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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  December 5, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm ben brown. today at two... with one week to the general election, the political parties launch their final push, reminding voters of their key pledges. we have an amazing choice in the next few days. we either get brexit done and move forward, unite the country, unleash its potential, or we have a year of dither, delay, defeatism. we are very clear, we have a totally funded and costed manifesto — the only party that has in this election — and it will give real hope and opportunity to everyone in this country, and i'm very proud of it. a nationwide strike brings much of france to a standstill as police fire tear gas at protestors. bbc research shows thousands of mental health patients in england are facing long waits for nhs
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talking therapy services. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport withjohn watson. thank you, everton manager at marco silva is facing the sack this afternoon after another defeat, this time in the merseyside derby to liverpool. thanksjohn, and ben rich has all the weather. as the saying goes, red sky in the morning, shepherd's warning, we had some beautiful red sun rises this morning but the warning is for a lot of rain in places. it is turning milder but i will have full details just before half past. thanks, ben. also coming up... the christmas advert getting tens of thousands of views, and it only cost a hundred pounds to make.
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hello, this is afternoon live. with one week to polling day, the political parties are beginning theirfinal push for votes. boris johnson is promising to pass his brexit deal and bring a tax—cutting budget within 100 days, if the conservatives win the election. labour have outlined plans to recruit almost 20,000 extra teachers in england overfive years. meanwhile, the liberal democrats have promised a £17 billion research and development fund, and the snp have said there is only one week to stop brexit. here's our political correspondent tom barton — and a warning that his report contains flash photography. they won't be able to vote for another few years. butjeremy corbyn hopes
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to persuade their parents. you have your hand up. why do you want to be prime minister? promising to recruit 20,000 more teachers and to keep class sizes below 30. but also attacking the conservatives‘ record in government. elect the tories you carry on with austerity, you carry on with increasing gaps between the richest and the poorest, you carry on with underfunded schools, oversized classes and increasing numbers of rough sleeping homelessness. we are very clear. we have a totally funded and costed manifesto. the only party that has in this election. and it will give real hope and opportunity to everyone in this country. good morning. good morning, philip, good morning, holly. 0n the this morning sofa, borisjohnson hoping his message on brexit will convince a daytime tv audience. if we get a working majority ofjust nine seats more we can be out on january the 30th. and how long will the trade deals take? well... years?
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no. we can get — we can do many new deals with countries around the world. with the eu, we can build a new trade partnership by the end of next year. the snp telling voters in scotland they've gotjust a week to stop borisjohnson and to stop brexit. the lib dems leader was stopped yesterday by extinction rebellion activists who surrounded jo swinson‘s campaign bus. but her supporters say the campaign is still on the move, fighting for the political middle ground. do we want to have a moderating voice within our politics? because i really don't think the british people like extremes, and the liberal democrats have always offered that centre path that helps to actually prevent some of those things happening. and as i say, our manifesto is really ambitious. i hope people will give it a look. this time next week, the polls will be open and so the parties have
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just a few days left to persuade you to give them your vote. and what you decide will determine how many mps each party gets to send here to westminster, and could ultimately shape this country's politics for years to come. tom barton, bbc news, westminster. 0ur assistant political editor, norman smith, is in westminster. as we said, a week to go and we have heard some pretty familiar messages from the main parties but what is their strategy now that we left? do they keep hammering away at those messages? i think the honest answer is yes, and in some ways that has been the story of this election campaign. for three of the big parties, the conservatives, the lib dems, the snp, their big narrative has been around brexit and for the labour party, their big narrative has been around ending austerity and a moment of real change and i think
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you will see them keep hammering home on those messages. and if you look back on the past three or four weeks, the only time the election has sort of swerved off the course was when we have had unexpected events. for example, the floods, we had a moment when borisjohnson was suddenly on the defensive, it seems to be behind the curve in terms of responding to the floods. and getting a grip on the situation. and then of course we had the london attack and again, that sort of provided a different narrative, the accusations between the parties over who was to blame for the release of usman khan. and then of course we had the nato summit which notjust sort of stopped campaigning for a couple of days but raised the whole issue of the nhs and possible trade deals with the us. apart from those moments, this has been an extraordinarily controlled, focused
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campaign, iwould extraordinarily controlled, focused campaign, i would suggest, by all the main parties. and as a journalist looking at it, it has meant it is a very different sort of campaign, even the encounters between the political leaders and the public again had been much more constrained and we haven't really had any of those moments which we have had in previous elections. that has meant, bluntly, it has been a rather dull and flat election and rather dull and flat election and rather one—dimensional. but for the parties, i would guess they are rather pleased with the way it has gone because it has enabled them to just focus on their core messages, which they have hammered home again and again. and i guarantee you, in the last seven days or so, they will absolutely stick with those messages are not just because absolutely stick with those messages are notjust because that is their aim, because really there isn't time to change course and come up with a different narrative. more of the samei different narrative. more of the same i expect for the next week. many thanks, norman. we can speak to
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ben wrightjoins many thanks, norman. we can speak to ben wright joins from many thanks, norman. we can speak to ben wrightjoins from derbyshire. borisjohnson is ben wrightjoins from derbyshire. boris johnson is on ben wrightjoins from derbyshire. borisjohnson is on the campaign trail this afternoon making a visit toa trail this afternoon making a visit to a small factory in derbyshire and norman is right, the tactic for the tories is pretty much the same it has been for the last few weeks. keep saying get brexit done and again and again until everybody is sick of it! and there will be no change from that core message and i'm sure that is what the prime minister will be saying when he speaks later. as norman mentioned, their theme today is sketching out their theme today is sketching out the first hundred days of a majority borisjohnson government the first hundred days of a majority boris johnson government if the first hundred days of a majority borisjohnson government if that is indeed where we are next friday. even though they are not announcing any new policies today, they are trying to give a sense of momentum and possibility, talking about a queen's speech happening within a few days, beginning the process of bringing the withdrawal agreement bill back to parliament, saying they will have a budget which will
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include a small tax cut in february. trying to get a sense that once this election is done and if boris johnson has a majority, it is full stea m johnson has a majority, it is full steam ahead. critics of course will point out he has already been a prime ministerfor134 point out he has already been a prime minister for 134 days and, as norman said, the truth is that while we may be leaving on the 31st of january if boris johnson we may be leaving on the 31st of january if borisjohnson gets the withdrawal agreement bill through, the prime minister knows and his party know and people in parliament know that that is only the beginning of the second phase brexit. complicate the negotiation with the eu, notjust on trade and aviation and defence and the rest, and the prime minister has said and is insisting that that negotiation will be done and dusted by the end of next year. there are many who think thatis next year. there are many who think that is simply an unrealistic timetable. the prime list it will be speaking here shortly and taking some questions. thank you very much —— the prime minister. we will be back with you when we hear from the prime minister. three members of the
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european parliament have resigned from the brexit party and called on leave voters to back the conservatives in the election. lance forman, lucy harris and annunziata rees—mogg said the brexit party risked splitting the leave vote. they were joined at a news conference in westminster by another mep, john longworth, who lost the brexit party's whip yesterday. 0ur chief political correspondent vicki young is in westminster where that event took place. 0ur political correspondent vicki young was at that news conference earlier today. there was a lot of talk ahead of this general election about some kind of pact between the conservatives and nigel harris's brexit party but in the end he decided not to put up candidates against the 300 or so tories who won last time round —— nigel farage. he feels he has done his bit but these four don't think so, they think he should have gone much further. they 110w should have gone much further. they now fear that brexit could be being jeopardised because they say that by standing in all these other seats, these brexit candidates are taking more votes from the conservatives than from labour and they think that
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actually it means in the end that brexit itself might be at risk because it is splitting the leave folk. this is how one explained her decision. i find it absolutely unbelievable but tragic that the brexit party, with so many wonderful people at to a cause, are now the very party risking brexit. i only stood in may to fight for brexit. i am still determined to do so. they say that this is all about brexit and getting that delivered and getting boris johnson's deal delivered and they say that nigel farage himself, they have nothing against him personally and think he has the wrong strategy but they think he has done more than anyone to make sure brexit happens and they feel at this point that he should just take the win if you like, and
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to stand down and all of those seats but it's too late for that. but that is not how nigel farage sees it a point of this is what he said earlier. one of them is a sister of a cabinet minister, another as a boyfriend working for that cabinet minister, faxed, and another is a personal friend boris. they're not smears, they are facts. theyjoined the brexit party... and you paraded them. they joined the coalition i put together and clearly they were disaffected with mrs may leader. and i tell you something, i tell you something, borisjohnson's deal, unamended, is unacceptable. i would stand by that. nigel harris has been very critical borisjohnson‘s deal, he does not regard it as a proper brexit —— nigel farage. he had said that he will spoil is ballot paper and not vote for on election day. that is the younger. with the election one week away, our community affairs correspondent
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adina campbell has been to luton to speak to young people from ethnic minority backgrounds about some of the issues they feel need more attention. could these faces be the next generation of uk leaders? here at bedfordshire university, meet—ups and workshops are hosted by the national charity uprising, which prides itself on diversity, inclusion and social mobility. they have a lot to say ahead of next week's vote. many people are calling this the brexit election. i started my politics degree three years ago, and i am sick to death about brexit. i've graduated now, and i think right now people just want a solution. we still have issues such as tax, welfare, people dying from poverty, that kind of thing, and we're not fixing it because we're so busy talking about brexit. ijust don't think people from bame backgrounds are really rated enough.
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like, we're really undervalued. everyone just thinks council estates, like, not going to school, skiving off, smoking weed, doing this, doing that, but there's so much more to a bame person. so, racism — is this still an issue in 2019? yeah, it's savage out there. racism is big. i face it a lot. if a party is being racist, if their leaders are being racist, we should be calling them out. i'm not really sure what's going to happen with the economy, going to happen with jobs and that is, in itself, what scares us about brexit. i think the danger is if we talk too much about the economy and it being a disaster, we will get led into austerity again. the people voted, so we have to, innit? i really disagree with that. we are going to leave, but we are going to get like, a bad deal. a proper bad deal. immigrants normally contribute more
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to the economy than they take away. like everybody's just, "0h, they come here for the nhs and for the benefits", when in reality, british—born people use those services more and immigrants disproportionally contribute to the economy — they're a net benefit. i think immigration has a lot to do with the racism aspect of brexit. and a lot of that has racist undertones of not wanting a particular looking group of people to come into this country. so, we're very fortunate that we have technology that we can access to and do our own research, because we are the future leaders of tomorrow, so we are going to be the ones that have to educate ourselves. adina campbell, bbc news. some news coming in from washington, the us house speaker nancy pelosi has confirmed that she has instructed the housejudiciary panel to d raft instructed the housejudiciary panel to draft articles of impeachment against president donald trump. "the president's actions have seriously
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violated the constitution," according to nancy pelosi, in reference to those allegations of trying to persuade the ukrainian government to interfere in the american election process. the us house speaker nancy pelosi confirmed she has instructed the house judiciary panel to draft articles of impeachment against president trump. a long way to go in that process of course but we will bring you more details on that as they come in from the us. we can actually listen in to nancy pelosi as she made the announcement a short time ago. our democracy is what is at stake. the president leaves us no choice but to act. because he is trying to corrupt once again the election for his own benefit. the president has engaged in abuse of power, undermining our national security and jeopardising the integrity of our elections. his
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actions are in defiance of the vision of our founders. and the oath of office that he takes, to preserve, protect and defend the constitution of the united states. sadly, but with confidence and humility, with allegiance to our founders and our hearts full of love for america, today i am asking our chairman to proceed with articles of impeachment. i commend our committee chairs and members for their sombre approach to actions which the president had not made necessary. that is nancy pelosi announcing that the push goes on to get donald trump impeached, saying that if we allow the president to be above the law, we do so at the peril of our republic. we can go to our washington correspondent in a few moments, chris buckler, but first we will bring you the latest headlines.
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with a week to go before the country goes to the polls, the political parties are out pushing their big election pledges. as we have heard, the us house speaker nancy below sea asset impeachment proceedings will go ahead against president donald trump. french police fire tear gas at protestors, as the biggest nationwide strike in years brings chaos. moore from france now. those strikes an clashes between police and demonstrators. police have fired tear gas at protestors in the french city of nantes during the biggest strike in decades, which has brought large parts of the country to a standstill. rail and metro services are deserted, flights have been grounded, and about half of eurostar services between paris and london have been cancelled. many schools are also affected. the strike is against plans to create a universal retirement
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system, which unions say will force millions of people to retire later or live on a reduced pension. alexandra mckenzie has the latest. protesters gathered in the city of lunt, angus pulling over to the french president and his demands to reform pensions. —— anger spilled over. they responded with tear gas. this is france's largest public sector strike in years. with more than 200 demonstrations expected across the country, others have been more peaceful. transport workers, hospital staff and teachers are amongst those demanding that president macron abandon his plans to overhaul france's pension system.
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he wants to introduce a simplified points—based system but unions are strongly opposed. translation: universal system is all well and good apart from those who have problems in their careers and there is a lot of uncertainty, unemployment, part—time, they will be paying less or nothing. don't they have a right to receive pensions questioning transport networks in paris and other french cities ground to a near halt this morning. railway and metro stations we re morning. railway and metro stations were largely deserted in rush hour and hundreds of flights were cancelled. london's at st pancras is also affected with the eurostar working on a reduced service until the 10th of december. passengers are advised to check the timetable before travel. in france, this is a protest that threatens to pa ralyse the country. translation: in the following days, the prime minister
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will give concrete guidelines on the new pension system. i hope by the middle of next week we can make very concrete progress with the unions. and this strike will be over as soon as possible. the battle between president macron and the unions for public support will be pivotal to the strikes' success. previous governments have tried to bring about pension reform and failed. more on that news from the us that nancy pelosi, the house speaker and leading democrat, has announced d raft leading democrat, has announced draft measures of impeachment against president trump. let's speak to our correspondent in washington, chris buckler. we have seen a tweet from the white house, the press secretary saying that the democrats should be ashamed that the democrats should be ashamed that donald trump —— and donald trump has done nothing but lead our country.
