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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 10, 2019 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today: police launch a criminal investigation into the deaths of up to 13 people after a volcano erupted in new zealand. labour's jeremy corbyn joins us on the programme, in the last of our leadership interviews ahead of thursday's general election. good morning. who is cashing in on christmas? i am at chester zoo finding out why it is notjust the shops that are busy at this time of a long—awaited victory for arsenal. they beat west ham for their first win in ten games, and relief for stand—in manager
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freddie ljungberg. after a relatively dry start on the east, wet and windy weather in the west will move across all areas today. the strongest winds in the north and the west. i will have more inis north and the west. i will have more in 15 minutes. remember the ice bucket challenge. tributes are paid to the man who inspired it, raising more than £150 million for charity. it is tuesday 10 december. our top story: police in new zealand are launching a criminal investigation into the deaths of 13 people after a volcanic explosion at a popular tourist destination. white island remains too dangerous to access, but aerial reconnaissance flights have detected no further sign of life there. doctors treating the 31 injured fear some have suffered burns so severe they may not survive. our correspondent shaima khalil has this report. the prime minister on the sight of
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where those who were affected by the devastation were first taken, praising those who jumped straight into helper. they worked tirelessly in the most devastating circumstances. any of them had not yet rested or slept. told that the impact of this extraordinary tragedy has had on them was obvious. police are now launching a criminal investigation into the deaths and injuries after the eruption on white island. we know to there will be bigger questions in relation to this event. these questions must be asked, and they must be answered. one of the paramedics who helped move the injured into safety described the scene. it was like - like i've seen the chernobyl miniseries. there wasjust — everything wasjust miniseries. there wasjust — everything was just blanketed miniseries. there wasjust — everything wasjust blanketed in ash. it was quite an overwhelming feeling. the police and the army have tried to launch a drone for surveillance on the island, but were unable to do so because of windy
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conditions. the situation there remains quite unstable, with officials saying that there is a 50% chance of a smaller size or a similar eruption happening within the next 2a hours. but even a small eruption can have devastating effects. the focus is now mainly on helping the families of those who have died and giving the injured the ca re have died and giving the injured the care they need, but more questions will be asked about why they were allowed on such a volatile place. shaimaa khalil, bbc news, whakatane. our reporter danny vincentjoins us now with the latest from new zealand. good morning. what more do we know this morning? well, what we do know is there have been five people that have been declared dead and there are still eight people missing, but the latest is that the police have stated that they intend to create a criminal investigation. now, this is very much a town in morning. of course, the island which is behind me to my right is known as an active island, an active volcano. but what
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happened here yesterday has shocked this community, but at the same time there are questions that are unanswered. many people are wondering why the tourists were allowed to go to this island at all at the time. at the same time, the mayor has said that this criminal investigation is part of the process in trying to understand exactly what happened yesterday, and what lessons can be learned. thank you very much for that, danny. we will be speaking to the new zealand red cross about how it is helping the local community just before 6:30am. borisjohnson has been criticised after initially refusing to look at a picture of a sick four—year—old boy who had to sleep on the floor of a leeds hospital. the picture in the daily mirror ofjack, who had suspected pneumonia, spurred complaints about nhs cuts. breakfast‘s tim muffett is at leeds general infirmary this morning. remind us of what happened, tim. yes, good morning. it wasn't the
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easiest of days for the prime minister on the campaign trail, and many of the difficulties stemmed from many of the difficulties stemmed fro m eve nts many of the difficulties stemmed from events that have taken place here at leeds general infirmary. let's remind ourselves of what happened yesterday. the troubles for him first really started when he was asked by an itv reporter, joe pike, to ta ke asked by an itv reporter, joe pike, to take a look at the picture you mentioned which was on the front page of yesterday's daily mirror of a sick four—year—old asleep on the floor of this hospital. he initially refused to look at the photograph and put the reporter's phone in his pocket. let's take a little look at what happened. 40 new hospitals. i am talking about this boy, prime minister. how do you feel, looking at this photo? let me tell you-i haven't had a chance to look at it. look at it now, prime minister. look at it now. well, he did eventually look at the photograph, and he apologised for taking the reporter's phone. the prime minister was then quizzed about this a little later by other journalists, quizzed about this a little later by otherjournalists, asking why he hadn't looked at the picture, and he didn't directly answer that
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question, but he did reiterate conservative pledges to properly fund the nhs. the health secretary, matt hancock, was then sent to the hospital to try and repair some of the damage. he did apologise for what had happened. he was also then heckled by some protesters as he left the building. so quite a lot of reaction to this, as you would expect. the leeds teaching hospital's nhs trust said the hospital's nhs trust said the hospital had been extremely busy. they were very sorry to jack's family for having had a long wait and they had had a significant increase in the number of people visiting the paediatric emergency department, the highest number since april 2016. other political leaders, as you would expect, commented as well. jeremy corbyn said that we should be no doubt the conservatives because the crisis by depriving the nhs of the funding it needs. the liberal leader, jo swinson, said the prime minister wouldn't look at the photograph because the prime minister doesn't care about anything but himself, and ian blackford said the prime minister had no empathy
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and no moral compass. so not the easiest of days for the prime minister. today we expect him to be talking about brexit, and we know thatis talking about brexit, and we know that is a subject he is far keener to focus upon. borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn are concentrating on what they regard as vote—winning issues for their parties, with 48 hours to go before the polls open in the general election. the prime minister will say that only a majority conservative government can break the brexit deadlock, while the labour leader will set out his plans for the nhs. let's talk now to our political correspondent chris mason, who is at westminster. we will talk about today's campaigning ina we will talk about today's campaigning in a moment, butjust on the fallout from what happened yesterday, first of all, i know you dealt with it on electioncast as well. that will dominate a lot of the discussion today, won't it?|j think it will, because there haven't been, in this campaign, all that many events, moments, things that happen organically that end up shaping the conversation on the
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campaign trail. and what happened yesterday in leeds, with those revelations that the yorkshire evening post got hold of and the daily mail picks up on, and joe pike, the daily mail reporter, scrutinised borisjohnson about, really felt like one of those moments, not least because it played right into the hands of labour and jeremy corbyn who regard the nhs as territory politically that they see as their own. now, the conservatives argue that they are putting a lot of money into the health service. as tim was saying, matt hancock, the health secretary, was dispatched to leeds general infirmary pretty quickly. but the prime minister's response in that conversation with itv was something that — well, was seized upon very, very quickly by his political opponents. jeremy corbyn will pick up annette today. he is talking about if he is a prime minister having an immediate audit of risk, as he describes it, for the nhs -- of risk, as he describes it, for the nhs —— pick up on it. the buildings that need additional work. and the headlines keep coming. the daily
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mirror had that headline of little jack yesterday, another arresting image on its front page this morning ofa image on its front page this morning of a nine—year—old girl called lily, from chester, asleep on a hospital chair. again, a case study, if you like, of the pressure is the nhs is under this winter. as sally was mentioning, borisjohnson under this winter. as sally was mentioning, boris johnson returning to his core election theme today of brexit that slogan, to get the exit done, and his fear that if there we re done, and his fear that if there were to be a hung parliament, you would have yet more parliamentary paralysis rather than decisive action on the government. 0k, paralysis rather than decisive action on the government. ok, so much to look forward to today. and in ourmeet much to look forward to today. and in our meet leaders series, we are completing the set. jeremy corbyn will be here just after eight a.m.. as we complete the set of all the leaders who have popped up and been scrutinised in some detail and some depth, and loads of questions for jeremy corbyn. because here we are,
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48 hours before polling day, and the one thing we can absolutely guarantee in this election is that big changes coming, whatever the outcome, if there is either a conservative government, majority or minority, labour government, majority or minority. because labour's plans, to reshape the economy, to reshape the role of government within society, are very, very big by any modern precedent, and the conservatives want to deliver brexit within a matter of about six weeks, a huge, significant change. so quite a 48 hours ahead and a big interview to look forward to after eighta.m.. and a big interview to look forward to after eight a.m.. and a reminder, if you have just switched on, to after eight a.m.. and a reminder, if you havejust switched on, we have done a series of meeting all the leaders, they have all come on the leaders, they have all come on the bbc breakfast so far. we have taken the sofa tojeremy corbyn this morning, and louise will be talking to him fora morning, and louise will be talking to him for a good length of time, as we have done with older leaders, trying to find about their policies and also about them as a person. that is just after eight a.m.. aung san suu kyi, the de facto leader of myanmar,
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will appear at the un's international court ofjustice in the netherlands this morning to face charges of genocide against the country's rohingya muslim population. around 750,000 rohingya fled to bangladesh two years ago during a violent crackdown by myanmar‘s military. the leader, who was once hailed as a human rights champion, has denied all allegations. ukraine and russia say they will to try to exchange prisoners and implement a ceasefire in eastern ukraine before the end of the year, but the first direct talks between the leaders of the two countries failed to reach agreement on wider political issues related to the fighting between ukrainian forces and russian—backed separatists. another round of negotiations will be held within four months. the man who helped inspire the global fund—raising phenomenon known as the ice bucket challenge has died at the age of 34. pete frates was diagnosed with als, a degenerative condition that affects the nervous system, seven years ago. in 2014 he was instrumental in starting the ice bucket challenge, where people poured cold water over themselves and posted footage on social media. an estimated £160 million
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was raised worldwide. it is an amazing influence to have, isn't it? incredible, and raising awareness of the because he was campaigning for. and you did it, didn't you? you sometimes get things, don't you, where for a few weeks everyone was doing it, and i got nominated a few times, tried to avoid it, and my kids asked if they could throw the buckets of water. and did they? they did. do we have evidence of this? i think there might be. i have lost the video but iam sure might be. i have lost the video but i am sure someone on might be. i have lost the video but i am sure someone on the breakfast tea m i am sure someone on the breakfast team will find it at some stage.l source tells me we will be showing it later. time for sport. i think we're going to share it, aren't we? are you ready for talking about arsenal. arsenal's winless streak is finally over.
