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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  December 6, 2019 5:00pm-5:46pm GMT

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the headlines at 5pm... a man described by police as one of the most dangerous sex offenders ever seen in the uk has been found guilty of a string of offences, including rape, false imprisonment and kidnap. joseph mccann faced 37 charges relating to 11 women and children — he'd been mistakenly released from prison three months before carrying out the attacks. joseph mccann is a horrendously dangerous individual who has shown complete contempt for his victims. he is clearly, i think, one of the most dangerous sex offenders that we have ever seen in this country. there are serious questions for the criminaljustice system following the conviction, after it emerges mccann was released from prison by mistake. also in the next hour... the labour leaderjeremy corbyn claims leaked documents
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from borisjohson‘s brexit deal are hard evidence it would have a devastating impact on northern ireland. the former conservative prime minister sirjohn major calls on voters in some areas not to back the tories in next week's election. a teenager has admitted attempted murder, after throwing a six—year—old boy from the tenth floor of tate modern in london in august. firefighters in new south wales are tackling a 37—mile—wide blaze, as hundreds of bushfires continue to burn. a father has shared the moment his four—month—old daughter's new hearing aids are turned on — and her reaction to her mother's voice. and natalie portman is an astronaut losing touch with reality after her space mission. find out what mark kermode makes of lucy in the sky, and the rest of the top cinema
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releases in the film review. good evening, it's five o'clock, i'mjane hill, our main story: a man described by police as one of the most dangerous sex offenders ever seen in the uk has been found guilty of a string of attacks earlier this year. 34—year—old joseph mccann faced 37 charges relating to 11 women and children — including rape, false imprisonment and kidnap. our correspondent sarah corker has followed the trial at the old bailey. one of mccann‘s victims described him as pure evil. his attack started in watford and continued in london, lancashire and greater manchester. today the jury praised his victims
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for their courage and bravery in coming forward. but mccann refused to attend his trial here at the old bailey, instead remaining in his cell at belmarsh prison. details of this case are disturbing. here is june kelly. in the front seat of this passenger seat of this car, a 21—year—old woman is being kept captive byjoseph mccann. he has grabbed her off the street with a knife to her throat, held her and raped her. she is too traumatised to escape. as he pays for his petrol, this is a man at the start of a perverted mission to attack, terrify and humiliate women and children. mccann kidnaps this first victim after she leaves this nightclub in watford. her ordeal lasts five hours. a few days later in walthamstow in east london, a 25—year—old is walking home from this tube station. mccann spots the woman —
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her identity is disguised — then stops and seizes her, subjecting her to m hours of depravity and violence in his car. still holding this woman, he moves to edgware in north london and kidnaps a 21—year—old off the street. he drives to a pub car park in hertfordshire and now, with two prisoners, he stops and rapes the 21—year—old. he then heads to watford and this hotel. hello? keeping watch on his captives, mccann, wearing rosary beads around his neck, tries to book a room so he can continue his abuse. but when he returns to the car, one of the women smashes a vodka bottle over his head and both finally manage to break free. with a manhunt under way, mccann evades capture
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and travels to the north—west. in lancashire, he rapes a girl of 17 and her 11—year—old brother after taking them and their mother prisoner. within hours in greater manchester, he abducts and rapes a woman of 71, then rapes and kidnaps a 13—year—old girl. he crosses into cheshire. in congleton, he grabs two 14—year—old girls of the street. —— off the street. police then spot and chase his stolen fiat. he hits this mercedes. they lose him and he abandons his car with the girls in it. having shaken off the police, he turns up at a pub. hejust came in for a drink — surprisingly, and had a malibu and lemonade. i knew he was a dodgy character when he walked in.
