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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  December 9, 2019 11:30am-1:01pm GMT

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wales, the south—west. winds associated with that, temperatures ten to 13 celsius. but the land of rain will move eastward as we go through tuesday evening. this you're watching bbc newsroom live. it's11am and these are the main stories this morning: at least five people have died in a volcanic eruption in new zealand and several remain missing. police say they do not expect there to be any more survivors. the world anti—doping agency bans russia from all major international sporting events for four years, after it agreed moscow had manipulated laboratory doping data. with only three days to go until polling day, labour promises to deliver a budget to end austerity within 100 days if it wins the election. borisjohnson is spending the final days of the campaign visiting labour heartlands, warning leave voters thatjeremy corbyn will
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betray them on brexit. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. police in new zealand say they don't expect to find any more survivors after a volcano in new zealand erupted without warning. at least five people have died and several more are missing. the volcano on on white island to the north of the country is a popular tourist attraction. the sudden eruption happened just after 2pm local time. it's feared passengers from a cruise ship were looking at the volcano‘s crater when it started spewing ash thousands of feet into the air. police say more than 20 people are still unaccounted for —
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and officials say it is currently too dangerous for emergency services to travel to the island to establish exactly what happened. our news correspondent richard lister has been following developements and has this report. a boiling ash cloud fills the sky. these day—trippers had a lucky escape. they had been on that island just minutes before. they left behind a sightseeing helicopter, destroyed by the force of the eruption. the plume of ash is still building, and further down the beach, a large group of day—trippers is assembling on a rock, waiting for rescue. 23 were picked up by tourist boats, but others are still unaccounted for. i know there will be a huge amount of concern and anxiety for those who have loved ones on or around the island at the time. and i can assure them, police are doing everything they can. the injured were brought to the harbour. most were suffering from burns and five of them did not survive the injuries.
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helicopters transferred those who were critically ill to specialist hospitals. this rescue and recovery operation has had to be suspended for now. the island is unstable. there are possibilities of further eruption. of further eruptions. the physical environment is unsafe for us to return to the island. white island may be new zealand's most active volcano, but it's also popular with tourists. some 10,000 visit every year. last month, a volcano monitoring group raised the alert level, seeing eruptions may be more likely. it's quite plausible that this is the first stage of this it's quite plausible that this is the first stage of an eruption that could continue. but, on the same side of the coin, it could just simply be a one—hit wonder. it's not up to 27 people might still be trapped on this island. until it is deemed safe for rescuers to return,
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anyone left alive has no choice but to wait for to come. samantha 0lley is a reporter for nz—me and took a flight close to the volcano after the eruption. she told us what she saw. it was a great streaming monstrosity. there is a large crater lake inside white island. the crater lake was steaming a lot more than usual. there were many more events, but the main difference was that the entire crater was covered in green and grey ash, which is not normally here. and the cloud, there was a large white cloud initially above the crater lake. and then that slowly grew to a more grey colour as the ash spread to the east. and in the eastern side of the island and the sea,
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you could see that the ash had to change the colour of the sea. it had turned to a brown colour, is the ash had come out of the sky. and also flowing out from a river which flows into a nearby beach. emergency crews cannot get to the island. it is simply too dangerous. we were very lucky to be able to fly over today and in fact whenever the wind changed, you could smell the sulphur before you knew that the cloud was slightly moving and we had to fly you knew that the cloud was slightly moving and we would have to fly away from that. russia has been banned from taking part in and hosting all major sports events for the next four years over the doping scandal. the announcement was made in the last hour by the world the bbc‘s steven rosenberg is in moscow for us and joins us live. is usually significant decision?
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yes, i'm a huge disappointment here in russia as well. not too much surprise. —— yes and a huge disappointment. they had expected the world anti—doping agency to come down quite tough on russia and that is what has happened. for the next four years, there will be no russian flag at major sporting events around the world. the team will not be allowed to participate in events. that affects the summer 0lympics next year, then the winter olympics in beijing in 2022. and other major sporting events. also, russia will not have the right to host any major sporting events or apply to host such events. so this is quite tough. i have been speaking to some people in moscow. great disappointment. the russian anti—doping agency says it is very sad that it expected this
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decision. the head of the russian boxing federation said it was a sad and stupid decision. 0nly boxing federation said it was a sad and stupid decision. only those guilty of doping should have been banned. 0ur athletes don't want to compete unless it is under the flag of russia. and the head of the swimming organisation said no one has the right to take away dreams. if we go back to the origins of this crisis for russian sport, it's not just about individuals comments about a laboratory and a cover—up. yes, and a massive state—sponsored doping operation in russian sport that was uncovered a few years ago. and i spoke to one russian hurdler today on the phone, timothy charlie, who was deeply disappointed. he blames russian officials for this. he says this had been swept out, new people put in. they did not act in time and as a result he will not be
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able to participate in major events with the russian flag. i should mention that if russian athletes can prove they are untainted by the doping scandal, then they will be allowed to take part in events but without the russian flag. steve, thank you. party leaders are making their final push for votes in the last week of the general election campaign. the prime minister is visiting four brexit—voting labour—held seats in the north east of england, with just three days to go before polling day. mrjohnson started the day at a fish market in grimsby, one of a number of longstanding labour constituencies that voted heavily to leave the eu in the 2016 referendum, that both the conservatives and the brexit party are targeting. he said his message was that a vote for his party is a vote to get brexit done and unleash britain's potential. this is a big, big
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choice for our country. on thursday, we can either go forwards with a dynamic one—nation agenda that will get brexit done, unleash investment into this country, allow us to continue with 20,000 more police, a0 new hospitals, all the things we want to do for the country, or else we can have delay, division, deadlock with corbyn and nicola sturgeon, in a coalition. another hung parliament. that is not the right way forward for our country. that is why we want a working majority, to get brexit done, help the fishing industry and so much else besides. john mcdonnell has promised to deliver a budget to end austerity, in a speech setting out labour's priorities for its first 100 days in government. the shadow chancellor also detailed plans for democratic control of newly nationalised water and energy firms. finally, let me just say also, in some respects most importantly, our first budget will be introduced. the budget which ends austerity once and for all.
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this is the budget that will save the nhs. that starts to rebuild our public services the tories have brought to their knees. a budget that will put money in people's pockets, with a real living wage of £10 per hour. money to fix the worst aspects of universal credit, while we design its full replacement. a 5% pay rise for public sector workers after years of pay freezes. and yes, the waspi compensation scheme, which will be established through legislation, and we will also introduce the legislation that will scrap tuition fees once and for all. in scotland, the issue of independence will be critical in determining how people vote. speaking on good morning britain earlier snp leader nicola sturgeon urged people to stop boris by voting snp.