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they come from behind to beat west ham 3—1 for their first win in ten games, also their first under stand—in manager freddie ljungberg. this is normally when i eat my brea kfast! remember these scenes? well, liverpool need a point at salzburg tonight or they are likely to be out of the champions league at the group stage, just six months after they won the trophy. russia have been banned from all major sporting events for four years. the world anti—doping agency voted unanimously to impose the ban after russia were found to have manipulated lab data. and rory mcilroy has turned down an offer to play in next month's european tour event in saudi arabia. he said there was a morality to his decision, and hejust didn't want to go there. which is a really interesting point of view, isn't it? because we saw anthonyjoshua of view, isn't it? because we saw anthony joshua and of view, isn't it? because we saw anthonyjoshua and quite a few other sporting events have had a lot of money thrown at them to be hosted there, and there are always questions about political regime and human rights. it is quite a few
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sportsmen have taken the money. and saudi arabia very keen to make themselves a sporting destination, i guess. it is interesting for him to ta ke guess. it is interesting for him to take a stand, isn't it? i am delighted to be sitting here on a momentous occasion, because guess what. .. momentous occasion, because guess what... she is back. carol is back with this morning's weather.|j wondered with this morning's weather.” wondered what had happened there, good morning, everybody. what a day to come back. wait until you see the to come back. wait until you see the weather forecast, because today some of us already have some heavy rain, but we're also looking at squally winds, and a whole lot is moving from the west to the east. it is going to be wet and windy at some stage in the day wherever you may be. now, at the moment we've got some relatively clear skies on the east, but you can see all this cloud coming in from the west. this is rain bearing cloud. as i mentioned, some of it is particularly heavy. and it's going to continue to journey from the west towards the east through the course of the day, eradicating that right start, but
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the wind will most certainly be a feature of the weather. so we're looking at the kind of gusts, around about 50—60 mph for some, 60—70 mph with exposure and height, for example, across north wales, also the northern and western isles, and with that combination it could well lead some disruption. but temperatures fall in the mild side. fairly academic in all this weather. we could hit 14 degrees, for example, somewhere like the murray coast. if you are travelling, it is worth bearing in mind this could lead to some travel disruption. the combination of the wind and also some rain. the wind certainly strong enough to bring down branches of trees, and you could run into them as you are driving or cycling along the road, and also with the heavy rain, some large puddles and a lot of surface water and spray. but look at the yellow is vanishing from the charts. as our cold front bringing the rain moves from the west to the east, behind it, cold airfollows in behind. these temperatures are indicative of towns and cities. in rural areas they will be lower, but
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with quite a noticeable wind. we are not anticipating any problems foremost with frost. so tomorrow morning we start off in a dry note, a bright note as well, the east that you travel. but you can see a lot of showers coming in from the west, drifting east. some of them merging to give some stronger spells of rain. still quite a noticeable breeze and we will be looking at some snow on the hills in the door. in fact, we could see snow on the hills almost anywhere. but it is a higher ground feature. another thing you will notice tomorrow is the temperatures are going to be down on where they are today. today we are looking at double figures. tomorrow we are looking at single figures. but that will all change, so wednesday into thursday, this is the cold air represented by the blue. by thursday the next system coming our way is introducing milder air and some more rain once again. and that is what the week is like, a bit to psy—tu rvy is what the week is like, a bit topsy—turvy in terms of temperature. so once again a bright start on the east, but we've got rain coming in from the west, drifting eastwards through the course of the day. again with some hill snow, especially so
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in the northern half of the country, then a lot of showers. it won't be as windy, though, in the northern half of the country on thursday. that it still will be quite easy on the south, and that's reflected quite nicely in those temperatures. we got three, four and five in the northern half of the country. look at that — in the south, ten and 11. some of us won't know ourselves. great to see you, lovely to talk to you this morning. it's 6:17am. let's take a look at today's front pages. we'll start with an online outlet — the metro's metro.co.uk is leading on a labour activist being wrongly accused by the conservatives of punching an aide to the health secretary, matt hancock, outside leeds general infirmary. he was sent there after boris johnson had made that interview in
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yorkshire and took the journalist's phone and put it in his pocket. they have a video of the incident. matt hancock was sent there to appease things? smooth it over? didn't go too well. the guardian leads on the same story. it reports claims by labour that the conservatives "lied" about the altercation to divert attention from the original reason that mr hancock was at leeds general infirmary — reports of a young boy who was sleeping on the floor due to a lack of beds in the hospital — and borisjohnson's initial refusal to look at the story during a tv interview. "here's another picture you won't want to look at, mrjohnson," says the front page of the daily mirror, showing a baby asleep on a chair during a reported 6—hour wait for a and e treatment. that is the front page that chris mason was talking about. and the express leads on the prime minister's plan to replace the compulsory bbc licence fee with a voluntary subscription. also something we will be discussing with the conservatives later on. and
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the volcanic eruption on white island yesterday in new zealand. five people dead now, still many more missing and the number is expected to rise. we will be speaking to the red cross later. and here we have a christmas cow. this will be no surprise to anybody. the london 2012 olympics, figures have revealed just how important coverage of the games was, saying it provided the two most watched programmes of the two most watched programmes of the decade. london 2012 tops the list of most watched shows, show with the highest ratings was the closing ceremony of the 2012 olympics, featuring, do you remember who was in that? shall i tell you? spice girls? emily sunday. she was
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brilliant, fantastic. it's a long way. not if you are in scotland. laughter. george michael, an audience of 24.5 million people. it was brilliant. glory days, glory yea rs. was brilliant. glory days, glory years. this is a cow in a christmas jumper. it's not easy to knit one of these bad boys. imagine getting it on the cow. we've got a little christmas jumper for on the cow. we've got a little christmasjumperfor our on the cow. we've got a little christmas jumper for our dog. have you? it's hard to get on. you can hear the kids struggling every morning. but that is a lot of work.
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this is a real christmasjumper, it's not fabricated ? this is a real christmasjumper, it's not fabricated? not csi? not csi, what is it called? cgi? csi, that can't be right. now this one, 34 years old, this is the prime minister of finland, sanna marin. if this makes you feel like a grown up this makes you feel like a grown up this morning... so, these videos was by hundreds of thousands of people, just opening stuff, unboxing videos. some kids have made a fortune from this. apparently watching a present be unwrapped is a gift in its self.