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he had quite a sway on him. he asked to use the phone. it was very bizarre really, he was writing down a lot of things as well. things like postcode and phone numbers. he is eventually found by police who corner him hiding up a tree. for hours there is a stand—off, before he is finally brought down and arrested. he tells officers, "if you had caught me for the first two, the rest of this wouldn't have happened." joseph mccann is a horrendously dangerous individual who has shown complete contempt for his victims. he is clearly one of the most dangerous sex offenders, i think, that we have ever seen in this country. joseph mccann‘s background makes this case a catastrophic failure by the criminaljustice system. it can now be reported that mccann, who began offending when he was 11, should have been in prison when he was roaming around the country raping women and children and threatening to slit their throats. he had been wrongly released. this is his history.
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in 2008, at the age of 23, he was jailed for an aggravated burglary at an 85—year—old man's home. in 2017, he was freed on licence. the same year, he was arrested for new offences and should have been recalled to prison for breaching his licence conditions. but he wasn't. in 2018, he was sentenced for his new crimes with the judge expecting him to remain injail for some time because of his previous conviction. instead, at the start of this year, he was mistakenly let out. he should have gone before the parole board who would have decided if he was safe. three probation officers at the watford office have been disciplined. one of them has been sacked. workloads were at an extraordinarily high level and there were certainly shortages, hence the use of agency staff. i can imagine it not being a very nice place to be if you were trying to do yourjob
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to protect the community. joseph mccann refused to leave prison to attend his trial. a controlling individual, but at heart, a coward. he didn't have to hear the testimony and tears of those he abused and face up to the enduring damage he has done to them. tonight, the probation service has apologised for its failings in a statement they said, "we have taken strong and immediate action against those in the management of mccann because my case and taking significant steps to improve intelligence sharing between i. these failures, these errors, they have had eight devastating effect on his 11 victims and mccann will be sentenced here at the old bailey on monday.
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the former conservative prime minister sirjohn major is urging voters to support rebel independent candidates who are standing against tory candidates in next week's election. sirjohn says voters should back three former ministers, who all lost the conservative whip earlier this year; boris johnson described the intervention as sad and wrong. it comes as the prime minister and jeremy corbyn prepare to go head to head for the final time in front of a studio audience on the bbc tonight, as our political correspondent iain watson reports. the scene is being set for the final debate of the campaign. a head—to—head clash between the two people who could be prime minister after polling day. as voters focus on who they'll back next thursday, tonight's primetime encounter could be crucial. and both boris johnson and jeremy corbyn have already clashed today on a key theme of the election, brexit. this morning, the labour leader brandished what he said was a leaked
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government document, which suggests that borisjohnson‘s withdrawal agreement has the potential to separate northern ireland — in practice — from whole swathes of the uk's internal markets, something in which the prime minister had denied. this is cold, hard evidence that categorically shows the impact a damaging brexit deal would have on large parts of our country. but the thrust ofjeremy corbyn‘s attack wasn't so much brexit, as trust. if they hid this report and the ones that i revealed last week, what else are they hiding? what else will they sell you out on? at every stage throughout this campaign, borisjohnson has chosen to deepen divisions. his poster said britain, not the uk, which includes northern ireland. but borisjohnson insisted the whole united kingdom would be moving out of the eu together.
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i haven't seen the document you're referring to, but that's complete nonsense, and what i can tell you is that with the deal that we have, we can come out as one whole uk. this campaign is straining traditional tribal loyalties. for example, some former labour mps have been urging people not to supportjeremy corbyn. but, today, a former conservative prime minister is advising voters in some seats to abandon the party he once led. he says he's backing a trio of candidates, who were chucked out for opposing borisjohnson‘s policy on brexit. sirjohn major declares that none of them have left the conservative party, the conservative party has left them. and in his message, the pro—referendum final say campaign, he says "if i were resident in any of their constituencies, they would have my vote." i think it's very sad, and i think that he's wrong. and i think that he represents a view that is outdated. alas, i greatly respect him
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and his record, and i think that what we need to do now is honour the will of the people and get brexit done. so, there are disputes within political parties, but tonight's showdown will be more straightforward. the current prime minister versus the labour opponent who wants to take his place at number ten. iain watson, bbc news, westminster. let's talk to our political correspondent helen catt well we heard about tonight's debate there, which begins at 8.30pm — christian fraser is on the set: we will have the mass ranks of the media in here watching on the two big screens over here for the debate. it is a funny night, friday night for the newspaper journalists because the first editions come quite early. they are already scribbling away and they will be
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trying to hoover up the reaction for tonight. there will also be parties here like the snp, the lib dems, we will have the reactions of those as well. behind these big green doors is the auditorium. the live television audience are in there and if you minutes ago, they invited me on andi if you minutes ago, they invited me on and i met with nick robinson who will be moderating tonight. with just over three hours from the big debate tonight of the anticipation is building and this is the set that you will see on bbc one at 8:30pm. i have been on quite a few set and this one is pretty slick. you have the surgeon lights at the back and this is where the audience will sit. just over 100 people. i am often asked how the audience is selected and it is selected by the pollsters.
