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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 30, 2019 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at six: cambridge graduate jack merritt has been named as one of the victims killed in yesterday's attack on london bridge. the 25—year—old was working for one of the university's this is bbc news. education initiatives. i'm shaun ley. this is bbc news. the headlines at five: i'm shaun ley. the headlines at six: cambridge graduate jack merritt has been named as one cambridge graduate jack merritt has of the victims killed in yesterday's been named as one of the victims killed in yesterday's attack on london bridge. attack on london bridge. the 25—year—old was working for one of the university's the 25—year—old was working education initiatives. the attacker‘s been named for one of the university's as usman khan, released education initiatives. from prison on licence, despite a terrorism conviction. police say there's no evidence of a wider plot. 0ur investigative priority at this neil basu, from the met police, time is to ensure that there is no said he did not believe the attacker acted alongside anyone else — but investigative teams are working to rule out a wider plot. our investigative priority at this time is to ensure that there is no one related as an outstanding threat to the public. to this end, we carried out two searches at addresses both in staffordshire and in the stoke—on—trent area. the prime minister visited the scene earlier,
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where he said people convicted of terrorism offences shouldn't be released from prison early. the practice of automatic early release, where you cut a sentence half and let really serious violent offenders early, simply isn't working, and i think you've had some very good evidence of how that isn't working, i'm afraid, with this case. in other news, millions of commuters will have to pay an average of 2.7 percent more for rail tickets in the new year. one of the two people killed in the london bridge attack has been named as cambridge university graduate jack merritt. the 25—year—old is believed to have been a course co—ordinator
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for learning together, an organisation specialising in prison—based education. it held the rehabilitation conference at fishmongers hall in london, yesterday, attended by the attacker usman khan. jack merritt‘s father described his son as a ‘beautiful spirit who always took the side of the underdog.‘ in the last half an hour, assistant commissioner neil basu of the metropolitan police said detectives had found no evidence that anyone else was involved in the attack. good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. i'd like to update you on our continuing investigation into the terrible attack of yesterday near london bridge. officers from london's counterterrorism command have been working flat out with security services over night, as you would expect, to continue to try and establish the full circumstances of what's happened. at this time, we've found no evidence, no evidence, to
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suggest anybody else was involved in this attack. however, we are still making extensive enquiries to make sure that no one else was involved. our investigative priority at this time is to ensure that there is no one related as an outstanding threat to the public. to this end, we've carried out two searches that addresses both in staffordshire and in the stoke—on—trent area. our officers have therefore been supported by officers from staffordshire and the west midlands counterterrorism police. i would like to thank them as well as the local community in those areas for the support they've shown as we carry out those crucial enquiries. the investigation team is also speaking to many of those who were present at fishmongers‘ hall, but i would appeal to anyone who was there on friday, anyone who hasn't been spoken to, to contact police on 0800 789 321 immediately. we now know this attack began inside fishmongers‘ halljust before 2pm yesterday. the attacker, whose identity
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we confirmed last night, stabbed a number of people inside the building, and as a result, five people have suffered injuries. three people, a man and two women, were injured and remain in hospital. theirfamilies have been contacted, and specialist officers are supporting them. tragically, two people, a man and a woman, were killed during the attack. and of course, i'm fully aware that the media and social media have named one of those victims. you must understand that i have to wait for formal identification from the coroner. but i will provide you an update as soon as i can. on behalf of the entire policing family, can i offer my heartfelt thoughts and condolences to those families of the victims, both the deceased and those still in hospital, and everyone who has been affected by this incident. we are still piecing together the exact details of what happened.
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it's already clear that this cowardly act was immediately countered by some incredible acts of bravery, both by members of the public and from police officers. we know this attacker was attending an event called learning together, and some of those present at that event were people who confronted this attacker to try and stop him. the attacker then left the building and ended up on london bridge. he was pursued and detained by members of the public, as well as a british transport police officer who was in plain clothes, before armed officers from both the city and metropolitan police arrived, confronted the attacker and shot him. let's cross to london bridge now where we can speak to our correspondent katharine da costa. first off, a bit more about the condition of victims of yesterday's attack.