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watching people open presents. well, in real life. but this is on youtube. people you don't know? so, you are unaware of the phenomena. online videos of children unboxing foster a desire of youngsters to explore and socialise. how? my suggestion would be either going and playing with your own toys, winding something to do rather than watch someone else. i thought it was about the joy you get of watching their face when they open the toys. the gift of giving, but this is a bit different. if you go on youtube and type in unboxing, then you can see some of the dullest things you have ever seen in your life, other people opening presents. it's all with new pieces of technology, phones and headphones and all that. we are
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there now. it is 6:22am. the red cross have been helping the community in whakatane come together after the yesterday's volcanic eruption. 13 people are presumed to have died, with eight people still missing. rick hopcroft is from the new zealand red cross and joins us now. rick, thank you very much indeed for your time. i have vitiate it is probably an incredibly busy time. what is the latest news you can tell us? thanks. inaudible. i apologise, everybody. a bit of a problem getting rick hopcroft with us. hello, sorry. what is the latest information you can
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give us about the situation? we have set up in whakatane, as you suggested, and some partner agencies here. they are setting up to support the families and the victims. yeah, and in the township of whakatane. what support can the red cross offer at this point? the new zealand police contacted red cross for our support about 24 hours ago, setting up support about 24 hours ago, setting up the family links website. it is intended for people — it isn't an official police into estimate —— estimate, but it is used for people to mark themselves safe or look for a loved one. it's been criticalfor the new zealand pleased to have a record of who they are trying to contact. that was our national response, today it is 7pm at night now, but this morning we deployed a
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response team to whakatane to provide more help for the families and communities in psychosocial support and asking information, making sure people are as up—to—date as this dynamic situation can be kept up—to—date on. as this dynamic situation can be kept up-to-date on. and for the team on the ground at the moment, you are saying they can offer support to the people who were there —— are there now, what other practical things they need? we have had an influx of families, a lot of them have been heading off to hospitals or other agencies to either look after their loved ones or be provided more information. the few that have been around often just want to have a chat about the situation, make sure they are up to speed with as much information as we have and the public have. but really, just coming together so they can have as much information as possible. rick, it is great to talk to you. thank you very
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much for your time. rick hopcroft from the red cross speaking to us. louise is out and about. she will be speaking to jeremy louise is out and about. she will be speaking tojeremy corbyn after eighta.m.. and speaking tojeremy corbyn after eight a.m.. and ben speaking tojeremy corbyn after eighta.m.. and ben is at speaking tojeremy corbyn after eight a.m.. and ben is at chester zoo, probably the bestjob of the lot. they are preparing for a christmas surge in visitors. good morning, ben. good morning to you. it's quite chilly here in chester zoo. take a look at this, part of the lantern light so they have going on at chester zoo, it is now in its eight year. when it began it was just 10,000 visitors who came to see it, but they now have more than 110,000 expected at the zoo this year to see stuff like this. and where we have right now, we're right in the lion enclosure. we have quite
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special access and the lions have been recreated light. they have been recreated at the other side of the zoo. recreated at the other side of the zoo. but it's all about getting more visitors through the doors at a traditionally quiet time of the year. so many businesses are trying to cash in on christmas to make up for quieter times elsewhere. evidence suggests we are now spending more money on experiences rather than stuff we might be buying at christmas. the shops are still busy, but more spending on things like this. so what we're going to do for the next hour or so it speaks of the team here, find out what it ta kes to the team here, find out what it takes to put on a light show like this and how they get the visitors through the doors to keep money coming year round. the zoo is a 365 the day a year operation —— 365 date. and the animals need feeding. we will take a deeper look a little later, but first, let's get the news, travel and weather wherever
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you are this morning. we will see you are this morning. we will see you soon. good morning from bbc london. i'm tarah welsh. there are calls for a major change in approach to tackle the spread of so—called county lines, which is when gangs groom young people to move drugs from big cities to small towns. the head of london's national centre for gang research says it's leaving children surrounded by violence and believes a solution will only be found with the help of young people. a community group in south—east london says it's gone from helping a handul of older people to having around 600 adults on its books. the carribean social forum in woolwich is run by volunteers without any external funding or support. but as their members age they sometimes struggle with the needs that brings. a few people, i think, in here with dementia, and i think it's very, very difficult because people with
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dementia often they can remember things from the past, but not more recent things. so they might remember the music that is playing and so forth, but obviously there is and so forth, but obviously there is a big need for more than we can provide at the moment. now, if you are not yet in the christmas spirit, you soon will be, especially if you live in greenwich. a postbox in south—east london is getting into the festive spirit. this one in greenwich has been given a wintry makeover and features the sound of elves when you post a letter. and a collection ofjames bond books by author ian fleming, that were given to his friend noel coward, are going under the hammer in london. the first edition stories which include ‘live and let die' and ‘the spy who loved me' feature messages written to the playwright and composer. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on all tube lines this morning.
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it on all tube lines this morning. slow on the a102. - on it slow on the a1 02. —— it's slow on the a102. good morning. we have a little bit of low cloud and patchy frost. however, that was soon changed. it is going to turn rather wet and windy. some hazy son signed to start with but the cloud thickening, outbreaks of rain moving from west to east. temperatures today getting to east. temperatures today getting to up to 11 celsius. we have a brisk south—westerly so it won't feel that mild at all. in the rush hour, some
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heavier and more persistent rain clumping together. so, wet and windy for the first part of the evening. that clears the way in the sky clears, temperatures drop against low single figures. we hang onto a bit of a breeze, though, so we should be frost—free tomorrow morning. for wednesday, again some heavy showers on the cards. thursday, it is going to stay wet and windy. that's it for me. i will be back in half—an—hour. in the meantime, plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though, it's back to dan and sally. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and sally nugent. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: he inspired the globalfundraising phenomenon, the ice bucket challenge, raising hundreds of millions of pounds for motor neurone research. we will speak to a close friend of pete frates, who has died at the age of 34. later, the comedian david baddiel will be here to tell us about confronting online trolls, and going on the road with his new one—man show. and, after one of the last surviving
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battle of britain pilots dies, we will remember the heroic efforts of ‘the few‘ who defended our skies from german attack in 1940. good morning. here is a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: police in new zealand are launching a criminal investigation into the deaths of 13 people after a volcanic explosion at a popular tourist destination. white island remains too dangerous to access, but aerial reconnaissance flights have detected no further sign of life there. doctors treating the 31 injured fear some have suffered burns so severe they may not survive. borisjohnson has been criticised after initially refusing to look at a picture of a sick four—year—old boy who had to sleep on the floor of a leeds hospital. the picture in the daily mirror ofjack, who had suspected pneumonia, spurred complaints about nhs cuts. the health secretary, matt hancock, later apologised for the boy's experience.
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borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn are concentrating on what they regard as vote—winning issues for their parties, with 48 hours to go before the polls open in the general election. the prime minister will say that only a majority conservative government can break the brexit deadlock, and warn of what he calls the clear and present danger of a hung parliament, while the labour leader will set out his plans for the nhs. aung san suu kyi, the de facto leader of myanmar, will appear at the un's international court ofjustice in the netherlands this morning to face charges of genocide against the country's rohingya muslim population. around 750,000 rohingya fled to bangladesh two years ago during a violent crackdown by myanmar‘s military. the leader, who was once hailed as a human rights champion, has denied all allegations. ukraine and russia say they will to try to exchange prisoners and implement a ceasefire in eastern ukraine before the end of the year, but the first direct talks between the leaders of the two
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countries failed to reach agreement on wider political issues related to the fighting between ukrainian forces and russian—backed separatists. another round of negotiations will be held within four months. a falklands veteran forced out of the royal navy over his sexuality will have a military honour returned. joe ousalice, who you can see on the right of this picture, served as a radio operator for 18 years, but was discharged in 1993 and stripped of a long service and good conduct medal. the ministry of defence now says its policy was wrong, discriminatory and unjust. those are some of the main stories around this morning. normally, sally, it is slightly strange day because louise is out and about interviewing jeremy corbyn. he will be here after eight a.m.. i say
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here, but we have taken the sofa to him this morning. normally we go to sally for the sport. it is nearly christmas, everything is a bit different. we're talking about arsenal first of different. we're talking about arsenalfirst of all, different. we're talking about arsenal first of all, didn't they play well last night. for once. yes, for once. arsenal have their first win in ten games. they came from behind to beat west ham 3—1, and that will come as a huge relief to stand—in manager freddie ljungberg. patrick gearey reports. muddles, bubbles, toil and trouble. these have been worrying times for arsenal. they arrived at west ham without a win in nine, disorientated, and about to be made dizzier still. angelo ogbonna west ham's scorer. ainsley maitland—niles's unfortunate touch seemed to sum it up. nothing was going the way arsenal intended it. for an hour, they stumbled, relying on west ham's mercy. the next goal seemed a matter of time. from that shot, it took around five minutes.
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and, amazingly, it came at the other end. gabriel martinelli had started something remarkable. his strike released forgotten energy. six minutes later, arsenal's club—record signing nicolas pepe scored the kind of goal he had long promised, yet up ‘til now rarely delivered. and, with hammerheads still spinning, here was pierre—emerick aubameyang with the third. after weeks of gloom, nine minutes of glory — enough to shift the clouds for west ham and manuel pellegrini. the night had got suddenly darker. patrick gearey, bbc news. we have a lot, a lot to work on and a lot of things that we can see that we need to get on the training pitch to fix, but at least they have been under pressure for weeks and weeks and weeks but they haven't won. so to have that mental strength, and do that away from home, it was a long time ago, so extremely proud. it is only six months since liverpool won the champions league, but they are in danger
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of going out at the group stage of this year's competition. they need a point away at red bull salzburg to be sure of making the last 16. it is a tight group, so a win would take them through as group leaders, but they cannot afford to slip up. we will fight in each challenge, 100%. what salzburg did at anfield. we played really well at the beginning, but then we opened the door for the game. they used it because they are talented, strong. jess is doing an incrediblejob. so it's just a football game, like it always is. chelsea also have work to do. they know a win tonight at home to lille will see them through, though they could get away with a draw if other results go their way. manager frank lampard knows the significance of games like these. i was fortunate enough to have big nights to play, and other ones that stick in your mind. so it is opportunities for the team to... particularly the young boys, it is quite new to them, to make a mark. so it is good. i like the pressure of this game being a knockout, and we are all talking about it. if we're going to do anything good here, we're going have lots of these nights.
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the world anti—doping agency have banned russia from all major sporting competition for four years after the state—sponsored doping scandal. the russia flag and anthem will not be allowed at events such as next year's olympics and paralympics in tokyo, and the world cup in 2022. athletes who can prove they are clean will be able to compete under a neutral flag. it is very important for me, in my opinion, that we take this decision, wada take this decision. all the members of the executive committee anonymously. so i think this is a strong message to the sport family, to the sport space, that — a strong message that we will never tolerate dopers, cheats and manipulations. rory mcilroy has turned down an offer to play in next month's european tour event in saudi arabia. the country's human rights record has been heavily criticised, and mcilroy admitted that there was a moral element to his decision.