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there will be equal representatives from the two parties, plus the selection of undecided voters. just have a look at the podium is because there are only about an arm's—length apart. it will provide some of the fireworks this evening. here is the man who moderated all, our very own nick robinson. they are asking the questions, so what is your alternate? my job is to throw the questions to the two leaders, try to get them to debate but if they ignore the question, if they don't answer the question, ignore ignore the question, if they don't answerthe question, ignore point each make about each other, it is my job tojump in and try to pin them down a little bit. i am not here to down a little bit. i am not here to do an interview and i'm not the great interrogator, but i'm more thana great interrogator, but i'm more than a referee. i'm trying to make sure that everybody gets an equal say and make sure the questions asked their answers appear. do you
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memorise the facts? what you have on your lactone? for each question it isjust a your lactone? for each question it isjusta reminderof your lactone? for each question it is just a reminder of the your lactone? for each question it isjust a reminder of the key point of the question and there are one or two facts just of the question and there are one or two factsjust as of the question and there are one or two facts just as a reminder. but you know, if it isn't up there, you might want to look down and check the exact number. but if it is not there, you really need to have it in your head, to understand it. you can revise a bit with a number or a quote, but essentially, you have just got distress again, i'm not here as an interviewer. it is not along come the gated question, it is just asking them what they are saying to the person there. when you go back to 2010, you had the break—out moment agreeing with nikolai, do think we've had the break—out moment in these debates? no, but remember how rare this is. since the first us residential election debate back in 1960, then,
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again and again, we said there was a version of this in britain. wilson, callaghan, thatcher, blair, major, theresa may didn't do it. we had those experiments with three people oi'i those experiments with three people on stage when nick clegg was on stage in 2010, seven in 2015. this is the first time in the history of britain in the selection we have seen head to head debates between the prime minister and the leader of the prime minister and the leader of the opposition. the changes it.|j listen to every morning and you do this all the time, interviewing these guys, but is this a little bit different, do get nervous? 0h, these guys, but is this a little bit different, do get nervous? oh, yes. i don't normally get scared, you get hyped up a little bit and want to make sure you're doing well. i am not going to be apologetic about the fa ct not going to be apologetic about the fact i have woken up in the middle of the night, because i do not want to get in the way of them saying what they want to say. i also don't wa nt what they want to say. i also don't want people at home to ask me why i am letting them get away with
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something. so finding the right balance of helping them debatable to helping you at home think, i have understood what i need to understand andl understood what i need to understand and i might get paid after. so, a political feast ahead of us this evening. it feels a little bit like a presidential debate. we even have an american—style diner to service cups of tea this evening as well. 8:30pm tonight on bbc one but we will be here in the spin room all the way up to 8:30pm. we have a special programme at pm. we will talk to some of the journalist and politicians who are coming to watch the debate here as well. after the debate, we will be here for a half—hour wrap—up and we will have all of the reaction and let these political parties put their glass are not on what they have seen. you can watch it here in the news channel or on bbc one.