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yes, we know there were three victims, a man and two women. yesterday, we were told one of them was ina yesterday, we were told one of them was in a critical condition. we now know that two are in critical condition and a third suffered less serious injuries. the woman who lost her life is yet to be named, but police have contacted their families and they are being supported by specially trained officers. what activity has there been at the scene during the course of today? you can probably see behind me that a large chord and remains in place while forensics carry on their work. there is also a number of police patrols. they have been stepped up across london. earlier, the prime minister was joined across london. earlier, the prime minister wasjoined by the home secretary as well as the heads of the metropolitan police and the city of london police. they visited the crime scene on london bridge. they spoke to officers who had been on
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duty yesterday. they then visited borough market, just round the corner from borough market, just round the cornerfrom here. borough market, just round the corner from here. they borough market, just round the cornerfrom here. they spoke borough market, just round the corner from here. they spoke to traders and members of the public to reassure them that london is safe. cressida dick said london is resilient. she said it is business as usual. people are being told to remain vigilant but to carry on as normal. we also know in that update from the assistant commissioner earlier that a british transport police officer in plain clothes was one of those who intervened to confront the attacker, and their bravery and courage has been recognised. running towards danger, putting their lives at risk to save others, particularly as at the time they thought he was wearing an explosive device. we now know that that device was fake. moments later, armed police arrived on the scene and shot the suspect dead. dr anthony richards is a senior lecturer in the department of law
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and criminology at royal holloway, and is the lead author on a book about the threat from jihadist terrorism. doctor richard, thanks for being with us on bbc news. i wonder what strikes you most about yesterday's incident, and what we know about the man involved ? incident, and what we know about the man involved? one of the striking things is that this is an individual who was within the radar of the security agencies and intelligence agencies, so that, i think, security agencies and intelligence agencies, so that, ithink, was particularly striking. i gather this individual had permission to attend this conference and he was out on licence, so i think it really does raise some serious questions, and i think one of the questions is, how is it that somebody who has such a serious track record in terms of terrorism and the persistent intent to carry out acts of terrorism, seemingly, can suddenly be out on the loose on london bridge armed
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with knives? the question is added to in terms of the potential significance of this case, because asa significance of this case, because as a result of the efforts to contain the group that calls itself islamic state in iraq and syria, some foreign fighters have come back, so there may be people with real experience of violence who have come back to this country and are not in the prison system. in terms of those who are, what is the track record on de—radicalisation programmes? there have been suggestions from this man's solicitor that he had either not been subject to that or had attempted to access them and they had not been available to him. we have only have the picture from one side, but i think people assume that if you go into the prison system, there is an organised programme to try and at least address some of the things that may have led you to become a terrorist. absolutely, and i understand there are resource issues around attempting to
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de—radicalise prisoners that have been motivated to carry out acts of violence on behalf of islam, i don't know the full details here, but it is quite possible that whilst individuals may have claimed to want to access de—radicalisation programmes, it may be the case that they are making an —— making an attempt to continue to carry out a cts attempt to continue to carry out acts of violence. your right to underline the point that there is a lot we don't yet know, and we are not even sure if those parts of the investigations have been carried out yet. they are ongoing and they are trying to deal with the immediate impact of yesterday's attack looking ahead at the efforts being made to deal with the potential threat of jihadists and those who believe you
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can use violence in this way for a politicised version, as they see of it, of islam, what is most useful that we are doing at the moment? what works? in the volume we have just produced, the book we have written, one thing that crops up time and again is community engagement, the value of community engagement, the value of community engagement and the value of trust between local communities and the authorities. i think that is something that is of value across the board, across many experts in this field. certainly intelligence, of course. let's not forget, it is a tragic situation, a tragic event yesterday, but actually, something like 22 plots have been foiled by
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the intelligence agency since march 2017, if we remember the khalid massoud attack on westminster bridge at that time. the intelligence has managed to prevent a lot of serious terrorist attacks through organisations like the joint terrorism centre which is designed to collect appreciation of different pieces of a ten —— intelligence across the system. intelligence and generally strong, and i think community engagement is also very important in counterterrorism. potentially, there could be an issue about the management and handling of people who are convicted of one offence to prevent them convicting future offences, and a lot of that is presumably about the mechanics of prison, probation and sentencing. absolutely. in this case, we have seen absolutely. in this case, we have seen that the original sentence was
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indeterminate. i understand that in 2013 that was changed to a six—year sentence, and then automatically after half of that the prisoner was released, so after eight years. i know the prime minister has paid particular attention to this issue. that's what we need to look at. perhaps we need to reconsider how we ensure public protection when it comes to dangerous offenders. thank you very much forjoining us on bbc news. on a tour of the scene of the attack, the prime minister said he wanted longer sentences for violent criminals and an end to early release. i've just been down again to talk to the emergency services to thank the police for what they are doing, and i pay police for what they are doing, and i pay tribute to their incredible
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response. they were on the scene in four minutes. the assailant was tackled within five minutes — quite incredible response by the police. i also want to pay tribute again, as i think the whole country does, to the sheer bravery of those members of the public who went to deal with him spontaneously, putting their own lives at risk. so, i've been talking a bit about the scene, what happened, trying to understand exactly how this man came to be in fishmongers' hall, and you know, it is early days and there is a lot, and investigation, that needs to be done. it is clear to me that this quy done. it is clear to me that this guy was out. he had served half of his sentence. he was out on automatic early release, and i have long said that this system simply isn't working. it does not make sense for us as a society to be
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putting terrorists, people convicted of serious, violent, terrorist offences out on early release. we argue that people should serve the tariff, serve the term for which they are sentenced. that is my immediate takeaway, and it is why we are committed to increasing the sentences for serious and violent offenders, and why i have argued that when people are sentenced to a certain number of years in prison, they should serve every year of that sentence. this evening, the london mayor, sadiq khan, condemned the government for its handling of offenders. this government was wrong to get rid of the power to give an indeterminate sentence to protect the public. that sentence was removed by the government. i am concerned, and i have said it publicly before, that i think the cuts that have been made to the ministry ofjustice, the changes
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made to privations and prisons means their ability to rehabilitate and supervise is compromised. it is important that the government reverses those cuts and changes. it isa reverses those cuts and changes. it is a fact of life that the more successful we a re is a fact of life that the more successful we are in catching, arresting, prosecuting and convicting people of serious offences, we have got to think about what happens when they are in prison, and also whether they should be released and how they are supervised.