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he said he just didn't want to go there. really interesting in the context of anthonyjoshua's really interesting in the context of anthony joshua's fight over the weekend and other sporting events taking place in saudi arabia. one of the few to say no, isn't he? with two days to go before the general election, nicola sturgeon is urging voters in scotland to back her party if they want to stop the conservatives winning a majority. the snp leader insists there is every chance her party will hold the balance of power at westminster after the general election. let's speak to the snp's drew hendry, who is in inverness. thank you for coming on the programme. good to talk to you. the nhs has been a real sort of area of discussion, hasn't it, for the last few days particularly. you are in charge north of the border because of devolved government. but do you concede that the snp, if there is a finger to be appointed, one of those significant fingers can be pointed to your record when it comes to the
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nhs in scotland? look, there is growing pressure on the nhs worldwide, and we have seen yesterday from the tv pictures the enormous pressures and the situation in england. so scotland has some areas to improve, but don't forget the scottish nhs, in terms of accident and emergency, for example, is performing much better than the other parts of the nhs, in for example other parts of the nhs, in for exa m ple wales other parts of the nhs, in for example wales and england, which are run by labourand example wales and england, which are run by labour and the conservatives. so yes, there is more to do in scotland, and that will continue to bea scotland, and that will continue to be a priority. but i don't think any of the tories or labor party can point the finger at scotland for that. better, but still short of targets. six of the eight targets weren't met. cancer targets weren't met. there's a huge drug addiction problem in scotland and the budget was cut by 15 million. so you say there are to address, but it is underperforming like all areas, isn't it? well, of course, spending in the nhs in scotland is £136 per
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person more than scotland. we have urged the uk government to meet spending in scotland. that is in our ma nifesto. spending in scotland. that is in our manifesto. so that will generate not only a better nhs service for the rest the uk, but with an extra £4 billion to invest here. you know, the shortage of funding from the nhs comes from the austerity that has been imposed on scotland from first of all the tory liberal coalition government, and then the tory government, and then the tory government over the past nearly ten yea rs. government over the past nearly ten years. so again, we will take no lessons from them in terms of funding. it is about time they stopped the austerity regime and actually made sure that people don't suffer in terms of the shortage of funding across the uk. last week we had our meet the leaders series and we spoke to nicola sturgeon. we will be speaking to jeremy we spoke to nicola sturgeon. we will be speaking tojeremy corbyn today, and we spoke on independence and how that might play out with a potential
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linking up with the labour party. i am sure we will talk tojeremy corbyn about that, but from your perspective, if labour were to rule out ranting a referendum on independence before the holyrood election in 2021, would that mean that you wouldn't support them in government? well, look, you know, i think it's unlikely that they would stick to that. i think they want to get into government. if the only way to do that is to get some kind of support, i don't see the possibility of any kind of coalition, by the way, with labour, but if the only way, with labour, but if the only way to do that is to get support from the snp, i can't see them refusing to do that. plus it is an important principle which has been accepted important principle which has been a cce pted by important principle which has been accepted by labour party figures, and if there is a majority in the scottish parliament for an independence referendum, then that should be allowed to go ahead. now, there is a majority already in the scottish parliament from the last election for another independence referendum, so it is really not down to, you know, down to the political whim ofa to, you know, down to the political whim of a particular political leader to deny the people of
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scotla nd leader to deny the people of scotland their rights in that case. and of course, we would keep saying that this is something that has to happen in terms of gaining our support, but there are other things, as well, in our manifesto that would be important in any kind of situation where we held the balance of power, as looks quite likely. the other thing is, of course, you talk about majority. if there was to be a conservative majority, and that door about another independence referendum would be firmly shut, what would be cause of there? because when we did have nicola sturgeon there, we asked about potentially illegal action or holding sort of an unofficial referendum —— a legal action. is that something that has been discussed? well, we are fighting in this election to win, and in every single seat where the tories holds, in scotland, the snp are the nearest challenges. so a vote for the snp is about to lock boris johnson challenges. so a vote for the snp is about to lock borisjohnson out of number ten. we want to make sure that happens and in this election that happens and in this election thatis that happens and in this election that is what we are fighting for. at the moment we are not contemplating
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the moment we are not contemplating the situation you talk about. but i will come back to this yet again. if you imagine the optics of the scottish people being denied the right to choose their own future by any government, i think all that would do is increase the feeling that we need to make sure that we have a choice in the future, and that this indeed, as has been shown over the brexit shambles of the last 3.5 years, shining a light on how scotla nd 3.5 years, shining a light on how scotland has been ignored, this isn't a union of equals, and it is not working for the people of scotland. can i ask you one final one. in terms of timing, what do you think should be held first, a second independence referendum or an eu referendum? well, look, if the only options are on the table for stopping brexit are to have another eu referendum, then clearly the timescale dictates that that would probably come first, just in chronological order. but you know, the people of scotland must have their choice about whether or not to have a borisjohnson broken brexit
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westminster future, or if they want to make their own choice about scotla nd to make their own choice about scotland in the future, and its place in the european union, through independence. and that's the right thing to do, so that will come forward as planned in 2020. thank you for talking to us on bbc brea kfast you for talking to us on bbc breakfast this morning. we just wejust had we just had an update from new zealand in the last couple of seconds, police talking about the volcanic eruption stop we've been bringing updates of the last one to four hours. they've just released this statement saying it now there may not be a criminal investigation into the white island volcano eruption. earlier on we reported police that there was a criminal investigation. they are now saying thatis investigation. they are now saying that is not the case. the new statement is saying police can also confirm we have commenced an investigation into the circumstances regarding deaths and injuries on the
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island. at this time, the police are investigating the death of individuals on the island on behalf of the coroner. to correct our earlier statement, this is from the new zealand police, it is too early to confirm whether there will also be criminal investigations. so just some clarification from them in the last few moments. sort of clarifying themselves. we do know it is expected to be 13 people dead, but that figure could rise as there are people unaccounted for. and there we re people unaccounted for. and there were people on the rim of the crater just before the volcano erupted with ash and gas yesterday. and some of the injuries we are hearing sound incredibly serious. so, yes, those numbers may change. and later we will be speaking to a volcano are just who will give us some detail on what may have happened —— volcanologist was up and the island
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is privately owned. it had been showing activity in the last couple of months, so, yes, much more later in the programme. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning, carol. good morning to you too. if you are just stepping out, take a brolly with you but make sure it is a sturdy one. today we are looking at heavier rain and is fully winds across the whole of the uk. already we've got some heavy rain coming in across northern and western scotland, northern ireland, parts of northern england and this whole band of rain is going to continue its journey, whole band of rain is going to continue itsjourney, moving eastwards through the day accompanied by gusty winds. so, after a bright start in eastern parts of england, you will notice the cloud encroach and rain arrives. the wind is the other half. the wind strength today could be damaging for some. we're looking at gusts 50—60
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mph in parts northern england, northern ireland and scotland. so, it could lead to some disruption today, for example, we could have trees down or branches of trees down and very crossings might be affected. speed restrictions on temperatures, some temperatures closed to high vehicles, so check before you set out. as we head through the evening and overnight, watch the milder yellows being pushed away, that is because the rain moves into the east. it's a cold front bringing the rain and behind it we are back into colder conditions. temperature—wise you can see 2—5, that tells you what we are expecting in towns and cities. it will be cold in rural areas. we are not anticipating any issues with frost. tomorrow will start off on a
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relatively dry and bright note stop showers already in the west will move towards the east, and this light stuff you see on the charts is of course snow. talking about snow on the hills, it will not be low—level. temperatures double figures today are going to be in single figures tomorrow. it is a to psy—tu rvy single figures tomorrow. it is a topsy—turvy week weather—wise, so if we have a look at what else is happening, the uk in blue being pushed away by milder yellows coming our way on thursday accompanied by more weather fronts. that means we start off on a dry and bright note in the east but rain from those weather fronts coming in from the west journey eastwards, weather fronts coming in from the westjourney eastwards, snow weather fronts coming in from the west journey eastwards, snow almost anywhere on higher ground on thursday, and more showers following and behind. milder conditions in the south where it will still be windy, less windy, across the north of the country but it will still be cold.
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carol, it's lovely to see you. matt is all right. i'm not saying i don't like carol. are you trying to balance things out in the week of an election? let's be fair. i like carol, but i also like the others.” ama carol, but i also like the others.” am a lifelong carol voter. it is 6:50am. the man whose battle with motor neurone disease helped inspire the ice bucket challenge, has died at the age of 34. pete frates' family said "today heaven received our angel. " the ice bucket challenge began in 2014, with thousands of people, including many celebrities and politicians tipping freezing cold water over their heads. the videos were viewed millions of times, raising more than £160 million for charity. here's pete's story. my
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my name is pete frates, i'm 27 and i was recently diagnosed with als, or as it is more commonly known, lou gehrig's disease. there is no effective treatment for this disease, and if we could get together that would be an absolute miracle, and that is what we're really praying for. if we can just stop at the way it is now, i think all of us would be — we can live with this. but realise that... the grand slam homerun for peter frates! the disease is not like the main ones you hear about every day, seven people like myself to be diagnosed, hopefully i can use my youth and the networks i am part of to promote awareness. i have always kind of been a part of it. for me it was ok, let's go to work. als has never been talked about this much, so we're hoping to keep the momentum going. you ready?