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and a reminder you can watch tonight's debate at 8.30 this evening on bbc one and the bbc iplayer. well before tonight's head to head debate between borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn, two former prime ministers — tony blair and sirjohn major — are part of another election event that's being held in central london. they are joined by others from the world of politics and entertainment at an event organised by the vote fora final say campaign, and for our future's sake. let's talk to our political correspondent helen catt, who is at the event. that introduction tells an interesting story because you have one conservative labour, helen. absolutely and i think it's tells a story of what we have seen through the selection of this fracturing of party loyalty. the event is happening here and isjust party loyalty. the event is happening here and is just getting under way. specifically, is
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happening here and is just getting underway. specifically, is warning against a conservative majority. it is pretty astonishing that you have a former conservative prime minister, sirjohn major, recording a video message as part of this rally. his opposition to brexit is pretty well established. in this video message he says that this is the worst foreign coliseum decision in his lifetime. but what is striking is that he goes further and urges constituents in three constituencies not to vote and go for free constituencies not to vote and go forfree independent constituencies not to vote and go for free independent candidates who have been with removed in the summer. have been with removed in the summer. that is extraordinary. he is going to bejoined by anotherformer prime minister, his former opponent, labour‘s tony blair. heat as well will urge people to tactically vote for a hung parliament, will urge people to tactically vote fora hung parliament, he will urge people to tactically vote for a hung parliament, he says, he himself will vote labour. but he says let me put it this way, if you look constituents by constituency, you will know the best candidate to back. those are pretty extraordinary
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to come from to major figures like this. it shows how traditional party loyalties have been really stretched in this election. a senior british diplomat in the us has quit, saying the british government was asking the civil service to deliver messages on brexit which were not "fully honest". alexandra hall, the lead envoy for brexit in the british embassy in washington, said she could no longer "peddle half—truths" on behalf of political leaders she did not "trust." the foreign office has not commented on the matter. the headlines on bbc news... a man described by police as one of the most dangerous sex offenders ever seen in the uk has been found guilty of a string of charges. 34—year—old joseph mccann faced 37 charges relating to 11 women and children, including rape, false imprisonment and kidnap.
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the labour leaderjeremy corbyn claims leaked documents from borisjohson‘s brexit deal are hard evidence it would have a devastating impact on northern ireland. the former conservative prime minister sirjohn major calls on voters in some areas not to back the tories. that comes ahead of tonight's head to head bbc debate between borisjohnson & jeremy corbyn between boris johnson &jeremy corbyn. in &jeremy corbyn. sport, the not so heavyweight open in sport, the not so heavyweight open to take back the titles. anthonyjoshua will open to take back the titles. anthony joshua will be open to take back the titles. anthonyjoshua will be freestone lighter than his opponent in the rematch in saudi arabia. caroline was in aki will retire from tennis after next years australian open and so after next years australian open and so she wants to start a family. brendan rodgers has signed a new five and a half year contract at leicester city, appearing to end any
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speculation linking him with the va ca nt speculation linking him with the vacant managers job at arsenal. more stories at half past five. a teenager has admitted attempting to murder a six—year—old boy, by throwing him from a balcony at tate modern in london. jonty bravery, from west london, had initially denied the charge. the boy, who is french and can't be named, suffered a deep bleed to the brain and fractured his spine. helena wilkinson reports. it was here on a sunny summer afternoon, where a family day out turned into the unthinkable. the six—year—old had gone with his mother up to the tenth floor — the viewing platform — to take in london's skyline, then, out of nowhere, a teenager approached the boy, picked him up, held him over the railings and threw him. he fell five floors onto this concrete roof. there was a little commotion
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with a very loud primal scream. and so it was hard to ascertain what was going on. someone said someone had thrown a child over. i leapt up and looked over the rail, and i did indeed to see a child down below there. the child's mother then tried to climb the rail. i restrained her and pulled her back. and then the fellow who was being accused was being punched, and then we pushed him over to the side of the wall. he didn't seem to have any remorse. hejust almost giggled at one point, saying that, "i did it, yeah, i did it." the boy was treated at the scene before being taken away by paramedics on a stretcher under this blue tarp. it's a miracle, given how far he fell, that he survived. today, this teenager, john t bravery