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in every single one of the tory seats in scotland, the snp is the main challenger. so if people don't want to wake up on friday morning to five years of a borisjohnson majority government, they have got to vote snp on thursday, to help stop that happening. all of these other discussions are important. i have been very clear and frank throughout the course of this campaign. more so than anybody else has been, i think. but it's important we don't get ahead of ourselves here because we only get the opportunity to have this kind of influence if people deprive boris johnson of that majority on thursday, and that is the fundamental point. the liberal democrat leader, jo swinson, has defended her party's pledge to revoke article 50 which paved the way for britain to leave he european union. speaking earlier on five live she denied that going against the result of the 2016 referendum would be undemocratic, saying she wanted to give people a democratic choice. you know, in the vast majority of circumstances, it is unchanged.
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the liberal democrats want a peoples vote and we will work to secure a peoples vote that puts a specific brexit deal to the public to have their say. and let's be clear. we've tried to make that happen in parliament. you know, our preference was to resolve this issue through a peoples vote on the brexit deal that borisjohnson went and negotiated, rather than a general election. because it would be more specific. you know, it would be one question you're asking people. obviously, in a general election, there is a lot of different factors that people weigh up. a leaked government document seen by the bbc suggests that putting borisjohnson‘s brexit plan into action will be a major challenge due to new customs arrangements for northern ireland. the document from the department for exiting the european union casts doubt on the prime minister's promise of there being no checks on goods in the irish sea post—brexit. let's speak to our northern ireland economics and business editor.
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john campbell, explain the importance of this document. we have to understand the prime minister's timetable. he wants to get us out of the eu by the end ofjanuary and then we would be into this transition period which would last for a year. transition period which would last fora year. in transition period which would last for a year. in that time, he wants to negotiate a trade deal with the eu, an entirely new relationship with you, but also in parallel to that were going to have to work out what is going to happen in the irish sea, in terms of checks on goods going from great britain into northern ireland and stuff going the other way. what this leaked document is saying is that timetable is incredibly tight. in one of the big reasons is that the nature of those checks in the irish sea are going to be dependent on the outcome of that trade deal. so it put civil servants ina very trade deal. so it put civil servants in a very difficult position. how do they design and implement the system before the trade deal is agreed? and really what you're saying is it is very difficult, they will properly have to design a system which would assume a high level of checks. the
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whole thing could be subject to legal challenge. there will need to be planning issues. what facilities are there going to be at the ports in northern ireland? they are raising real doubts on the ability to have this new system designed, implemented and legislated for in little more than a year. and yet, going back to what the prime minister said, he said there will be no checks. that is not right. there will be checks. 0n the basis of the current deal the prime ministers pursuing, there will be checks on goods coming from great britain into northern ireland. the prime minister said this to the bbc in the immediate aftermath of that deal being signed in october. this although now seems to be resigning from this position. absolutely eve ryo ne from this position. absolutely everyone else is clear in the mind is that because northern ireland will effectively still be part of the eu single market, some goods coming from gb into ni will need to be checked. arlene foster, the leader of the dup, was interviewed
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today. she said her party went to the trouble of contacting hmrc in the trouble of contacting hmrc in the aftermath of the deal, saying, will have to be checks? they said yes. hmrc and the treasury think they will have to be checks. this new document also says there will have to be checks. i think the only way you could avoid checks as if the uk was to pursue a much softer brexit than the one that is currently on the table. and is that something then the voters are now —— northern ireland are examining and seeing come the way we close this gap between what borisjohnson says and what everybody else, including yourself, is saying? ithink in terms of reading across the brexit impact for northern ireland, it's quite difficult. 0n impact for northern ireland, it's quite difficult. on one hand, you could see the dup have got themselves in a terrible mess by supporting boris johnson and initially backing a harder form supporting boris johnson and initially backing a harderform of brexit. they have made a rod for
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their own backs. but, to be honest, their own backs. but, to be honest, the dup don't seem to be punished by the dup don't seem to be punished by the electorate for that. because the message the dup are seeing is that they have opposed any brexit you think is bad for northern ireland and will continue to oppose any brag that they think is bad for northern ireland. so i think ultimately where you might have brexit having an effect on northern ireland's politics is that some of the programme in parties, they have formed a pact, the us to decide on some seats, so they will try and return at least a couple of brought remain mps to parliament. john, thank you very much. we shall watch it closely. top health officials have accused the main parties of misleading voters and making unrealistic election promises over the nhs. chris hopson, the chief executive of nhs providers, which represents trusts in england, says politicians have ducked the big issues in regard to health and social care. and the royal college of physicians says manifesto promises were not physically possible because of a lack of people in training to fulfil them.
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join us at 8:30pm this evening on bbc one and bbc iplayer for a special edition of question time. emma barnett presents a question time special from york with a panel of politicians representing all seven parties — and an audience of 18 to 30—year—olds. they will be grilled on everything from jobs, education, housing and climate change, to brexit and more. you can also get live fact checking and analysis of the event on bbc.co.uk/news, the bbc news app and the bbc news channel. a 27—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering a woman in rushden in northamptonshire. the 25—year—old woman was found with stab wounds near st george's way on saturday evening and died at the scene. police said the arrested man
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has serious injuries, and another 27—year—old man is also being questioned on suspicion of his attempted murder. winds across the south west of england are expected to strengthen this morning, as storm atiyah continues to make an impact. with winds reaching over 80 miles per hour, the storm, which arrived from ireland, has already caused severe travel disruption and left thousands of homes without power. the headlines on bbc news: at least five people have died in a volcanic eruption in new zealand and several remain missing. police say they do not expect to find any more survivors. the world anti—doping agency bans russia from all major international sporting events for four years, after it agreed moscow had manipulated laboratory doping data. with just three days to go until polling day, the parties make a final attempt to win over voters with their key messages.
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in a few hours, high—level talks aimed at ending the conflict in eastern ukraine will resume for the first time in more than three years. the summit in paris will be the first time that ukraine's president volodymyr zelensky has met his russian counterpart vladimir putin face to face. it will take place as part of what's known as the normandy format with the leaders of france and germany also present. the conflict between the ukrainian army and russian backed forces has now been continuing for five and a half years and has cost more than 13,000 lives. from eastern ukraine here's our correspondent jonah fisher. after years of stalemate, there's movement in eastern ukraine. new positions being established — both on the ground and in talks. this is zolote, one of three locations where the ukrainian military has, at russia's insistence, pulled a kilometre back.
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how does it feel for you as a soldier to have to withdraw? translation: an order is an order. i don't consider this as a retreat. we are holding a defensive line. the new dynamic is down to this man, ukraine's actor turned president, volodymyr zelensky. he's made delivering peace his overriding priority. but the fact that it's ukraine making the concessions has angered some. the man has a point. international support for ukraine is waning, with question marks over the reliability of its most important ally — the united states. so this is one of the villages that the ukrainian military has pulled out of.