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(applause). 0h, oh, it is so desperately sad to see the pictures. just 27 when he was diagnosed. being involved in something like that to raise so much money across the entire world. and for so many people to take part. an incredible amount of people took part, including you, we will see that in just part, including you, we will see that injust a part, including you, we will see that in just a second. i'm delighted to say that jack dunn, that in just a second. i'm delighted to say thatjack dunn, a that in just a second. i'm delighted to say that jack dunn, a close family friend, joins us now from boston. good morning to you, thank you very much for your time today. let's remember pete, what was he like? he was an amazing human being. he was selfless and giving and kindhearted and a wonderful father and giving and kindhearted and a wonderfulfather and and giving and kindhearted and a wonderful father and husband. he and giving and kindhearted and a wonderfulfather and husband. he is a person who used his celebrity to help find a cure for this horrific disease and it ravaged his own life. he isa
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disease and it ravaged his own life. he is a remarkable human being. did pete ever think when he started with theice pete ever think when he started with the ice bucket challenge that it would have the impact that it has had? no, i don't think it ever imagined does mackie ever imagined that it would be a worldwide social media phenomenon on that it became. it exceeded all of the family's expectations, but pete spent his whole life exceeding expectations. and from the moment he was diagnosed, he never made about himself. it was always about the many other people he was trying to help? yeah that's exactly right. it would have been easy to succumb to the human emotions of anger and self—pity, but instead he devoted the rest of his life to finding a cu re the rest of his life to finding a cure for als so others wouldn't have to suffer the way he suffered. what he did was out of selflessness and a caring spirit. and the amount of money raised for charity is simply staggering, isn't it, when we look at the amounts. and the people who ended up taking part, we're looking
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at george w bush doing the ice bucket challenge, the people who took part incredible. what are the highlights of the campaign for you? just the fact that so many people responded. everyday citizens to professional athletes and a former president of united states, they all responded. people who are humble, people who are billionaires, they all responded because they realise this was an opportunity to do something worthwhile that could help find a cure for this illness. jack, it's lovely to talk to you. that jack dunn talking to us from boston this morning. great to share memories of an incredible, incredible man. so wejust memories of an incredible, incredible man. so we just very quickly remind ourselves of one celebrity who took part in the ice bucket challenge that may be familiar to everyone? oh, there i am. my children loved being
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involved. good on you for doing it. ididn't involved. good on you for doing it. i didn't realise there were ice cubes. aren't there supposed to be? extra ice cubes. well done for taking part in an incredible phenomenon that raised so much money. what a legacy. ben's at chester zoo this morning, to find out why they're preparing for a big surge in visitor numbers this christmas. good morning, ben. good morning to you. welcome to chester zoo. you are right, this time of year is traditionally quite quiet for places like this, but they found their way of using all of this to get visitors through the doors. they are expecting 110,000 to see this lantern light show. jamie is one of the bosses. jamie, good morning to you. this is your eighth year, particularly important for you. give usa particularly important for you. give us a sense of why you need people to come all year round, the zoo is operational of year? we operate 24
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hours, seven days a week. but we need the income to come in all year. we have 700 staff at the zoo at present, so attracting 110,000 people is extremely important to any charity. so we've been running this for about eight years, as you said, we started off quite small, 13,000 visitors a year, we are now at 110,000 people. give us a sense of that significance, something like this. this cost a lot of money to put on, doesn't it? you need staff and security at all about but it is worth it? absolutely. as a not—for—profit charity, worth it? absolutely. as a not—for— profit charity, all of worth it? absolutely. as a not—for—profit charity, all of the operating surplus we generated from this gets pumped into the zoo for next year. people buying in retail, food and beverage, adoptions at the zoo, people spending money on conservation rather than christmas presents has become more and more popular. it is important for us at this time of year. jamie, we will talk to you later, thank you. people
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are spending less on stuff this christmas apparently, and more on experiences. good morning to you, kate. give us a sense of that. we are spending more on experiences, but what our experiences? anything from gin making and alpaca walking to eating out. but we are spending on it for many reasons. social media has been a big part, it gives us talk ability and videos but also connectivity. how we want to build ouridea connectivity. how we want to build our idea of community again.” connectivity. how we want to build our idea of community again. i was at manchester city centre yesterday, there are still people buying stuff stop we can't right of retail, money is just also stop we can't right of retail, money isjust also going stop we can't right of retail, money is just also going into stop we can't right of retail, money isjust also going into buying experiences. there is this divide now where we are getting money out of—— now where we are getting money out of —— value out of our money, but it is the middle market that is quite challenged. business leaders are not seeing the opportunities for retail, andl seeing the opportunities for retail, and i think that is where the opportunity is going to come from.
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£2.6 billionjust this opportunity is going to come from. £2.6 billion just this christmas opportunity is going to come from. £2.6 billionjust this christmas in retail. thank you, kate. look, the lanterns, the light show on here, more than 100,000 people expected. so we will talk more about that after 7am, but now time for the news, travel and weather where you are. see you soon. good morning from bbc london, i'm tarah welsh. there are calls for a major change in approach to tackle the spread of so—called county lines, which is when gangs groom young people to move drugs from big cities to small towns. the head of london's national centre for gang research says it's leaving children surrounded by violence and believes a solution will only be found with the help of young people. a community group in south east london says it's gone
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from helping a handful of older people to having around 600 adults on its books. the caribbean social forum in woolwich is run by volunteers without any external funding or support. but as their members age they sometimes struggle with the needs that brings. a few people, i think, in here with dementia, and i think it's very, very difficult because people with dementia, often they can remember things from the past, but not more recent things. so they might remember the music that's playing and so forth, but obviously there's a big need for more than we can provide at the moment. now, if you're not yet in the christmas spirit, don't worry, you soon will be. especially if you live in greenwich. this postbox there has been given a wintry makeover and features the sound of elves when you post a letter. a collection of james bond books
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by author ian fleming that were given to his friend noel coward are going under the hammer tomorrow. the first edition stories include ‘live and let die' and ‘the spy who loved me' and feature messages written to the playwright and composer. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. it's very slow on the lead—up to the blackwall tunnel on the a102. the usual delays are made worse by late finishing overnight resurfacing works. in highgate, hampstead lane is closed. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a chilly start out there this morning. we have got a little bit of high cloud but the temperatures around zero in some spots. so, a patchy frost. however, that will soon change. cloud increasing, its going to turn rather wet and rather windy. so, some hazy sunshine to start with first thing, but the cloud thickening. outbreaks of rain moving from west to east, some heavier bursts in there. temperatures today getting up to around 11 celsius,
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but, we've got quite a brisk south—westerly wind, so it probably won't feel that mild at all. into this evening, the rush hour, some heavier, more persistent rain, it clumps together. so, wet and windy for the first part of the evening. that clears out of the way and the sky clears, temperature drops again to low single figures. we do hang on to a bit of a breeze, though, so should be frost—free tomorrow morning. now, for wednesday, again some heavy showers on the cards, it could get a rumble of thunder, some hail mixed in to those. and then for thursday it is going to stay rather wet and windy. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast, with dan walker and sally nugent. our headlines today: up to 13 people have died and 47
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seriously injured after a volcano erupted in new zealand. the country's prime minister says questions must be asked. labour's jeremy corbyn joins us on the programme in the last of our leadership interviews ahead of thursday's general election. good morning. who is cashing in on christmas? i am at chester zoo finding out why it is notjust the shops that are busy at this time of a long—awaited victory for arsenal. they beat west ham for their first win in ten games. relief for stand—in manager freddie ljungberg. good morning. after a dry start in some eastern areas, wet and windy weather already in the west is going to cross the whole of the uk today. the strongest winds will be in the north and the west, and it could lead to some disruption. i will have more details in about 15 minutes. remember the ice bucket challenge? tributes are paid to the man who inspired it, raising more than £150 million for charity.
