draw is always a decisive moment for everybody and knowing when the dates are, what the route looks like, i think the country, it feels as if they have been more engaged with the team over the last two years and that's one of the biggest highlights for me. never more so than at the last euros when an abject england were humiliated by minnows iceland. but two years later, southgate's young side surpassed all expectations, reaching the world cup semifinals in russia. the growing sense that his team are now genuine contenders. i think we have gain some respect and i think people would view us as a threat, which certainly wasn't the case at the end of russia. we also know that we have got to improve. euro 2020 kicks off in rome, but the tournament will be spread across the continent, with 12 host cities. wembley will stage both semifinals and the final itself. if england get that far, they will have played five of seven matches at home, raising hopes of a first
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major trophy since 1966. saw this with the rugby team and the cricket boys, whenever you see the national team in any sport doing well, people get behind it and sport is about taking people from the day—to—day into dreams, into hopes, into aspirations and pride. and that's what we are here to provide. next summer will evoke memories of the last time england enjoyed such home advantage. euro ‘96, when the hosts shone. southgate's semifinal penalty miss was the sad end to an unforgettable campaign. the tournament next summer is not about me and redemption. the team is about the players and the team is about our fans and it is more important that we make them proud. and as i said before russia, to do that, we've got to win matches as well. wales have also qualified. having reached the last four of the last euros in france, they will go into the drawer full of confidence. they will have a belief. they have had an experience of getting to a semifinal.
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they will enjoy it, no doubt about that. and when the draw is made, people will not want wales because they have match winners. northern ireland, scotland and the republic of ireland are also in the draw, but they still have to go through the play—offs to secure their place in european football's showpiece event. dan roan, bbc news. so, that draw takes place in bucharest at 5pm this evening and you can watch it live on bbc two. some news now following last night's fa cup tie between newport and maldon and tiptree. after one of the players had to be stretchered off, defender kyle howkins is this morning said to be stable in hospital after he suffered a clash of heads with maldon s charlee hughes. after a considerable delay while howkins was treated, padraig amond scored the only goal of that game for newport. our thoughts are with that player at
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this time of course. day two of the trampoline, tumbling and dmt world championships is under way in tokyo. megan kealy is back in action laterfor great britain. here she is yesterday as part of the gold medal—winning women's tumbling team. she's competing against her teammate shanice davidson in the individual tumbling finals and there are medals to be won in the individual dmt men 5 final. that is a double mini trampoline. can wejust that is a double mini trampoline. can we just see that again? is that possible? i would watch it all day. it almost looks like the film has been sped up, midway through, accelerates again. she thinks she is done and she keeps going. you are really enjoying it. want to give it a go? no. specialist skills required. i thought that would be you coming into work every day. you can watch all of that on the bbc
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sport website at the moment. that is ongoing. thank you. earlier this week, nurses at a hospice in hampshire made a twitter plea to disney, to help a terminally—ill patient see the new star wars film before its official release next month. yesterday the family got to watch it in a private screening. this is the tweet from rowans hospice. it said, "we have a patient who's a huge star wars fan. sadly, time is not on his side for 20th december. his wish is to see the final star wars film, the rise of skywalker, with his young son. if you know anybody who might be able to make it happen, please share with them." the star wars actor mark hamil responded, and then robert iger, disney's ceo, confirmed the family would watch the film in a special viewing, tweeting, "may the force be with you and with us all!" the patient, who is remaining anonymous, said disney had helped make wonderful memories in a horrible situation. we can talk now to the chief executive of rowans hospice,
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ruth white, and the nurses who made it happen, lisa davies and jill saunders. good morning to you all. one of the things that science is also the work you do in the hospice is often dealing with terminally ill patients and can be very sad, they are not sad places. —— one of the things that says. you want people to enjoy their moments. absolutely. people are still living. yes, people do die within the hospice, but this is about living and it is about helping people to create memories as the patient has had, and this is what has happened this week. it has been absolutely phenomenal. jill, talk to me about how it all happened and went ahead. the tweet went out and it isa went ahead. the tweet went out and it is a random request, hopeful request. yeah, absolutely. last
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weekend, lisa and i were working at the hospice looking after this patient and lisa happen to notice he had a tattoo of a star wars character, she is a fan, she knew what it meant and she came to me and said, this guy is not going to see the film, is there something we can do about it. we laughed about it over a cup of coffee and it developed. you never know, worth a try. we sent a message to the communications department and gave than a mission and they went with it and out went the tweet and we used twitter and facebook and it went crazy from the end it took us within four days to get the patient to see the film and he saw it yesterday morning. that is very quick work. lisa, can you tell me how the film was received? lisa, can you tell me how the film was received ? i lisa, can you tell me how the film was received? i notice you have the storm troopers behind you, you have set addressed the place. we have.
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the film was flown overnight from america. arrived in london morning and a lovely guy called jonathan from disney brought it down and we received it at the hospice yesterday morning at 10am. and it was all very secretive. nobody else was aloud in or out of the room, the disney person had to stay in the room, disclosure forms, the place was checked for cameras, no mobile phones in the room, or very exciting. and they made the patient‘s son sign a little thing, pinky promise, to say he would not tell any school friends he had seen the film. wonderful. who else managed to watch the film? was it just the patient and his family? just the patient and his family. just the patient and his family. just the patient and his family. just the five of them. what did they think of it? all they are allowed to
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tell us what's they had seen it and they thought it was great and they we re they thought it was great and they were grateful to disney. apart from that, not allowed to tell us anything. fair enough. istarted this by saying hospices, although you deal with terminally ill people, they are not negative places, you are working really hard to make people comfortable and this must have been such a comfort to the family. how has the family reacted to your kindness? absolutely. i saw the patient‘s father yesterday evening and he was just absolutely overwhelmed with what had been achieved. they don't want any publicity. that is not what they want. but they say, actually, i want to do this for you, rowans, you have made it so special for the family and we will never forget you, thank you so much. it was so emotional, that conversation. he was just
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incredible. i certainly will not forget it either and nor will my wonderful nursing team and of course the marketing team who made it happen with amazing tweets and facebook posts. all respect to you. a lovely story to hear, that this kindness has meant so much to this family, and especially this star wa rs family, and especially this star wars fan. keep up the good work, ruth, lisa, jill. they said hello in unison, didn't they? they are 18. you need those stories sometimes, especially on a day like today. —— they are 18. it is cold outside, but i believe it might warm up later in the week. it looks as though temperatures are back to where they should be but today we have lows of -10 should be but today we have lows of —10 in parts of rural scotland because much of us are under the
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influence of high pressure. the far south—west as seamless weather front clipping the isles of scilly, cornwall, channel isles, attaching outbreaks of rain —— has seen a weather front. early outbreaks of rain —— has seen a weatherfront. early morning outbreaks of rain —— has seen a weather front. early morning fog will slowly lift away but it will be stubborn in spots and temperatures will struggle. tonight, the cloud and light rain will ease from the south—west. clearer skies further north, particularly scotland, northern ireland, northern england. again temperatures below freezing. another frosty start on sunday morning. first day of december sparkling for many, good dry story for many, a few scattered showers in the far north—west of scotland. temperatures again struggling. just down where they should be for the time of year. back to you.