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it's now basically a sort of no man's land. it's very quiet. lots of people seem to have left. but just the fact that it's like this is an improvement, because during five years of war this place has seen a lot of fighting. valentina has been here for most of it. her children and grandchildren have left, choosing safety deeper inside ukraine. translation: my life has changed in a very bad way. i still hold onto the hope that there will be peace, my family will come back, and the crime will stop. but peace on what terms? any settlement is likely to involve elections in rebel areas. quite possibly while russian—backed forces are still there. these are the rebels. they're from the self—declared republic of luhansk, and are monitoring the only crossing point into government—controlled
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territory. thousands walk across here every day, many picking up pensions before returning to rebel land. if you had to choose one president, who would you choose, zelensky of putin? russia has not given up anything to make these talks happen. ukraine has and it could be about to find out whether it's much bigger and more powerful neighbour is really interested in ending a grinding, miserable war. jonah fisher, bbc news, in eastern ukraine. the most polluting firms are likely to lose 43% of their value, thanks to policies designed to combat climate change, a report says. meanwhile, the most progressive companies will see an uplift of 33% in their value. the forecast was commissioned by the un—backed principles
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for responsible investment. 0ur environment analyst roger harrabin reports. it is already evident that sectors like coal are threatened if governments clamp down on the emissions that are over heating the planet. the study goes a step further and examines the likely impact of climate policy on firms within each sector. for instance, it forecasts that car—makers concentrating on electric vehicles will increase in value by 108%, whilst firms are stuck by 108%, whilst firms stuck on petrol vehicles will lose value. power firms who have invested in renewable energy will see the value of their shares increase by 104%, whilst those reliant on fossil fuels could see their worth fall by two thirds. mining firms producing minerals critical for the new era, such as cobalt for batteries, may see a 54% upturn, whilst others could see their values halved.
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representatives of fossil fuel companies told bbc news they were already adapting their business plans to take climate change into account. roger harrabin, bbc news. police are making free online training on how to react to a terrorism incident available to the general public. the course, devised by counter—terrorism officers and experts, was previously only available to people working in crowded places like shopping centres. people who take the course will become so—called ct citizens. former paralympian baroness tanni grey—thompson has spoken out about attitudes towards pregnant disabled athletes. the 11—time paralympic gold medallist told a bbc podcast how people reacted when she fell pregnant with her daughter carys in 2001. she said she lost count of the number of times people asked her how she got pregnant. let's listen to her reaction.
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this women pokes me and asked how i got pregnant. i screamed at her, i had six with my husband. she said, thatis had six with my husband. she said, that is disgusting. actually, i think is quite good looking. i am a lot older than you guys. i have had to develop and learn those answers because otherwise i will scream like a banshee. so when someone says, people like you can't do that, my response is always, what, welsh people? saudi arabia will no longer require restaurants to have separate entrances segregated by sex, the government says. previously, it was mandatory to have one entrance for families and women, this and another for men on their own. the restrictions had already been quietly eased in practice, with many restaurants, cafes and other meeting places no longer enforcing segregation. now, a quick spoiler warning
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if you weren't watching last night, but after spending three weeks in australia, the queen of thejungle, and winner of this year's i'm a celebrity, get me out of here, has been crowned. the winner of i'm a celebrity, get me out of here, 2019 and the new queen of the jungle is jacqueline! eastenders actorjacqueline jossa's win brought the show‘s 19th series to a close, having first hit our screens in 2002. coronation street actor andy whyment was the runner up, with radio dj roman kemp in third. now it's time for a look at the weather. storm atiyah has moved away towards the east. some strong winds overnight over wales and eastern england. from the satellite, you can
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see the clear skies across the uk at the moment. some sunshine, code out to the west. that will bring —— that will be the troublemaker tomorrow. for now, plenty of blue sky. this going through the rest of the afternoon, we continue with the sunshine. some sellers possible down the eastern side of england. maximum temperatures today will be getting up temperatures today will be getting up to about six, possibly eight or 9 degrees across southern parts. this evening, the skies in eastern areas of the low temperatures to drop down. there will be a frost on the east. further west, not down. there will be a frost on the east. furtherwest, not as down. there will be a frost on the east. further west, not as cold. more cloud and some rain moving its way into northern ireland and into scotland. temperatures you're staying up, at about 5—9dc. in the far east of east anglia, we will see a touch of frost. cloud and rain in the west is linked into this weather system, or wrapped around an area of low pressure towards iceland. the
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isobars get much closer together again as we head towards tuesday. deal is expected for the irish sea coast. the rain spreads its way east. a windy day for all of us. these are the wind gusts, even across eastern parts. 45 or 50 mph gusts of wind. temperatures, ten degrees. the rain will be heavy on the cold front as it moves its way eastwards overnight. squally winds with that. as it clears away on wednesday, colder air returning. with that. as it clears away on wednesday, colderair returning. it will bring us in wintry showers, mainly for the higher ground of scotland. strong winds. elsewhere, some showers around throughout wednesday. some bright or sunny spells in between the showers. temperatures will be lower again. a bit of a roller—coaster of a temperatures for the next few days.
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5-9 temperatures for the next few days. 5—9 celsius. 0n temperatures for the next few days. 5—9 celsius. on thursday, more wet and windy weather moves on, turning milder again. by friday, strong winds will continue. staying very u nsettled winds will continue. staying very unsettled for the next few days. goodbye for now.
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you re watching bbc newsroom live. it's midday, and these are the main stories this morning — at least five people have died in a volcanic eruption in new zealand and several remain missing. police say they do not expect to find any more survivors. the island is unstable. possibilities of further eruptions, the physical environment is unsafe to turn to the island. the world anti—doping agency bans russia from all major international sporting events for four years, after it agreed moscow had manipulated laboratory doping data. with only three days to go until polling day, labour promises to deliver a budget to "end austerity" within100 days if it wins the election. borisjohnson is spending the final days of the campaign visiting labour heartlands,
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warning leave voters thatjeremy corbyn will betray them on brexit. chaimjoanna chaim joanna gosling chaimjoanna gosling live in crewe, the eighth most marginal seat in the country with just 48 for labour last time round. it is one of the seats that could decide the selection. good afternoon. welcome to bbc newsroom live. i'm carrie gracie. police in new zealand say they don't expect to find any more survivors after a volcano erupted without warning. at least five people have died and several more are missing. the volcano on white island — also known as whakaari — to the north of the country is a popular tourist attraction. the sudden eruption happened just after 2.00pm local time. it's feared passengers
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from a cruise ship were looking at the volcano's crater when it started spewing ash thousands of feet into the air. officials say it is currently too dangerous for emergency services to travel to the island to establish exactly what happened. 0ur news correspondent richard lister has been following developements and has this report. seconds after the eruption began, these tourists got off the island just in time. minutes later, and a boiling ash cloud fills the sky. 0h, my god. the man who shot this is lucky to be alive. it was less than half an hour before the volcano blew. he returns to his boat on hand, and they look for survivors. they find a sightseeing helicopter, destroyed by the eruption. the plume of ash is still building, and
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further down the beach, a large group of day—trippers is assembling ona group of day—trippers is assembling on a rock, waiting for rescue. 23 people were picked up by tourist boats, but others are still unaccounted for. i know there will bea unaccounted for. i know there will be a huge amount of concern and anxiety for those who have loved ones are more around the island at the time, and i can assure them, police are doing everything they can. the injured were brought to a harbour, most suffering from burns, and five did not survive the injuries. helicopters transferred to those who were critically ill to specialist hospitals, but this rescue and recovery operation has had to be suspended for now. the island is unstable. there are possibilities of further eruptions, but actually, the physical environment is unsafe for us to return to the island. white island
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may be in new ‘s most active volcano, but it is also popular with tourists. some 10,000 visit every year. last month, a volcano monitoring group raised the alert level, saying eruptions may be more likely. it is quite possible that this is the first stage of an eruption that could continue. but on the same side of the coin, it could just simply be a one—hit wonder. the same side of the coin, it could just simply be a one-hit wonder. the police have been flying reconnaissance aircraft, looking for any signs of life on the island. to say they have found none, and they are assuming there are no more survivors. samantha 0lley is a reporter for nz—me and took a flight close to the volcano after the eruption — she told us what she saw. it was a great steaming monstrosity.