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just underlining again the deep divisions this whole impeachment process is bringing to the us. that is certainly true but also what it underlines is that we are moving towards an impeachment trial inside the senate and it gives you the sense that this is an historic moment for america. remember that in the past, only two presidents have been impeached and it's now likely donald trump will be the third and if you listen to nancy pelosi, in a press c0 nfe re nce a if you listen to nancy pelosi, in a press conference a short time ago, it was to some extent a history lesson, talking about the declaration of independence and the constitution and talking about they feel they need to push forward. and the key line from what she said was that, "today i am asking our chairman to proceed with articles of impeachment." that chairman to proceed with articles of impeachment. " that basically chairman to proceed with articles of impeachment." that basically means articles of impeachment are formal charges against the president. what they are now saying is that they are going to take all of this evidence they have gathered, which they say shows abuse of power by the
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president, suggesting he has used his position, for example by pushing ukraine into launching investigations into his political rivals, bike for example, in their view, withholding military aid to the country which was very important for their security, they say all of that amount to the fact that president trump was going beyond his office, using us foreign policy for his own domestic political benefit. and it is that kind of charge that is going to be tested inside the senate. the other thing that stephanie grisham said in that tweet was that they look forward to a fair trial inside the senate could remember, there is this difference put in the us house of representatives, they still had to hold an impeachment vote. but there isa hold an impeachment vote. but there is a democratic majority inside the us house of representatives so it is highly likely that donald trump will be impeached. but at that stage, it all moved to the senate which is
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controlled by mr tom's republican party pond and therefore it is highly, highly unlikely he is going to be removed from office tess mr trump. there is an element of political theatre in this because it is unlikely he will be removed from office but nonetheless it is quite a moment and it sets up a dramatic trial, potentially as early as january, inside the us senate. trial, potentially as early as january, inside the us senatem certainly is quite a moment, thank you very much indeed, chris. let's go now to our political correspondent chris mason who has been following labour in peterborough, where they've been making those big education announcements today. good afternoon. from tamworth in staffordshi re good afternoon. from tamworth in staffordshire just north—east of birmingham where we are following the labourcampaign and birmingham where we are following the labour campaign and jeremy robin has been focusing on education, visiting a sequence of schools across the midlands —— jeremy corbyn. a real set of questions
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landing again in front of him on this whole question of anti—semitism. the submission we learnt about this morning from 70 serving and former labour officials submitting sworn statements as part of the official investigation into anti—semitism within the party and this is part of the submission from the jewish labour movement this is part of the submission from thejewish labour movement to the ongoing investigation into the party that started a little earlier this year. just this afternoon we have heard directly in a news conference hosted by the jewish heard directly in a news conference hosted by thejewish labour movement about the scale of their concerns and powerful testimony from sam matthews who is the former labour ahead of disputes and something of a whistle—blower in this ongoing row about anti—semitism. whistle—blower in this ongoing row about anti-semitism. all of us joined the labour party because we believed in its true values, values of antiracism and socialjustice. we witnessed a violation of those values by the very people meant to
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be leading our movement. as highlighted, 70 other whistle—blowers highlighted, 70 other whistle— blowers have highlighted, 70 other whistle—blowers have come forward. from all different parts of the party because they share my disgust at the violations of the labour party's true values. those whistle—blowers, party's true values. those whistle— blowers, some party's true values. those whistle—blowers, some of home are still employed by the labour party, are fearful of retribution from their employer. some are grappling with the same emotional and mental turmoil that my team and i experienced. inside the party those individuals are met with a chorus of public denials that they know to simply be untrue. we had a chance before this news conference this afternoon to put some of these allegations directly to jeremy corbyn during a school visit in peterborough. i became leader of the party, there we re i became leader of the party, there were 110 i became leader of the party, there we re [10 processes i became leader of the party, there were 110 processes in i became leader of the party, there were no processes in the place to deal with anti—semitism. i asked baroness check a party to reduce a report on this which she did and after that we introduced rules to
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deal with it —— baroness check a education protest so members understood the hurt that can be caused by anti—semitic remarks or behaviour. and introduced injuly a further rule change to say that really serious, egregious cases could be dealt with in a fast track process to our national constitutional committee which is independent of me, an independent process that is legally advised, and i think we have got processes in place that have improved it a great deal. but let's put it in context, the numberof deal. but let's put it in context, the number of cases, the total number reported in party membership is very, very low indeed but one case of anti—semitism is one too many. meanwhile, labour are trying when not facing questions about anti—semitism, to talk about schools. jeremy corbyn made a sequence schools. jeremy corbyn made a sequence of the school visits, firstly in peterborough this morning and then in rugby and then he is
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heading to the west midlands and he has a rally tonight. what is quite striking, anecdotally speaking to labour activists, is that yes, they are keen to get on the doorstep and still hopeful they can do well, but you don't have to probe far before labour activists acknowledge that the likelihood of them winning next week might be relatively slim in their view. and also those who make their view. and also those who make the point that while they think some of the messages that labour have are broadly popular, finding resistance tojeremy broadly popular, finding resistance to jeremy corbyn broadly popular, finding resistance tojeremy corbyn as a reason for people not to vote for labour is pretty easy for labour activists to find. chris, we were talking to norman smith earlier about what the parties' strategies art with a week to go. we are into the final lap if you like so how do they play it and how do labour play it?|j you like so how do they play it and how do labour play it? i think what we will get from all of the parties on this final lap, and activists and
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journalists alike are quite glad we are into it with a week to go! it is them returning to playing what they see as their greatest hits. we will see as their greatest hits. we will see from boris johnson see as their greatest hits. we will see from borisjohnson and the conservatives the whole message coming back to brexit, and i think we will see from labour a real focus on public services which they see as their strong hand. the big focus on education and schools in england today and then i suspect in the coming days a big focus on the nhs and of course labour can pin their message on the nhs to the whole questions that swirled around a potential us trade deal after brexit. de conservatives make their argument forcefully and repeatedly that under no circumstances would they want the nhs to be on the table in any such future trade deal but that does not stop labour banging the drum that it could be a fear. and returning to the broader theme of the nhs and funding for it which is something, territory if you like, that labour always feel pretty
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co mforta ble that labour always feel pretty comfortable and confident on. a return to playing the greatest hits i think as these battle buses, mixing metaphors, and took the final lap. i have never known you to mix your metaphors, chris! but always a first time! thank you. now it's time for a look at the weather. good afternoon. many of us had red and orange skies overhead but the warning was this, outbreaks of rain in the west of the uk. a very wet day in the in the west of scotland. rain in many areas through tonight but with a south—westerly wind it is turning increasingly mild as we start friday morning with temperatures of 11 or 12. with that some cloud and outbreaks of rain in the south—east of england and
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showers in scotland, northern ireland, wales and the midlands. turning a little drier in the north—west later with winds down to north—west later with winds down to north or north—west a lease and it will clear off holding onto values of 11 or 12 or 13 degrees. into the weekend it is largely dry with some rain on saturday night. sunday drive with blustery showers.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. with one week to the general election, the political parties launch their final push, reminding voters of their key pledges. we have an amazing choice in the next few days. we either get brexit done and move forward, unite the country, unleash its potential, or we have a year of dither, delay, defeatism. we are very clear, we have a totally funded and costed manifesto — the only party that has in this election — and it will give real hope and opportunity to everyone in this country, and i'm very proud of it.
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us speaker nancy pelosi says impeachment proceedings will go ahead against president trump for pressuring ukraine to investigate his democratic political rival. the president has engaged in an abuse of power, undermined our national security and jeopardise the integrity of our elections. his actions are in defiance of the vision of our values and the oath of office that he takes. a nationwide strike brings much of france to a standstill as police fire tear gas at protestors. bbc research shows thousands of mental health patients in england are facing long waits for nhs talking therapy services. sport now on afternoon live withjohn watson.
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i enjoyed liverpool's victory against everton but it was bad for their manager, wasn't it? yes, it could spell the end of everton manager marco silva. we are expecting news this afternoon of a managerial sacking. he has been on the brink for a while and the club board are talking today to discuss his future. it follows that 5—2 thumping by liverpool in the merseyside derby last night. after their defeat to norwich last month, a defeat to leicester and then the defeat last night seems to be the final nail in the coffin. we wonder who will come in to replace him with fa ns who will come in to replace him with fans thought to be unwilling to see david moyes given the job on a temporary basis. we understand his name is under consideration at the everton board with the team now in the bottom three. it was a was going to bea the bottom three. it was a was going to be a difficult game tonight but the defeat now put you in the bottom three. does that change anything for you and your position? i'm not the
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person to ask about that situation. you have to ask this question to different people because i'm not the right person to talk to. to italy where a sports newspaper has been heavily criticised for the racial tones of one of its headlines. romilly lukaku and chris smalling are pictured here with the headline" black friday". apparently the story itself was positive but it has been overshadowed by that headline. that's all for the sport for now. let's go to derbyshire now where the prime minister is about to give a speech... jumpers and knitwear and underwear! laughter all the things that will be under
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the trees of the nation. and everything that will be exported in the world. i didn't want to have a selection at all in the run—up to christmas but we had to do it because we have a broken parliament, my friends. we have a parliament that want to do its job. it my friends. we have a parliament that want to do itsjob. it is like a broken down busjackknifed on the yellow boxjunction a broken down busjackknifed on the yellow box junction stopping the entire nation making process. and what won't this parliament do? it won't get brexit done. for three and a half years it has been refusing to do it. why do we need to get it done? i'll tell you why, we are democrats and we believe in democracy. whether you voted for leave or remain i think most people in this country want to honour the will of the people and get it done. but there are lots of other reasons. 0ur but there are lots of other reasons. our economy is being held back at the moment by the dragged anchor of our broken parliament and people
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can't make decisions and people can't make decisions and people can't invest. millions of foreign direct investment will come into this country as soon as we get brexit done and we can get brexit done because we have a deal ready to go. as i said before it is oven ready. i not the greatest took in the world —— cook. we can get it done and we can get it back in parliament before you cook your christmas turkey. we can do it. all we need is a working majority to deliver it because every single one of the conservative candidate standing at this election has signed up standing at this election has signed up to this deal. they haven't been dragooned or lobotomised into doing
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it, they are doing it voluntarily from all wings of opinion of our party. there is a huge spread of opinion. they all want to back this deal and get brexit done and it does everything i think people want, taking back control of our borders, our laws, we can do things differently whether cutting vat on tampons. that is true. you can't do it at the moment under eu law. we will take away cruelty to animals and ban the export of live animals. british people have been campaigning against that for decades. we will have free ports around the country and we can do all sorts of things differently and better, including controlling our immigration system for the first time in decades. i'm in favour of having people of talents come to this country but i think we should have it's controlled and done that way. all of that we
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can do if we get brexit done but we can do if we get brexit done but we can simultaneously get on and take our country forward with massive investments. i've been in power for four months or so and in that time we are investing in the nhs, every secondary school in the country is getting more money, thousands more police on our streets. this is a new government with a new approach. i believe in uniting and levelling up across the country. i think as a one nation conservative there is talent and skill and genius everywhere in this country evenly distributed. i don't think opportunity is fairly distributed. do you? i think what we need to do now is to level up and unite this country with three things, better infrastructure, better education and technology. i'm thinking about things like broadband
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and 4g and 5g telephony. but those things in and give people a better chance. give every child in this country the chance to express their talents to make the most of their lives. that's what i want as a conservative. i believe in opportunity and that is what we can do in the next parliament injust a few weeks, just a week, if only we could get brexit done. mathematically there is only one alternative to that approach and thatis alternative to that approach and that isjeremy alternative to that approach and that is jeremy corbyn and the labour party, propped up by nicola sturgeon, the scottish nationalist, and we all know who will wear the ta rta n and we all know who will wear the tartan trousers in that relationship. there are two reasons why i think that would be a disaster. . it would mean taking a sledgehammer to the economy. billions of pounds of extra borrowing whacking up interest rates for the country pushing up
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mortgages. extra taxation. don't worry. there is an intervention from the labour party. don't worry. we won't be deterred is because what it would also mean its higher taxation asjohn mcdonnell has would also mean its higher taxation as john mcdonnell has admitted for everyone in the country. that would be an extra thousand pounds for people earning as little as £20,000 a year. it is not the right way forward for the uk. it will take a sledgehammer in our ability to fund public services how we want to and even worse we would have the whole of the next year or two years when we want to get on with all this uniting and levelling up, the next two years wasted on two referendums, one on scotland which we had before and were told it was a once in a generation event and then another one on the eu. i do think it is a complete waste of time. nobody knows
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what jeremy corbyn's deal will be. he wants to spend another three months negotiating a new deal and then he wants another referendum. he can't identify a single member of the shadow cabinet who would support his new deal. in fact, he doesn't even seem to support it himself. i do think it is a complete waste of time and it would just mean more wrangling and more delay and more deadlock and division. that is the difference between our one nation approach and the approach ofjeremy corbyn and the labour party. in conjunction with nicola sturgeon. so the choice is very clear, you can go with us and we are a party that backs the police and we want to see proper sentences for serious and violent criminals, we want to see
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terrorists serve full terms. we will back our armed forces. we support mi5, the agencies that keep us safe. diane abbott said she would get rid of them. we back business and enterprise like this amazing company here. we want to support enterprises and business across the country. we will cut business rates and national insurance contributions for 31 million people in this country. we wa nt million people in this country. we want to support people who work hard and support them with the cost of living and help business in this country. jeremy corbyn and the labour party would put up corporation tax and a tax on jobs to the highest in europe. they will ta ke the highest in europe. they will take a sledgehammer to the economy. i think this is an absolutely amazing country and it is an incredible privilege for me to be prime minister of this country. it is an extraordinary place to live and place to be and i think we have and place to be and i think we have a fantastic future ahead of us. look
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at where we already live. we have the greatest academic sector and universities. 0ne the greatest academic sector and universities. one in seven of the world ? universities. one in seven of the world? kings and queens have been educated in this country. we have more number one pop music hits than any other country in the world. we we re any other country in the world. we were the only country to export music to north america. the only country to take it to the united states. that is why it is called 0ne direction. we are one of the great manufacturing powers in the world. we are the sixth exporter of manufacturing goods. we also lead in bioscience, finance and the arts and all sorts of fields. yesterday i was
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in milton keynes at the red bull formula! in milton keynes at the red bull formula 1 racing team. they showed me that by using high technology they were able to reduce the size of they were able to reduce the size of the engine of these formula! machinesjust five years the engine of these formula! machines just five years from 2.6 litres... do you follow motorsport? do you know what i'm talking about? they are able to reduce the amount of petrol from 2.6 litres to !.6 in just five years and yet produce more power. that for me is a metaphor for this incredible country. we can go faster and faster and do better and better and be cleaner and greener at the same time. i hope you don't mind me saying that i think the only thing standing in our way... me saying that i think the only thing standing in ourway... my ambition is very simple, i want us to be the best place on earth to bring up your kids and grandkids and
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the cleanest country on earth. the only thing standing in our way... if you were only thing standing in our way... if you we re a only thing standing in our way... if you were a green supercar, the flat tyre that we have, do you know what it is? it is this punctured parliament! all i'm asking is your help to change that punctured parliament on thursday of next week and get us a working majority. that is all we need. we have seven days to do it, seven days to get brexit done, seven days to end the deadlock and seven days to get out of this pit stop we have been in for three and a half years. we have seven days to make sure we can invest in our nhs, in our schools and in our police. seven days to unleash this country's potential and get it surging forward again. thank you all very much for listening. q for having me along this afternoon. it