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it is tuesday 10 december. our top story: five people are confirmed to have died, with eight others still missing, after a volcanic explosion at a popular tourist destination in new zealand. white island remains too dangerous to access, but aerial reconnaissance flights have detected no further sign of life there. doctors treating the 31 injured fear some have suffered burns so severe they may not survive. our correspondent shaimaa khalil has this report. our reporter danny vincentjoins us now with the latest from new zealand. thank you for coming on breakfast to tell us, what do we know this morning? what extra information do we have? well, the son is now setting on this corner of new zealand, and behind me you might be able to see in the background is white island, the island of the
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volcano, of course, which erupted around 24 hours earlier. now, the police and the prime minister here have both said that many questions need to be answered, but at this moment this town are still in morning, because they know that they are living very close to an active volcano. in fact, are living very close to an active volcano. infact, it are living very close to an active volcano. in fact, it is the most active volcano in the country. but nobody expected anything like this to happen. there are five people that have been announced dead, there are still many people that have not been found, they are still missing. but the authorities here are losing hope. they fear that those people may never be found. danny, thank you for that update. we will be speaking to an eyewitness in a few minutes' time for you, one of those who was actually on the boat, new first aid, who was helping people who received burns from being on the island —— knew first—aid. you forget how terrifying it must have been for the people on the island. and also for how distressing it was for people
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who saw what happened and had to help people with very serious injuries at this stage. much more throughout the morning. that is our main story this morning. borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn are concentrating on what they regard as vote—winning issues for their parties, with 48 hours to go before the polls open in the general election. the prime minister will say that only a majority conservative government can break the brexit deadlock, while the labour leader will set out his plans for the nhs. let's talk now to our political correspondent chris mason, who is at westminster. not long to go. what can we expect from today's campaigning? good morning to you, sally. the countdown very much on with less than 48 hours to go. in fact, exactly 48 hours to go until polling stations open on tuesday morning. it has just turned 7am, so lots of focus on the core themes for the main parties in this last sprint finish. jeremy corbyn and labour focusing on last sprint finish. jeremy corbyn and labourfocusing on the nhs. it
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has been their core campaigning theme throughout this campaign. they are definitely going to step that up in the light of what happened in leeds yesterday, and that very arresting frontpage from yorkshire evening post and then the daily mirror. the story of little jack. now, this is something the conservatives clearly felt vulnerable about yesterday, hence the dash from the health secretary to the leeds general infirmary. so you will hear from jeremy corbyn talking about an audit of risk that labour will have instantly for the health service to try and work out where there would be problems and where there would be problems and where they would be a need for additional investment straightaway under a labour government. the conservatives argue they would be putting a lot more money into the health service as well. ron boris johnson, though, the focus on brexit and in particular what he sees as the risk of a hung parliament —— from borisjohnson. the risk of a hung parliament —— from boris johnson. he the risk of a hung parliament —— from borisjohnson. he is concerned that they could be a hung parliament and that they could be further paralysis at westminster as a result. very much down the two tram
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tracks, if you like, of what the two big parties would like to focus on. great to talk to you, thank you very much indeed. that is one very, very busy man, chris mason, 48 hours to go. later on this morning, we have the final one. we have had the com plete the final one. we have had the complete set of leaders on the brea kfast sofa complete set of leaders on the breakfast sofa at various points over the last few weeks. we have spoken to all the major parties and we will complete the set today. louise is out and about. good morning, louise. she is in bolton. we say on the red sofa, you have your own red sofa to sit next tojeremy have your own red sofa to sit next to jeremy corbyn have your own red sofa to sit next tojeremy corbyn later. have your own red sofa to sit next to jeremy corbyn later. very good morning, dan and sally. i seem to be very fond of this sofa. i was out yesterday in crewe, and today we have spoken to all the main leaders in the run—up to the general election. we have tried to talk to them specifically about their policies, find out also a little bit
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about the politicians themselves, and it has been a really interesting watch. so today we had six out of seven, and we have the full set because in an hour's timejeremy corbyn is going tojoin me here. and of course, he is out on the campaign trail. they are all out on the campaign trail. they are all very busy. we only have until thursday to make up our minds. watch in an hour's timejeremy corbyn, the last in our leadership interviews, here on bbc breakfast. we look forward to that in just about an hour's time. and as we say, two days away from the big day on thursday. and there will be continued coverage over the next few days, and then huw is leading the team on thursday night. are you one of the ones that stays up are you one of the ones that stays up on thursday night? the exit poll gives you a very idea of what will happen, and you can plot around the constituencies. i think naga is in
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sunderland, where they raced to get it done first and we will get some sort of definitive answer sometime friday morning. we shall see. and thenit friday morning. we shall see. and then it will all be over. well... it won't, will it? we will bring you the very latest. we will have the special programme friday morning and brea kfast special programme friday morning and breakfast is back on saturday morning. the man who helped inspire the global fundraising phenomenon known as the ice bucket challenge has died at the age of 34. pete frates was diagnosed with als, a degenerative condition that affects the nervous system, seven years ago. in 2014 he was instrumental in starting the ice bucket challenge, where people poured cold water over themselves and posted footage on social media. an estimated £160 million was raised worldwide. an incredible, incredible achievement. what a legacy. if you
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have just switched on, jeremy corbyn will be on louise's red sofa in bolton in an hour's time. thousands of tourists visit new zealand's white island every year, despite the fact it's the country's most active volcano. in the weeks before yesterday's eruption, the alert level on the island had been raised due to an increase in activity. geoff hopkins saw what happened and joins us on the phone now. thank you very much for talking to us on bbc breakfast this morning. first of all, describe to us what happened from your perspective. as we understand it, you were actually on the crater rim on white island about half—an—hour before it erupted. is that right? yes, so my daughter and i headed out for an excursion, a tour of white island, and we arrived for our tour of the
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island, went up to the crater rim, and finished that tour about 1.5 hours, headed back down to the beach, where we got into... you have to use an inflatable boat to get you in and out, a dinghy, from the main boat that is just anchored in the bay. and we got onto our boat. there was another boat that was there, with their tour group still on the island, when we left. we went around to the corner of the bayjust around the corner to take one last photo opportunity of the crater, and as we turned around to start heading back to the mainland, itjust erupted, just right in front of us. can you describe what that noise was like? bizarrely, there was no noise. over the noise of the engines of the boat, which won't quiet, but there
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was nothing —— weren't quiet. it was silent. there was no tremor, there was no shaking, there was nothing to really say other than the visual thing that we could see of the huge plume of steam and ash that was rising in the air. and geoff, as you say, there wasn't much sound. so you see this, and what happens? do you then return to the island? obviously you are thinking about what is happening to those people who are still there. yes, so we were probably only 200m off the shoreline. the ash cloud then started to envelop the entire island. we all got inside the cabin. there was about 30 people on the boat, and we immediately headed back to where we had left, which was the other boat, but it was still anchored. the crew on the boat knew
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that we were going to need to rescue people. at that stage, you couldn't see the island. it was just com pletely see the island. it was just completely covered in ash. very eerie. so how... i don't want to make this sound like a glib question, but what was it like, to return to the island and you are now treating and looking after some of those people? presumably that is quite traumatic for those of you who are on that boat, seeing what is happening to certain people. yes, the tour party that were on the boat, there was a silence, really, amongst people as we headed back. a few people were in tears. there was a shock. we knew that there were people still on the island. when we arrived back to where the other boat had been anchored, the ash started to clear. we could see that there we re to clear. we could see that there were people on the beach, there were some people in the water. everything was covered just in a perfect layout of grey ash. —— perfect layer. we
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could see the rex helicopter on the island and immediately the boat launched the inflatables and started picking up the injured. we didn't know what we were dealing with until the first one started to come on, and as they came on, they were horrific burns. we took 23 people of the island before we started heading back to the mainland. every single one of them were badly, badly burned. geoff, can i ask, as well, you were saying you and your daughter had been on the island with other tourists around half—an—hour before. i understand your daughter isa before. i understand your daughter is a geologist, is that right? she is a geologist, is that right? she is studying geology at uni, yes. were you warned at all before you went there that it was particularly active at that time? or whether any concerns while you were on the island? there was nothing to suggest... nothing out of the ordinary while we were there. it comes with a risk, an active
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volcano, and because of that, it is a lwa ys volcano, and because of that, it is always going to be a risk of an eruption. but the island is heavily... not that —— heavily monitored, not that that helped in that circumstance. you have to weigh up that circumstance. you have to weigh up the opportunity to walk on a live, active volcano. it comes with a huge element of risk, and we were well aware of that when we signed to go. i really appreciate your time this morning, geoff. thank you for talking to us. geoff hopkins, who if you have just turned talking to us. geoff hopkins, who if you havejust turned on talking to us. geoff hopkins, who if you have just turned on your television this morning, geoff was telling us an incredible account of being on the island with his daughter half—an—hour before it erupted. he said there was no sound to it, they could hear the word of the boat engine, but no sound, and a huge cloud came over the island. ——
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whir. they return to the island and started treating people who had been affected by the ash cloud and he was talking about some of the horrific injuries they saw. and then i imagine at some stage you start then thinking about what could have happened if you had been therejust half—an—hour difference in the timing. incredible account from jeff —— geoff hopkins, who are switched on and first aid trained and probably saved a few lives yesterday. we arejoined by we are joined by volcanologist jessica johnson. you've been to white island. it must be hard to balance the risk with the fascination of walking on a live volcano. how did you balance the risk? i think probably like quite a few other tourists, the possibility ofan few other tourists, the possibility of an eruption is sort of in the back of your head, but you're
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excited to go and it's just so overwhelmingly beautiful there. i was also lucky enough to go with scientists from genescience at a time of lower activity. just describe to us what it meant to cause that? the volcano is monitored with sensors and a major the —— and they measure the gases. since september they noticed there had been an increase in volcanic acids and so they increased the alert level to level two in november. they continue to monitor than —— the volcano. it's worth noting that the