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there was a large crater inside white island, otherwise known as whakaari, white island, otherwise known as wha kaari, and the white island, otherwise known as whakaari, and the crater lake was steaming a lot more than usual. but the main difference was that the entire crater was covered in green and grey ash, which isn't normally here. and the cloud, there was a large white cloud initially, above the crater lake, then that slowly grew to a more grey colour as the ash spread to the east. and the eastern side of the island and the sea, you could see that the ash had to change the colour of the sea, turned it to a brown colour, is the ash had come out of the sky, and also thrown out of a river that comes from the crater lake into a nearby beach. emergency crews cannot get to the island, it is simply too dangerous. we were very lucky to be able to fly over today, and whenever
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they wind changed, you could smell they wind changed, you could smell the sulphur before you knew that the crowd was slightly moving, and would have to fly away from that. russia has been banned from taking part in and hosting all major sports events for the next four years over the doping scandal. the announcement was made a short time ago by the world anti—doping agency. they other issued the following statement. for too long, they other issued the following statement. fortoo long, russian doping has detracted from clean sport. russia was afforded every opportunity to get its house in order, and we join opportunity to get its house in order, and wejoin the global anti—doping community for the good of its athletes, and for the integrity of the sport. but it's chose instead to continue its stance of deception and denial. as a result, the wider executive committee has responded in the strongest possible terms, while protecting the rights of russian
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athletes, who can prove they were not involved and did not benefit from these fraudulent acts. the bbc‘s steven rosenberg is in moscow for us and has and has reaction there. i think they have been expecting wada to come down quite tough on russia, that is what has happened. so effectively for the next four yea rs, so effectively for the next four years, there will be no russian flag flying major sporting events around the world. in effect, that means russia as a team will not be allowed to participate in these events, and that affects next yea r‘s to participate in these events, and that affects next year's summer 0lympics that affects next year's summer olympics in tokyo, then we winter 0lympics, olympics in tokyo, then we winter olympics, in beijing in 2022, and other major sporting events. also, russia will not have the right to host any major sporting events or even apply to host such events. so this is quite tough from wada will stop and the reaction, i have been speaking to some people here in moscow, as i say, great
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disappointment. the russian anti—doping agency says it is very sad, but it expected this decision. the head of the russian boxing federation says it was a sad and stupid decision. he said only those guilty of doping should have been punished, our boxers do not want to go to the other pics without the russian flag or the russian anthem. and the head of the russian swimming association says, this is a tragedy for clea n association says, this is a tragedy for clean sport people. nobody has the right to take away their dreams. but, steve, the problem is, if we go back to the origins of this crisis for a russian sport, it is notjust about individuals, it is about a laboratory and a cover—up. yeah command a massive state—sponsored doping operation in the russian sport that was uncovered a few years ago. i spoke to one russian hurdler today on the phone, he was deeply disappointed. he blames the russian sporting officials for this. he says they should have been swept out, new
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people put in. he says they did not act in time, and as a result, he will not be able to participate in major events with the russian fight. i should mention, major events with the russian fight. ishould mention, though, that major events with the russian fight. i should mention, though, that of russian athletes can prove they are untainted by the doping scandal, then they will be allowed to take pa rt then they will be allowed to take part in events, but as i say, without the russian flag. and in a short while we'll be speaking to our sports news reporter alex capstick who is in lausanne in switzerland where that decision was made. three days to go before the general election. john mcdonnell has promised to deliver a budget to "end austerity", in a speech setting out labour's priorities for its first 100 days in government. the shadow chancellor said labour would introduce a £10 living wage, scrap universal credit and deliver a 5% pay rise for public sector workers, in addition to renationalising water and energy firms. finally, let me just say also, in some respects most importantly, our first budget will be introduced.
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the budget which ends austerity once and for all. this is the budget that will save the nhs. that starts to rebuild our public services the tories have brought to their knees. a budget that will put money in people's pockets, with a real living wage of £10 per hour. money to fix the worst aspects of universal credit, while we design its full replacement. a 5% pay rise for public sector workers after years of pay freezes. and yes, the waspi compensation scheme, which will be established through legislation, and we will also introduce the legislation that will scrap tuition fees once and for all. the prime minister is visiting four brexit—voting labour—held seats in the north east of england,
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with just three days to go before polling day. mrjohnson started the day at a fish market in grimsby, one of a number of longstanding labour constituencies that voted heavily to leave the eu in the 2016 referendum, that both the conservatives and the brexit party are targeting. he said his message, was that a vote for his party is a vote to "get brexit done and unleash britain's potential". this is a big, big choice for our country. on thursday, we can either go forwards with a dynamic one—nation agenda that will get brexit done, unleash investment into this country, allow us to continue with 20,000 more police, 40 new hospitals, all the things we want to do for the country, or else we can have delay, division, deadlock with corbyn and nicola sturgeon, in a coalition. another hung parliament. that is not the right way forward for our country. that is why we want a working majority, to get brexit done, help the fishing industry and so much else besides. in scotland, the issue of independence will be critical
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in determining how people vote. speaking on good morning britain earlier, snp leader nicola sturgeon urged people to stop borisjohnson by voting snp. in every single one of the tory seats in scotland, the snp is the main challenger. so if people don't want to wake up on friday morning to five years of a borisjohnson majority government, they have got to vote snp on thursday, to help stop that happening. all of these other discussions are important. i have been very clear and frank throughout the course of this campaign. more so than anybody else has been, i think. but it's important we don't get ahead of ourselves here because we only get the opportunity to have this kind of influence if people deprive boris johnson of that majority on thursday, and that is the fundamental point. the liberal democrat leader, jo swinson, has defended her party's pledge to revoke article 50 which paved the way for britain to leave the european union. speaking earlier on five live and the bbc news channel, she denied that going against the result of the 2016 referendum would be undemocratic, saying she wanted to give people
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a "democratic choice." you know, in the vast majority of circumstances, it is unchanged. the liberal democrats want a people's vote to secure a people's vote that puts a specific brexit deal to the public to have their say. and let's be clear. we've tried to make that happen in parliament. you know, our preference was to resolve this issue through a people's vote on the brexit deal that boris johnson went and negotiated, rather than a general election. because it would be more specific. you know, it would be one question you're asking people. obviously, in a general election, there is a lot of different factors that people weigh up. leaked documents suggest that new customs arrangement for northern ireland will make borisjohnson's brexit plan very difficult. the document from the department of exiting the european union question is whether the customs arrangements for northern ireland can be
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finalised by the government deadline of december 2020. the chief secretary to the treasury insisted the government would be ready. top health officials have accused the main parties of misleading voters and making unrealistic election promises over the nhs. chris hopson, the chief executive of nhs providers, which represents trusts in england, says politicians have ducked the big issues in regard to health and social care. and the royal college of physicians says manifesto promises were not "physically possible" because of a lack of people in training to fulfil them. staying with politics — bbc news has been focusing on constituencies around the uk. todayjoanna gosling is in crewe. joanna. thank you very much. yes, throughout the campaign, bbc news has been looking closely at the seats where the election could be won or lost.