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is having me along this afternoon. it isa having me along this afternoon. it is a fantastic pleasure for me to be here. i will now take as many questions as i can. can someone first start. julie has got a long question. i've been trying to read it upside down. got a long question. i've been trying to read it upside down. we are asking for your help. i sent you an e—maila are asking for your help. i sent you an e—mail a few months ago. are asking for your help. i sent you an e-mail a few months ago. what did ido an e-mail a few months ago. what did i do with it? you are in trouble now. we also spoke to sarah downes. he came to specsavers a few weeks ago andl he came to specsavers a few weeks ago and i live at the top of the town where they want to build 400 times. it is on green fields. the
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fields are actually a flood plain. there is a source of underground water which makes it a flood plain. pa rt of water which makes it a flood plain. part of the town was flooded before the river broke its banks. we have been talking to the district council about it and they said that the government wanted so many houses that have to be delivered in their district over so many years. the derbyshire dales already have five years worth of housing. so why are they wanting to put it on a greenfield site which is pasture a flood plain, major traffic concerns, access, wildlife but they don't listen. we have had all sorts. we have had the traffic survey out. they are not interested. why? thank you very much, julie. i want to do everything i can to help you there. i've got a huge amount of sympathy
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for people in matlock and elsewhere in derbyshire, yorkshire and people who have suffered in the floods and thatis who have suffered in the floods and that is incredibly distressing when that is incredibly distressing when that happens. we have to stop building on flood plains and areas that are vulnerable to flooding. that is why we are putting another 4 billion into flood defences and also make sure we invest in brownfield sites which enable us to invest a housing that people need and let young people get on the housing ladder without racking green sites. they are not even affordable. ladder without racking green sites. they are not even affordablelj ladder without racking green sites. they are not even affordable. i can imagine. i they are not even affordable. i can imagine. lam they are not even affordable. i can imagine. i am going to ask sarah to ta ke imagine. i am going to ask sarah to take it up and make sure that she represents you properly to the local planning authorities and that your point of view is properly put across. point of view is properly put across. i totally understand. we have to put in long term flood defences but we've also got to plant
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millions more trees. it sounds crazy but it is true. you need to plant 30 million more trees on higher ground to deal with the water that are building up. trees are only part of the answer but they are part of the solution. when brexit is over are you going to pull the country back together? yes, we are. there is only one way to get it. it has got worse in the last three and a half years because the delay and the anger in parliament has made it worse. that is why i am so pleased that at least on our side of the argument even though people do disagree in the tory party or they have done they
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are all coming together to get this thing over the line. they want to move forward and that is a really great opportunity for our country. if we get it done we have a hugely exciting future ahead of us. i think people will come together in a big way. can you categorically guarantee that the nhs is not vulnerable to outside bodies from other countries?|j the nhs is not vulnerable to outside bodies from other countries? i can. ican bodies from other countries? i can. i can absolutely say that. this question does come up with a metronomic frequency. with great respect to everybody, it is a ufo idea. we believe passionately and i believe passionately in the nhs. it is one of the best things about our
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country. it is a very simple idea. when anyone is sick the whole country comes together to help them. ita country comes together to help them. it a fantastic thing. we are putting £34 billion into it, the biggest ever investment. we are upgrading 20 hospitals. we are building 40 new hospitals. we are building 40 new hospitals. in ten years time as a result of the decisions that this government is taking there will be 40 new hospitals but we are also investing in 50,000 new nurses. there will be 50 million more gp appointments as a result of the decisions we are taking. we want to invest massively in the nhs. it is a fantastic thing. if you have a healthy and happy population you will also have a more productive population. a population that feels more confident about itself. you will have a happier country and a richer country. we are investing in
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our future by investing in the nhs. it is absolutely the right thing to do. but i want to be clear that we can only make these investments if we have a robust economy and that is what we have to make sure we deliver. in the next few years we will make sure that we keep the economy moving and we do not clobber, we do not clobber people with excessive taxation, which is what jeremy corbyn and the labour party are proposing to do, and we do not attack the businesses that allow our economy to grow and thrive. you need two sides. we believe as one nation conservative there are two sides to our economy. there is brilliant infrastructure, a fantastic nhs, superb education. but then you have also got to have wonderful businesses for the —— that are prospering and flourishing. bringing in the revenue we need to
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pay for those investments. you have to have both and believe in both. some conservatives to have both and believe in both. some conservativesjust to have both and believe in both. some conservatives just believe to have both and believe in both. some conservativesjust believe in wealth creation, some just believe in putting money to the public sector. neither option works. you have got to do both and that is one nation conservatives and that is what we want to bring forward over the next five years. what we want to bring forward over the next five years. earlier today you knitted that and we would like you knitted that and we would like you to show people what it was. that is beautiful. thank you so much. you to show people what it was. that is beautiful. thank you so much. we will now throw it open to the media. thank you very much. i'm very proud of that. thank you very much indeed. that will keep me warm. i'm stepping
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down now because you have questions from the media. hang on, laura. laura from the bbc. thank you, mr johnson. you've said today that as soon as you win if you are lucky enough to win you would have a budget in february which would cut tax for people but overall your manifesto would raise tax. you said your deal would be done within a year but every time you say get brexit done, actually it would just lead to months or years of negotiations. what can we actually believe from you ? negotiations. what can we actually believe from you? i don't know what you are talking about on the first point, laura. we are cutting taxes on business rates and national insurance contributions for everybody in the country and as for
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your point about getting brexit done, the advantage of the deal we have ready to go is that it takes us out of the eu onjanuary 31. it means we are no longer part out of the eu onjanuary 31. it means we are no longer part of the legal empire of the eu. we have full sovereignty to legislate for ourselves and do all the things that i was describing and the most important thing is it ends the parliamentary wrangling and bitterness and feuding that in my view is to stabilise this country for the last three and a half years. it lets this country move on. what jeremy corbyn and the labour party would do is keep us locked in groundhog day for the whole of next year and beyond with more disputes in parliament about brexit. overall your manifesto would raise tax. that is very clear from what you have published. overall your manifesto would raise taxes. published. overall your manifesto would raise taxes. we are cutting taxes and national insurance contributions and on business rates
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and i'm certainly not aware of the data you describe. in our first budget we propose to do more to cut taxes. i have a list. beth rigby. hello. mrjohnson, this morning you absolutely promised to leave the eu by january 31. if we get a working majority government. but we all know that a robust economy doesn'tjust depend on january 31 that a robust economy doesn'tjust depend onjanuary 31 it depends on a trade deal with the eu by the end of december. so my question to you is do you absolutely promise that you will get your trade deal done by the end of december? beth, we already
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have a deal and we can come out on january 3! in a state of perfect equilibria and to grace with the re st of equilibria and to grace with the rest of the eu. we have a zero tariff and zero quote a position now. i am in absolutely no doubt at all that we will be able to make sure that the eu protect its own interests and has a deal with us that ensures that that continues for the future. in spite of the heroic exports ofjohn smedley and other companies, the eu has a millions of pounds trade surplus so it is in very much in their interest to do a deal with us and i have no doubt they will. if you say and i absolutely guarantee we will get a deal, i think i can. look at what we achieved in three months. with the new deal that i did. everyone said it wasn't possible. everyone said it wouldn't happen. i think you may be
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expressed scepticism yourself. but we did it. it is a great deal and it will take this country forward. we did it. it is a great deal and it will take this country forward. so thatis will take this country forward. so that is a cast—iron guarantee in front of all these people? we already have a fantastic deal and the possibility you are lead to simply will not happen. paul. the possibility you are lead to simply will not happen. paul. prime minister, you have been talking about your first !00 days in government as if the conservatives haven't already been in power for 3495 days. if you want people to believe... i was running the london at the time. but you are an mp for many of those years. if you want vote rs many of those years. if you want voters to believe you aren't turning over a leaf on austerity and you be honest and say that your predecessors cut too much? what
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happens in 2010 was that a new government came in and found that the place was totally bankrupt. all labour governments end up running out of money and all labour governments end up with debt higher than they began. all labour governance and that with unemployment higher than they began. i think it was right to govern prudently and i still think it is right to govern prudently but what i wa nt right to govern prudently but what i want to do is to invest massively in our public services and we are going to do that. we will do it by running a strong economy and we do that because we get brexit done and move on. does it mean you think there was too much cut earlier? you must do? this is idle speculation, if i may say so. what i want to do is get on and invest in our country and our future. if i look at the alternative, every labour government
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end up with an economic crisis, if i look at what jeremy corbyn and the labour party... would start an economic crisis. matt from the sun. thousands of people are struggling to get to work every day because of the current strikes in south—western railand as the current strikes in south—western rail and as mayor of london you want to the then tory government to ban strikes on the tube and do still wa nt strikes on the tube and do still want to see a tory government banning strikes on public transport, and lastly you did not answer my question about how you will personally spend your £85 tax cut next year. honestly! on the strikes, and it's a perfectly reasonable question, i do think it is absurd that critical transport, mass transit systems should be capable of being put out of action by strikes. there are other countries in the world that have minimum service
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requirements for public transport and that is what i want to see, that is and that is what i want to see, that is in and that is what i want to see, that is in the manifesto and it's what we will be doing and we will do that right at the beginning of the next parliament if we get a working majority and that will help commuters majority and that will help commuters across majority and that will help commuters across the whole of the country. on your other point, the answer is country. on your other point, the answer is! country. on your other point, the answer is i have no idea, all i want to do is get brexit done so the country can move on. claire from the daily mail. we have not heard anything from jacob rees-mogg in this election. is the guaranteed to be your comments lead if you win the election?” think it would be wrong for me to give answers to that media but who will be in the next government when we need to form a new government to put it we only have seven days of this election campaign left. i think all these questions come under the general category of measuring up the curtains, don't you think? i think we need to get on, get a working majority, get this over the line and get brexit done. and then there will
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be plenty of time to answer those types of questions and martin from the daily express. types of questions and martin from the daily express. thank you, martin brown, i'm sure it's a situation you are not contemplating but if there is are not contemplating but if there isa are not contemplating but if there is a referendum next year, a second referendum on the eu, do you think it is right that eu citizens, 2 million of them in britain, should get the right to vote, as is the labour party policy? i think the whole proposal from the labour party is bizarre and that they want to spend another three months negotiating a new deal, they won't explain what it is, you can't find a single member of the shadow cabinet who would support the new deal mr corbyn wants to do. i don't understand what he actually intends about this negotiation. they would have six months or a year for another referendum campaign on this weird deal he wants to do and i think people will be outraged by the whole thing. to think that it is going to be linked in some way by
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getting in millions more voters who would be likely to vote one way rather than another, i think that would cause a great deal of public disquiet and you don't think it's the right way forward. that is my list. yes, go on. the right way forward. that is my list. yes, go on. thank you. really do an interview with andrew neil before thursday? do an interview with andrew neil before thursday? i'm very happy to do interviews with all manner of people. the highest privilege of this campaign is to be able to answer your questions this campaign is to be able to answer your questions and i think i have submitted so far to... i'm the first prime minister to have done or about to do two one on one leadership debates, several hours worth of phone—ins, endless press conferences, and interviews with all sorts of bbc people called andrew.
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and i will continue to submit to the interrogation of the media and any... if you want to have any further information on that i direct you to doctor lee kane who will advise you. yes? you to doctor lee kane who will advise you. yes? when a british voter turns to you in the middle of 2020 and says, mrjohnson, he said brexit would be done so why do i keep hearing about it on the tv, reading about it in the newspapers, this negotiation with the eu and the companies and the economy lobbying to have interest heard in that negotiation? you said it would be done, what will you say to that photo? i don't think that such a person will put that question in that way because what will happen is it will be done. if we can get a working majority on january the 3!st we will be out of. and we will have full legal control of the things that matter to us and a great
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opportunity to take this country forward. i much looking forward to it my will take my last question from... yes, you. sorry. it my will take my last question from... yes, you. sorry. ijust want to follow up on laura's question because you keep saying that you are the party of tax cuts but you have written down in black and white in your manifesto your policies will lead to net tax increases. a vote for the tory party is a vote for higher taxes, why won't you admit that? because it's absolutely not right. we have a manifesto that commits us to cutting national insurance contributions for everybody in the country. what is true, what is true is that we are not going to begin in the first budget by cutting taxes on absolutely everything, we are going to begin by cutting taxes for those who need the most help with the cost of living. that is why we are doing things like cutting national
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insurance first because everybody benefits from it. we will go on to cut national insurance by... lift the threshold to £12,500 and help people on low and modest incomes to pay less tax. i think that is what the people of this country want right now. i think that is the right way forward. what we will also do, by the way, is increasing the living wage by the biggest ever amount because i also think it is right for a one nation conservative party to help people with the cost of living. that is what we will do. we will invest massively in public services, invest massively in public services, invest in education and schools, but we are also going to support the wealth creating sector of the economy and cutting taxes on businesses and making sure that we make this country still a fantastic place to invest. as i say, there is £150 place to invest. as i say, there is £!50 billion worth of foreign direct
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investment waiting to come into this country, according to goldman sachs i think it was, if we can get our deal, my deal, through. what you wa nt deal, my deal, through. what you want for christmas, folks? £!50 billion worth of investment in this country or jeremy corbyn's billion worth of investment in this country orjeremy corbyn's plan for two referendums, one on the eu and one on i think i know what i want and what is good for the uk and the economy put a thank you very much. there we are, the prime minister in derbyshire taking questions from some of the people at that company but also journalists, in some of the people at that company but alsojournalists, in particular questions about brexit and taxation. just to say, he was in the derbyshire dales constituency and you can see a full list of the candidates in that constituency and also if you want to see the
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constituency candidates where you live, you can check that out online by going to the bbc news website. our political correspondent ben wright with listening to the prime minister. as i said, taking an array of questions but a couple including from our political editor at laura kuenssberg, specifically about taxation and what the conservative party manifesto talks about with tax laura asked him, net, the manifesto is proposing tax increases which he didn't seem to like as a question. he took exception to. it was a tetchy exchange and laurette said the scorecard of the tory manifesto showed an increase in taxation —— laura said. he said not put that we know the institute for fiscal
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studies as said the tory manifesto promises they don't think are credible and that they would need to produce tax increases or at least increase borrowing in the future to account for it all but it was a tetchy exchange pulled the prime minister did not like the question very much. the forum was interesting, he has not done many of these two and as with the public but he came him to a factory in derbyshire and took some questions from some of the people who work to —— many of these 0&as. there were questions on brexit, on housing. he was drumming home the tories' court message that in his view, all the problems of the country are because parliament is gridlocked and it will not get on with brexit, even though the last parliament did pass the first hurdle a borisjohnson's deal. he said it was a punctured parliament stopping the country motoring again and that was the theme he came back to. here is a flavour of what he said pulled i'm afraid our economy is being held
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back at the moment by the drag anchor of our broken parliament to. people cannot make decisions and businesses cannot invest and there is about £150 billion worth of foreign direct investment that will come into the country as soon as we get brexit done and get our deal over the line. and we can get brexit done, because we have a deal. ready to go. as i said before, it was up and ready. are not the greatest cook but if you were using a microwave, it would prick the lid and whack it in for three minutes. we can get it done and get it back in parliament and get the withdrawal bill in parliament before you cook your christmas turkey. we can do it. all we need is a working majority to deliver it because every single one of the conservative candidates standing at this election including sarah who is here, every one has signed up to this deal.