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thank you. nikki lilly was six years old when she was diagnosed with a rare and life—changing disorder. when she was too ill to see herfriends, nikki began making video blogs to boost her confidence. now, aged 15, she has over 1 million viewers on youtube. tomorrow, she'll receive a bafta award for inspiring other young people. we'll speak to her in a moment, but first, let's take a look at some of nikki's vlog. hi, youtube. it's nikki from nikki lilly. now, today i am doing a video called nikki. i was really unconfident. i used to look at myself in the mirror and think, where have i gone? i used to wish this was face paint and some nights i used to get a flannel and wet it and scrub my face because i couldn't believe it was not going to come off. what i'm going to be doing isjust doing make—up on this side
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of my face and not on this side of my face. and i am basically going to be talking about the power of it and how it has changed my life, changed my confidence, changed my mental health. oh, my gosh. this is so crazy, like, look at me right now. one side has nothing at all and one side with foundation. it is so weird. wow. nikki joins us now. you are inspiring people, you are now being awarded this with a bafta because of the work you have done, how does it feel? i think you have been incredibly brave to put yourself out on any social media, pray for anyone. thank you. it feels absolutely crazy to be receiving the award. there have been such amazing people that have received the award before me and i have big shoes to fill but i feel very grateful. i
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don't really like calling myself inspiring because i feel like i have just done what anyone would do in my situation. no, you haven't. many people would not do this in your situation and that is important to recognise because what you will do and the reason people say you are inspiring as you are showing you are prepared to speak and anyone else who feels confident is also given a door. that is why i wanted to put myself out there because that is so much pressure on social media to look a certain way and convey a certain life. i wanted to challenge that perspective. it is so hard for people because they are constantly presented with airbrushed ideals and it can make them feel so low on confidence and i wanted to show people, you are enough. you shouldn't feel you should have to change yourself or anyone. i hope i have been able to provide hope for people who watch the videos. like a lot of people who are inspiring, you
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are quite modest. the person we see now and the person sitting on the sofa now, when did that change come? was there a moment in time, i know you have talked about how difficult things were medically and psychologically, was that a moment when you went, do you know what, i am who! when you went, do you know what, i am who i am, here you go? when i was first diagnosed with my condition at six years old, i found it really difficult to understand or cope with the fact my life was changing. i was so young, the fact my life was changing. i was so young, i did not really get it. i was such a chatty and confident child, i would speak to anyone, but the confidence completely dropped and went away when i was diagnosed. asi and went away when i was diagnosed. as i started making videos, it brought back my confidence and it made me realise that the way i am is the way i am for a reason.” made me realise that the way i am is the way i am for a reason. i am thinking, you just said, when i started making videos, but the first time, i don't know if you remember,
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maybe you were worried about confidence, lo and behold, put a camera in front of yourself, take the leap. it is true. that is a brave moment in time and you don't know how people will react.” didn't. we started off with the comments disabled because my parents we re comments disabled because my parents were worried about how people would react to an eight—year—old with a visible difference. then i enabled the comments and i was seeing a couple of likes and views and i was worried and comments are a lot more personal. at the time, i did not realise that people would see the videos, it was morejust realise that people would see the videos, it was more just a realise that people would see the videos, it was morejust a project for myself, escapism. when people did start seeing them and they were really positive about them, it was great because i was so worried as i grew up and i enabled the comments because i realised some people in the world are not very nice, so it was the amazing thing to see. top of
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the videos and being inspiring, you won juniobake off, you the videos and being inspiring, you wonjuniobake off, you have interviewed the former prime minister theresa may, and other people who have said they want to speak to you, how does it feel?m feels insane. to think little nikki filming on an ipad, i would never think i would be where i am today and have the opportunities i have had. ifeel very and have the opportunities i have had. i feel very grateful. and have the opportunities i have had. ifeel very grateful. the people i have interviewed, they have been so open and honest with me and i feel very lucky they felt co mforta ble i feel very lucky they felt comfortable with me. tomorrow you will be getting your award at the british academy of children's awards, enjoy it. lovely talking to you. stay with us. headlines injust a moment.
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good morning welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today... the london bridge attack... passers—by are praised for their bravery as it's revealed the attacker
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is a convicted terrorist. when we were all kicking him and holding him to the ground, the guy was just constantly screaming, "get off me! get off me!", as if everyone wasjust going to let him go and do his thing. but we wanted to make sure that he's never going to do this again, that he's not going to harm another single human being. two people — a man and a woman — were killed. police patrols have been stepped up across london. the attacker, who was shot dead by armed officers, is named as usman khan. overnight an address in staffordshire linked to him was searched. the attack overshadowed the latest televised election debate, which brought together senior figures from seven parties. england's hopes of levelling the series fade... the visitors are chasing new zealand's first innings score of 375 in the second test in hamilton with the black caps firmly in control. good morning, a bitterly cold start to the weekend with a hard frost and some fog out there. but it is going to be a dry story for many of us this weekend, with lots of sparkling winter sunshine.
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all the details coming up shortly. it's saturday the 30th of november. our top story... the man who carried out an attack on london bridge yesterday was a convicted terrorist. two people — a man and a woman — were stabbed to death. members of the public have been praised for restraining the attacker — named as 28—year—old usman khan — who was then shot dead by police. he had beenjailed in 2012 for a plot to bomb the london stock exchange and set up a terrorist training camp, but was freed on licence a year ago. simonjones has this report. terror returns to the streets of london. a man and a woman killed. but now the question is, how was this allowed to happen? pictures filmed from a bus show police moving in on the attacker who'd been held down by members of the public. a man takes a knife from the suspect and runs away, we've blurred his face at the request of police. officers pull away another man wrestling with the attacker and then open fire.