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tributes to one of the victims of the london bridge terror attack. jack merritt‘s father says he was a "beautiful" spirit — who always took the side of the underdog. the 25 year old cambridge graduate was attacked while running a prisoner rehabilitation conference — to which his assailant had been invited. the 25 year old cambridge graduate was attacked while running a prisoner rehabilitation conference — to which his assailant had been invited. it's emerged that usman khan had been released from prison last year on licence — after serving eight years for islamist terrorism. and the other main stories on the programme... rail passengers face another rise in fares, as parts of the network prepare for weeks of strike action. jonjo shelvey! 0h jonjo shelvey! oh yes! and more disappointment for manchester city — as newcastle take on the champions.
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good afternoon. one of the victims of yesterday's terror attack has been named as jack merritt, a cambridge graduate who was helping coordinate a conference on prisoner rehabilitation near london bridge. he was one of two people killed by 28 year old usman khan, a former prisoner who'd been convicted of terrorism offences, and released from prison on licence last year. khan, who'd been invited to the conference, was shot dead by police after members of the public tackled him. here's our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford. 25 years old and a keen traveller, jack merritt had a masters from cambridge university. he was described by his father today is a beautiful spirit who always took the
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side of the underdog. yesterday, he was stabbed to death in a frenzied attack by a former prisoner at a conference that he had helped organise. in the aftermath, his killer was wrestled to the ground by otherformer killer was wrestled to the ground by other former prisoners who had been attending the conference and then shot dead by police. the man who stabbed him, usman khan, was released from prison last year halfway through a sentence for plotting to bomb the london stock exchange. 11 years ago he told the bbc he was no terrorist. exchange. 11 years ago he told the bbc he was no terroristlj exchange. 11 years ago he told the bbc he was no terrorist. i have been born and bred in england, in stoke—on—trent and all the community knows me and if you ask them, they will know, these labels they are putting on like terrors, they will know, i am putting on like terrors, they will know, iam no putting on like terrors, they will know, i am no terrorist. today, his lawyer said his client had wanted help with de—radicalisation but had not got the right assistance. he requested assistance with addressing some of his thinking. he recognised
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that. his extreme violent ideology was wrong and he wanted to correct himself and move on. a police forensic tent marks the place where usman khan was shot dead by police. but the building where he carried out his attack is just on the side of the bridge. that was where he was attending a conference on prisoner rehabilitation. a conference at which he turned on some of those who had invited him and killed him. this picture was taken just before the attack at the conference in fishmonger tall where usman khan also stabbed a woman to death. the attacker then left the building and ended up on london bridge. he was pursued and detained by members of the public, as well as a british transport police officer who was in plain clothes, before armed officers from both the city and metropolitan police arrived, confronted the attacker and shot him. the actions of the police and the public are all the more remarkable as we now know the more remarkable as we now know the attacker was wearing what looked
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like a very convincing explosive device. thankfully, we now know that was a hoax device. today, this address where usman khan had recently been living was being intensely searched. but police say at this stage there is no evidence to suggest anybody else was involved in the attack. this way, please. which leaves the burning question, how was a convicted terrorist released from jail while still dangerous? and how did he, still wearing a tag, killed two people at a meeting focused on the rehabilitation of prisoners? daniel sa nford, rehabilitation of prisoners? daniel sanford, bbc news, london bridge. boris johnson visited the scene of the attack this morning, and pledged to toughen up sentences. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn called for a full investigation into khan's early release from prison. 0ur political correspondent jessica parker reports. hello, how are you doing? visiting the scene at london bridge,
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the prime minister, alongside the met police chief, cressida dick, as people try to take in what has happened and understand what lessons can be learned. boris johnson today said that the case of usman khan raised the issue of sentencing. i have said for a long time now that i think that the practice of automatic early release, where you cut a sentence in half and let really serious violent offenders out early simply isn't working and i think you have had some very good evidence of how that isn't working, i am afraid, with this case. general election campaigning has overall been more muted today, but the labour leader said there needs to be a full investigation into what has happened. clearly, there has been a complete disaster and lives have been lost because of his behaviour and i think there is also question about what the probation service were doing. were they involved at all and whether the parole board should have been involved in deciding whether or not he should have been allowed to be released from prison in the first place. the details of this case will inevitably come under great scrutiny, but today politicians