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we are in ten of the most marginal constituencies throughout the campaign, and today i am in crewe. it is the eighth most marginal in the country at the last election, it was won by labour with a tiny majority, just 48 votes in it. so it is in the north—west of inwood, and the most marginal seat in the north west. it is surrounded by five other seats, four of them and one labour in the last election. and as i mentioned, here in crewe, labour won with just a 48 vote majority over the conservatives. in terms of the eu referendum, crewe was close across cheshire, but it was an overall vote for aleve, 51% voting aleve, and 49% for remain. —— leave. 0ne aleve, and 49% for remain. —— leave. one of the big issues for the party
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as austerity, and phil mccann has been looking at the ten years of captain crewe. the normally conservative leaning town of nantwich, just a few months before the last election. local schools were about to see their funding change, so they got less per pupil than anywhere else in england. those funding changes were later altered, but for schools like this one in nantwich and across the region, their costs have been going up region, their costs have been going up and theirfunding is not matching it. why do we get less funding than other places? 0ur it. why do we get less funding than other places? our children are needed just as much. other places? our children are needed just as muchlj other places? our children are needed just as much. i think there either needs to be more funding for children with additional needs, because my youngest child who is in preschool at the minute, she has possibly got additional needs, but she is too young for the funding. we fund raise for this school anyway, so... fund raise for this school anyway, so... so fund raise for this school anyway, so...soa fund raise for this school anyway, so... soa lot fund raise for this school anyway, so... so a lot of it is about the peasa nts so... so a lot of it is about the peasants fundraising anyway? yeah, all the parents make up the lack of
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funds. all the main parties now say they will put more money into schools, taking it back to at least where it was before the squeeze began at nine years ago. at the moment, we are ok, but there will be an impact going forward if there are not changes. so we hope there will be changes. up in crewe, and of the generation gap. a subsidised christmas lunch by a charity that helps people with disabilities, and those who are lonely. they are stuck in the house, public transport is not as good as it should be, and the family have to work so hard for every penny, often they cannot provide time for their parents. they cannot afford to put people into the ca re system, cannot afford to put people into the care system, and the provision is not there. it seems to be disabled that seem to get cut on the first round. it's councils who run social ca re round. it's councils who run social care who have been among the hardest hit by government savings. centres like this one in crewe have closed. across the north west, government
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gra nts to across the north west, government grants to councils have gone down by more than 50% since the cuts began at nine years ago. more public sector jobs have gone at nine years ago. more public sectorjobs have gone in our region than anywhere else. but the north west economy has grown slightly more quickly than most of the rest of the country. we have seen an increase in the number of jobs. however, country. we have seen an increase in the number ofjobs. however, what we do know is that a lot of those jobs are poorly paid, or relatively insecure. the railway works that defined crewe are being partially demolished, but they are being replaced by new houses. elements like this and the stats indicate the economy of crewe and the north—west is successful. but that is not necessarily the experience of lots of those who live here. as we heard there, the railway absolutely fundamental to this area of crewe, built on the romulans, and where we are today as they had at its centre. when you can see behind me, some old railway stock and some ice cream vans built in this
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particular area. lets talk more about the areas that will be affecting voters in this constituency, which is going to be one of the key results, potentially for the outcome of the election, because it is the eighth most marginal seat in the country. tell us marginal seat in the country. tell us how important it is. the most marginal seat in the north west. and also the academics think it is a brexit wedding soup, by about 60%. so if the conservatives do not win here, they will be having a shocker ofa here, they will be having a shocker of a night. so they really need to come here. we have had high—profile conservative figures, the home secretary was here a few weeks ago. jeremy corbyn has been here, so they are both jeremy corbyn has been here, so they a re both clearly jeremy corbyn has been here, so they are both clearly taking it seriously, because they need to. 60%, as you say, for leave care. however, is that, when you go out and about, the main issue for voters ? and about, the main issue for voters? i don't think that is a massive surprise, they probably the same everywhere. one of the reasons this is a marginal constituency is because you have two completely different places in it. crewe and nantwich, and crewe is a traditional
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labour voting town, networks of terraced streets built for the railway workers. nantwich a conservative voting cheshire market town, traditionally. and brexit is ten things on its head and some extent. people in crewe who voted labour all their lives might not do that this time because they do not like we were's brexit policy. and if you're going to nantwich, you will come across many lifelong tory voters who will say that they are first and foremost remains and are thinking about voting for the lib dems are labourers. possibly in a lot of cases not liking whatjeremy corbyn stands for. so it has put things in reverse to a large extent. thank you. one poll indicates that around 13% of voters are currently undecided, and a bit later on, i will bejoined by undecided, and a bit later on, i will be joined by a undecided, and a bit later on, i will bejoined by a group of undecided voters. there are 40 or so of them, they are all undecided, lighted throughout the course of the morning, speaking to politicians, some of them have been making up their minds. we will check in with them a bit later. later on this
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evening at 8.30, on bbc one and bbc iplayer, a special edition of question time. emma barnett presents a question time special from york with a panel of politicians representing all seven parties, and an audience of 18— to 30—year—olds. they'll be grilled on everything from jobs, education, housing and climate change, to brexit and more. you can also get live fact checking and analysis of the event on bbc.co.uk/news, the bbc news app and the bbc news channel. sport now. the biggest story of the day, the world anti—doping ban. russia have been given a four—year ban from all major sporting competitions, by the world anti—doping agency. wada's executive committee met today and voted unanimoulsy to impose the ban, after russia's own anti—doping agency was found to have manipulated laboratory data. it means the russia flag and anthem
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will not be allowed at events such as next year's olympic games in tokyo and the world cup in 2022. however, athletes who can prove they are clean will be allowed to compete under a neutral flag. after beating andy ruinunior to win back his three world heavyweight titles, anthony joshua has revealed he was unwell in the run—up to theirfight injune, which ended in a shock defeat. he said he'd managed to solve the problem, and he was transformed before their rematch in saudi arabia. i had some issue with my health, which i was going through for a long time, idid which i was going through for a long time, i did not know what was wrong with me. just felt so tired and drained, andi with me. just felt so tired and drained, and ijust thought it must be down to training. and then i got myself sorted out, and ifeel $1 million. even in the changing room before the fight, i asked one of the coast to get a bucket of water and putice coast to get a bucket of water and put ice on it, and i was shoving my