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this was the man shot dead. usman khan, 28 years old, from staffordshire. he was jailed in 2012 for his part in a plot to bomb the london stock exchange but released on licence last year. ahead of the meeting of the government's emergency committee cobra last night, the prime minister made his feelings clear. i have long argued that it is a mistake to allow serious and violent criminals to come out of prison early. and it is very important that we get out of that habit and that we enforce the appropriate sentences for dangerous criminals, especially for terrorists that i think the public will want to see. it's believed usman khan was attending a conference on prisoner rehabilitation in fishmongers' hall at the northern end of london bridge when he started attacking people.
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the alarm was raised just before 2:00 yesterday afternoon. he was pursued onto the bridge where he was tackled amid chaotic scenes. police then arrive at 2:03 and fire two shots, fearing khan was wearing an explosives vest. politicians are calling on communities to stand together to reject hatred. we have to remember that we live in a democratic society and those that would seek to silence us will not succeed. our democracy must be alive and vibrant. the police have praised the public‘s response. i also want to thank the members of the public who have helped, either by showing extraordinary courage and stepping in to tackle this attacker or indeed by following the instructions they have subsequently been given by officers at the scene and in the area. while the police believe there is no outstanding threat to the public,
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they have been searching a property in staffordshire and many are asking what was being done to monitor the convicted terrorist who went on to kill. simon jones, bbc news. let's speak to our correspondent simonjones, who's at london bridge. good morning, please take us through the latest developments. yes, the police investigation continues at a pace. much of this area remains cordoned off this morning. officers have said they are not looking for anyone specific in connection with what happened but they want to make sure there is no wider threat to the community. there has been much talk about usman khan and why he was released from jail. the government have confirmed that as well as the wider police investigation, there will also be a further review into why he was released, into what sort of danger he was considered to pose
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and who made those decisions. this morning, interestingly, the parole board have made it clear it was nothing to do with them. they believe that usman khan was released, having served time. he was released, having served time. he was released automatically on licence having served the eight years he was due to serve. the london mayor is particularly concerned about this and told us he is concerned that prisoners are no longer being given indeterminate sentences, where they can basically be held injailfor as long as necessary until it is considered it is safe to release them into the community. he was also very keen to talk about people who stepped in to try to foil the attack. they had no idea whether this man had a bomb he could detonate by pressing a button, they had no idea how many other people we re had no idea how many other people were involved. what did they do? ran towards him and made sure they kept all of us safe by taking him out. it is really important that we recognise, that we prepare and plan, we practice for these things, but the public don't, what you saw was
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the public don't, what you saw was the best of humanity and we should just pause and reflect upon that and give those londoners a pat on the back, and i am sure over the course of the next few weeks and months they will be duly recognised for their bravery. and i as the mayor of london want to thank them for that. and the words of the london mayor we saw the worst of humanity in this terror attack but the best of humanity and the way that people put themselves in danger, and often the advice in a situation like this is for people to run away from danger. but here we had people on london bridge, one man with a fire extinguisher who let it off in the face of the attacker. another man when the attack broke out who seized an ornamental task, a five foot task and use that to try to fend off the attacker. so some positives from what we have heard —— tusk. the
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remains to women and a man in hospital at the moment. there will be more visible security on the streets today, we have heard. yes, the message is that there will be increased patrols, both here in london, and in other parts of the country. you can see that this area remains cordoned off and there is a big police presence in this specific area but you will expect to see more police out and about on top —— public transport in london and in other areas, partly that is a message of reassurance from the police. we do not believe that there is any further imminent threat was that there will also be further meetings of the cobra, the government's emergency committee, during the day. they will undoubtedly assess the further terror risk, if any, but we will likely hear from the prime minister later today. he was very quick to condemn what happened but also like the mayor of london, praised the bravery of those who try to follow
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this attack. for the moment, simon, thank you. simon jones. let's speak to our reporter liz copper who's in stafford for us. what's been happening there? ican i can see there is a property cordoned off behind you. this is linked to the attacker, usman khan. well, we are here at an address on wolverhampton road in stafford, close to the town centre, and there has been a considerable amount of police activity here. you can probably see, it is quite a large property, it is all cordoned off but staffordshi re property, it is all cordoned off but staffordshire police officers have been on the cordoned but i have also seen been on the cordoned but i have also seen members of the met police arriving here and there have been reports that the police have been here since late yesterday afternoon. we do not know what connection, if any there is to khan here but there isa any there is to khan here but there is a great deal of police activity. khan is very much on the radar of authorities here in staffordshire,
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following his conviction in 2012, and his release subsequently on licence. i think there will be questions in staffordshire about the terms of that license and how he was being monitored. liz, for the moment, thank you very much. we have been able to speak to members of the public who have been praised for their bravery. we heard the mayor of london, siddique khan, say that, after this terrorist was tackled. tour guide stevie hurst was there. he's been speaking to 5 live. his account contains some graphic details. well, we saw, just sort of a handful of people running away from a direction to the left of us, on the left—hand side, from south to north, and i don't know why, but i felt compelled to jump out of the car to go and see