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sarah who is here, every one has signed up to this deal. of course, claiming brexit will be done if he is returned with a majority is the cornerstone of this campaign but he was asked here, as he is almost every time he is in front of the press, to be honest with people. exit, while at the uk may leave the eu on june the exit, while at the uk may leave the eu onjune the 31st if he gets his agreement through, that the reality at the beginning of phase two of brexit because there will be a negotiation with the eu around trade, aviation, defence, security and the rest and he claims he can do all that within a year, no need to extend the implementation phase or the transition phase. he was asked again whether he can guarantee there would be that trade deal by the end of next year and he said he could. there will be many who doubt whether that will be borne out by events but i thought he gave the strongest assurance he thought he could do it all within a year. he was asked this question by one of the people it works here about the nhs. question by one of the people it works here about the nhs.” question by one of the people it works here about the nhs. i can absolutely say that and thank you,
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this question does come up with a metronomic, frequency. it is a total... you know, with great respect to everybody, it is a ufo idea. we believe passionately, i believe passionately in the nhs, it is believe passionately in the nhs, it isa believe passionately in the nhs, it is a fantastic thing, it is one of the best things about our country. it's a very simple idea, when anybody is sick, the whole country comes anybody is sick, the whole country comes together to help them. it is a fantastic thing and it is loved and admired in ourcountry fantastic thing and it is loved and admired in our country and around the world. we are putting £34 billion into it, the biggest ever investment. boris johnson responding toa investment. boris johnson responding to a question from a member of the audience about the nhs and whether he could guarantee it would be safe and not tied up in brexit negotiations put it is a question that he is repeatedly asked in this campaign and he said absolutely not, and he said to me had not come up in
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conversations with president trump at nato. that was the event in derbyshire and the campaign now rolls into the last six or seven days and we will not see any deviation from the core message borisjohnson was deviation from the core message boris johnson was hammering deviation from the core message borisjohnson was hammering away at, that it borisjohnson was hammering away at, thatitis borisjohnson was hammering away at, that it is all about brexit and trying to get a new parliament in place and the tory majority. thank you very much, ben in derbyshire. as we we re you very much, ben in derbyshire. as we were saying, just a week to go until polling day and all of the parties are beginning their final push for votes. boris johnson was speaking to workers in derbyshire and he said he wants to unite the country and get brexit done. labour have outlined plans to recruit almost 20,000 extra teachers in england over five years. almost 20,000 extra teachers in england overfive years. as almost 20,000 extra teachers in england over five years. as for the liberal democrats, they have been promising a £17 billion research and develop and fund put out the snp have said there is only one week to stop brexit. a report now from our political correspondent tom barton.
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they won't be able to vote for another few years. butjeremy corbyn hopes to persuade their parents. you have your hand up. why do you want to be prime minister? promising to recruit 20,000 more teachers and to keep class sizes below 30. but also attacking the conservatives' record in government. elect the tories you carry on with austerity, you carry on with increasing gaps between the richest and the poorest, you carry on with underfunded schools, oversized classes and increasing numbers of rough sleeping homelessness. we are very clear. we have a totally funded and costed manifesto. the only party that has in this election. and it will give real hope and opportunity to everyone in this country. good morning. good morning, philip, good morning, holly. on the this morning sofa, borisjohnson hoping his message on brexit will convince a daytime tv audience. if we get a working majority ofjust nine seats more we can be out on january the 30th.
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and how long will the trade deals take? well... years? no. we can get — we can do many new deals with countries around the world. with the eu, we can build a new trade partnership by the end of next year. the snp telling voters in scotland they've gotjust a week to stop borisjohnson and to stop brexit. the lib dems leader was stopped yesterday by extinction rebellion activists who surrounded jo swinson's campaign bus. but her supporters say the campaign is still on the move, fighting for the political middle ground. do we want to have a moderating voice within our politics? because i really don't think the british people like extremes, and the liberal democrats have always offered that centre path that helps to actually prevent some of those things happening. and as i say, our manifesto is really ambitious. i hope people will give it a look. this time next week, the polls will be open and so the parties have just a few days left to persuade
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you to give them your vote. and what you decide will determine how many mps each party gets to send here to westminster, and could ultimately shape this country's politics for years to come. tom barton, bbc news, westminster. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. with just a week to go before the country goes to the polls, the parties are pushing their big election promises. in washington, the us speaker, nancy pelosi, i said impeachment proceedings will go ahead against president trump for pressurising ukraine to investigate his democratic political rival. french police have been firing tear gas at protesters as the biggest nationwide strike in years brings most of france to a standstill. and
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in sport, marco silva is facing the sack as everton manager with a clip board meeting this up new to decide his future after they lost the merseyside derby, slipping into the premier league bottom three. there has been heavy criticism for an italian sports newspaper for its black friday headline, picturing romelu lu ka ku black friday headline, picturing romelu lukaku and chris smalling ahead of inter milan playing rome tomorrow. and anthony joshua ahead of inter milan playing rome tomorrow. and anthonyjoshua said he expects to be at his lightest weight in five years for his rematch with andy ruiz, focusing on speed in his training camp having lost to the same fight in june. training camp having lost to the same fight injune. more to come on all those stories later. more on that news from france. police have fired tear gas at protestors in the french city of nantes during the biggest strike in decades which has brought large parts of the country to a standstill. rail and metro services are deserted, flights have been grounded and about half of eurostar
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services between paris and london have been cancelled. many schools are also affected. the strike is against plans to create a universal retirement system which unions say will force millions of people to retire later or live on a reduced pension. let's speak to hugh schofield who's in paris for us. first of all, we know that french people are often quite resistant to political and economic change but is this another example? you would have to say yes, i guess. the thing about this reform is that it is something, when people are asked in principle if they are for or against, they tend to say yes, we think the pension system should be reformed and be made more fair and even. it is full of all sorts of strange discrepancies and anomalies that often date back decades. it results
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in certain groups of people having a much better terms of retirement than others and president macron's basic point was to put everybody on the same basis so everybody who works a certain amount of money has at the end of their time in work the same pension rights when they retire. that is the principle but there are all sorts of fears that have been attached to it. the government has been perhaps foolish for not yet spelling out clearly what the detail of the reform is going to be which means a lot of different sectors of the economy fear they will lose out, on top of which you have this general sense among the left in france that they have been squeezed out of the political debate for the last few years under macron and this is the chance for them to make their comeback. the left was eclipsed by the gilets jaunes movement has not been able to stage a big relic like this for a long time indeed. this opportunity has come their way and
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allow them to galvanise the left —— allow them to galvanise the left —— a big rally. ithink it allow them to galvanise the left —— a big rally. i think it is quite true that a lot of people who are not particularly bothered about the pension system have come out in any case simply because they want to give macron a kicking. and talking about that kicking, what has been going on around the country? particularly in nantes, there has been tear gas fired? and right here in paris it has been heating up, that might be too strong a word but there was a big demonstration with tens of thousands of people, a big old style battalion and left—wing demonstration which is trying to get down to the plus deliver public to my left but they have been stopped because apparently there was trouble brewing with a truck set on fire and police intervening. although i cannot confirm it, it looks like members are in black block anarchist
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elements which have joined the demonstration and are causing trouble but we will see how it pans out. it does not particularly surprised me because wells has happened in the last year of gilets jaunes is we have seen time and again how easy it is for radical anarchist elements to make their way into demonstrations and basically spoil it for everybody else. for the moment, thank you very much for the latest from paris. back down to british politics. current and former labour staff have been speaking about their decision to submit sworn evidence to the equality and human rights commission about anti—semitism in the party. our political correspondent chris mason has been following the labour story. good afternoon from tamworth north—east of birmingham where we are following the labour campaign. jeremy corbyn has been focused on education today, visiting a sequence of schools across the midlands. but a real set of questions again
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landing in front of him on this whole question of anti—semitism. the submission we learnt about this morning from 70 serving and former labour officials submitting sworn state m e nts labour officials submitting sworn statements as part of the official investigation into anti—semitism within the party which is part of the submission from thejewish labour movement to the ongoing investigation into the party that started earlier this year. this afternoon we have heard directly in afternoon we have heard directly in a news conference hosted by the jewish labour movement about the scale of their concerns and powerful testimony from sam matthews who is the former labour head of disputes and something of a whistle—blower in this ongoing row about anti—semitism. this ongoing row about anti-semitism. all of us joined the labour party because we believed in its true values, of antiracism and socialjustice. we witnessed a violation of those values by the very people meant to be leading our
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movement. as highlighted in this document, 70 other whistle—blowers have come forward. from all different parts have come forward. from all different pa rts of have come forward. from all different parts of the labour party because they share my dngust at the violations of the labour party's true values. those whistle—blowers, some of whom are still employed by the labour party are fearful of retribution from their employer put at some are grappling with the same emotional and mental turmoil my team andl emotional and mental turmoil my team and i experienced. inside the party those individuals are met with a coarser public denials that they know to simply be untrue. —— a chorus of denials. know to simply be untrue. —— a chorus of denials. we had a chance before this news conference to put some of these allegations directly tojeremy some of these allegations directly to jeremy corbyn some of these allegations directly tojeremy corbyn during a school visit in peterborough. tojeremy corbyn during a school visit in peterborough.” tojeremy corbyn during a school visit in peterborough. i became leader of the party and there were no processes in place to deal with anti—semitism. i asked no processes in place to deal with anti—semitism. iasked baroness chakrabarti anti—semitism. iasked baroness chakra barti to produce anti—semitism. iasked baroness chakrabarti to produce a report on this which she did and following that we introduced rules to deal with it, we introduced an appeals
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procedure to deal with it and we introduced an education process so party members understood the hurt that could be caused by anti—semitic remarks and behaviour. and are introduced injuly a further remarks and behaviour. and are introduced in july a further rule change to say that really serious, egregious cases, could be dealt with a fast track process to our national constitutional committee which is independent of me, an independent process independent of me, an independent process that is legally advised, and i think we have got processes in place that have improved it a great deal. but put it in context, the numberof deal. but put it in context, the number of cases, the total number in proportion to party membership is very, very low indeed but one case of anti—semitism is one too many. meanwhile, labour are trying when not facing questions about anti—semitism to talk about schools today. jeremy corbyn a sequence of school visits, firstly in peterborough and then in rugby and then heading here to the west
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midlands where he has a rally tonight. what is striking, anecdotally, speaking to labour activists is that yes, they are keen to get out on the doorstep and still hopeful they can do well but you don't have to probe far before labour activists acknowledged that the likelihood of them winning next week might be a relatively slim in their view. and also those who make their view. and also those who make the point that whilst they think some of the messages that labour have are broadly popular, finding resista nce have are broadly popular, finding resistance to jeremy corbyn as have are broadly popular, finding resistance tojeremy corbyn as a reason for people not to vote for labour is pretty easy for labour activists to find. chris mason reporting. the speaker of the us house of representatives, nancy pelosi, has announced that impeachment proceedings will go ahead against president trump. she said he had abused his power for personal gain at the expense of us national security.