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head into the bucket of water like, why do i feel so tired? you could see the state of things when i was in the ring. centuries from danni wyatt and tammy beaumont helped england's women to a 75—run win over pakistan in the first one—day international in kuala lumpur. the pair shared a first—wicket stand of 188, as england made 284 for six. kate cross then took four wickets as pakistan were dismissed for 209. these three 0dis are england's last fixtures in the icc women's championship, which determines qualification for the 2021 world cup, which they're all but certain of making. iam i am really happy with that, exceptionally happy for danni wyatt today to get her first international one day 100 as well. that one was tough, it was we had out there in the heat. i thought it was quite a ha rd the heat. i thought it was quite a hard week wicket, but obviously danni was playing differently. 0ne of the more ugly runs, maybe, but
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you've just got to get them sometimes. england will play a friendly against italy at wembley in march as part of their preparations for euro 2020. it'll be the first of four matches in the run—up to the euros in the summer. england had already scheduled home games against denmark and romania, with a trip to austria in between. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. back now to one of those stories. russia has been banned from taking part in and hosting all major sports events for the next four years over the doping scandal. the announcement was made a short time ago by the world anti—doping agency. 0ur sports news reporter alex capstick is in lausanne in switzerland where that decision was made and joins us live. we will have a full explanation in a moment from wada's readership, but this goes back to the doping scandal
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uncovered in 2016, where the report said it was a state—wide systematic conspiracy to cheat. what happened after that was that wada suspended the anti—doping programme in russia. it was lifted controversially in september 2018. but part of the conditions for doing that was they had to hand over data that was kept under lock and key in a moscow laboratory. they got hold of that earlier this year, and what they have found is that the information had been manipulative, that russia was still time to protect athletes who had committed doping violations. the compliance review committee met, they decided that russia should be made noncompliant again, and the sanctions should be a four—year ban from all major global sporting events. that includes the tokyo 0lympics, it includes the 2022 world cup in qatar. hugely impactfulfor the russian public, russian athletes even more, russian politics. and it
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is interesting that it was unanimous that, whatever strong arming or pressurising went on behind the scenes, was ineffectual on the russia's part. we expected to be meeting to go on for a few hours, it was wrapped up in around 60 minutes. and as you say, it was a unanimous decision. and what they said is that the russian anthem, the russian anthem, russian kit, it cannot be used at any of these international events. although athletes will be allowed to compete, but they have to prove they are clean and they are untainted by the conspiracy, this doping conspiracy, they will compete as neutrals. i should say that we do expect the russians to appeal against this, they have got 21 days to do that, and if they do, it will go to the court of arbitration for sport. so they will have the final say. if they agree that these actions are justified, then that will go to the individual governing bodies, like fifa and the ioc gentleman punishments. alex, we will let you go and get yourself settled for the news conference, thank you
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for the news conference, thank you for the news conference, thank you for the update. a 27—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering a woman in rushden in northamptonshire. the 25—year—old woman was found with stab wounds near st george's way on saturday evening, and died at the scene. police said the arrested man has serious injuries, and another 27—year—old man is also being questioned on suspicion of his attempted murder. 0ur correspondentjo black is in rushden with more on this. we are here in rushden, this is the scene where it happened on saturday evening at around 8.30. we know that sadly, 25—year—old young lady lost her life. we are told she was stabbed on saturday night, and a 27—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. we are told that he received injuries, and he is
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in hospital, but has been arrested on suspicion of her murder. furthermore, another 27—year—old man has been arrested on attempted murder, so the attempted murder of the 27—year—old man who is in hospital. another pointed out here is that there a 13—year—old boy who was arrested on suspicion of murder here in relation to what happened here in relation to what happened here on saturday night. we have been told by police that he has been released with no further investigations into him. we have been speaking to neighbours who about what happened on saturday night. not many people saw what happened, but one that never did tell us that he heard a bang, and he looked out his window, and saw a couple of cars that had stopped, they thought there had been a car accident, and subsequently, police have been asked if they could search his garden. —— police have asked. so lots of people we have spoken to around here also say they are very sad and shocked by what has happened. 0ne lady i spoke to him to leave some flowers and said she did
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not know the victim of what you have read so much on social media that she decided to come down here and play some flowers. so people have been laying flowers all day. the victim's family have been laying flowers here as well, but they have asked us to respect their privacy. we also understand the risks and police activity at a house further up police activity at a house further up this road, and police are yet to give us an update as to why this happened on saturday night. we expect a press conference shortly after 1.00 and saturn. —— we understand there is police activity. time now for the weather forecast. —— shortly after 1.00 this afternoon. stormy conditions moving out towards the east and under this transient ridge of high pressure, helping to settle things down. still a keen wind down the north sea coast, fading on one or two showers, but those should ease as the day goes on. sunshine elsewhere, but add another four western parts of
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northern ireland and scotland as we head through the afternoon. despite the sunshine, feeling cold, clear skies by day meaning the temperatures by night will drop away. certainly initially, but the winds will strengthen as the next system begins to spill it from the west. introducing some strong winds and some wet weather. down to what east anglia and the far south and east, hanging on to clear skies so we can expect a frost, but the cloud will increase in the rain will work its way in. a windy day across the board, but particularly for irish sea coast. we are expecting girls there. and later in the day, winds and heavy downpours. —— we are expecting deals. hello, this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: at least five people have died in a volcanic eruption in new zealand and several remain missing. police say they do not expect to find any more survivors. the world anti—doping agency bans russia from all major international
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sporting events for four years, after it agreed moscow had manipulated laboratory doping data. with only three days to go until polling day, labour promises to deliver a budget to end austerity within100 days if it wins the election. borisjohnson is spending the final days of the campaign visiting labour heartlands, warning leave voters thatjeremy corbyn will betray them on brexit. a 13—year—old boy who was arrested on suspicion of murder after a woman was stabbed in northamptonshire has been released with no further action to be taken against him. the 25—year—old victim died at the scene in rushden. a man remains in custody.
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let's listen into a news conference regarding the russia doping ban. meaningful sanctions have been recommended via the compliant standard, which was not available the last time the russian anti—doping agency was stated they we re anti—doping agency was stated they were noncompliant. for too long, russian doping has distracted from clea n russian doping has distracted from clean sport. the blatant breach by the russian authorities over reinstatement conditions, approved by the executive committee in september 2018, demanded a robust response.