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what the situation was. and we saw a guy being accosted to the floor. i ran over to investigate what was going on and the guys were just screaming, "he's stabbed a couple of women". i'm guessing from the bar, from the fishmongers' bar. so they were screaming that. so everyone was just on top of him, trying to bundle him to the ground, and we saw that the knife was still in his hand, he was covered in blood. the knife was still in his hand, so ijust put a foot in to try and kick him in head... we were trying to do as much as we could to try to dislodge the knife from his hand so he wouldn't harm anyone else. so the guys that were there were just amazing. incredible people. heroes beyond belief. the police were there within minutes, which was incredible. they started to drag all of us off, and that is when you see the guy that had the knife with the suit, he is... he has found a knife that has been dislodged, it kind of went down the side of the pavement, he has picked it up and taken it away, because we wanted to make sure that that is all that he had. we wanted to make sure
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that we dislodged that so he couldn't harm anyone else. but as the police were dragging him off, he rolls onto his back, and that is when they scream, "bomb!" so that is when we noticed that he was wearing a bomb vest of some kind. he has got some sort of bomb device connected to him, and that is when everyone started to step back. and my long green coat, in all of the videos, i have just realised that is very obvious. we have all stepped back. he tried to get up. but the funny thing is, when we were kicking and holding him to the ground, the guy was constantly screaming, "get off me! get off me!", as if everyone wasjust going to let him go and do his thing. but we wanted to make sure that he was never going to do this again, he is never going to harm another single human being on this planet. the police put three rounds into his chest from his back and he still lying on the floor putting the coat over him to try and, i don't know, keep himself warm, knowing that he is to die. that was stevie hurst, a tour guide who happen to be on the scene. you have heard from a number of eyewitnesses this morning, as well as politicians, who has said how many people in that moment in time
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did that thing that mostly they tell us not to, to run towards danger. they usually tell us to run away from danger. some general election campaign events have been suspended, in response to the london bridge attack. the stabbings overshadowed the latest televised debate, which brought together senior figures from seven parties, who discussed issues, including brexit, the nhs and climate change. nick eardley reports. welcome to cardiff and the national assembly for wales... in a fractious political period, last night's debate began on a sombre note. once again, london and the country as a whole are having to come to terms with a horrific terror attack. two members of the public are now dead, as is the man who attacked them, others are injured, some seriously. politicians paying tribute to the london bridge first responders and discussing how to tackle the security threat. soon, though, things returned to other election issues. there were tense exchanges between labour and the conservatives on how they'd spend money if they win power, and questions
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raised about whether boris johnson could fulfil his promise to get brexit done if he wins power. the tories say yes but some say it's not true. michel barnier said it will take up to three years and that's before you add us trade talks or trade talks with any other organisations or countries that will put, potentially, our nhs on the table. we are in episode one of a ten season box set and if you don't like what you've seen up until now, you don't have to watch the rest. critics of the conservatives say a no—deal exit will be back on the table if they win because they said they won't extend the next part of talks on future trade beyond 2020, but their representative last night, rishi sunak, said a deal could be done. you said he couldn't get a brexit deal, it will be possible, but he did, he got a great new deal and got it in three months! plaid cymru, meanwhile, were less than impressed withjeremy corbyn's plan to stay neutral. no wonder people don't have faith in politicians when the leader of the labour party, the candidate to be prime minister,
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won't even tell us where he stands on this central question. while the greens were critical of a lib dem proposal to cancel brexit, even though the parties are working together in some seats. i do think that to go for a unilateral revocation is a slap in the face of 17.4 million people who voted to leave, so that's why i think it is important that people do have their say in a democratic process. they were tense exchanges over the nhs, too. the tories said claims it was for sale were a conspiracy theory. labour insisted they were genuine. and the snp's nicola sturgeon agreed. i'm going to be pretty blunt here, when boris johnson says that the nhs is not on the table in a future trade deal, i simply do not trust him and i do not believe him. nothing is for sale in the nhs. it provides incredible front—line care and great outcomes, so i would say to lucy, the nhs is not failing but what we do need to do, as well as investing more money, we have to manage it better,
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that's crucial, and we have to cut out the waste. no game changer but a reminder of the big election issues and the choice we all face when we go to the ballot box in a couple of weeks. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. the time is 9:16am. here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. yes, it is bitterly cold in a sheltered rural areas of scotland, but at least you have the sunshine. look at this beautiful weather watcher pictures sent in from the scottish borders. the winter woolley is an essential i would think. it is going to stay cold, largely dry and sunny. it looks like that settled weather will stay with us, not only today, but for the next few days. one exception to the rule, as you can clearly see, is across the south—west of cornwall, the eyes of silly, channel islands, light, patchy rain here, we have some
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freezing fog which were lift for most but temperatures are likely to struggle. a call today for all as you can see, temperatures between eight and 10 degrees. the exception is the far south—west. that means that that rain will ease away this evening but it is therefore a time and pushes its way into the near continent. the breeze will continue and that should prevent frost and fog forming across southern england overnight tonight, but further north under clear skies, lighter winds, temperatures will fall, again quite sharply. another cold start to sunday. temperatures down below freezing in rural areas. a hard frost first thing on sunday morning. it is the 1st of december, a sparkling winter is the expected from any. as the high pressure builds in from the north—west it will keep things dry, this weather front to the north enhancing the showers into the far north—west of scotland. but a relatively settled story, the frost will lift, the
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fault should be lighter and patchy with more of a breeze around tomorrow. the dry theme for many and the temperature is a little subdued, just down below where they should be for the time of year, but hopefully the sunshine will compensate, certainly the dry theme as well will do it. three and 8 degrees the high. high pressure is moving on from the west, how long will it last? most of the week in actual fact, it to dress down to the south and allows these weather fronts to push on by the end of the working week into the far north—west, but the winds will pick up, so generally speaking, for the bulk of the week it remains dry and settled, but relatively cold. something milderfrom friday onwards with the change of one direction. that could bring some light and patchy rain into the north—west. but i will take this week's weather, not bad for the beginning of december. thank you, louise. it is 9:18am. time for a look at the papers.