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— who was 17 at the time — pleaded guilty to trying to murder the six—year—old. four months on, and the little boy is still recovering. in a recent statement, his family said they can now take him outside in a wheelchair, that he's beginning to move his legs a little, and he can now once again kiss them. some hope for the boy's parents with his slow recovery, but the horror and trauma they experienced that day will never leave them. helena wilkinson, bbc news, at the old bailey. let's have a look at some other news... a man has appeared in court charged with the murder of a 12—year—old boy who died in a hit—and—run outside his school in essex. terence glover, who's 51, was remanded in custody. harley watson died after a car struck a group of children in loughton on monday. the ride—hailing app uber says it received almost 6,000 reports of sexual assault in the united states
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in 2017 and 2018. the company said that passengers — as opposed to drivers — accounted for nearly half of those accused. but it says 99.9% of the total journeys were taken without any safety issues. the mother of baby "p" — peter connelly — has been denied parole for the second time in four years. tracey connelly was jailed in 2009 after admitting causing or allowing the death of her one—year—old son. she was let out on licence in 2013 but returned to prison for breaching her parole conditions in 2015; she was denied parole in 2017. a berkshire couple who were rejected by their local adoption service because of their indian background have been awarded more than £100,000 in damages. sandeep and reena mander from maidenhead successfully sued the royal borough of windsor and maidenhead council. the judge said they were
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discriminated against on the grounds of race. our community affairs correspondent adina campbell has more. justice for sandy and rena mandel. today, the couple have been awarded nearly £120,000 in damages plus costs after a court ruled they were unfairly turned away from their local adoption service in berkshire because of their ethnicity. i was really, really hurt. i think, first off, i was shocked. and then i was quite hurt, and i just thought, another roadblock. and i can't believe the colour or culture of what they are assuming my culture is is coming into play at this stage. and for them to also say, go to, i think it was india or
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pakistan, to where our culture would be better fitted. it was so assumed. what made us really angry was the assumption of what our values and cultural beliefs were. i mean both rena and i are british—born. we are roman catholic schooled. the couple had spent seven years trying to conceive, including a number of failed ivf cycles. they contacted adopt berkshire in 2016, but were soon told their application wouldn't be processed because of their sikh sikh—indian heritage. the attitude we got on the phone from the lady that was on the call just broke our hearts, really. in a statement, windsor in maidenhead bureau counsel says they've reviewed their policies to ensure they are fit for purpose. and they're are confident they don't exclude prospective adopters on the grounds of ethnicity. it sends a really powerful message that there are inequality laws out there, which should help and benefit the entire society. but sometimes, you do have to make some noise to ensure that they are being applied properly by those in power. they now have an 18—month—old son who they adopted from the us. despite the problems they faced in the uk, they
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hope to adopt more children in the future. adina campbell, bbc news. we'll have more on tonight's election debate shortly , and just before we get an update on the weather, have a look at this. a father has shared the moment he turns his daughter's hearing aid on in the morning. that's a very loud hello. paul addison, from harrogate, tweeted a video of his four—month—old georgina reacting to her mother's voice. georgina was diagnosed as severely deaf in september and wears a hearing aid in each ear. he said using the hearing aids, "it's like the lights have been switched on" for her.
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now it's time for a look at the weather. today we have seen a lot of cloud across the uk, outbreaks of rain pushing eastward followed by really heavy showers as well. so most of us have seen rain at some point in the day. skies looked threatening in this picture. overnight tonight we will keep the north—westerly winds and that will continue to bring patchy cloud and a scattering of showers around the north—westerly coast. they will be dry weather for quite a few of us with temperatures at four tonight. tomorrow will be a reasonable start to the weekend and sunshine breaking through the cloud are crossing and wales. but the cloud is thicker in the afternoon where we will see some afternoon rain arriving in the north—west of scotla nd rain arriving in the north—west of scotland and turning increasingly heavy. the level b accompanied by south—westerly winds. temperature up
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to 11 celsius. the second half of the weekend, the weather is set to turn quite a bit windier. good evening, you are watching bbc news. the headlines... a man described by police as one of the most dangerous sex offenders ever seen in the uk has been found guilty of a string of charges. 34—year—old joseph mccann faced 37 charges relating to 11 women and children, including rape, false imprisonment and kidnap. he isa he is a horrendously dangerous individual who showed complete co nte m pt individual who showed complete contempt for his victims, clearly one of the most dangerous sex offenders we have ever seen in this country. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, claims leaked documents from borisjohson's brexit deal are hard evidence it would have a devastating impact on northern ireland. the former conservative prime minister sirjohn major calls on voters in some areas not to back the tories in next week's election.