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across the board have been offering their sympathies to the affected families and paying tribute to those who rushed to the same. 0ur emergency services as always rise to the challenge, so, you know, we need to make sure there is a robust response to incidents like this. any lessons that need to be learned are learned but at the moment i think everybody 's thoughts are with everybody who has been affected. there are clearly questions that need to be answered and answers found to how this happened and the process for that is very important, i think today that the focus is on those who are mourning. during the 2017 general election there were two terrorist attacks, at manchester arena and another at london bridge. it can lead to greater political focus on security issues. parties records and their future plans for keeping people safe. but for some those conversations
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may be for another day. jessica parker, bbc news. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford is here. there's a political row going on, but who will have taken the decision to release khan? this attack through some difficult questions. difficult and urgent questions. difficult and urgent questions because a lot of people have been convicted of terrorist offences sent 9/11 18 years ago and many of them have been released here coming upfor many of them have been released here coming up for release. this is something that needs to be dealt with. in his case, usman khan had to be automatically released under the current system, halfway through his sentence, that was done and as far as anyone could tell, he was complying with the conditions of that release. he was wearing his tag and doing what he was supposed to be doing and he had permission to be at the conference yesterday. but clearly, in his case, the system has com pletely clearly, in his case, the system has completely failed. a dangerous man has been released from prison and within a year he has killed, which
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is what he had not been able to do previously when his previous attem pts previously when his previous atte m pts to previously when his previous attempts to carry out an attack had failed. in this case it has failed and clearly people want to make sure it will not fail again. ok, daniel, many thanks. rail fares will rise by an average of 2.7% injanuary, according to the body that represents the rail industry. it means some commuters will see their season tickets go up by more than a hundred pounds. the independent watchdog transport focus said a majority of rail users did not feel they were getting value for money. katie prescott has the details. christmas is coming and for commuters on south—western railway that means almost a month of scenes like these as strikes on the line start on monday. so the news that train fares will rise again next year, above the standard rate of inflation has not gone down well with these passengers in bristol. i think the rail service probably needs to be improved nationwide before they can think about putting up fares. i've just come from cambridge and it would have been cheaper for me to go to paris.
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today ‘s announcement means many commuters face an increase of more than £100 on the annual cost of getting to work. for example, a season ticket from eastbourne to london goes up £136, tipping it over the £5,000 mark. a season ticket between glasgow and edinburgh will set you back by £4200 a year, up £116. but the rail industry defends the increases, saying 98p from every pound spent on fares goes into running the railway. at the moment we're going to like a record splurge on the railway network, more money is being put onto the network now than at any other time since the victorian era. so, we are half of the entire nation ‘s fleet, but we are also putting money elsewhere, by adding extra services where they really needed. both train companies and passengers
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say they would like to see a new, more flexible system for fares put in place. but the future of fares and indeed the rare wales will be in the hands of the ever wins the election. katie prescott, bbc news. football, and liverpool stretched their lead at the top of the premier league to eleven points with a 2 —1 win over brighton. earlier manchester city, who are in second place, missed the opportunity to reduce the gap as they were held to a 2 all draw at newcastle as jo currie reports. when you are the defending champions, but nine points behind the premier league leaders, every game becomes a must win. manchester city arriving at newcastle looking to make up ground on liverpool. and it all started so well. a sneaky backheel from david silva found raheem sterling and city were off the mark. but that lead didn't last long. just three minutes later, defenderjetro willems took advantage of space on the edge of the area to ensure newcastle went in at the break all square. after the restart, in the chilly conditions, the game needed warming up and kevin de bruyne brought the firepower.