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forensic scientist angela gallop is here to tell us what's caught her eye. you are starting off with the story linked to hillsborough and we saw issues about that this week. what has caught your eye? yes, this terrible case, and the fact that all these years later the families are still suffering and perhaps there is something better that could be done about our legal system. clearly, the syste m about our legal system. clearly, the system has given rise to expectations. it doesn't seem to have delivered for them. this is a sort of clearly critical issue. they are criticising the cps were not properly prosecuting the case and not challenging the defendants and not challenging the defendants and not challenging the summing up of the judge. david not challenging the summing up of thejudge. david duckenfield, the former police chief was acquitted. that happened on thursday. yes, that is one thing and that is a
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resolution, but i think the families are left with the feeling that they have not had a justice, that is the issue. so there are lessons to be learned, as has been acknowledged. they must be learned and i do not think we have heard the end of this because of that. we did speak to a family member yesterday who was very distraught, understandably, about this. households are recycling less than they were five years ago. we ran a story this week, didn't we, about disposable plastic bags. apparently the bags for life, we are using more of them than ever. and if they contain more plastic. yes, this is about domestic recycling. this particular article is about that. it shows that in 2017 we were only recycling about 45.2% but in 2018, that had gone down to 44.7%. and that had gone down to 44.7%. and thatis that had gone down to 44.7%. and
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that is below the 2014 rate which was 44.9%. there is a government target apparently for 50% in 2020 and we will look to miss it. it is such a huge issue. you are a forensic scientist by trade, aren't you, does that mean that your home is absolutely... ? you, does that mean that your home is absolutely...? is it immaculate, because you know where everything is? do you recycle in that respect? i wish i could say that, but i can say that i am quite neurotic about it, trying to get the right bin for the right thing. i am quite neurotic but i do not always succeed.” the right thing. i am quite neurotic but i do not always succeed. i am trying to look at the reasons, angela, lie behind recycling, by the amount is less. you speak to people and some have said we do not get enough collections, we don't know what is and isn't recyclable. you are told that only certain plastics are told that only certain plastics are accepted. it seems very
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complicated. yes, and there is no national strategy for it. east yorkshire are doing very well on 65%. some places are doing really well. whereas there was one london borough quoted at only 17%. if we had a national strategy, best practice in one area could be transferred to other areas, that would probably be a good idea. you picked out a story about black friday. towards the beginning of this week there was a report, wasn't there, to be where the black friday gales that might not seem to be what they seem to be. this story are suggesting that people are purchasing things anyway. yes, they seem purchasing things anyway. yes, they seem to be carrying on. apparently it was up 9% on last year. so, an amazing increase. that doesn't seem to be... they don't seem to have been put off. have you got anything? idid, been put off. have you got anything? i did, actually. what was it? and are you sure it was a bargain? yes, i wanted a pair of them. it was a
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lamp, a lampshade. 20% off was what i got. so i am lamp, a lampshade. 20% off was what igot. solama lamp, a lampshade. 20% off was what i got. so i am a black friday shopper! well you unknowingly check later to see that they are not found cheaper? probably not because that would just depress me.” cheaper? probably not because that would just depress me. i like this headline, "crunch time for our orchards". it doesn't sound great but the story is interesting.” orchards". it doesn't sound great but the story is interesting. i live in yorkshire where we had a lot of orchards so i was very interested in this article. the french chef raymond blanc, he also lives there and he has had some interesting things about our orchards, including 90% in yorkshire have disappeared since 1950. 1950 was when i was born, so i am interested in that timescale that i relate to. what is it down to? cheaper imports from other countries i believe make it
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more cost—effective to bring them in. anyway, he has set up to a new orchards, one is specialising in english varieties, which is very nice, and the other things are the things that he had in his family orchard in france when he was going up, which can be interesting as well, although perhaps a little bit expensive if you have to go to his re sta u ra nt expensive if you have to go to his restaurant to eat them! but it is a step in the direction, the right direction. now computerisation to make sure you don't have paperwork, thatis make sure you don't have paperwork, that is deemed the way forward. but not necessarily when it comes to tax discs. yes, apparently losing a lot of money because people... it has all gone online in 2014 and people are not keeping their car tax up—to—date. are not keeping their car tax up-to-date. because you don't have to display it like you used to do. exactly. you get sent an mild. yes, but perhaps people are not
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responding to that. perhaps it gets lost. the fines are significant, it could be up to £1000. but it is not working, is it, for some reason or another? we have lost £280 million apparently since 2014. that is a lot of money. a huge amount, as one local council said, it would actually make a massive difference if you could put that money into potholes, something we are all suffering from on a daily basis, that would be massive. so it was an interesting set of facts. thank you very much, angela. saturday kitchen takes over from ten o'clock. matt tebbutt is at the helm this morning. good morning. looking at this story about raymond blanc planting to match orchards. do you have green fingers, does that appeal to you? it does. i do not have much time however. i do not have any land to do that on. i would really like
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an orchard. i try to buy a piece of land recently but this could get quite political, iwas land recently but this could get quite political, i was trying to buy it from the church, we will not go down that direction! one of our chefs today... all day, you used to work for raymond blanc. yes, he is a great man, i worked with him in my first restaurant. were you involved in that garden? we would pick the vegetables for ourselves and they thought i was respect for fruit and vegetables at a young age. thought i was respect for fruit and vegetables at a young agem thought i was respect for fruit and vegetables at a young age. it is a great thing for chefs to do, isn't it? we are doing this out of order. you have your own farm as well, don't you? yes, my pig farm, growing the veg, my own restaurant. i might get into it, we do not have many gardens in liverpool. let's get back on track. sophie is our special guest. welcome. we will talk about your new book, your children's book injusta your new book, your children's book injust a bit. do you have green fingers? i pretend that i do. but
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not really. not part of your gale? —— part of your deal? not really. not part of your gale? -- part of your deal? well perhaps when i was younger. we will see. we will talk about your lovely children's book later. will talk about your lovely child ren's book later. what will talk about your lovely children's book later. what is your idea of food heaven? fish, fennel, chicory. bullet points! as that is how we're going to work today? food hell? il. that is my total food hell. and brie, ithink that hell? il. that is my total food hell. and brie, i think that is an overrated, grim cheese. imagine that combination! so olly, what do you have? we will be cooking a delicate pumpkin soup. a delicious winter
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dish with lots of flavour and colour. and vegetarian. and it is on at your restaurant at the moment? it is, absolutely. your first time on the show, ellis. don't be nervous, lad. what have you got for us? the most beautiful lobster, i've got some port. lovely lobster sauce with pork, apple lots of love. helen, nice to have you back, what have you got? lots of wine. there are so much out there with christmas coming up, lots of deals to pick from. we have some really good bargains. you sort of hesitated when you mention christmas coming up. i did! december begins tomorrow, it is a advent calendar day! we have a great tribute to gary rhodes. you are in charge of what
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our guests eat at the end of the day. get in touch and we will see you at 10am. thank you very much, matt. stay with us, the headlines coming up shortly. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. the man who carried out a terror attack on london bridge yesterday was a convicted terrorist. two people, a man and a woman,
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were stabbed to death. the attacker, named as 28—year—old usman khan, was shot dead by an armed officer. he had beenjailed in 2012 for a plot to bomb the london stock exchange and set up a terrorist training camp, but he was freed on licence a year ago. we've been speaking to people about this throughout the programme this morning. earlier, london mayor sadiq khan said there'll be an increased police presence on the streets this weekend. over the course of this weekend and the next few days, there will be in london more police officers from the met police service, from the city of london, from british transport police. many will be armed, some will be unarmed and uniformed, and plainclothes police officers as well, they are there to keep us safe and reassure us, not because there is an additional heightened threat. do you want to take this opportunity to talk about how you feel the emergency reserves has responded and the very brave civilians who helped