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volcano. it's worth noting that the volcano had been at raised alert levels previously and there was no eruption. just because the alert level was raised, there is no way of predicting whether there was going to be an eruption or how big or when that eruption might happen —— gns science. how important is it for scientists to study volcanoes like this? do the benefits outweigh the risks? i think so. as scientists we have risk assessments we have two conduct. we are well placed to see how the volcano is acting before we go atany how the volcano is acting before we go at any time, but there have been disasters where scientists have been injured or died disasters where scientists have been injured ordied in disasters where scientists have been injured or died in volcanic eruptions, too. do you call it the ring of fire around there? in the pacific there are tectonic plates that are moving together, and that creates a lots of volcanoes and
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earthquakes. it is a part of the world that is known to be active? absolutely. you say you go there aware of what could happen, i suppose? throughout the north island of new zealand, there are several other volcanoes and the ring goes through japan through to other volcanoes and the ring goes throuthapan through to alaska and down through north america and south america —— ring of fire. down through north america and south america -- ring of fire. the eruption has resulted in a loss of life and many people injured. in terms of the eruption itself, where does it rank in terms of other volcanic eruptions you have observed? it's very small. if nobody had have been there, it wouldn't be on the news. i probably would have heard about it but wouldn't have been bothered about it. i think the difference is that, well, people
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we re difference is that, well, people were there, but the thing with white island is that it is such a small island. when people visit, they have to be in the crater sensually. there are other volcanoes that are tourist destinations, but a lot of the time you are watching it from a distance. whereas white island, because of being such a small island, when you visit you are right in there, right in the action. because it's 49 kilometres away from the mainland, there is no escape from that either. which is what happened over the last 24-48 which is what happened over the last 24—48 hours. is it likely to erupt ain? 24—48 hours. is it likely to erupt again? it's hard to predict. this eruption had a lot of water involved in it because there was a water lake in the crater. when the water comes into co nta ct in the crater. when the water comes into contact with magma or very hot rock, it flashes to steam. that stea m rock, it flashes to steam. that steam expands quickly and causes the explosion there. so that is why we had such a big explosion, but it
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also means even though there was a raised alert level, the eruption itself was unpredictable and we don't know whether something similar could happen, we just don't know whether something similar could happen, wejust need don't know whether something similar could happen, we just need to don't know whether something similar could happen, wejust need to keep an eye on the monitoring data and see what happens. jessica, thank you. jessica johnson, thank you very much indeed. and fascinating to hear from geoff hopkins as well, an eyewitness who was on the island 30 minutes prior the eruption and went back on the boat to rescue people on the island. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. starting off with a beautiful weather watchers picture, you can see how there has been frost under clear skies in parts of the east. this picture was taken by one of our weather watchers in norfolk. in 25 minutes or so i will be announcing the winner of the first—ever pick of the winner of the first—ever pick of the season weather watchers competition. this morning it is a wet start to the day, it is also a
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windy one. that is mostly in the west but it is moving towards the east, so we're all going to get a blast of rain and strong winds as we go through the day. you can see we've already had a bit of rain in the north and west of the uk, that is already travelling eastwards, maybe snow in the hills were a time, but further east where we have had clear skies, a cold start to the day, hence the frost for example in norfolk. through the day the cloud will build, the rain will continue to journey west to east, so we will all see eight hours of rain. that's only half the story, the wind is the other half. gusts of 50—60 mph across parts of northern ireland, and northern england. higher speeds in north wales. similar values, 60-70 in north wales. similar values, 60—70 miles an hour across the north and western isles. the temperatures today are higher than yesterday's, most of us in double figures. it's
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fairly academic because of the wind and the rain. this is a cold front, and the rain. this is a cold front, and as it continues to move towards the east, behind it will start to pull in some colder air as indicated there by stornoway. however, with a combination of the wind and rain, it could lead to travel disruption. ferry crossings could be affected. there may be strict tunes on temperatures for high sided vehicles. branches and trees on the roads, that sort of thing to look out for. our weather front moves down overnight, eradicating those yellows indicating milder air. we have greens and blues moving in. below, the temperatures are low, we are expecting issues with frost it is going to be not too windy. in central and eastern areas, starting the day on a bright note but a lot of showers tomorrow, some of them merging to give longer spells of rain, some pretty heavy as well. on higher ground almost anywhere we
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could see snow. the temperatures are back down into single figures. that changes as we head into thursday, because here is the uk with the blues indicating cold temperatures, we have this mild air coming in from the west as indicated by yellows and weather fronts, that means the west as indicated by yellows and weatherfronts, that means more rain coming our way weatherfronts, that means more rain coming ourway again weatherfronts, that means more rain coming our way again moving from west to east with some hill snow and followed on behind with some showers. still busy in the southern half of the uk, not as busy in the north. so in the north temperatures will be that little bit lower. back to you. thank you, carol. log on to social media right now and you'll probably see lots of adverts and messages from politicians trying to win your vote this thursday. but, can you always trust what you see? this morning there are calls for urgent new rules on the way that political parties use the internet during an election campaign. our digital elections reporterjoe tidy reports.
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thanks everybody. the general election campaign trail has clocked up election campaign trail has clocked up hundreds of handshakes, speeches and miles on the bus stop its all been fairly well stage—managed and conventional. online, it's been anything but stop doctored videos have gone viral. this controversial one from the conservatives made labour's and it looked tongue—tied. this one from labour supporting group momentum, almost got them sued by coca—cola. but the real battleground has been paid ads on facebook and instagram. nearly 20,000 have been launched since the election began with nearly 2 million spent so far. most are highly targeted and use the social network's digital tools to hone in
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on specific voters. certain ads are being chosen for us based on age, location, interests and gender. so how much of a difference with all of this political advertising actually make? well we won't know the full a nswer to make? well we won't know the full answer to that until thursday, where this building at 50,000 others turned into a polling station. come to speak with people on the other they have seen and haven't. this ad is only aimed at 45—year—old man and older. it's fast. it's not particularly appealing. it is making you laugh stop there is the tagline. what do you think about? not aimed at you but what about the message? how do you feel about the fact the parties are aiming very different m essa g es to parties are aiming very different messages to different people in the country? well, it's all marketing, isn't it? i think it's the modern e, isn't it? i think it's the modern age, really. i think it's isn't it? i think it's the modern age, really. ithink it's quite worrying because it means you have to find the best message for you and for me, which doesn't really have any relation to what is best for the country. her fears are mirrored by a growing number of groups calling for reform in political ads, bilyk
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petite —— particularly around fact checking, which isn't required at the moment. we need ads to be legal, decent, honest and truthful and to set out what you can't say in and add comments particularly —— in an ad, particularly around factual claims. will they rise to the challenge? joe tidy, bbc news. have you seen many political ads lately? not really. i had two at the football christmas lunch. i have had two christmas dinners so far.l whole chocolate log went down. are you struggling today? you know when
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you struggling today? you know when you feel a bit the budget? it's ok, only live sally. let's get the news, travel and weather where you are —— live television. good morning from bbc london, i'm tarah welsh. how to tackle the issue of social ca re how to tackle the issue of social care is one of the biggest issues for the next government, and one community group from southeast london says it has gone from helping a handful of older people to having 600 adults on its books. the korean social forum 600 adults on its books. the korean socialforum in 600 adults on its books. the korean social forum in woolwich 600 adults on its books. the korean socialforum in woolwich is run by volu nteers socialforum in woolwich is run by volunteers without external funding or support —— caribbean, but they sometimes struggle with the needs it brings. a few people, i think,
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who have been here with dementia, and i think it's very, very difficult because people with dementia, often they can remember things from the past but not more recent things. so they might remember the music that's playing and so forth, but obviously there's a big need for more than we can provide at the moment. two weeks to go into christmas, if you haven't put up your tree, you aren't alone. people are going for an eco— alternative. i think you've really bought into the fact —— we have really bought into the concept, it's something we value, i think, into the concept, it's something we value, ithink, so into the concept, it's something we value, i think, so that is why we have come to buy a tree here. look at what has appeared in greenwich, a postbox that lays the sound of elves when you post a
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letter. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. the metropolitan spinal has minor delays at our tunnel —— metropolitan line has minor delays. it'd be very slow on the lead—up to the blackwall tunnel on the a102, the usual delays are made worse by late finishing overnight resurfacing works. in highgate, hampstead lane is closed from the village to hampstead heath for repairs to a burst water main. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a chilly start out there this morning. we have got a little bit of high cloud but the temperatures around zero in some spots. so, a patchy frost. however, that will soon change. cloud increasing, its going to turn rather wet and rather windy. so, some hazy sunshine to start with first thing, but the cloud thickening. outbreaks of rain moving from west to east, some heavier bursts in there. temperatures today getting up to around 11 celsius, but, we've got quite a brisk south—westerly wind, so it probably won't
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feel that mild at all. into this evening, the rush hour, some heavier, more persistent rain, it clumps together. so, wet and windy for the first part of the evening. that clears out of the way and the sky clears, temperature drops again to low single figures. we do hang on to a bit of a breeze, though, so should be frost—free tomorrow morning. now, for wednesday, again some heavy showers on the cards, could get a rumble of thunder, some hail mixed in to those. and then for thursday it is going to stay rather wet and windy. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and sally nugent. boris johnson and jeremy corbyn are focusing on what they regard as their parties' key strengths today, with two days to go before the polls open in the general election. jeremy corbyn will set out his plans for the nhs. meanwhile, boris johnson will say that only a majority conservative government can break
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the brexit deadlock. let's speak now to the conservative robert buckland, who joins us from westminster. thank you very much for coming on the programme this morning. one of the programme this morning. one of the things we have been discussing in many of our viewers have been discussing is what happened in leeds yesterday. before we talk to you, let's see what happened when the prime minister met an itv reported yesterday. 40 new hospitals. let me tell you — i haven't had a chance to look at it. look at it now, prime minister. look at it now. his mother says the nhs is in crisis. what is your response? his mother says the nhs is in crisis. what is your response7m his mother says the nhs is in crisis. what is your response? it is a terrible, terrible photo, and i apologise to the family and all those who have terrible experiences in the nhs. how do you feel when you watch that?