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our democracy is what is at stake. the president leaves us no choice but to act because he is trying to corrupt, once again, the election for his own benefit. the president has engaged in abuse of power, undermining our national security and jeopardising the integrity of our elections. his actions are in defiance of the vision of our founders and the oath of office that he takes to preserve, protect and defend the constitution of the united states. sadly, but with confidence and humility, with allegiance to our founders and our hearts full of love for america, today i am asking our chairman to proceed with articles of impeachment. i commend our committee chairs and our members for their sombre approach to actions which i wish the president had not made necessary. that was nancy pelosi, house speaker. well, chris buckler has this
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analysis from washington. nancy pelosi's speech was laced with references to history and this is an historic moment. she talked about the fact that the declaration of independence, the constitution was all set up, in her words, to stop a pink president being corrupt about foreign influence and using that on america. —— king president. she has announced that as far as she's concerned it's time to draw up articles of impeachment and it brings forward the idea of a vote inside the us house of representatives to impeach donald trump and set up a trial in the us senate, potentially as early as january. she set out the reasons for her belief that president trump must be impeached with the suggestion he tried to pressure ukraine into launching investigations into his own political opponents for his own personal gain but this goes to this idea that president trump have stopped military aid from being paid
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to the country and that was very important aid for ukraine to try to defend the country. hundreds of millions of dollars. and also the suggestion he dangled the idea of a white house meeting to the ukrainian resident volodymyr zelensky to try to force him to launch these investigations. nancy plessis said at one stage, "if we want our president to be above the law, we do so at the peril about the public. in america that no one is above the law." she said the facts are not contested and that's not the case. republicans have made very clear that as far as they are concerned the president did nothing wrong and they say that ultimately military aid was withheld and no investigations were launched into the likes of joe investigations were launched into the likes ofjoe biden and his son hunter who had business dealings in the country but itjoe biden is of course one of the individuals hoping to win the democratic nomination to chan gulch —— to challenge donald trump next year. and if this trial goes ahead it will take place at the start of an election year and it
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will all feed into that vote in november 2020 and make very bitter campaign. although it is highly likely that the us house of representatives will to impeach donald trump probably before the end of the year, it is highly unlikely that the senate will remove him from office because it is worth pointing out that the senators, the 100 senators there, act as the draw in this case. they are majority republican members of mr trump's party and it's highly unlikely they will be in a position where it they convicted him of any offence. nonetheless, this feels like quite a moment in america and also itjust reinforces once again the clear divide that exists in washington at the moment, divide that really centres on this trump administration. our washington correspondent there. and the president has just tweeted his response, he said "the do nothing democrats had a historically bad day
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"yesterday in the house. "they have no impeachment case and are demeaning our country. "but nothing matters to them, they have gone crazy. "therefore i say, if you are going to impeach me, do it now, fast." that is the message from donald trump. let's see what the weather is doing. a red sky. some people were up doing. a red sky. some people were up early enough to see the sunrise and look at the beautiful orange and spread sunrise we got to see across many parts of the uk this morning. we get these red sunrises when there isa we get these red sunrises when there is a lot of particles in the atmosphere and it scatters away the blue light spectrum and we see more of these pink and red colours. that is why we sometimes get red skies in the morning. there is that expression, of course, red sky at
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night shepherd's delight. red sky in the morning, shepherd two warning. you might think this is just one of those bits of weather with no science involved but that is not the case in this instance because we get those particles trapped on the area of high pressure and so we see red skies in the morning when high pressure is clearing away to the east. so we look east, we see the sun through those particles at sunrise which is why the sun is appearing so red. at the same time we have unsettled weather coming in from the west and are unsettled weather usually comes in from the west so when you see a red sky in the morning it is a warning that the settled weather is moving away and something more unsettled will take its place. so some real science there. what is taking place this weekend? quite a lot of cloud and rainfor weekend? quite a lot of cloud and rain for some at the moment. that is how it looks across scotland and you
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can see why on this satellite image with this pipeline of moisture just ploughing into the british isles. with that we are dragging in a south—westerly wind which feeds increasingly mild air in our direction. so temperatures in the coming hours for many will actually climb. but the rain could cause further problems in western scotland with localised flooding and travel disruption because the rain has been really persistent here. some of that rain in northern england and parts of wales. it stays windy in northern and western parts. not as windy further south and east. something a little drier there but those are your temperatures for the end of the afternoon and start of the evening. sevenin afternoon and start of the evening. seven in norwich and eight in stornoway. watch the bridges at the end of the night. cloud and outbreaks of rain places but that south—westerly wind will still be wafting mild airour south—westerly wind will still be wafting mild air our way so by the end of the night those temperatures will have come up a little bit, 12
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degrees in london and belfast. tomorrow morning will be exceptionally mild. very different compared to what we have had lately. was that some outbreaks of rain and hefty shower pushing through northern ireland and down into northern england, wales and the midlands. a little drier in the north—west later. by the end of the day the wind comes back from the north and temperatures in northern areas will begin to drop. the temperature is really up and down over the next 24 was also. then the start of the weekend and saturday is the drier day for many but as you could see cloud and rain will be gathering. more rain for western scotland. more heavy rain will not be welcome. saturday temperatures are generally between eight and 11 and saturday nights will be a very wet one. this band of heavy rain pushes eastwards across all parts of the country with brisk winds and as that rain band clears away we will be left with a strong westerly wind bringing a mixture of sunny spells and showers. some of their showers
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will be heavy on sunday and could well be thundery and when theory over high ground in scotland. later in the day because the parts of wales and south—west england we are a little concerned because it looks like the winds will ramp up and severe gales could cause problem lies ina severe gales could cause problem lies in a day. saw lots going on with our weather as we head through the next few days.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. with one week to the general election, the political parties launch their final push, reminding voters of their key pledges. in washington, us speaker nancy pelosi says impeachment proceedings will go ahead against president trump for pressuring ukraine to investigate his democratic political rival. ——joe biden. a nationwide strike brings much of france to a standstill as police fire tear gas at protestors. bbc research shows thousands of mental health patients in england are facing long waits for nhs talking therapy services. sport now on afternoon
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live withjohn watson. and marco silva's role as everton manager is hanging by a thread? a little bit. there has been rumours circulating for a while that marco silva is due to get the sack as manager of everton. the club's board our meeting this afternoon. following that 5— two defeat to liverpool. he was allowed to stay after the defeat to norwich last month but the defeat to leicester followed by defeat to their city rivals followed. who will replace him? fans are thought to be unwilling to see former manager david moyes given the job on a temporary basis. it was a waste going to be a difficult game tonight but the defeat puts you now in the bottom three. does that change anything for you and your position at the club? i am not the right person to ask. you would have to ask
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this question to different people because i am not the right person to talk to. not italy where a sports newspaper has been heavily criticised for the racial tone of its headline. romilly lukaku and chris smalling are pictured next to the headline black friday. roma say the headline black friday. roma say the intention of the article was positive but it has been ruined by a terrible headline. the paper defends itself by saying it has been misconstrued by those who see it as anything other than celebrating diversity. there's a big fight tomorrow, isn't there? there is indeed. this will be a career defining moment for anthony joshua. he will be at his lowest weight in five years against andy ruiz weight in five years against andy ruinunior. this is there much anticipated rematch. it all went wrong forjoshua last time when these two met. they will be fighting
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in saudi arabia on saturday night with joshua looking in saudi arabia on saturday night withjoshua looking to win back the heavyweight titles he lost to ruiz injune. joshua heavyweight titles he lost to ruiz in june. joshua says he heavyweight titles he lost to ruiz injune. joshua says he has to prepare differently for this fight. iam punching prepare differently for this fight. i am punching like a horse kicking back right now. my rhythm, there is no tension in my body. rhythm and flow. that is what boxing is about. we're going back the 70s. i have just been studying this game and i think rather than doing the weights and stuff like that just going to box. he looks relaxed but surely there has got to be some nerves because if he loses this one you wonder what's next for anthony joshua. our reporter is in saudi arabia and says it is clear that his new training regime has made a difference. he is like a different man from the one we saw on fight week in new york back injune. he
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seems very focused for this fight. there is a different intensity about him. he has told us that he might well weigh in tomorrow under 17 stone and if he does that it will be his lightest weight for five years. that tells you his focuses more speed to negate the threat that andy ruiz poses and to use his height and reach advances advantage. one of the trainers for an undercard fighter told me that the weight loss might work against anthonyjoshua because he might get tired of the fight goes on. he does seem on edge this time round. maybe that is a good thing because last thing he didn't have much fearfactor. this because last thing he didn't have much fear factor. this time round you can see he really doesn't want to lose the rematch. we finish with
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some snooker and defending champion ronnie o'sullivan is out of the uk championship in york. in the last few minutes he has been beaten 6—4 by ding. o'sullivan has won this tournament for the last two years. worth pointing out that ronnie o'sullivan is 44 today so i hope he has something fun planned to get over that defeat. that is all from the bbc sport centre but i will be back with an update in the next half hour. it's one week until the election, and the snp have a new focus, ‘seven days to stop brexit‘. nicola sturgeon today embarks on a week—long bus tour of the country, in a final push to win votes. she's been speaking in edinburgh. think carefully, notjust about how you will feel a week today but think about how you want to feel a week
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tomorrow. think about the news you wa nt to tomorrow. think about the news you want to be waking up to i don't believe that many people in scotland wa nt to believe that many people in scotland want to be waking up on friday 13th december at the news of boris johnson as prime minister for five yea rs. johnson as prime minister for five years. deciding and dictating scott don's future. instead, let's wake up to the news that we have taken the future of our country into our own hands, lock the tories out of power and give ourselves the opportunity to build a better brexit future. let's go out this week and vote snp. that was the message from nicola sturgeon. in a week's time we will all be casting our votes — geeta guru—murphy is in croydon for us. yes, that's right. we are endorsing this pop—up cafe
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and entertainment space in croydon. croydon is a really big area which voted 50—50 in the brexit referendum but it is made up of three seats. bbc news is looking closely at the places where the election could be won and lost. one of those is croydon central. let me take you through some more detail on that. croydon is one of the biggest london boroughs and population second only to barnet but it is wrecked by three constituencies. —— splits by three constituencies. two were held by labour and one by the conservatives in the last election. its a battleground for the conservatives and labour, as croydon central has never really been a safe seat since its creation in 1974. after years of having a conservative mp it fell to labour in the 1997 landslide and since then has swung
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between the parties. both the main parties are really focused on winning this seat in a way‘s time. let speak to some of the voters in croydon who live and work here. with me i have someone who works in the housing sector and to young voters, one that works on the nhs and one who is a student. you are both in the croydon south seat at the moment and and, you work in croydon in the housing sector. how big an issue as housing? housing generally across the nation is a major issue. i think there has been recognition from all parties on this. in croydon we have work here for 38 years and we offer advice, support and accommodation to a number of young people. what we have seen is that there has been a
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gradual increase and there has also been an increase in complexity in their mental health of young people which is quite worrying. are the party is offering you any hope on what they are saying?” party is offering you any hope on what they are saying? i feel there is hope. there is wider acknowledgement that investing in our young people because they are the next generation of voters is an important issue. so i do feel the is a positive. how much money is the shortfall between what young people can shortfall between what young people ca n afford shortfall between what young people can afford and what is actually available? typically in any london borough what you find is that most young people have to move into the private rental sector because i insufficient social housing and what they receive in benefits is probably half the amount of what the market demands for rooms. and nicky, how much is housing a factorfor you or are there other issues that will help you decide who to vote for?
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housing is obviously an important issue but for me the nhs and mental health services are obviously more importance because i have used mental health services for so long and people that i support at work and people that i support at work and in my charity, mental health is and in my charity, mental health is a huge issue. and lauren, how about you, what is key for you? probably the education system and also transport. the fares are just so expensive so i would look to see who is lowering the fares and what i can get for my money. is it local issues and your local candidates that will help you decide. what about the brexit question and the leadership question? for me i find it quite difficult to decide between one of the candidates in one of the parties. i feel like one of the candidates that we have who ran before has been really good for our
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area but what that party stood for i don't really agree with. and how about you, nicky? is it specific things that happen in your life that matter are you looking at brexit at all? ijust want brexit over matter are you looking at brexit at all? i just want brexit over and done with so we can focus on other issues. well we all talk about brexit there are people dying from austerity and things like that and i think it has come on long enough. what about you, and, you work in housing, will that determine your vote ? housing, will that determine your vote? it will play a large part of it but in general welfare for young people because i think they are quite often defined by the circumstances and not seen as young people first. there even seen as homeless all young offenders. so it is very much about how we look after the next generation. because the crime question has also been very big here? exactly. there has been a
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rise in crime over london but certainly it is something we need to tackle. thank you very much to all of you. just a flavour of some of the thoughts here. local issues we are hearing seem to be important across croydon there are many other issues as well. croydon central as i said is very split. there is a full list of candidate for all three croydon seats on the website. millions of hsbc customers are facing significantly higher fees if they use their arranged overdraft. the bank says that from march, it will bring in a single charge of almost 40 per cent across all its accounts — except those held by students. but it's removing the current £5 daily fee for going into an unarranged overdraft. let's get more on this from our personal finance correspondent simon gompertz. why is this happening?
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40% sales quite a lot. 4096 sales quite a lot. it all goes back to the financial watchdog which decided to clamp down on the huge cost of overd rafts which decided to clamp down on the huge cost of overdrafts which the banks ra ke cost of overdrafts which the banks rake in about £2.5 billion a year from us that way. so they like us to have overd rafts. from us that way. so they like us to have overdrafts. they love it because it has been a big money earner in the past and the charges have been confusing. you had interest rates and daily fees and monthly fees and people who particularly you lose out are those who have unarranged overdraft, once they have gone into without permission and they have tended to pay a lot more under banks have made a lot of money out of them. the fca watchdog have said to just have an interest rate so it is easy to compare and it benefits people who are paying all of those charges. so hsbc‘s response that has been to come up with a whopping interest rate of nearly 40%. so we will
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expect other banks to respond in this way. it all comes on in the spring. does that mean that the watchdog's action has backfired? possibly not because hsbc is also getting rid of a charge of £5 a day which they impose on people who went into unauthorised overdraft. and there will be a £20 cap on charges per month which is to be £80 so that isa per month which is to be £80 so that is a benefit as well. 39.996. is that to try and make it sound like not 40%7 to try and make it sound like not 40%? anyway, what is the impact likely to be on this? if you frequently go into unarranged overdraft then you are likely to benefit from this. if you are one of those people who enjoys using the overdraft a nd those people who enjoys using the overdraft and has an arranged one which tended to be low cost then you will most likely pay more. here is
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an example. if you go £100 into overd rafts that will cost 49p a an example. if you go £100 into overdrafts that will cost 49p a week as opposed to 32p before. overdrafts that will cost 49p a week as opposed to 32p before.” overdrafts that will cost 49p a week as opposed to 32p before. i suppose people could just borrow loads on an unarranged overdraft? you might think if you are an unarranged category and it is cheaper than you mightjust use that but 40% is still a lot and it has doubled and what a lot of people pay on their credit ca rd lot of people pay on their credit card and you get want to not get onto debt with your credit cards so you need to be carrefour. —— you need to be careful. they could stop the use of your account whatsoever if you've borrowed too much. just underline this doesn't apply to students? it doesn't apply to stu d e nts students? it doesn't apply to students and it doesn't apply to people who have an interest free overdraft attached to their account and it doesn't apply for some paid for premium accounts where you actually put a lot of money through them and have a buffer of over
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£5,000. thank you very much indeed for that. staying with business, ramzan karmali has been in croydon talking to entrepreneurs to get a sense of what matters to them in this election. i'm in croydon in south london looking at but businesses are after in this election. i met a huge business in the area who deal in plastics and polymers. these are plastics and polymers. these are plastic pellets and what they do is they put them under about three different intense processors, hating them, mix them with additives and then pumping it with nitrogen. eventually that becomes a technical phone. those are the things that end up phone. those are the things that end up in yourcars, phone. those are the things that end up in your cars, your planes and in trainers. they look a bit like this. they are very lightweight and very eco—friendly as well apparently because of the nitrogen used in the
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process. this is a massive business for the area as i said but there are lots of small and up—and—coming businesses as well. one of those firms is mulla cakes. tell us what you are all about? we are a london based fashion brand and we have been able to expand into different sectors. i also do entrepreneurial and motivational workshops in schools and colleges. last year we released our creative community hub for young creatives up in the croydon area. what do you want to hear from politicians? are croydon area. what do you want to hearfrom politicians? are you hearing what she wants? it is a bit confusing and it is leaving me a bit torn. i want support from politicians and the government but what i am hearing is a little bits
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of broken promises and what makes me a little confused is that i am labour born and bred because i am a people's champion but i have a conservative mindset about business. so it is leaving me in a catch—22 about making a decision. so it is leaving me in a catch—22 about making a decision. so it's fairto about making a decision. so it's fair to say you are a undecided voice. this plastics firm is keen on making their business more sustainable. what about your business? sustainability is definitely an important factor when it comes to business. what i tend to look at when it comes to being sustainable is where is my manufacturing being made? something i feel passionately about is that with don't want our clothes be made under child labour and stuff like that. in terms of howl under child labour and stuff like that. in terms of how i sustain it for my brands are used branding. that is very important. mula cakes brand is what carries us. it is not
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any specific product but the brands which always wins at the end of the day. croydon is quite a diverse area and lots of small businesses like yours are cropping up. why so many small businesses moving to croydon? i believe we are home to the youth. we have the most out of the boroughs. i feel that independence and business start—ups are something that kids relish and want to become. seeing lots of role models like my safe and having independent businesses, i feel like that is the way of life for them now. dexter seems from mula cakes. thank you very much for your time. it is an amazing business here and a huge business. they operate notjust here but in america, china, india and are even looking at opening a plant in poland. we are going to find out more about their plans for the future and on sustainability as we have been hearing.