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bring down the attacker?” the very brave civilians who helped bring down the attacker? i spent yesterday afternoon with the police discussing things in new scotland yard, and of course we saw the horrific actions of this man, the worst of humanity. but i am in or of the bravery, the courageous nurse, of ordinary londoners and others —— in awe. the viewers would have seen some of the bravery on the bridge, but also bravery and side fishmonger is full. they ignored all the advice which is to run away from danger —— fishmongers' hall. the advice is to let the professionals deal with the bad guy. you saw people running towards danger, we do not have the benefit of hindsight. they saw a man with a big knife and another knife and they saw a man with a belt around him which for all intents and purposes could have been an
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explosive belt, suicide vest. they ran explosive belt, suicide vest. they ra n towards explosive belt, suicide vest. they ran towards him to stop him hurting other people. i am so proud and we should all be really proud of these people. literally, within minutes, and armed response team arrived and again they had no idea, naga, whether the man had a bomb he could detonate whether the man had a bomb he could d eto nate by whether the man had a bomb he could detonate by pressing a button. they had no idea how many people were involved. they run towards him and make sure they made us safe by taking him out. it is important we recognise we prepare, we plan, we practice for these things, but the public don't, and we saw the best of humanity. and we should just pause sometimes and reflect on that and give those londoners a pat on the back and i am sure over the course of the next few weeks and months, they will be duly recognised for their bravery and i as the mayor want to say thank you to them. sadiq khan talking to us
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earlier on the programme. the security minister, brandon lewis, told us what reassurance he could give the public. after an incident like this, once the police have the facts, the information they need, there is not just the criminal case to look at but also the lessons learnt and i think it is quite understandable people will want to question, as the prime minister recognised in his statement quite rightly last night, are we having tough enough sentences for people who commit the most violent offences in our country? we need to have the right hon tough long sentences and that our agencies and the police have all the powers they need to do theirjob properly —— the right tough and long sentences. of course it is a sensitive time to talk about it, but it is inescapable, people will be thinking, this man was on licence, the more severe end of what a judge at the time passing sentence, they
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said, this was a serious long—term venture in terrorism that could also result in atrocities in the uk. his offences were at the more severe end offences were at the more severe end of terrorism —related charges and yet he was free. people will be thinking today, how many more people may be out who have similar instincts and possibly related incidents? i am instincts and possibly related incidents? iam not instincts and possibly related incidents? i am not talking about specifics, people will be really concerned, this has happened, notwithstanding your caution around talking about it specifically, he was found guilty and was freed, what reassurance do you have there are not others like him? i absolutely understand, a very fair question. but the reality is, viewers will understand there is an awful lot of information the police have to go through, investigation to do. it is inappropriate for me to comment on the specifics. let me ask you... i don't want to interrupt you because we are not in that kind of
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interview, but if i mayjust say... it is important to say, as the police have said, they are not at this moment looking for any other suspects. they are confident about the suspect they have named and they are not looking for any further suspects. in terms of people's ability to be secure in the knowledge that, actually, all of us, quite rightly, should be going about our lives today as we would on any other day. let's speak to steve hartshorn, the police federation firearms lead, who joins us from the scene. thank you for talking is, former firearms officer with the met police. you will have some insight into what these officers were facing at this time. good morning. before we go, can i pass at this time. good morning. before we go, can i pass on at this time. good morning. before we go, can i pass on my sincere sympathies to everyone involved on the half of the police federation of england and wales? absolutely. thank you. can you give us insight into what officers would have faced and
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what officers would have faced and what procedures they would have undertaken and what procedures would have kicked in? they would have responded to 999 call via the radio set in the vehicles. they would attend the location with as much information as they are given and it is probably only as much as someone armed with a knife making threats, possibly attacking people. they will deploy from the vehicle and do a rapid scene assessment to find out what they are dealing with. they will act accordingly using training which is very intensive. as we have all seen on social media, they have taken action to neutralise the threat and resolve the situation to its ultimate conclusion. you said you have seen on social media some eyewitness footage, what would a firearms officer be thinking about in terms of decision—making when confronted with a man who has obviously attacked members of the public and wearing what could have
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been a suicide vest, a bomb? good question. initially they would be thinking about the threat posed to not only themselves but the public and also the type of weaponry the suspect may have. they want to do a dynamic risk assessment and combine with the training sessions they have, they make a decision as to what type of force to use. i believe yesterday they were confronted by what they thought was a person with an explosive device which varies the risk assessment greatly and they have to take perhaps more decisive action because of the proximity of members of the public and indeed themselves. they were very brave yesterday, ran forward, themselves. they were very brave yesterday, ranforward, members themselves. they were very brave yesterday, ran forward, members of the public and police alike. it makes it a very impact of situation and the decision to pull the trigger is never taken and the decision to pull the trigger is never ta ken lightly. and the decision to pull the trigger is never taken lightly. the response time has been very swift. can you give me an idea of how many firearms officers would be in the area, the ability of them to be able to get to the scene quickly? it all depends on
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the scene quickly? it all depends on the time of day and where offices are posted to. peak times i believe the current number in the city of london on the met police area is about 30 armed response vehicles, quite considerable number. what happens next in terms of reviewing, procedures undertaken, decisions made, what is the next in the procedural chain? once the officers have been involved in the shooting, they return to a post—incident procedure location, they will be provided with legal support, welfare support, by the federation and force and they will begin to make evidential statements which will be submitted ultimately for the inquest and for the independent investigation now taking place. what help is given to police officers who have been involved in this kind of incident? i'm thinking about emotional, mentalsupport, incident? i'm thinking about emotional, mental support, help incident? i'm thinking about emotional, mentalsupport, help from the force. that situation has
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improved drastically over the years. given a lot of mental health support if they need it. access to counsellors and coaches. we will put them on the welfare support programme provided by the national federation. if they are a member of the police firearms association, they will have access to a wide range of support via colleagues nationally who understand what officers go through. they get peer support as well as own internal occupational health within the police service. thank you for talking to us, talking to us from the police federation firearms unit. the sport now. a bit of changing room chitchat. with a rather important england manager. gareth southgate and dan roan. a little bit ofan insight southgate and dan roan. a little bit of an insight ahead of the draw for euro 2020 taking place later this afternoon. fascinating chapter here from the manager who seems very positive. —— fascinating chapter.
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first, cricket. let's get the latest from hamilton where england's cricketers are facing a real battle if they're to win the second and final test and level the series. they've lost two early first innings wickets in reply to new zealand's 375 all—out. england finished the day on 39—2, so they trail by 336. the day started well enough with england's bowlers on top. tom latham made a century yesterday but he added just four to his overnight score before he was bowled by stuart broad. new zealand recovered well, though. daryl mitchell made 73 and bj watling — who you'll remember frustrated england with a double century in the first test — also scored a half century to put the hosts in control on day two. later today, england and wales will find out who they'll face at next year's euros. scotland, northern ireland and the republic will be watching the draw keenly too, as they can still qualify through the play—offs. for england, though, they go into the finals as joint favourites.