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russia chose a different route. wada will send a formal notice to the russian anti—doping agency, and to remain in effect until the fourth anniversary of that date. they have 21 days to accept this decision, or else it were to appear before the court of arbitration for sport, at which point wada will have to justify this assertion of noncompliance. 0n justify this assertion of noncompliance. on behalf of the executive committee, i would like to thank the members of the crc for
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their expert and considered recommendation. as well as the forensic experts for their skill, their diligence and perseverance in getting to the bottom of a highly complex case. thank you. briefly, i would like to thank the whole intelligence investigation, the wada team, as well as the compliance review committee for the exceptional and tremendous work? thank you very much for your thoughts. i'd like to highlight that
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the decision today is important for the decision today is important for the anti—doping system. it is very important that those recommendations we re important that those recommendations were approved by all the members and it's also worth mentioning that previously this decision was consulted in different regions a couple of days ago, in europe we had a meeting where all european countries, members of the council of europe, of course except russia, supported those recommendations. a unanimous decision today is a good sign for the future of anti—doping. what is important in the decision todayis
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that... for those who have nothing to do with the doping scandal in russia. innocent athletes. one of the most important objectives of wada is to protect clean athletes. the work is not done yet. we need to focus on the implementation of crc recommendations, absolutely. thank you. thank you. i would like to open it up to questions. please raise your hand, wait for a microphone, let us know who you are and where you are from and then ask your
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question. first question from david. thank you. david owen from inside the games. it's a question for jonathan and possibly gunter. if i can read it, you said in the wada press release, jonathan, that wada now has the names of all suspicious athletes on the database thanks to the painstakingly forensic nature of the painstakingly forensic nature of the database, the painstakingly forensic nature of the data base, that the painstakingly forensic nature of the database, that includes the athletes whose data was manipulated or deleted, including the 145 athletes within the targeted group of more suspicious athletes. does that mean that if this process confirms the decision of today, that you will be able to keep those 145 athletes out of the olympic games
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and paralympic games? and will you at some point be able to name them, so at some point be able to name them, so that people like us will be able to check that they are kept out? thank you. thank you for the question. the answer to your question. the answer to your question is, yes, we do know who those athletes are. 145. any for the athletes as well. therefore, they will be kept out of the games. if they're still competing. will be kept out of the games. if they‘ re still competing. remember that the data relates to testing donein that the data relates to testing done in 2012—2015. so it may or may not be the are still competing. if they are, that will be a block to them using the mechanism provided for two participate in the games. as to whether or not their names will be made public, moving forward, that will depend. it's not something we
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specifically focused on. it will depend on due progress. it will depend on due progress. it will depend upon whether or not further evidence can be obtained in proceedings can be brought against them. on the first point, you can be sure that they will not participate in the events. in the second point, i think we will have to watch and wait on that one. new york times. i'm not sure who the best place person is, but in 2018, before pyeongchang, we had the schmidt report and all of that, very strong sanctions. it was a day like today and russia were banned from the olympics. we were all at the olympics. we were all at the olympics and it was russia in all but name. the olympic team from russia or whatever they were called, hundreds of russian athletes. what are we going to see here? you said they are banned from international sports, olympics and world championships. are we going to see
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the four —— football team formerly known as russia at the world cup? the formerly known russian team in hockey? the teeth of this band, what does it actually mean? is itjust something we are going to write today and we're going to see hundreds athletes? thanks. thank you. it's a fair question. first of all, let's be clear about the totality of the package. this is a four—year package. it relates to a number of different things. i will come to participation in linnaean skin ina come to participation in linnaean skin in a moment. but bidding for events, as well as hosting events. this in terms of participation, the standard is clear. there will be no flag at the events that are covered. it goes down to world championships
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in each sport. there will not be a russian flag on the athletes will not be participating as representatives of russia. the details from sport to sport will have to do differ because some are tea m have to do differ because some are team sports, summer individual sports. there are going to have to bea sports. there are going to have to be a case by case basis. nevertheless, what is important to note is the standard status under the control and, or the approval of wada to ensure standardised, appropriate enforcement. if there is appropriate enforcement. if there is a cas case, it might be taken into them. can we be definitive now as to what in every case it will mean? no. but the standard is clear. they will not be there as representatives of russia. every case will need to be
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developed. we need to be guidelines that the court of arbitration for sport will have to look at.|j that the court of arbitration for sport will have to look at. i have a couple of questions for russian tv. is there a road map for russia to restore their credibility for wada? in case of dispute, —— dispute of rusada, do you expect the decision of cas will be different from your decision? and one small question, will you accept russian athletes to perform as olympic athletes from a russian team, as in previous games? that is also for you, jonathan. is
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there a road map for rusada to restore credibility? let me be clear. the standard which craig referred to, put in place in 2018, tries to deal with the circumstances and anticipate circumstances such as this. noncompliance is able to show its anti—doping activities remain credible and reliable. that is the judgment of wada at the moment. based on audits that have been done of the anti—doping operations of rusada, plus reports back from international federations like the athletics integrity unit, who you will have seen recently in their press release about the lysenko case thanked rusada for their cooperation. rusada, despite being noncompliant, can be allowed to continue to conduct activities. in
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orderfor reinstatement continue to conduct activities. in order for reinstatement after four yea rs, order for reinstatement after four years, rusada will need to be able to confirm they are independent and operating properly in accordance with the court and standard and without interference. do i expect the decision of cas to be different from this decision of wada today? no, i don't. and well russian athletes be accepted as 0lympic athletes be accepted as 0lympic athletes from russia? no, they are neutral athletes, which means not brea kfast neutral athletes, which means not breakfast —— not representatives of any country. not representatives of russia. so, we will leave the world anti—doping agency news conference
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there. fairly determined in the answering of questions regarding a four—year ban for russia. they say it will mean a longer ban because they will not be allowed to bid for any sport for four years. lots more analysis throughout the day on that. back to politics, with just three days until polling day, what could the parties do to convince undecided voters? joanna gosling is in crewe with more. thanks, carrie. yes, throughout the campaign, bbc news has been looking closely at the places where the election could be won and lost. we've been to ten parts of the uk where seats will be closely contested. today we're in our last town, crewe, in the north west of england.