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a huge goal and a huge moment for city. however, newcastle weren't finished. a clever free kick and an unmarked jonjo shelvey culminated in a special finish to once again bring his side level as they kept their sights on finishing the game with a point. a great response to a stuttering season, but for city, a missed opportunity. jo currie, bbc news. that's itwe're back with the late news at ten o'clock now on bbc one it's time for the news where you are. goodbye. in places temperatures will struggle to get much above freezing. scotland, also aware that fog has been slow to clear. some rain in the forecast for this evening. courtesy of this area of low pressure
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fringing the far south—west of the uk. in cloud should had pics of a need to be isles of scilly, devon, cornwall, the channel islands. the odd spot of rain and wales. more cloud and southern parts of the uk and the seeming fog will reformat with the midlands, east wales and into northern england. meanwhile, every a re na into northern england. meanwhile, every arena by south west england will start to pull away taking gusty winds with it. a breeze blowing across the southern half of uk and the fog not quite so extensive and frost not as sharp either. further north, clearer skies. 0ne frost not as sharp either. further north, clearerskies. one or frost not as sharp either. further north, clearerskies. 0ne ortwo skyscraping ester in scotland. to the east coast of england, another cold night. quite breezy, as i mentioned, particularly for the southern half of the uk. that will keep things mist up. the fog not quite so extensive but still a cold night. a touch of frost for morning but sharpest across northern england, northern ireland and scotla nd england, northern ireland and scotland were temperatures in places across rural scotland could get down to minus nine celsius again. into sunday we have got this area of high pressure building from the west. low
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pressure building from the west. low pressure slipping its way southwards. a breezy day across much of the uk and that beetle feed in a few showers across northern and eastern scotland and down to eastern coasts. the fog will lift more readily thanks to the breeze and a dry, bright of its business in china but still on the cold side. even though the temperatures are a little bit about what we're seeing today. 3-9dc bit about what we're seeing today. 3—9dc tomorrow. as we go into monday, for most another cold, frosty start with a good feel of sunshine. the exception being the far north of scotland. 0utbreaks have been working their way eastwards. turning persistent and heavy across the northern isles for the day. elsewhere a good feel of sunshine after that cold and frosty style temperatures rising to between 6-10dc. style temperatures rising to between 6—10dc. now, for the week ahead, this area of low pressure which is very extensive across much of the ca ke very extensive across much of the cake but notice more of a breeze across the northern half of scotland and also some fronts just starting to question him at times particularly as we go to the end of the week and some of that rain could be heavy but for most we have seen some very wet weather recently and
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things are looking dry, still quite cold at first. milder later. goodbye. milder later. we'll have the latest on the euro 2022 draw in just a moment, but we'll start with the premier league. liverpool have stretched their lead to 11 points at the top of the table but victory over brighton at anfield was far from straightforward. it should have been when two virgil van dyke headers gave them a 2—0 lead at halftime but they had their keeper allison sent off for handling outside the box and lewis dunk scored from the resulting freekick as substitute keeper adrian was trying to line up his wall, leaving an open goal , but liverpool hung on for the 2—1win. he was the man of match because coming in and then, yeah, making two savesin coming in and then, yeah, making two saves in the one was tricky and even the goalie kicks of course are
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difficult. to do that with com pletely difficult. to do that with completely cold feet, it is just impossible. he should have done that probably differently but we were not prepared for that situation and so i am completely happy. prepared for that situation and so i am completely happy. so liverpool 11 poinst clear of manchester city who slipped up in the lunchtime kick—off at newcastle they took the lead twice at st james, raheem sterling with city's first. but on both occasions, newcastle hit back within a couple of minutes, jetro willems finished off a lovely move 1—1 at halftime. city thought they'd won it inside the last 10 minutes =, kevin de bruyne with a thumping finish that went in off the bar but they conceded a late free—kick and didn't close down jonjo shelvey who earned newcastle a 2—2 draw with a lovely curling finish. sure we were going to see the goal. a stunning goal, it was not easy on
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the defensive saudi but we knew it. we moved well, we created enough chances to score more goals and for it to happen, in the last action they scored. but in general the game is good. couldn't ask for anything more in the way they have gone about it in their attitude towards it. you know, we we re their attitude towards it. you know, we were disappointed on monday night at villa which is something away from him we are going to have to address that at home, here, we have given the crowd something to shout about. good to see them going home with a smile on their face. good to see them going home with a smile on their face. there was a surprise result at stamford bridge. 11th placed chelsea lost to 1—0 to west ham aaron creswell‘s goal early in the second half eneded the hammers 7 game winless run and also gave them their first win at chelsea for 17 years. tottenham's and dele alli's revival underjose mourinho continues, they breat bournemouth 3—2 at home. dele scored twice, he also scored against 0lympiacos in the champions league a few days ago.
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he should have scored a hatrick. moussa sissoko also scored his first goal in over two years. they went 3—0 up but there was a nervy finish as harry wilson scored twice fro the visitors, but spurs hung on and it's 3 wins out of three for mourinho. he was very impressed with what proved to be a match—winning performance. to play in a position where it feels happier and he feels very co mforta ble, happier and he feels very comfortable, to give him some principle, collective principles of the game, barry adapted to his qualities the same time to give him also some space for his creativity that he always has. and that's it. i think, three matches since i arrived in three phenomenal matches for him. one other premier league result and a really good win
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for crystal palace — 2—nil at burnley, zaha and schlupp the scorersthe late kick—off between the bottom two in the table, southampton against watford, has just got under way at st mary's. sixth tier altrincham were just moments away from causing a shock a penalty with just seven minutes to go at 2008 winners portsmouth looked like securing but a last minute winner for pompey from brett pitman at fratton park means they will take their place in monday's 3rd round draw. that match was one of eight second round ties today — you can see the goals from all of today's matches on the bbc sport website. four games in the scottish premiership today — leaders celtic and second placed rangers don't play until tomorrow, aberdeen are up to third after a 2—1win at home to st mirren. hibernian and kilmarnock drew 2—2, it was goalless at livingston while motherwell thrashed stjohnstone 4—0.