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and our sports editor, dan roan, has been speaking to manager gareth southgate to get his thoughts ahead of today's draw. final preparations in bucharest where those competing in european football's flagship tournament next summer are about to learn their fate. after an impressive qualifying campaign, england are among the favourites for euro 2020. here at their training base, the manager told me the perception of the team has now shifted. the draw is always a decisive moment for everybody and knowing when the dates are, what the route looks like, i think the country, it feels as if they have been more engaged with the team over the last two years and that's one of the biggest highlights for me. never more so than at the last euros when an abject england were humiliated by minnows iceland. but two years later, southgate's young side surpassed all expectations, reaching the world cup semifinals in russia. the growing sense that his team are now genuine contenders. i think we have gained some respect and i think people would view us as a threat,
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which certainly wasn't the case ahead of russia. we also know that we have got to improve. euro 2020 kicks off in rome, but the tournament will be spread across the continent, with 12 host cities. wembley will stage both semifinals and the final itself. if england get that far, they will have played five of seven matches at home, raising hopes of a first major trophy since 1966. saw this with the rugby team and the cricket boys, whenever you see the national team in any sport doing well, people get behind it and sport is about taking people from the day—to—day into dreams, into hopes, into aspirations and pride. and that's what we are here to provide. next summer will evoke memories of the last time england enjoyed such home advantage. euro ‘96, when the hosts shone. southgate's semifinal penalty miss was the sad end to an unforgettable campaign. the tournament next summer is not about me and redemption.
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the team is about the players and the team is about our fans and it is more important that we make them proud. and as i said before russia, to do that, we've got to win matches as well. wales have also qualified. having reached the last four of the last euros in france, they will go into the drawer full of confidence. they will have a belief. they have had an experience of getting to a semifinal. they will enjoy it, no doubt about that. and when the draw is made, people will not want wales because they have match winners. northern ireland, scotland and the republic of ireland are also in the draw, but they still have to go through the play—offs to secure their place in european football's showpiece event. dan roan, bbc news. so, that draw takes place in bucharest at 5pm this evening and you can watch it live on bbc two. and of course on the bbc sport website.
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18 months ago, three—time olympic gold medalist pete reed had just announced his retirement from the sport and returned to a job with the royal navy. but in september, pete suffered a one in a million spinal stroke which left him paralysed from the chest down. his friend, rower and broadcaster, sir matthew pinsent, went to visit him in hospital for his first interview. hello, matt. hi, nice to see you. long time. you right? i'm good. so show me around, where have we got to go? so we're at the duke of cornwall spinal treatment centre in salisbury. hi, sophie, you all right? been in here for nearly three weeks now and as the new boy coming in, you have to introduce yourself, normally as, hi, i'm pete reed, i'm a t6c, or whatever your condition is, and they'll tell you as well. here we go. so i walked into hospital in uniform. i had weak legs and a strange gait, but then on the third day in hospital, i had a big stroke
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in the same area and that's scary, that's really scary. so i had such big pain to the point where i felt nauseous. i went back into bed and the pain was extraordinary, like nothing i've felt, across my chest and across my back. by this point, jeannie, my partner, was with me, and it was scary cos i was lying down and i could feel the life drain out of my legs. jeannie was holding my feet because i asked her to as i was wiggling my feet up and down and then slowly they came to a stop and within about 45 minutes the pain had gone and i couldn't move my legs. the first thing i did was try to sit up and i couldn't so i grabbed the sides of the bed to pull myself up and i fell forwards like a rag doll and then fell backwards because i've got no core strength and that was the first time that... that's really scary. and your athlete mentality, does that help at that point? there's nothing more beneficial to me now than my athlete mindset, nothing. my mindset is, although it's scary, you have to stretch yourself, you have to get up. for me, i have to have a shave,
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have to clean my teeth, and the big goal is, how quickly can i get back to that big scary world out there, that's more scary now i'm in a chair but it shouldn't be? you mentioned jeannie. it must be so difficult for you together. i think it's hardest for her, she's stuck by me, she's incredible and i think everybody in this situation needs someone just like her, so i'm very lucky, but she's handling it brilliantly and we're a great team. in this situation, i don't know what your gold medal is and maybe you don't and maybe it's an unfair question. rather than a 20km row on the machine and weights and a rowing session every day, it's get up, morning routine and while it's not as physical as before, it's still as demanding and still tiny little baby steps. i'm up for that challenge and if the aim is walking again, rather than a gold medal, the target is even bigger than before, for me.
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and the motivation is even bigger than before for me. and i didn't ever think i would be able to say that again after london 2012. who thought that i would have a bigger challenge and more motivation to achieve it? remarkable. only happened three months ago and so positive and at that, such an inspiration to hear him speak like that. sport does sometimes throw up the great stories. that is what sport is all about sometimes. when he was first diagnosed in september, thinking at the time, to be told you are going to be paralysed from the waist down, how do you cope mentally? from that point, so positive even then, amazing to hear him speak. they have the strength from competing, it naturally comes through. thank you. let us find out how the weather is for the weekend. louise is a there for the weekend. louise is a there
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for us. it is very quiet this weekend but at this time of year quiet weather brings problems with frost and fog. dense fog in places and quitea frost and fog. dense fog in places and quite a hard frost on the ground. weather warnings for the fog which is freezing, dense, visibility less tha n which is freezing, dense, visibility less than 100 metres in parts of east wales, the midlands, down to the north of london, east anglia and lincolnshire. some areas might see the fog really slow to left and that will have an impact on the temperatures. foremost, the story is dry, settled and cold, but sunshine as well. the only exception is in the far south—west where we have outbreaks of rain from an area of low pressure drifting into france, not quite as cold here. elsewhere, temperatures are really struggling. the rain still lingering in the early evening. gradually pushing south and clearing all bar the channel islands in the early hours.