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a teenager has admitted attempted murder, after throwing a 6 year old boy from the 10th floor of tate modern in london in august. much more coming up in the next few minutes, and of course at quarter to, it is a film review. but right now, we will catch up with the sport news. here is hugh farris. hello to you. there will be a significant difference in weight between the two fighters, anthony joshua attempts difference in weight between the two fighters, anthonyjoshua attempts to win back three world titles from andy ruiz win back three world titles from andy ruinunior in it saudi arabia tomorrow night. joshua came in under 17, that is the latest she's been for a world title fight. he says the skills will pay the bills this time after being criticised for the first meeting he lost to ruiz in new york for being overweight and underprepared. ruiz tip the scales,
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he has put on a little since that first bite. also since he when he faced as a negative press about his lifestyle and the odd extravagant purchase as well. it is live on radio five live and bbc sounds. elsewhere, caroline's he hit says she has encompassed all she could have ever dreamt of on the court. the former world number one announced that she will be retiring after next month's australian open. the scene of her one and only grand slam title. she's only 29, but was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis last year, but she insists her health has no bearing on her decision she said to start a family, and raise awareness of her condition. michael's field town league to game tomorrow has been postponed after the players refused to play. they say their mental well—being is at rock bottom with staff and players still waiting to be paid. the football league said it had sympathy with the players, but has found the club guilty of misconduct after being unable to fulfil the fixture. brendan rogers
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has committed his future to leicester city, signing a new five and a half year deal through 22025. he on the move to the stadium in february, but after winning 17 of his 26 league games so far come in with the club second in the primarily, the extension seems to end speculation linking him with the va ca nt end speculation linking him with the vacant manager's job at arsenal. chelsea have had their transfer been reduced on appeal by the court of arbitration for sport. it means they are now free to sign players again injanuary are now free to sign players again in january after their initial are now free to sign players again injanuary after their initial band cover the whole season for breaching laws on signing young players. manchester united manager has added his voice to the criticisms surrounding the headline in an italian newspaper out of the syria match between rome tonight. the front page of the newspaper headline for the coverage as black friday. showing these players, both players and both clubs have criticised the newspaper and said he was shocked.
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when you see that paper you say wow, really? is that possible? it's the worst front page i've ever seen. it has to be. of course, we have been in touch with chris, just so he knows that we will back him and we support him and roma do as well. yeah. it's, idon't support him and roma do as well. yeah. it's, i don't work in your line of business, but wow. that's incredible. at least we don't see that here. we can see lots of different things, but we don't see that. so, that has to be stamped down. three time winnerjohn higgins has been knocked out of the uk snooker championship, in the quarterfinals, he lost six frames to three to the chinese teenager. he now goes on to play in the last four. well the two time champion has already beaten a chinese compatriot
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to make the semi finals in your key. one by six frames to do in at the quarterfinals today. the other last formats will be decided tonight. that's all your support can find out more on all those stories on our website, including the newsjust coming into us here this afternoon at the bbc sport centre. the former leicester manager, nigel pearson is set to take over at watford. that's oui’ set to take over at watford. that's our website, much more on that and everything else in sports day at half past six. thank you very much, hugh. you ferris there. now, we will talk more about our main story here tonight. a man described by police as one of the most dangerous sex offenders ever seen in the uk has been found guilty of a string of attacks earlier this year. 3a year old joseph mccann faced 37 charges relating to 11 women and children — including rape, false imprisonment and kidnap. he was mistakenly released from prison just he was mistakenly released from prisonjust a he was mistakenly released from prison just a few months before