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the draw is taking place for euro 2020. england and wales are 2 of the 20 teams that will find out who they are playing next summer. 4 more teams will come thoguh the play—offs that take place next march. then see if we can take your life to the draw. their own one of the little montages. they have drawn some of the first teams we already knew about, really. all the seeded teams. england will be in booth d, belgium and boothby. you can watch this live on bbc two right now. it will be slightly complicated and the member there are 12 host cities spread across europe. wales will pop up spread across europe. wales will pop up on that in groups arb. all well make sense and sports day at 6:30pm we will hopefully know a lot more.
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that is taking place live in bucharest right now and you can watch that on bbc two if you so wish. watch that on bbc two if you so wish. england cricketers will struggle to level the series against new zealand, with the kiwis on top in the second test, they made 375 in their first innings before england closed on 39 for 2 on day 2. they still trail by 336. rhia chohan was watching. it is early for a rendition of 0 come all ye faithful but after england's trashing they would have been heartened by the unwavering support in new zealand. england's day started badly. tom latham resumed on 101. but they were frustrated by daryl mitchell and bj watling. mitchell showing scant respect to the part—time bowling of showing scant respect to the pa rt—time bowling of joe showing scant respect to the part—time bowling ofjoe denley.
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watling, who scored a double century in the last match, showing scant respect of everyone including broad. broad's perseverance was eventually rewarded. you got both of them and ended up with four wickets but not before new zealand had gone past 300. they ended up with 375. that seemed more impressive when england batted. dominic sibley at 2a and in just his second test is quickly finding out the extra demands of test cricket. joe denley, who is eight years sibley‘s senior might conclude that things do not get any easier. both went forjust conclude that things do not get any easier. both went for just four. conclude that things do not get any easier. both went forjust four. the captain has mastered the art of test batting but recently even his touch has deserted him. how england would welcome a big score from him on day three. it is an opportunity for some people to put their hand up. the debut, ben
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stokes, joe root. there are people there who are capable of batting long periods of time the sub doesn't look as if it is a type of wicked favourable can straightaway and blast away. you have to earn the right to score the runs, as we have seen s0 right to score the runs, as we have seen so far in the series and i think england will be looking for people to do that tomorrow morning. leiws hamilton has wrapped up the championship but he's looking to end the formula one season on a high. he's on pole for the final race of the season, the abu dhabi grand prix tomorrow. incredibly it's his first pole for 4 months , nine races. his mercedes teamamte valterri bottas was second qucikest but an engine changes means that he'll start from the back of the grid tomorrow. max verstappen bumped up to the front row. i don't know if i find that extra as such but the car a much better position, i would say, this qualifying session. all the other sessions, nice for them. the delivery of each lapse i'm quite
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close to the bull's—eye kind of thing and the first q3 lap was awesome in the next one just a little bit better so that is kind of the benchmark. that is what you want to make sure you do every qualifying session. it is not easy to get that. it is not easy to get that. there was great entertainment at the principality stadium in cardiff as wayne pivac‘s first game in charge of wales saw them beat the barbarians 43 —33. the baba's were being coached by the former wales boss warren gatland. austin halewood reports. a chance to look to the future and say goodbye to old friends. new wales coach with a first chance to see his ideas and practice but some aspects don't need changing. joss adams scored seven tries at the world cup on straightaway picked up where he left off. from there, wales pressed further ahead and when your hooker scores back back trays you know you are in trouble. ken 0wens crossing other side of the break. going forward wales are determined to play with pace and the signs are good. the bag from thomas williams
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and the finish from who else but adams? from all corners of the principality. much when the former ireland captain bid farewell to international rugby. at his side we re international rugby. at his side were not quite done yet. a typical late flourish from and brought a tight finish and a mass mail from warren gatland. and it's closer than they would but a winning start nonetheless for the new wales. wales women's were also in action against the barbarians to finish their autumn series. they lost 29—15, that was also played at the principality stadium . there was an east midlands derby in the rugby union prmiership, and northampton saints completely outclassed leicester tigers to go top of the table. they scored 5 tries at franklin's gardens. matt proctor with a first half brace on his debut. saints move ahead of bristol who play london irish tomorrow.