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now, high street retailers spend millions of pounds every year making christmas adverts targetting festive shoppers. but the owner of a hardware shop in powys spentjust £100 making an advert for social media encouraging people to buy local. it's become a viral sensation — and made a star out of the business owner's young son — as hywel griffith reports. music. it's the time of year when every company wants to sell us that warm, fuzzy feeling. a shop offering plungers and drill bits is not the first place you'd expect to find it, but hafod hardware in mid wales has put itself on the map, reminding customers that small independent shops are there to help, too. the video has already been watched tens of thousands of times after going global. the reaction has been incredible. we're totally overwhelmed by the amount of likes, shares, the emails we've had from all over the world.
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people say how much they love it and that it's put a smile on their face. it's really, really nice to hear. the star is tom's two—year—old son, arthur, who tookjust a morning to deliver his role doing jobs around the shop. polish the counter. you like polishing the counter? yeah. and cleaning the floor? yeah. you work very hard. yeah. do you think father christmas will come and see you? yeah. you've been good boy? yeah. while the likes ofjohn lewis and debenham's spent millions of pounds perfecting their christmas campaigns with focus groups and film crews, this shop made its video with a total budget of £100. this is the third christmas production made by tom and his friend josh. it may not bring millions of shoppers to mid wales, but it is delivering a bit of festive cheer. hywel griffith, bbc news, rhayader. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich.
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good afternoon. red sky in the morning shepherd's warning so the saying goes and many of us had red and orange skies overhead at sunrise but the warning was for this. lots of cloud and outbreaks of rain pushing in in the north west of the uk and very wet indeed in the west of scotland. with a south—westerly wind it is turning increasingly mild out there as we start friday morning with temperatures of 11 or 12. with that some cloud and outbreaks of rain in the south—east of england. showers in northern england, wales and the midlands, turning a little dry to the north—west later with wind going round to the north or north—west the lease cooling off as the day goes on across the northern half of the uk with the south holding onto values of 12 or 13 degrees. in the weekend it is largely dry on saturday with rain on
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saturday night and sunday rain and blustery showers.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm ben brown. today at 4. with one week until the general election, the leaders of the main political parties have been out meeting voters this afternoon in a bid to woo them with their key pledges. people can't make decisions and businesses can't invest and there's about £150 billion worth of foreign investment that will come into this country as soon as we get brexit done. we are very clear we have a totally funded and costed manifesto, the only party that has in this election, and it will give real hope and opportunity to everyone in this country and i'm very proud of it. i don't believe many people in scotland want to be waking up on friday the 13th of december to news of borisjohnson as prime minister for five years, deciding and dictating scotland's future.
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us speaker nancy pelosi says impeachment proceedings will go ahead against president trump for pressuring ukraine to investigate his democratic political rival. the president has engaged an abuse of power in our national security and jeopardising the integrity of our elections. his actions are in defiance of the vision of our founders and the oath of office that he takes. a nationwide strike brings much of france to a standstill as police fire tear gas at protestors. bbc research shows thousands of mental health patients in england are facing long waits for nhs talking therapy services. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport withjohn watson. marco silva waiting to learn his fate with his sacking as everton manager expected this afternoon.
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thanksjohn, and we'll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. ben rich has all the weather now. a red sky in the morning, shepherd's warning, but we had the red sunrise in many spots this morning, but the warning was for some heavy rain. i will have all of the details later on. also coming up — rowing to antarctica. we meet the man planning to row 750 miles across what's known as the most dangerous ocean crossing in the world. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm ben brown. with one week to polling day, the political parties are beginning theirfinal
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push for votes. speaking to factory workers in derbyshire this afternoon, borisjohnson says he wants to unite and ‘level up‘ the country. labour have outlined plans to recruit almost 20,000 extra teachers in england overfive years. meanwhile, the liberal democrats have promised a £17bn research and development fund, and the snp have said there is only one week to stop brexit. here‘s our political correspondent tom barton — and a warning that his report contains flash photography. they won‘t be able to vote for another few years, butjeremy corbyn hopes to persuade their parents... you have your hand up. why do you want to be prime minister? ..promising to recruit 20,000 more teachers and to keep class sizes below 30. but also attacking the conservatives‘ record in government. elect the tories, you carry
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on with austerity, you carry on with increasing gaps between the richest and the poorest, you carry on with underfunded schools, oversized classes and increasing numbers of rough sleeping homelessness. this we are very clear. we have a totally funded and costed manifesto. the only party that has in this election. and it will give real hope and opportunity to everyone in this country. good morning. good morning, philip. good morning, holly. on the this morning sofa, borisjohnson hoping his message on brexit will convince a daytime tv audience. if we get a working majority, if we getjust nine seats more, we can be out onjanuary the 30th. and how long will the trade deals take? well... years? no. we can get... we will do many new deals with countries around the world, but with the eu we can build a new free trade partnership by the end of next year. tell me what you're doing. the snp telling voters in scotland they‘ve gotjust a week to stop borisjohnson and to stop brexit. and i hope you will look
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at the plans we've set out... the lib dem leader was stopped yesterday by extinction rebellion activists who surrounded jo swinson‘s campaign bus. but her supporters say the campaign is still on the move, fighting for the political middle ground. do we want to have a moderating voice within our politics? because i really don't think the british people like extremes, and the liberal democrats have always offered that centre path that helps to actually prevent some of those things happening. and as i say, our manifesto is really ambitious. i hope people will give it a look. this time next week the polls will be open, and so the parties have just a few days left to persuade you to give them your vote. and what you decide will determine how many mps each party gets to send here to westminster, and could ultimately shape this country‘s politics for years to come. tom barton, bbc news, westminster.
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our political correspondent ben wright has been following the conservatives campaign in derbyshire today. he came here to a factory in derbyshire and took questions from some of the people who work here and there were questions on brexit, there were questions on brexit, there were questions on brexit, there were questions on housing, certainly. he was drumming home the tory core message that in his view, all the problems in the country are all the problems in the country are all because parliament is gridlocked and it will not get on with brexit, even though the last parliament did past the first hurdle of boris johnson‘s deal. he said it was a punctured parliament and stopping the country motoring again and that was the theme he came to again and again. here‘s a flavour of what he said. i'm afraid our economy is being held back at the moment by the dragged anchor of our broken parliament and people cannot make decisions and businesses cannot invest and there are about £150
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billion of direct foreign investment that will come into the country soon as we get brexit done and get the deal the line. and we can get brexit done, because we have a deal ready to go, in fact as i said before, it is often ready. i‘m not the greatest cook in the world. if it was for a microwave, you prick the lid and then whack it in for about three minutes. anyway, we can get it done and back in parliament and get that withdrawal bill back in parliament before you cook your christmas turkey. we can do it and all we need isa turkey. we can do it and all we need is a working majority to deliver it. every single one of the conservative candidate standing at the election, every single one of the candidates has signed up to the deal. now, claiming brexit will be done if borisjohnson is returned with a majority is the cornerstone of this campaign but he was asked here, as
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he was asked almost every time he was in front of the press, be honest with people. while the uk might leave the eu onjune the 31st if he gets the withdrawal agreement through, in the reality that is the beginning of phase two and then there will be negotiation with the eu about trade, aviation, defence and security. mrjohnson claims he can do all of that within a year, no need to extend the cementation phase or transition phase and he was asked again if he can guarantee there would be a trade deal by the end of the year and he said he could. there will be many who doubt whether that will be many who doubt whether that will be many who doubt whether that will be borne out by events but he gave the strongest guarantee and assurance that he thought he could do it all in a year. meanwhile, current and former labour staff have been speaking about their decision to submit sworn evidence to the equality and human rights commission about anti—semitism in the party. our political correspondent
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chris mason sent this update. afternoon, ben, from tamworth in staffordshi re to afternoon, ben, from tamworth in staffordshire to the north—east of birmingham. we are following the labourcampaign and birmingham. we are following the labour campaign and jeremy corbyn has been focused on education today, visiting a sequence of schools across the midlands but a real set of questions landing again in front of questions landing again in front ofjeremy corbyn on the whole question of anti—semitism, the submission that we learnt about this morning from 70 serving and ex labour officials submitting sworn state m e nts labour officials submitting sworn statements as part of the investigation into anti—semitism in the party, which is part of the submission from the jewish the party, which is part of the submission from thejewish labour movement to the ongoing investigation into the party that started a little earlier this year. and just this afternoon we have heard directly, in a news conference hosted by the jewish labour heard directly, in a news conference hosted by thejewish labour movement about the scale of their concerns and very powerful testimony from sam matthews, the former labour ahead of
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disputes and something of a whistle—blower in this ongoing row about anti—semitism. take a look at this. all of us joined the labour party because we believed in its true values, values of antiracism and socialjustice. true values, values of antiracism and social justice. we true values, values of antiracism and socialjustice. we witnessed a violation of those values by the very people meant to be leading our movement. as highlighted in this document, 70 other whistle—blowers have come forward. from all different parts have come forward. from all different pa rts of have come forward. from all different parts of the labour party, because they share my dngust at the violations of the labour party's true values. those whistle—blowers, some of whom are still employed by the labour party, are fearful of retribution from their employer. some are grappling with the same emotional and mental turmoil that my team andl emotional and mental turmoil that my team and i experienced. inside the party, those individuals are met with a chorus of public denials that they know to simply be untrue. we had a chance before this news co nfe re nce had a chance before this news conference this afternoon to put some of these allegations directly tojeremy
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some of these allegations directly to jeremy corbyn during a school visit in peterborough.” to jeremy corbyn during a school visit in peterborough. i became leader of the party, there were no processes in place to deal with anti—semitism. i asked processes in place to deal with anti—semitism. iasked baroness chakra party to produce a report on it, which he did, and following that we introduced rules to deal with it and introduced an appeals procedure to deal with it and an education process so party members understood the hurt that can be caused by anti—semitic remarks and anti—semitic remarks and anti—semitic behaviour and i introduced injuly anti—semitic behaviour and i introduced in july a anti—semitic behaviour and i introduced injuly a further rule change to say that serious egregious cases could be dealt with in a fast track process to the national constitutional committee, which is independent of me, so it is an independent of me, so it is an independent process that is legally advised and i think we have got processes in place that have improved it a great deal but let‘s put it in context, the number of cases, the total proportion of party membership is very, very low indeed,
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but one case of anti—semitism is one too many. meanwhile, labour are trying when not facing questions about anti—semitism, to talk about schools today. he made a sequence of schools today. he made a sequence of school visits, firstly in peterborough this morning and then in rugby, and then he is heading on here to the west midlands and he has a rally tonight as well and what is striking is that anecdotally, speaking to labour activists, is that yes, they are keen to get out on the doorstep and they are hopeful that they can do well but you don't have to probe far before labour activists acknowledge that the likelihood of them winning next week might be relatively slim in their view and also those who make the point that while they think some of the messages that labour have are broadly popular, finding resistance tojeremy broadly popular, finding resistance to jeremy corbyn is a reason for people not to vote labour is pretty easy for labour activists to find. chris mason, our political
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correspondent. and the snp have a new focus, ‘seven days to stop brexit‘. nicola sturgeon has today embarked on a week—long bus tour of the country, in a final push to win votes. she‘s been speaking in edinburgh. we stand here today exactly one week away from the most important general election of our lifetimes. the future of our country is on the line in this election and in seven days‘ time we have an opportunity to make sure that scotland chooses the right path. we have an opportunity next thursday to escape the mess of brexit, to stop brexit... cheering. ..as we say on the side of the bus, and we have an opportunity to take scotland‘s future into our own hands so that we in scotland decide
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the kind of future we want and the kind of country we want to build. in short, we have got the opportunity to choose a better future. but the thing we must do to enable all of that is to vote next thursday to lock borisjohnson out of power. the speaker of the us house of representatives, nancy pelosi, has announced that impeachment proceedings will go ahead against president trump. she said he had abused his power for personal gain at the expense of us national security. (tx sot) of us national security. our democracy is what is at stake. the president leaves us no choice but to act because he is trying to corrupt, once again, the election for his own benefit. the president has engaged in abuse of power, undermining our national security and jeopardising the integrity of our elections. his actions are in defiance
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of the vision of our founders and the oath of office that he takes to preserve, protect and defend the constitution of the united states. sadly, but with confidence and humility, with allegiance to our founders and our hearts full of love for america, today i am asking our chairman to proceed with articles of impeachment. i commend our committee chairs and our members for their sombre approach to actions which i wish the president had not made necessary. and a short while ago, president trump has tweeted in response to nancy pelosi‘s announcement. he wrote,
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well, chris buckler has this analysis from washington. nancy pelosi‘s speech was laced with references to history and this is an historic moment. she talked about the fact the declaration of independence, the constitution, it was all set up in her words "to stop a king president being corrupted by foreign influence and using that on america". she has now announced that as far as she is concerned it is time to draw up articles of impeachment and that brings forward that idea of a vote inside the us house of representatives to impeach donald trump and set up a trial in the us senate potentially
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as early as january. she set out the reasons for her belief that president trump must be impeached, the suggestion that he tried to pressure ukraine into launching investigations into his own political opponents for his own personal gain. this goes to this idea that president trump may have stopped military aid from being paid to the country, and that was very important military aid for ukraine to try and defend the country, hundreds of millions of dollars, and also the suggestion he dangled the idea of a white house meeting to ukraine‘s president zelensky to try to force him to launch these investigations. nancy pelosi said at one stage, "if we allow a president to be above the law, we do so at the peril of our republic. in america, no—one is above the law." but she also said the facts are not contested and that simply isn‘t the case. republicans have made very, very clear that as far as they are concerned the president did nothing wrong. they say ultimately military aid was withheld and no investigations were launched into the likes
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ofjoe biden and his son hunter, who had business dealings in the country. joe biden is, of course, one of those individuals hoping to win the democratic nomination to challenge donald trump in 2020. and, of course, if this trial goes ahead, it will take place right at the start of an election year. it will all feed into that vote in november 2020 and make a very bitter campaign. but although it is highly likely that the us house of representatives will vote to impeach donald trump, probably before the end of the year, it's it is highly unlikely that the senate will remove him from office. it is worth pointing out that the senators, there are 100 senators there, act as the jurors in this case. they are majority republican members of mr trump‘s party and it is highly unlikely that they could be in a position where they convicted him of any offence. nonetheless, this feels like quite a moment in america and also itjust reinforces once again the clear divide that exists in washington
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at the moment, a divide that centres on this trump administration. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines with a week to go before the country goes to the polls — the political parties are out pushing their big election pledges. us speaker nancy pelosi says impeachment proceedings will go ahead against president trump for pressuring ukraine to investigate his democratic political rival. french police fire tear gas at protestors as the biggest nationwide strike in years brings most of the country to a standstill. in the sport, marco silver is facing the sack as everton manager. the clu b the sack as everton manager. the club board is meeting this afternoon to decide his future after he lost the merseyside derby and slipped into the premier league bottom three. heavy condemnation for an
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italian sports newspaper for its black friday headline picturing romilly lukaku and chris smalling ahead of the inter milan game against roma tomorrow. anthony joshua says he expects to be at his lightest weight in five years for his much anticipated rematch with andy ruiz his much anticipated rematch with andy ruinnr. he‘s been focusing on speedin andy ruinnr. he‘s been focusing on speed in his training camp, having lost badly back injune. more on those stories in around ten minutes‘ time. back to politics — and today, three members of the european parliament resigned from the brexit party and called on leave voters to back the conservatives in the election. lance forman, lucy harris and annunziata rees—mogg said the brexit party risked splitting the leave vote. they were joined at a news conference in westminster by another mep, john longworth, who lost the brexit party‘s whip yesterday. let‘s go to westminster and speak to chief political correspondent vicki young.