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attacks. —— the attacks. nick hardwick was chair of the parole board from 2016 to 2018, and he told the bbc that the case showed there might be systemic problems in the probation service. something's clearly gone wrong here. we need to get to the bottom of it. we need to know whether this was about individual errors, or whether this is a symptom of a much wider problem in the probation service. and, therefore, something like this or something similar to it could happen again. and when you say wider problems, what do you mean specifically? well, since the probation service has been reorganised, what probation officers on the ground will tell you is that they are under resourced, that the system is confused and systems aren't working as they should do. and i think we need to get to the bottom of that and see whether that was a factor in this case. when you hear the details of what's gone on here and the failings, are you surprised? i'm not surprised that there are mistakes being made in the probation service. i mean, this individual set of circumstances seems very unusual to me. i'm not aware of anything similar to this. but i am aware of mistakes
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being made about processes not being followed that should be them being picked up almost as a last—gasp thing. so i do think that there's wider grounds for concern than simply the awful circumstances of this case. when you hear the details of this, where do you think the problem lies? well, it's difficult to say. there were clearly individualfailures here. but what we don't know is whether the context of the pressures and resource shortages the probation service are under were contributory factors. so it's no good just looking at the person on the front line who made the decision, we need to look at the wider system failures here to see where the buck should stop. nick hardwick talking to our correspondent, june kelly.
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let's return to politics now — in a couple of hours, borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn go head—to—head in a live bbc debate, in the run up to next week's general election. of course, let's head back to christian fraser is in maidstone where the debate is being held. high, christian. yeah mech hello, jane. we are in the spin room, which is filling up nicely. you can see the massed ranks of the media who are here will be watching the debate tonight on these television screens. it will be quite cosy and here i think. come eight o'clock when everybody crimson here, they tend to be quite functional spaces, these big television studios, but this one has a rather quirky diner, where they are serving cups of tea to everyone tonight. you are about to go into your film review, aren't you? this one looks a bit like back to the future. i wonder if we are going to get back to the future moment tonight to though. are we going to get a big tv moment that shifts the polls in any one direction or another? there were lots of people saying jeremy corbyn needs something tonight to move the narrative. let's take a seat next to chris morris from a reality check, who is playing the role of marty mcfly
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tonight. you have been looking through these documents, these are the irish documents, these are the irish documents that labour released today. treasury leaks. documents that labour released today. treasury lea ks. what documents that labour released today. treasury leaks. what do you make of them? so, it's an internal treasury document that the conservatives say was an initial analysis, not used to make policy, not seen by the prime minister, nevertheless, some well—connected, well—informed treasury officials have concluded that borisjohnson's withdrawal deal, in effect, creates a trade bordered on the receipt, so that's border within the uk between northern ireland and great britain. and some of the language and is quite striking. it says that for exporters from northern ireland to great britain, a lot of them are small businesses, it thinks they could potentially struggle to deal with the extra costs that this deal could impose. and for importers, this is all the cumulative cost that they might have to deal with, given all the checks they may have to take —— that may have to take place, could be equivalent to a 30% tariff, these are initial assessments, but
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this is exactly the kind of thing the democratic unionist party was warning borisjohnson saying, this is why we can't support your deal. what boris johnson of chris has been saying this has not been put in front of ministers. this is civil servants who have done the work on this. limits of the experts know what they're talking about then. right, that's one point. let's talk about the flow, just so i am clear in my mind. you are saying obviously there will be custom checks going from great britain to northern ireland, because some of that stuff will be going into the european union across the irish border, but are you also saying there are going to have to be checks within the united kingdom from northern ireland going into great britain?“ united kingdom from northern ireland going into great britain? if checks, but some. so, from great britain into northern ireland, certainly, tariffs would have to be paid if you know that goods are going to move on into the republic of ireland. the next so that is a border within the united kingdom. that's what the deal warned about. potentially if goods are deemed to be at risk going to northern ireland to crossing the border either themselves or perhaps a little widget inside another bit of good is going to go into the single market,