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saracens are 1—18 points after that points deduction but they will have wa nted points deduction but they will have wanted leicester to lose, which they did, emphatically. wanted leicester to lose, which they did, emphatically. england's netball team have wrapped a series win over south africa after beating them 59—53 in the second test in jess thirlby‘s side followed up victory in the first test on friday kadeen corbin. south africa scored three back—to—back goals as they took the lead early in the third quarter. but england came back again. cardwell on the scoresheet helped secure the win series ahead of tomorrow's third and final test. defending champion ronnie 0'sullivan is through to the third round of the uk championship after a routine victory this time it was china's tian pengfei on the end of another ruthless display from the seven—time
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winner of the event. nobody else has won the trophy at the barbican centre more times than him. he is aiming for a state title ina him. he is aiming for a state title in a row. 18 months ago three time 0lympic rowing champion pete reed had just announced his retirement from the sport and returned to a job with the royal navy. but in september, he suffered a one in a million spinalstroke which left him paralysed from the chest down. in his first interview since the injury, he tells sir matthew pinsent how his life has changed over the last few months hi, nice to see. you are right? i'm good. show me around. we are at the duke of cornwall spinal treatment centre in salisbury. he would go. i walked into hospital
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in uniform. add weak flags he would go. i walked into hospital in uniform. add weakflags on he would go. i walked into hospital in uniform. add weak flags on a strange gate but on the third day at the big stroke in the same area. i felt nauseous. i went back into bed and the pain was extraordinary, like nothing i have felt. across my chest and across my back and my partner was with me and it was scary because i was lying down and i could feel the life drain out of my legs and within about 45 minutes the pain had gone and i could not move my legs. the first thing i did was try to set up the first thing i did was try to set up andi the first thing i did was try to set up and i couldn't so i grabbed the side of the bed to pull myself up andi side of the bed to pull myself up and i fell forward like side of the bed to pull myself up and ifell forward like a rag doll and ifell forward like a rag doll and then fell backwards because i've got no core strength and i was the first time. that's really scary. you mentioned your partner. it must be so difficult for you together. i think it is hardest for her but she has stuck by me. she is incredible and everybody in the situation need someone and everybody in the situation need someonejust and everybody in the situation need someone just like and everybody in the situation need someonejust like her so i am very lucky that she is handling it brilliantly and we have a great team.
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your athlete mentality, doesn't help at that point? there is nothing more beneficial to me now than athlete mindset. the goal is how quickly can i get back to the big scary world out there that is more scary now that i am in a chair but it shouldn't be. i am up for that challenge and if the aim is walking again rather than a gold medal, the target is even bigger than before for me after london 2012, who would have thought i would have had a bigger challenge and more motivation to achieve it. that euro 2020 drawer continues in bucharest. you can follow it on the bbc sport website. england, would you believe it, they've got croatia in group d so the team that beat them in last year's world cup semifinal. the czech republic have been drawn in england's group as well. group f. germany against
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france. that is another really difficult group. germany against the world champions, france. we don't know who wales have got it yet. bbc sports website bbc two. now on bbc news it is time for to make the travel show. . we are starting off in iceland this week. it is one of the best places in the world to see whales in their natural habitat. but it's also now providing a home for a pair of these amazing mammals who spent their lives in captivity. they are now looking forward to their retirement in an environment that is closer to their natural home. and cat has been to meet them. here, just off the coast of iceland, we are searching. because, apparently, there is something in the water. notjust one of them, either.
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there are 23 species of them. every now and then, someone points in a direction and the whole boat rushes over, trying to see what is happening. and then someone points in another direction so we rushed that way. it is like whack—a—mole, you never know when they will pop up. we are watching boats cast off to sea each day in iceland in the hope of catching a glimpse of these mammals. you have a great spot up here. the best one on the boat. minke whales, two o'clock. minke whales at two o'clock. how do you even try to find a whale in such a vast area? what are the tell—tale signs? the easiest one is the body.
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when their black body comes up and you see the triangle—shape dorsal fin. but also the blows. when you see their breath, you know what species you have. really? you can tell the species from the breath? yes. it is incredible. how often do you see whales on these tours? we basically see them almost every trip that we go out. in the end it is the food. we have nutrient—rich waters because it is cold. the colder the water, the more oxygen and with that the more life that you have. elsewhere in the world, travellers' contact with whales is often in captivity where they are kept for public entertainment.
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globally, hundreds of whales are thought to live this way. but public appetite for holding these intelligent and social animals appears to be shifting. just last year, greenpeace drew attention to dozens of beluga whales and orcas that had been caught and kept in poor conditions in russia, destined for entertainment parks in china. in recent weeks they were released after a public outcry. fortunately, these whales had only been captive for a short time so they could cope with life back out at sea. but what happens when themepark owners agree to release their whales that are unable to defend for themselves in the ocean? so the next morning i travel to the south of the island and to the westman island, a short ferry ride from the mainland. i had heard that here in iceland a new kind of sanctuary was being created. there are so many beautiful
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coves around iceland. why this particular place? it is a beautiful surrounding for them. the cliffs protect them from the wind and the icelandic weather and then also having the water temperature more like the arctic and subarctic where they would be found in the wild. two beluga whales called little white and little grey will soon be the first released into the bay. they had until recently been performing at an entertainment park in china but after the operators decided to end the practice they tried to find new homes for the animals where they could live out their lives. what is the plan for tourists, so they are not too overwhelmed? the plan with tourists is to manage boat trips.