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a bit ofa channel islands in the early hours. a bit of a breeze preventing frost and fog in southern england. elsewhere, temperatures expected to fill below freezing with clear skies and sheltered rural areas. perhaps allowing more fog to form. certainly allowing more fog to form. certainly a frost butjust a little patchy fog. high pressure building from the north—west. keeping things very quiet indeed for the start of december. looking likely sunday will be sparkling, lots of sunshine. a few scattered showers with a breeze in the far north—west of scotland, temperatures really struggling and at the very best highs of 3—8d. that is just at the very best highs of 3—8d. that isjust a at the very best highs of 3—8d. that is just a little bit below where they should be for the time of year. the bulk of next week, first week of december, high pressure staying with us, drifting off into europe and that will allow weather fronts to
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push into the north—west but they will be weak, only affecting the extreme north—west. for the bulk of the country throughout the week, dry and settled and on the chilly side but certainly in comparison to the weather in november, pleased to say no significant heavy persistent rain. back to you. have a lovely weekend. thank you. when eric tucker, a builderfrom warrington, passed away last year, his family discovered more than 400 paintings and sketches he'd done in his spare time. they put them on display in his home and thousands of people queued to see them. drawing comparisons with ls lowry, his work has been hailed as an important discovery in british art. you can see some on the sofa with us this morning. now, his loved ones have fulfilled one of eric's final wishes — to have an exhibition in a gallery in his home town. we arejoined by an art
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we are joined by an art critic and his nephew. he had a stash, the family knew he was painting, but hadn't seen much of it? how had he kept it so secret? it wasn't quite he kept it secret but he didn't shout about it. we knew he painted, you would see he used his front room as the studio so we would always see there was something on the easel. if you asked him, he would bring you in and say, sure, have a look. but he didn't get their work at and say, look at what i have done. it wasn't until after he died towards the end of his life and after he died that my dad went around the house and discovered every room was full, stacked full of paintings. hundreds of them. are they good, ruth? they looked great. i was asked a year ago to have a look at some of the images
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andi to have a look at some of the images and i had no idea what to expect.” was blown away by them because there are clear comparisons to lowry here, street corners and people meeting, in front of the urban industrial landscape, but also surrealism influences and he has developed his own brand— new influences and he has developed his own brand—new distinctive style, such a unique vision. the image you are talking about a moment ago, can we get a shot on the one between us here. with your art critic mind, talk us through the picture and why it has special value. eric met lowry ina it has special value. eric met lowry in a gallery in manchester and he admired his work and you can see the influence in pictures like this. take us through it. you have the figures meeting, the tableau of characters in front of the very traditional terraced red brick houses, smoking chimneys in the background. black cat up here. moody
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sky, very atmospheric. now, his parlour, his studio is going to be recreated. yes, it has been in warrington museum. that was the room were. . . warrington museum. that was the room were... he lived in council house in warrington and his front was where he painted every single painting. does it feel surreal? it is weird, strange. it is nice to kind of go into the museum and see all of his stuff, as it was, as i remember it. what did your dad think? it seems bizarre a talented artist, the house was full of them, no one thought they were any good, is that what the family thought? no, my dad more than anyone always encouraged him, you have got to try to get your work seen, get it exhibited, but he was
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very resistant. he would not do it. they had a few goes, but he just... we don't know exactly why, but he was always very resistant to having his work shown until the very end of his work shown until the very end of his life when he said, i would like these paintings to be seen. as i understand it, there has been public demand, plenty of people queueing up to see the pictures. yes, the first thing we did was we did an exhibition at his house, last year, because we were kind of like, how do we get his pictures scene? it seemed like, this is where he painted them. you were lining the walls? did you see them? i didn't make it up there. a p pa re ntly see them? i didn't make it up there. apparently were —— there were people lining up around the block. we open for two days and it was a cold day in october, i had done a facebook event, but we didn't know how many
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people would come. the queues started forming at 9am and it didn't go down. as an art critic, ruth, these are labours of love, but value? so hard to put a value on them at the moment. what i would say is they are part of modern british art history and they need to be rewritten into the narrative. there are clear comparisons with british surrealists, people like emily bridgewater, the value is going to be so great. someone turned up at the house with £800 asking to buy one of the pictures and it would be considerably more than that. there is providence, a story attached to it, part of the joy. is providence, a story attached to it, part of thejoy. hidden is providence, a story attached to it, part of the joy. hidden stash, now made public. people love that. yeah, ithink now made public. people love that. yeah, i think so. that is it. he is an interesting character. there are not many artists i suppose who are xbox and sand building site labourer
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is -- xbox and sand building site labourer is —— ex—boxers and building site labourer is. who has he left the paintings too? my dad and his sister, i think. lovely paintings too? my dad and his sister, ithink. lovely to paintings too? my dad and his sister, i think. lovely to see them. thank you for bringing them in. the exhibition, eric tucker — the unseen artist, is on at the warrington museum and art gallery until the 23rd of february. this morning we have been hearing many voices from yesterday possible attack on london bridge. they have been praising the emergency services and also ordinary people caught up in the drama. the may said he was proud so many people had run towards danger. i was on the east side of london bridge and i ended up being directly parallel to what happened.
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a man, basically, kind of came screaming out of nowhere saying someone had a knife. i saw it unfolding. over the other side of the bridge. take us through the sequence of events. we are seeing some images of people running away. take us through what happened as it unfolded. after the man came running towards me shouting someone had a knife, i could see there was a massive bundle of people on the other side of the bridge and, by that point, lots of people were screaming, it felt like hundreds on the bridge, people getting out of cars. quite early on, i remember looking at a man and i haven't said this to anyone yet and thinking, he looks terrible.
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i've since realised that was the man holding the knife from the attacker. i dialled 999, ifelt like no one else was doing it, people were running around screaming, i don't know where that came from, ijust did it. a police car appeared on the bridge ten seconds after i did that almost and officers started to intervene. felt like an extremely long period of time, shouting at the attacker, and then took over and obviously ended up firing their guns. he went on to say how he was amazed at the people that chose to get directly involved. of course throughout the morning there will be much more coverage on bbc news, the
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news channel and we will be following up on this on the programme tomorrow morning from 6am. goodbye.
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this is bbc news. passers—by are hailed for their bravery on london bridge yesterday as it's revealed the attacker they restrained before this is bbc news. the headlines at ten o'clock... passers—by are hailed for their bravery on london bridge yesterday as it's revealed the attacker they restrained before he was shot dead by police was a convicted terrorist. when we were all kicking him and holding him to the ground, the guy was just constantly screaming, "get off me! get off me!", as if everyone wasjust going to let him go and do his thing. but we wanted to make sure that he's never going to do this again, that he's not going to harm another single human being. the attacker has been named as usman khan. he killed two people and injured three more. they are now recovering in hospital. the attacker has been named as usman khan. he killed two people and injured three more.

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