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you may then have to pay a tariff and get it reimbursed later. so, it's a very hard to argue that this is not some kind of a border. it doesn't mean the countries being split in two, but these are such sensitive issues in northern ireland, and one of these things, of course borisjohnson ireland, and one of these things, of course boris johnson keeps ireland, and one of these things, of course borisjohnson keeps insisting it's all nonsense. there will be no checks from his own officials in a black and white here are saying look, there will be, that's what the withdrawal agreement says. of chrisjeremy corbyn is going to make great play of this tonight, you would expect. he is not —— it's not been released by accident today, it's dodgy ground, because he has to turn to brexit, and is not rock—solid on that topic. i thank you are right. i don't think he's going to make that much of a fa ct of he's going to make that much of a fact of the northern ireland economy, because let's face it, both of these men need to win votes in the heart of england, and the fate of the northern ireland economy is probably not a hot electoral topic in dudley or stoke, or wolverhampton. the issues of trust are, andl wolverhampton. the issues of trust are, and i think both of them are vulnerable to issues of trust. labour will push the line saying that this document proves that you can't take boris johnson at his
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word. mrjohnson's clearly going to push back and say we are the people who are going to get brexit done, and labour's plan isjust more differentially. those are the words we have heard 1000 times before. the question is does any of it the room any more? i think one of the crucial things into my's debate is the air going to be that kind of dry dropper moment? if either of them needs one, it's probably mr corbyn, because the polls suggest that he's slightly behind. chris morris, thank you very much. chris morris, thank you very much. chris is right, because if you look at the bbc poll tracker this evening, around ten points ahead the conservatives, so certainly, jeremy corbyn needs to eat into that lead that the tories have. you needs something tonight, jane. christian, we will be watching. thank you very much indeed, thank you. firefighters in australia are tackling a hundred serious fires across the state of new south wales. some of the fires have combined to create what's being described as a 37 mile wide "mega blaze". sydney is blanketed in thick, choking smoke. our correspondent there shaimaa khalil has the latest.
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the extraordinary moment when firefighters fled to safety as flames surged towards them. the latest example of how fast and unpredictable these blazes are. it's a continuous fight with uncontrollable fires and it's happening across the country, stretching the resources to the limit. in new south wales alone, 100 fires are tearing through the state. the fiercest are on the outskirts of sydney, with strong winds pushing a heavy blanket of smoke on the city from every direction. australia's largest city has been heavily impacted by the fires around it. and you can see it and smell it in that haze of smoke that has covered sydney for a week now. and it's not letting up. the air quality has deteriorated to beyond hazardous. and we've heard of numbers rising of people going into hospitals with respiratory problems. one local newspaper has summed it up quite neatly. it said "sydney chokes
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as state burns". nothing escapes the devastation here. hundreds of homes have been destroyed. and wildlife continues to suffer as the fires blazed through natural habitats. 1.6 million hectares of land have been scorched in new south wales. the severity of the flames early on in the fire season has sparked anger and new calls for the government to tackle climate change. at the heart of it all is the unrelenting drought with no rain expected anytime soon. fire officials say there are fears of more blazes as australia begins its scorching summer. shima halil, bbc news, sydney.
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hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. so mark, what do we have this week? it's quite a week we have, we have ordinary love, which is a drama starring leslie mann field and liam neeson. we have motherless brooklyn, which isa we have motherless brooklyn, which is a pet project for edward norton, who directs and stars, and lucy in the sky, natalie portman gets lost in space whilst on earth. that is a very interesting and a mixed bag of a week in terms of themes. talk us through your first try. let's start with ordinary love, which is written bya with ordinary love, which is written by a playwright and stars leslie mann field and liam neeson as a couple. who have come in their past, a tragedy, loss, but they are living with and dealing with it. we meet them at the beginning of the movie. they are doing a walk at that she's kind of insisted that they do, because they are reaching that age where they get aches and pains, and they need to stay healthy. she then
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