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what is the significance of this? there was an awful lot of chat about a possible pact between the conservatives and the brexit party before the campaign began. conservatives and the brexit party before the campaign beganm conservatives and the brexit party before the campaign began. in the end, nigel farage made the lead —— decision not to put up candidates against conservatives who won last time round, so injust over 300 seats. the argument from those today who decided that they could no longer back the brexit party, they say they should go further and the logic is, if you want brexit to happen and boris johnson logic is, if you want brexit to happen and borisjohnson now has a brexit deal, then you shouldn‘t be standing anywhere, because they think you are taking votes away from the conservatives that risksjeremy corbyn getting in, and if it is a hung parliament, you could end with another red random and brexit not happening —— referendum happening. and they feel brexit could be jeopardised by the party who has campaigned for it for many years. the is how one mp explained her
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decision. i find it absolutely unbelievable, but tragic, that the brexit party, with so many wonderful people dedicated to a cause are now the very party risking brexit. i only stood in may to fight for brexit. i am still determined to do so. these four say they are not making a personal attack on nigel farage who has been a brilliant campaign and he above anybody else can take the credit for the process, the brexit process getting this far but they feel at this stage he should recognise that he should take that victory and allow brexit to go ahead. but that is not how he sees it. what is the sister of a ahead. but that is not how he sees it. what is the sister of a cabinet ministerand it. what is the sister of a cabinet minister and another has a boyfriend working for that cabinet minister and another is a personal friend of
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boris and another is a personal friend of borisjohnson. and another is a personal friend of boris johnson. smears. they are not smears, they are facts. theyjoin the brexit party. and you paraded them. they clearly were disaffected with theresa may as leader and we are not the conservative party, and i tell you something, i tell you something, borisjohnson's deal, unamended, is unacceptable and i certainly stand by that. that is the point from nigel farage, he does not think the boris johnson point from nigel farage, he does not think the borisjohnson deal is a real brexit, and he says he himself will not be voting for anybody when it comes to the election next week and will spoil his ballot paper. thank you. health campaigners say that "hidden" waiting lists are causing delays for thousands of mental health patients in england. nine out of ten people referred to the improving access to psychological therapies service are seen within six weeks,
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but bbc research has discovered that nearly ninety—five thousand people had to wait more than 90 days for a follow—up appointment. let‘s get reaction to this and talk now to one of the directors of the mental health foundation, dr antonis kousoulis. you are the england and wales director for this foundation, and first of all, talk to us about what this therapy is and why it is important. there are similar schemes in the other three nations, but in england, it it insures people who show symptoms and reach a certain point of distress with their mental health are seen within a certain amount of days, and for millions of people they are the point of access for them into what we call talking therapies, psychological support specialists from psychologists. so the idea is to see the people quickly and get them into the system quickly. when you get to the point of being referred to psychological
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therapies, a lot of people are in significant distress, so that is certainly part of the plan. but the problem is, as we mentioned in the introduction, they might see somebody quickly but then it‘s taken a lot of time to get a follow—up appointment. i have to say i'm not surprised. this is a symptom of a wider issue and mental health problems are very common in the uk, as they are all over the world and the official statistics say one in six every week, symptoms of a common mental health problem. so, common and becoming more common? possibly. it is debated but some people like young women, we are seeing problems becoming more common and overall it is unlikely that we would be able to resource the nhs and it would take about ten or 11 million people per week. it‘s unlikely we can ever have that kind of resource so it‘s a symptom of a wider issue where we should be trying to prevent people
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getting to the point of distress and needing clinical services in the first place. but people are essentially waiting months to get the kind of therapy they really need. exactly. there is a high risk for that, and they have been promised a service or treatment and we saw that this saw people self harm. sometimes they are life threatening situations, so i would say that we need to do more as a society to prevent people from getting to that point of need. but to stop those huge delays we are seeing, the huge waiting times, what are we talking about? is it more people, more staff, more therapists and people needing more help? there
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isa and people needing more help? there is a committed investment to go to mental health services but even though with that we are unlikely to meet demand. part of where we need to shift the resources is not public health services so they can introduce preventative measures at the local level and ensure that there are fewer people getting to that point so the waiting list will be smaller. how do we compare, generally, in terms of the way we treat mental health with other countries, other european countries, or the us, for example? are we lagging behind in the kind of care we offer? in principle, not so much. it isa we offer? in principle, not so much. it is a fact that the uk still remains a leader in certain respects in how we see mental health generally and how we see mental health from a stigma perspective and the support we provide to people who are in distress, but there are some who have put a lot of gaps in the services and there are a lot of gaps
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compared to other nations, but the services variable across the world if you look at it from a global perspective. but we need to do better, that is your perspective. absolutely. thanks forjoining us and thank you for your time. pleasure. three men who say they were framed by a corrupt detective almost fifty years ago have had their convictions quashed at the court of appeal. winston trew, sterling christie and george griffiths were members of the so—called oval four , a group of black men who spent eight months in prison for assaulting a police officer and theft in 1972. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw is at the old bailey. what is the background to this case? it's it‘s an extraordinary case that goes back almost half a century. these four men were part of a group of black activists in london, and they
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we re black activists in london, and they were targeted as they left oval underground station in south—east london in 1972. there was a scuffle involving police officers and eventually they were put on trial and convicted of offences including assaulting a police officer and they served many months in prison as a result of their crimes at the time. now, it later emerged that the police officer who had led the investigation was a man called detective sergeant derek ridgewell and in1980 he detective sergeant derek ridgewell and in 1980 he was jailed himself for plotting to steal mailbags from the royal mail. he was given a long prison sentence and he died in prison. as a result of that, clearly a lot of doubt was cast on cases ridgewell had investigated and it has taken until now for this case to be brought back to the court of appeal as a result of a referral from the criminal cases review
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system and the review of three of the four, sees their convictions quashed by a panel made up of the most seniorjudge and criminaljudge in england and wales, lord burnett, the lord chief justice in england and wales, lord burnett, the lord chiefjustice and he said the lord chiefjustice and he said the convictions were no longer safe asa the convictions were no longer safe as a result of the misconduct of this officer and a specialist team that he led for british dance —— transport police and he said that his only regret was that it had taken so long for the injustice to be remedied, almost half a century, in fact. does this ruling have further implications? i think it does. there have already been other cases where people have had their convictions quashed as a result of the evidence given by ridgewell, and it is believed there are still other cases and still other people who have convictions outstanding because of the evidence this policeman gave. there will now be worth going on behind—the—scenes to try and unearth
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all the files from those cases from many years ago to try and find the men who say they have been wrongly convicted of other crimes and bring their cases back to the court of appeal as well. danny, many thanks. danny shaw, our home affairs correspondent. danny shaw, our home affairs correspondent. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with ben rich. red sky in the morning, shepherd‘s warning, so the saying goes and many of us had a red sky at sunrise this morning. but the warning was for this, a lot of cloud and outbreaks of rain pushing into the west of the uk. it will move eastwards over night. but with a south—westerly wind it is turning increasingly mild out there as we start friday morning. temperatures will be around about 11 or 12. with that, cloud and outbreaks of rain and showers moving through scotland and northern ireland, northern england, wales and
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the midlands. turning a little drier to the north—west later. it will cool off as the day goes on across the northern half of the uk, further south holding onto values of 11, 12 or 13. into the weekend it is largely dry on saturday, rain on saturday night, sunday, sunshine and blustery showers. this is bbc news, our latest headlines... with one week until the general election, the leaders of the main political parties have been out meeting voters this afternoon in a bid to woo them with their key pledges. us speaker nancy pelosi says impeachment proceedings will go ahead against president trump for pressuring ukraine to investigate his democratic political rival. a nationwide strike brings much of france to a standstill as police fire tear gas at protestors.
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violence breaks out. bbc research shows thousands of mental health patients in england are facing long waits for nhs talking therapy services. sport now on afternoon live. john watson has got that. john, tell us about the everton manager. it is not looking very good for him. no, after last night‘s defeat in the merseyside derby we were expecting news of his sacking or departure. the club‘s board is meeting this afternoon to decide what steps they will take next. that includes the everton owner who arrived in liverpool this afternoon. they lost heavily against liverpool, 5—2, last night. that match could well be his last. he was given a stay of execution after their defeat to norwich last month, but then defeat to leicester and now this one
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followed the only decision really. who will replace him? fans are unwilling to see former manager david moyes given a job on a temporary basis. everton are currently in the bottom three. temporary basis. everton are currently in the bottom threem was always going to be a difficult game but the defeat puts you in the bottom three, does that change anything for you and your position? lam not anything for you and your position? i am not the right person to answer you about the situation. ask this question to different people because lam not question to different people because i am not the person to talk about that. when we get news of that board meeting we will bring it to you. to italy. there‘s been heavy criticism for an italian sports newspaper for its black friday headline. it pictures romelu lukaku and chris smalling ahead of inter milan‘s game against roma tomorrow. rome sa the intention of the article was positive but it has been ruined
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bya was positive but it has been ruined by a terrible headline, the paper defending itself saying it has been misconstrued by others. they wanted to celebrate diversity. it has part issues in italy and here as well. and there is a big fight this weekend? a career defining moment for anthonyjoshua. he says he has lost none of his power despite boxing at what will be his lowest weight in five years. he has really trimmed down. it is a hugely anticipated rematch against andy louisejunior. anticipated rematch against andy louise junior. anthonyjoshua is looking to win back the heavyweight belt that he lost in that fight in june. joshua says he has had to reassess after he prepares for this fight after what unfolded six months ago. i tell you i am punching like a horse kicking back right now. my connect chain, my rhythm, there is no tension in my body, it is loose
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and heavy, rhythm and flow. that is what boxing is about, we are going back to the 70s, that is why the afro is out right now. 70s fighters. i have been studying this game and we are just going to box, man. i have been studying this game and we arejust going to box, man. how will he fare? our reporter is in saudi arabia and he says it is clear thatjoshua‘s new training regime has made a difference. he is like a different man from the one that we saw in new york back injune. he seems very focused for this fight, there is a different kind of intensity about him. he told us he might weigh in tomorrow under !7 stone and if he does that, it will be his lightest weight for some five years. he is focusing on speed to negate the threat that andy poses.
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interestingly, we have somebody here who knocked out lennox lewis. he told me the weight loss might work against anthonyjoshua because he might well be drained as the fight goes on. one thing i have taken away from this week is how determined he is. he is almost on edge. it is not necessarily a bad thing because it that was the missing ingredient in the last fight, maybe he did not have enough fear factor. this time around, you can sense he does not wa nt around, you can sense he does not want to lose this rematch. around, you can sense he does not want to lose this rematch. and plenty more to come in the build—up to tomorrow‘s fight. ronnie 0‘sullivan is out of the uk championship in york. he was beaten 6-4 championship in york. he was beaten 6—4 by ding junhui. at 4—4 he looked to be on the comeback, and he had won this tournament in the last two yea rs. won this tournament in the last two years. i was 4-1 down and he had not missed the ball and i thought this could be 6—0, 6—!. it was my
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birthday and it could not get any worse and then i got back to 44 —— 4-4. he is still smiling. isuppose it was his birthday after all. more to come in the next hour. in a week‘s time we will all be casting our vote. geeta guru—murphy is in croydon for us. yes, indeed i am. bbc news has been looking closely at the places where the election could be won and lost. we are visiting ten parts of the uk where seats will be closely contested. croydon is one of the most populous london boroughs, second only to barnet. the borough is split into three constituencies. two were held by labour and one by the conservatives in the last election.