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the railway is a very important part of crewe's history. the real be station opened in 1837. the gateway to the north—west. even if you haven't been to crewe, you may well haven't been to crewe, you may well have passed through it. key politicians have been coming here to try to win votes. jeremy corbyn kicked off the road trip for labour at your end crewe. saying there has been no labour government without labour having this seat. there are still a lot of undecided voters. latest polling suggests 13% of voters are undecided and we are days away from the election. i'm joined now by a group of undecided voters, brought together for us by britain thinks — an international insight and strategy consultancy— rachel, gemma and les. rachel, tell us how you see things. i have struggled for a long time, trying to overcome my feelings about the different parts of our needs —— personalities at the helm of the different parties. i don't
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particularly respect either of them. i know either of them are likely to come out with a majority, so i need to get over that. you are talking about boris johnson and jeremy corbyn. i am viewing more towards labour because of their policies. traditionally, i have voted more lib dem, but i don't think we have a strong enough presence to make an impact. so that's the difficulty for me with them. labour, i guess what's holding me back as they seem to have made some wild promises which i'm not sure where the money is going to come from those. some of them seem to be bribery of the electorate. things like free broadband in 2030. it just seems excessive. that's interesting. so even if you think they are things you might like, you think it is naked politics and you don't like it? i think the money
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would be better directed elsewhere. i don't know. you have gone around most of the parties in the past? well, i don't really remember back to 2010. the last one, but it was the hung parliament, i did vote for the hung parliament, i did vote for the lib dems. mainly because i don't understand politics, i don't really read into it too much, sabac then i sort of voted, so i didn't vote for the party that one. you also voted to leave. that would indicate you might go tory this time. but you are not there. tell us why that is?” think it's very difficult to separate the facts to the opinions. on social media, you will see something from the tories say that i
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agree with and then something else then pops up sort of contradicting what they have said. so you don't know who to trust? no. layers, what about you ? the know who to trust? no. layers, what about you? the same issue, trust. we had a referendum. i am strongly in favour of leaving. the government have done nothing for three years. they have held up investment and stop the economy moving forward. borisjohnson stop the economy moving forward. boris johnson says stop the economy moving forward. borisjohnson says the most important thing is to get brexit done. i don't trust westminster. does he really mean it? he says the national health is not for sale, does he really mean it? we have asked today about social care for the elderly. you get told we're going to put so many million pounds into it, but who is actually seeing what you're going to do with the
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money? this other top men going to get a pay rise, fancy cars and a new office? that won't help. until we have a policy it is going to go in the put it in black so we know, we don't know. are you definitely going to vote ? don't know. are you definitely going to vote? when will you do site? this i will vote. i will decide on the ballot box. i have more of an idea of where i am going, but i need to clarify it in my own head. thank you. as i mentioned, 13% of voters are still undecided. down from 15% a week ago. slowly but surely, it seems people are making up their minds. we have a large group of undecided voters in the corner. i will be speaking to them later. now a business update. egon is also in crewe. he has the business news.
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this is a 75,000 square—foot site about cheese. the operate around the world. the import cheese from ireland, packages set up and exports it to more than 30 countries around the world. nick is the boss. thank you forjoining us. we are in the centre of the d box area in the cold storage. let's turn to the election. what's the first thing you would like to see the new prime minister tackle, as soon as they get into number ten? we just feel we should have an end to this brexit process. the end of no man's land. it would be good for us to understand timing, the timetable, what is the deal going to look like, but most important, give us a chance to move
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on. how has uncertainty affected your business here? there is a lot of time spent in planning what is going to happen, trying to second guess what will go on, a lot of investment decisions have been put on hold because of the uncertainty. do you feel as if you have been hurt by the political voices in westminster? it's difficult to say, actually. certainly, nobody ever asks. so we havejust actually. certainly, nobody ever asks. so we have just carried actually. certainly, nobody ever asks. so we havejust carried on doing our own business and making our own decisions as we go along, really. so the answer is no. do you think then, does that feel the political process really is irreleva nt to political process really is irrelevant to you ? political process really is irrelevant to you? i think irreleva nt irrelevant to you? i think irrelevant is a bit strong. 0f course, it's important to understand, but it's very difficult to understand what the clear m essa g es to understand what the clear messages are coming back. so we can ta ke messages are coming back. so we can take decisions necessary for our
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business. now, you have had to deal with 25% tariffs imposed on cheese by washington. how has that affected your business? it was a big worry. 25% of a huge increase for us to deal with. it happened last month. it's difficult to assess the true effects. we a re it's difficult to assess the true effects. we are having to absorb a lot of it ourselves. and in need through the supply chain, before it goes through to the end customers. so will be a while before we can judge the true effects. how important is a trade deal with the us? it would be helpfulfor us, to understand how that could work, but it's a good market. thank you very much. let's move on to a couple of the staff year. we have michael. michael, you are from poland. and
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sandra, you are from romania. what have you made of the tone? to be honest with you, everything is taking way too long will stop a lot of public money is being spent and there are no results. yeah, i think this brexit has brought too much heat between the people who support and the people who are against. and my concern is for the european union citizens who live and yes. and, briefly, what is your message for the politicians over this? get it done as soon as possible. saw it one way or another fast and think about the people as well. thank you very much. that's all from me. back in a couple of hours. now some breaking news. serial rapistjoseph mccann
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has been sentenced at the old bailey to 33 life sentences with a minimum term of 30 years. this the serial sex attacker was convicted last friday. the attacks over 15 days, abductions, rapes and assaults in watford, london and the north—west. a convicted burglar, he had been freed after a probation service error two months before embarking on a vodka and cocaine fuelled rampage. top line breaking news. coming in from the old bailey. serial rapist joseph mccann has been sentenced to 33 life sentences with a minimum term of 30 years.
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now it's time for a look at the weather. more wet and windy weather on the cards for the coming week. interspersed with more calm interludes. today, large parts of the uk enjoying crisp, winter sunshine. the stormy conditions we had yesterday cleared out towards the east and we are under this ridge of high pressure helping to settle things down. a northerly wind, quite a cool direction to be coming from, feeding and fairly cold air. notice this edge of something more mild in the atlantic. still quite a keen breeze in the north sea coast. a few showers, but they should ease as the day goes on. lots of sun turn around, but it will feel cold with single figure temperatures. overnight, under the clear skies,
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the temperatures will plummet. particularly out towards the east. to the west, the next system begins to ta ke to the west, the next system begins to take in. strengthening winds and outbreaks of rain, gradually working a little further eastwards. for east anglia and the far south—east, we could hang on to clear skies for much of the night and we can expect a frost in the morning. tuesday, across the board, a windy day. particularly for irish sea coast. the rain gradually worked its way eastwards. some heavy bursts of rain and squally winds. notice the difference in the temperatures. back up difference in the temperatures. back up into double digits. looking at tuesday into wednesday, that second band of rain squeezes out the milder airand we are band of rain squeezes out the milder air and we are back in colder conditions. low pressure to the north of scotland will dominate the scene. breezy through wednesday, but not as blustery for most places as it has been on tuesday. on the far
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north of scotland, we hang onto gills. elsewhere, dry intervals, and also some heavy and thundery showers. we are back down into single figure temperatures once again. on thursday, wet and windy conditions. it looks as though it will be an improving story as we head through to friday, away from the eastern coast.
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many tourists are feared dead after the volcano they were visiting in new zealand erupted unexpectedly. day trippers had been walking inside the rim of the crater when it happened. five people are confirmed dead, more than 20 are missing. injured survivors are evacuated but the authorities say it's too dangerous to mount a rescue attempt. the island is unstable. there is the possibility of further eruptions but actually, the physical environment is unsafe for us to return to the island. police now say they're not expecting to find any more survivors. we'll be live with our correspondent in new zealand. also this lunchtime... the serial rapistjoseph mccann is given 33 life sentences. the judge described him as a classic
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psychopath who will never

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