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we have a partner who will be bringing visitors out. they will not get out on these pontoons but they will be able to see them from a distance, like a whale watching trip, and hear about the project and learn why little white and little grey are here. little white and little grey were carefully flown on the long journey from china to iceland but they could not be released straight into the bay. they have, for the last few months, been acclimatising in the nearby centre and working with handlers to learn how to take the final journey into the bay. oh, my goodness. wow. these are incredible. can i come down? hello. they are so graceful in the water, aren't they? what do you love about them? beluga whales are a friendly animal. they will not hurt you and you can work with them peacefully
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and so it is great fun to work with them. beautiful gentle giants. yes. so which is the naughty one? this one? go. this country's relationship with whales is complex, being one ofjust a few places in the world that still legally allows some hunting of the animals. but projects like this and the various whale watching experiences on offer are to encourage understanding and protection. would you like some more fish? yum!! iwillgive you... the whale burps. 0h, was that a burp? she keeps wanting more.
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oh, if you insist. if you insist. there we go. the whale burps. oh, there is another little burp.
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it was an idea that i had had on the back of my mind that i wanted to put a team together. i had seen two teams of wounded and sick guys do it and seen that there had been no females in the scheme and wondered why not. there was eight riders. all have had different health challenges, be that physical or psychological or both. have the team we re psychological or both. have the team were civilian and have where military. i met sally through on victors training camps. the one main concern i had was the fact that i am visually impaired. i had a brain injury when i was injured in the army quite some time ago now, in 1996. so for me to be cycling on other side of the road when i'm com pletely other side of the road when i'm completely blind to the left was a lwa ys completely blind to the left was always going to be something i had never done and quite frankly, did
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not really know how that was going to go. will went over the start together. what then had to happen was as a nonstop race the team of eight riders broke down into two pods so there was for people in each pallet and a support crew. the first team carried on cycling for a nine hour period. so within that nine hours every 20 minutes we would change riders. the other part in that time had moved forward and they were having to get their rest and which is quite difficult when you have just had the adrenaline of the start suddenly go, you need to go to sleep. ican sleep. i can remember seeing a lot of aid to be honest. and you are cycling you're concentrating on cycling as fast as you can. looking up is not necessarily something you do and i looked up and i am so glad i did. we we re looked up and i am so glad i did. we were the part that was very, very fortunate to cycle through monument
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valley. a lot of colour, a lot of red rock formations that just stand on this vast array of countryside. it's almost indescribable. well done. good stuff. there have been a lot of doubt in everybody‘s mind and for me, i look back and reflect on the time when my depression was at its worst, when i didn't think there was any reason to live and, yeah, i look back to that time and think, this isn't as difficult as that to try and overcome. the race finished in maryland. eight of the cycle to the road and everybody is chairing that is driving past. i everybody is chairing that is driving past. lam incredibly proud to have been able to pad and
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opportunities had to take part in such an extreme event. it has forced me sort of go out of my comfort zone, i suppose. we were able to achieve something really quite incredible and hopefully others will be able to look back on what we've achieved and inspire them to go on to take on their own race across america. for a large swathe of the uk it has been a cold, crisp saturday other places time—shares will struggle to get much above freezing. scotland for example, that felt has been slow to clear. some rain forecast are deceiving. courtesy of this area of low pressure just fringing the far south—west of the uk put up a new cloud and ibec survey into the isles of scilly, devon, cornwall, the channel islands. the odd spot of rain. cloud across southern parts of
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you can do this evening and overnight the fog will reform to the midlands, east wales and into northern england. meanwhile that area of rain across south—western that will pull away, taking gusty winds with it. a breeze blowing across southern parts of the case of the fog not quite so extensive and that file is not as sharp either. further north, clearer skies. that file is not as sharp either. further north, clearerskies. maybe one or two down the east coast of england. another cold night. quite breezy, as i mentioned, particularly for the southern half of the uk. that would tend to keep things mist up. the fog not quite so extensive but it is still a coordinate that of a touch of frost for many that sharpest across northern england, northern ireland and scotland by temperatures in place across rural scotla nd temperatures in place across rural scotland could get down to maybe minus nine celsius again. into sunday we have an area of high pressure building on the west. low pressure building on the west. low pressure slipping its way southwards. quite a breezy day across much of the uk. that beetle feed in a few showers across northern and eastern scotland and down some eastern coast. the bug should lift more readily thanks to
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the breeze and for many it is a dry, by day. some good spells of sunshine but still on the cold side. even though temperatures are a little bit about what we have seen today. 3—9dc tomorrow. as we go into monday, for most, another cold, frosty with a good feel of sunshine. instead there is much exception being the far north of scotland. turning quite persistent and heavy across the northern isles throughout the day. a good feel of sunshine after that cold and frosty start. temperatures rising to between 6—10dc. for the week ahead it is this area of high pressure which is extensive across much of the uk but notice a breeze across the northern half of scotland and also some frontages starting to push inhibit times, particularly as we go through the end of the week in that rain could be heavy but for most some very wet weather recently. dry and quite cold at first, milder 00:59:53,725 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 later. goodbye.
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