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i m in croydon central, where labour gained the seat from the conservatives. its a battleground for the conservatives and labour, as croydon central has never really been a "safe" seat since its creation in 1974. with me is raymond robb from the lions‘ society and marcus roberts from yougov. from the lions‘ society both from the lions‘ society of you live in croydon and y both both of you live in croydon and you both know the patch really well. rehman, you work with people who are at risk of getting involved and have got involved with knife crime. why do people get involved with knives at all? sometimes poverty, sometimes self hate and sometimes fear, they are fearfulfor their self hate and sometimes fear, they are fearful for their lives, and sometimes they don‘t have enough support at home or at school or even just in their communities. mostly
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for safety as well. safety. people will find it very hard if they are not in this environment to understand why a young child is tempted to pick up a knife, even if they are worried about self defence. it is something that can inflict terrible harm on somebody else and it exposes them. these young people are very vulnerable and fear has a big part to play in it. if young people are commuting to school, work or university, sometimes they feel they will be attacked by another person. have you had experience in this area yourself? yes, for sure. i myself have been attacked by a knife previously, but i also know young persons who have been stabbed and killed and have become a victim of knife crime. hence why we decided we wa nted knife crime. hence why we decided we wanted to make a stance against it. you work massively in this area.
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marcus, how big the question is crime, drug crime, youth crime and policing in this election here? crime, drug crime, youth crime and policing in this election here?m is policing in this election here?m isa very policing in this election here?m is a very big factor because the degree of violent crime in croydon is nearly six points higher than the national average and under the conservative government since 2010 violent crime conservative government since 2010 viole nt crime overall conservative government since 2010 violent crime overall has nearly doubled. that gives places like croydon a different flavour to their politics. the local politics, the community politics, will be shaped more by issues like knife crime, overcrowding, housing issues, and the need for community support services in ways and forms that will probably give the labour party more advantages. the probably give the labour party more adva ntages. the conservatives probably give the labour party more advantages. the conservatives have to deal with local anger. in terms of how you think any of the parties are making an offer now, do you find those believable, plausible? over the past two years we saw labour do
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some great work on the ground, some of the councillors and the mp, and it was good for them to be visible in our community whilst knife crime was rising. local issues, where the young people and the community felt vulnerable, and in the community the consensus is that we want politicians to be more hands with our issues and not to have empty words. brexit has not been talked about that much from the people we have spoken to today, but croydon as a whole is a 50—50 brexit and this is tied between the tories and labour. is the politics changing in terms of how look ahead? it is definitely changing. croydon is an important bellwether for two reasons. important bellwether for two reasons. one, croydon central has voted the same way as the party that has won the government of the united kingdom injust has won the government of the united kingdom in just about has won the government of the united
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kingdom injust about every has won the government of the united kingdom in just about every election for nearly 50 years, except for two occasions. the second reason why this matters is because croydon and the way it is changing tells us something about the way the labour party's vote and the conservative party's vote and the conservative party's vote and the conservative party's vote is changing. the conservatives are very keen to win the seat back and they are definitely putting resources into winning it back this time, yet they remain vote that is growing in croydon, combined with the local issues that ray and i have been talking up about, the conservatives have been appealing to northern constituencies in the midlands and the north west and england and wales, and it all means that the shape of what we can expect in our politics is different. it could be that croydon central goes labour even when the rest of the country votes conservative. even when the rest of the country votes conservative. thank you very much, we are out of time, sadly. very difficult to predict. still much to play for in the coming days
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as people really start to get to grips with what is going to determine their vote. thanks very much geeta — great to get the lay of the land in croydon. bbc news has lots of tools to help navigate this election campaign. you can use our election translator to understand more about the words and phrases which are being used. try it out on the website or on the bbc news app. back in 1933, douglas douglas—hamilton became the first person to fly an aircraft over mount everest. now his grandson, jamie, is setting off on an expedition of his own. he‘s hoping to become the first person to row 750 miles across the drake passage between cape horn in chile to antarctica. it‘s known as one of the most dangeous ocean crossings in the world.
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well, we can talk to jamie now from edinburgh. thank you very much. thank you for letting me on. thank you for coming on. why are you doing this? it sounds nasty and dangerous. on. why are you doing this? it sounds nasty and dangerousm on. why are you doing this? it sounds nasty and dangerous. it is one of those things that everyone describes as being crazy and it is something that cannot be done and no one can ever do it. since rowing in the indian ocean and knowing what happened in that, we realised it could be done. if you have got the right team and the right boat, no matter how bad the weather conditions are, we knew it could be done. so we thought we would try it, but it is a bold first and no one has ever done it before. it will be the first human powered crossing of the first human powered crossing of the drake passage all the way to mainland antarctica and it is one of the last world firsts left. how long will it take and tell us about the perils that might lie in store for you. it will take about three weeks.
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half the team is there already and i am flying out tomorrow and we will leave on the 19th, whether dependent. the southern ocean is the roughest in the world and the worst pa rt roughest in the world and the worst part is the drake passage. you have gotan part is the drake passage. you have got an antarctic polar current that goes around antarctica constantly. then you have got the pacific, and the atlantic ocean is meeting the southern ocean in a very narrow crossing between south america and antarctica. waves can quite easily get up to 80 feet. it is known after francis drake when he first went across, when he was hit by a hurricane for 52 days. out of the three boats that he went with, one was lost and sung and one had to go home. it is the roughest part in the ocean. you will have to keep your wits about you all the time. will you be able to sleep? yes, we wrote 24 hours a day for three weeks, but that will be 90 minute sessions.
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euro for 90 minutes, sleep for 90 minutes, sleep for 90 minutes. when i say sleep, you will be cooking and try to sleep, but you will get about three hours‘ sleep on average a day. how have you train for this? this is unlike anything you have ever done before? i did two months rowing from australia to africa and that was a big adventure. but this will be harder, the seas will be harder and all the waves will be coming from the west because we are trying to go southwards, so we will capsize a lot. we started training a year ago. i have done pretty intensive training in the last six months. the last three months especially. all our team—mates have been training. one walked across antarctica last year, conor o‘grady. one has broken the speed record in the atlantic and the speed record in the atlantic and the pacific and indian oceans. cameron, who i wrote with before, has just swung from barbados to say
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lucio for his training. it was the longest open channel swim in history and he was in the water for 56 hours without any flippers or a wet suit. i mentioned your grandfather. tell us about him and the inspiration he has been to you. what grandad it was incredible. those open cockpit biplane is can never go that high and they had to put an extra big propeller on. it was described as a suicide mission at the time. but he knew that they could with the right preparations get through. so he managed to take one of these planes out there and he flew over. he was very lucky because he only cleared the summit by about 20 feet. the footage that he took from that is what hillary took to climb mount everest 20 years later to choose his new route. we were growing up as kids wishing we lived in the age of
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exploration with shackleton and with scott and with what grandad and i thought everybody had been done. the ocea ns thought everybody had been done. the oceans are the last frontier. indeed.jamie, oceans are the last frontier. indeed. jamie, really, really good luck to you. stay safe and let‘s talk to you when you have successfully completed your mission. thank you. jamie douglas hamilton, good luck to him. jamie douglas hamilton, good luck to him. police have fired tear gas at protestors in the french city of nantes during the biggest strike in decades which has brought large parts of the country to a standstill. rail and metro services are deserted, some flights have been grounded and about half of eurostar services between paris and london have been cancelled. many schools are also affected. the strike is against plans to create a universal retirement system — which unions say will force millions of people to retire later or live on a reduced pension. alexandra mckenzie has the latest. protesters gathered in the city of nantes. anger spilled over towards
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the french president, and his plans to reform pensions. with a heavy police presence, they responded with tear gas. this is france‘s largest national public sector strike in years. with more than 200 demonstrations expected across the country, others have been more peaceful. transport workers, hospital staff, teachers and police officers are amongst those demanding that president macron abandon his plans to overhaul france‘s pension system. he wants to introduce a simplified universal points—based system, but unions are strongly opposed. translation: a universal system is all well and good, except for those who have problems in their careers. and there‘s a lot of uncertainty — unemployment, forced part—time. they would be paying
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less or nothing. don‘t they have a right to receive pensions? transport networks in paris and other french cities ground to a near—halt this morning. railway and metro stations were largely deserted during rush hour, and hundreds of flights were cancelled. london‘s st pancras is also affected. the eurostar is working on a reduced service until the 10th of december. passengers are advised to check the timetable before travel. in france this is a protest that threatens to paralyse the country. translation: in the following days, the prime minister will give very concrete guidelines on the new pension system. so i hope, by the middle of next week, we can make very concrete progress with the unions, and this strike will be over as soon as possible. the battle between president macron and the unions for public support will be pivotal to the strike‘s success. previous governments have tried to bring about pension reform and failed.
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alexandra mackenzie, bbc news. our paris correspondent hugh schofield told me that many people do recognise that the pension system needs some reform but are unhappy about what president macron wants to do. the odd thing about this reform is that it the odd thing about this reform is thatitis the odd thing about this reform is that it is something that, when people are asked in principle if they are for or against, they tend to say yes, we think the pension system should be reformed, made fairerand system should be reformed, made fairer and made more even. it is full of all sorts of strange discrepancies and anomalies that do not date back decades. it results in certain groups of people having much better terms of retirement than others. president macron‘s point is less put everyone on the same basis so that everyone who works and earns a certain amount of money has at the end of their time in work the same pension rights when they retire.
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that is the principal, but there are all sorts of fears that have been attached to it. the government has been foolish not spelling out clearly what the detail of the reform is going to be, which means lots of different sectors in the economy fear they will lose out. on top of which you have got this general sense among the left in france that they are being squeezed out of the political debate during the past two and a half years and this is the chance for them to make their comeback. the left was eclipsed by the yellow jacket movement and they have not managed to stage a big rally like this in the centre of paris for a long time indeed. this opportunity has come their way, allowing them to galvanise the left around this pensions issue. it is true, a lot of people who are not particularly bothered about the pension system have come out in any case because they want to give president macron a kicking. let's talk about that
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kicking. let's talk about that kicking. what has been going on around the country? in launch we have seen tear gas being fired and that kind of thing. right here in paris it has been heating up, maybe thatis paris it has been heating up, maybe that is too strong a word, but there isa that is too strong a word, but there is a very big demonstration with tens of thousands of people here, it is an old—style, big battalion, left wing style demonstration. they have been trying to get to the place de la republique. but they have been stopped because of some trouble with a truck being set on fire and the police. it looks like anarchist elements have joined the demonstration and are causing trouble. we will have to see how that pans out, but it does not surprise me because what has happened in the last year of the yellow vest demonstrations is we have seen time and again how easy it is for radical anarchist elements to make their way into demonstrations and basically spoil it for everyone
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else. hugh schofield, our paris correspondent with the latest on the strike action that is causing so much trouble across the country. strike action that is causing so much trouble across the country. more on the latest in the general election and with one week to go to the polls, our community affairs correspondent adina campbell has been to luton to speak to young people from ethnic minority backgrounds about some of the issues they feel need more attention. could these faces be the next generation of uk leaders? here at bedfordshire university, meet—ups and workshops are hosted by the national charity uprising, which prides itself on diversity, inclusion and social mobility. they have a lot to say ahead of next week‘s vote. many people are calling this the brexit election. i started my politics degree three years ago, and i am sick to death about brexit. i‘ve graduated now, and i think right now people
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just want a solution. we still have issues such as tax, welfare, people dying from poverty, that kind of thing, and we're not fixing it because we're so busy talking about brexit. ijust don't think people from bame backgrounds are really rated enough. like, we're really undervalued. everyone just thinks council estates, like, not going to school, skiving off, smoking weed, doing this, doing that, but there's so much more to a bame person. so, racism — is this still an issue in 2019? yeah, it's savage out there. racism is big. i face it a lot. if a party is being racist, if their leaders are being racist, we should be calling them out. i‘m not really sure what‘s going to happen with the economy, going to happen with jobs and that is, in itself, what scares us about brexit. i think the danger is if we talk too much about the economy and it being a disaster, we will get led into austerity again.
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the people voted, so we have to, innit? i really disagree with that. we are going to leave, but we are going to get, like, a bad deal. a proper bad deal. immigrants normally contribute more to the economy than they take away. like everybody‘s just, "0h, they come here for the nhs and for the benefits", when in reality, british—born people use those services more and immigrants disproportionally contribute to the economy — they‘re a net benefit. i think immigration has a lot to do with the racism aspect of brexit. and a lot of that has racist undertones of not wanting a particular looking group of people to come into this country. so, we're very fortunate that we have technology that we can access to and do our own research, because we are the future leaders of tomorrow, so we are going to be the ones that have to educate ourselves. adina campbell, bbc news.
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two british pilots have landed back in the uk after flying around the world in a newly restored spitfire. their journey theirjourney in a plane originally built in 1943 started and finished at goodwood aerodrome in west sussex. 58—year—old steve brooks and 45—year—old mattjones took four months to circumnavigate the globe, stopping off at 100 locations in 30 countries. well done them. that is it. that is it. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with ben rich. red sky in the morning, shepherd‘s warning, so this guy goes. many of us had a red sky at sunrise this morning. but rain is pushing in and
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it will push eastwards across many areas overnight. with a south—westerly wind it is turning increasingly mild out there and as we start friday morning we will have temperatures round about 11 or 12. but with that cloud and outbreaks of rain in southern england and cloud moving into northern wales, northern england and the midlands. the wins go back to north and north—westerly and it will cool off in the northern half of the uk, further south holding onto values of 11, 12 or 13. into the weekend it is largely dry on saturday, rain on saturday night and on sunday it is sunshine and blustery showers.
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this is bbc news, i‘m reeta chakrabarti. the headlines at 5pm. with voting taking place in the general election this time next week, political parties make their final push. party leaders are out across the country, reminding voters of their key pledges. people can‘t make decisions and businesses can‘t invest and there‘s about £150 billion worth of foreign investment that will come into this country as soon as we get brexit done. we are very clear we have a totally funded and costed manifesto, the only party that has in this election, and it will give real hope and opportunity to everyone in this country and i'm very proud of it. let's wake up to the news that we have ta ken the let's wake up to the news that we have taken the future of our country into our own hands, like the tories out of power, and give ourselves the opportunity to build a

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