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well, the prime ministers apologised. eventually. well, elections are unpredictable events and things can happen. it is very difficult sometimes in interviews to respond immediately, but he did look at that photograph and apologise. the health secretary went to the hospital as well, spoke to the family and apologised, and i think it's important we remember now the family have asked for privacy and they don't want the issue to be used as some sort of political football, andi as some sort of political football, and i think we should all respect that and deal with the wider issues here. and of course, in leeds we will be seeing investment this year ina new will be seeing investment this year in a new assessment centre for children and a new hospital being built over the next few years, and thatis built over the next few years, and that is investment which has been agreed with nhs england and is going to bring investment to people in the leeds metropolitan area.” understand that, but why is the prime minister seemingly incapable of saying what a horrible picture, i am really sorry about that, let me get to the bottom of what happened.
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why is there no empathy there? why did it take almost a minute of being shown a picture for him to just look at it and admit it wasn't a particular good picture and it didn't reflect well on the government and he was going to try and change that? why did it take such a long time for him to show that empathy? well, i think he did show the empathy. these things are thrust upon people, and you need to understand and take in what it is all about, and he did do that and apologised, and the expression, and his view about what he saw i think was a human reaction that any of us would have, those of us who are pa rents, would have, those of us who are parents, those of us who aren't pa rents. parents, those of us who aren't parents. sorry, mr butland, i am pretty sure if i was interviewing you and i showed your picture on view, you —— picture on my phone, you wouldn't take my phone and put it in your pocket —— mr buckland. well, i don't know precisely what happened. we have just seen well, i don't know precisely what happened. we havejust seen it, he was shown a picture on his phone and
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he took the phone and put it in his pocket. i think the important thing here is that when he had assimilated it, he apologised and empathised in a way that all of us would. he acknowledged readily this was unacceptable, and as a result of that, the health secretary went directly to leeds to speak notjust to the professionals but also to the family as well, to understand in greater depth what had happened here, and as a result of that, there has been a fulsome and appropriate apology, and indeed, notjust a promise of action now, but a reminder that already the local health trust, and indeed the government, have plans to improve and enlarge facilities there to reduce the prospect of this sort of thing happening in future. you know, these human situations are well understood by all of us, because i use the health service with my family, so do other ministers. we understand the pressures, and we respect the staff who give their time and their dedication to serving
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the public in a brilliant way. time and their dedication to serving the public in a brilliant waym doesn't matter what your political view might be, which party you are voting for. i think most people voting, watching this morning and watching that yesterday will struggle to see that as a normal reaction. are you saying that the way the prime minister reacted to that yesterday is fine, in your view? well, i think his apology, his reaction to the photograph, were what you should expect. and that's what you should expect. and that's what happened. and wasn'tjust an apology, it was then action by the health secretary going there and actually finding out more. mr buckland, it was incredibly awkward to watch. surely you can admit that. it was incredibly awkward to watch, for 90 seconds refusing to look at the phone, taking the phone and putting it in his pocket, and then eventually being almost forced into an apology. it was a painful day for the conservatives yesterday. well, look elections are really difficult things. things will happen in elections, unpredictable events. i don't think he was forced into it. i think when he looked at it, the
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reaction was clear and unforced and natural, and the apology was forthcoming and fulsome. and i think, you know, that response and the response that we've shown in the hours since, and the action that the health secretary took, shows that we we re health secretary took, shows that we were taking this matter incredibly seriously, as we would with any matter relating to our national. but it is the action that we want to ta ke it is the action that we want to take and are taking, agreed with nhs england, to make investments in places like leeds, that will really bring a benefit in the years ahead to users of the nhs, and everybody who works within our wonderful nhs. iam not who works within our wonderful nhs. i am not going to ask you another question about it, because i am sure our viewers can make their own mind about whether that was a normal reaction, human reaction, we saw yesterday from the prime minister. cani yesterday from the prime minister. can i ask you about this as well, because i know you are saying it is not a blunder, but there was the issue with the photograph and the apology eventually, and then there was this that happened. let's have a look at what happened at the hospital when matt hancock turned up
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a little bit later on. these people have got a say in our country. i put my hand up and you walked into it. it is hard to get exactly to the bottom of the sequence of events, and we will see that again, mr buckland, but apparently there were briefings from the conservatives that that was a punch on one of matt hancock's aides. i can't see the footage now, but i have watched the extra ct you footage now, but i have watched the extract you are referring to where you can see there might have been some accidental contact. clearly there was a very confusing and fluid scene, lots of shouting. to a reasonable bystander... it is not a punch, though, is it? it seems like some sort of public order incident where people are shouting, people are trying to get out of the way of that and move on to avoid a confrontation. whatever. it wasn't an acceptable scene, in my view. we live in a lively democracy. people are entitled to make their views
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known, and sometimes vigorously. he was just pointing. known, and sometimes vigorously. he wasjust pointing. how known, and sometimes vigorously. he was just pointing. how is that a public order issue? he was just pointing and someone walked into his arm. i think there is more to it than that because it does seem that there was an orchestrated attempt by people to come there and create some sort of scene. and i have to ask myself the question, how does that advanced democratic debate? surely it is far better that we have a reasonable debate in a respectful way, rather than people gesticulating and shouting towards the health secretary and his team outside what is after all the hospital, which should be a place of safety a nd hospital, which should be a place of safety and tranquillity. ok, let me put this to you, and you can deny this, if you like. but this was the accusation yesterday, that you had had a really bad day with what happened to the prime minister and then the conservatives are briefing that matt hancock's aids has been punched in leeds and went to the hospital —— aides, and distracting attention away from the prime minister. i don't think ahead of a general election campaign people can
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plan things in that sort of way. there clearly was a confused scene. some sort of contact, however inadvertent it might have been, seems to have taken place. it might have been misunderstood by somebody, and chinese whispers developed. we have seen the footage. it is clearly not a deliberate punch or an assault, but it is a scene of some sort of public disorder, which i think is unacceptable. you are also talking about the bbc license fee. can you explain what your position is on that? what are the conservative party saying will happen if you get a majority in the next election in a couple of days' time? yes, well, there has long been debate about whether or not nonpayment of the license fee should be treated as a criminal offence, and one in12 be treated as a criminal offence, and one in 12 cases in her magistrates court dealt with our tv licence cases, but about 70% of those defaulters are women, very often in a vulnerable position. i am not at all convinced that criminalising people, particularly
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vulnerable people, is the right approach. we would of course consult about that as to whether or not we should decriminalise it and make it a civil penalty or a civil liability, which of course can be enforced by the bbc, but which doesn't lead to the stigmatisation ofa criminal doesn't lead to the stigmatisation of a criminal offence. you know, the license fee has been with us for many generations now. it is not immune to reform, and i think responding and listening to concerns of residents on the doorstep is the right thing to do, because if you are on a fixed income, the license fee is a significant amount of money, and the issue needs to be addressed. ok, one further thing i would like to ask about, to go back to what we were talking about earlier on. i know you feel that the prime minister was acting normally yesterday and it is ok to take a phone off a reporter and put it in your pocket. do you think that that isa sign your pocket. do you think that that is a sign of him feeling the heat in this election campaign, with a few days to go? i know it has been very busy. i know he has probably not stopped. but do you think that is what happened yesterday? well,
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election campaigns are high pressure. i have been in many of them. you do feel the heat. you can get quite tired, you can get, you know, under pressure, because things can happen in an unpredictable way. that is the beauty of our lively democracy, and i think all of us politicians, we forget sometimes we are human beings, and the heat can get quite intense. and this campaign has been a long one, you know, a lot of scrutiny, as is proper, and i think it is entirely natural that all of us, whatever our political colour, will at times feel the heat. so we are human beings. it is coming to an end shortly, and i think the public will share a collective sigh of relief when this election is over, and i hope that we can move on, get brexit down, and start 2020 ina on, get brexit down, and start 2020 in a positive way. so you he would have acted more normally had it not been during a campaign? well, look we are all individual human beings with our own reactions. what i saw there was a prime minister who apologised, and i think that is in a
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really important point to remember. the human reaction there, to see a young lad in that position, was to apologise, and he did that. ok, mr buckland, you have made that point. thank you very much. talking about the video which i am sure many of you have not only seen today but yesterday as well. don't forget we have jeremy corbyn from the yesterday as well. don't forget we havejeremy corbyn from the labour party, the leader of the labour party, the leader of the labour party, is going to finish off. we have had all the other party leaders on the sofa, and the one we hadn't had until today is jeremy on the sofa, and the one we hadn't had until today isjeremy corbyn. he will be with louise in bolton just after 8a m will be with louise in bolton just after 8am this morning. let's catch up with a bit of the sport. arsenal have their first win in ten games. they came from behind to beat west ham 3—1, and that will come as a huge relief to stand—in manager freddie ljungberg. patrick gearey reports. muddles, bubbles, toil and trouble. these have been worrying times for arsenal. they arrived at west ham without a win in nine, disorientated, and about to be made dizzier still. angelo ogbonna west ham's scorer. ainsley maitland—niles's unfortunate touch seemed to sum it up. nothing was going the way arsenal intended it.
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for an hour, they stumbled, relying on west ham's mercy. the next goal seemed a matter of time. from that shot, it took around five minutes. and, amazingly, it came at the other end. gabriel martinelli had started something remarkable. his strike released forgotten energy. six minutes later, arsenal's club—record signing nicolas pepe scored the kind of goal he had long promised, yet up till now rarely delivered. and, with hammerheads still spinning, here was pierre—emerick aubameyang with the third. after weeks of gloom, nine minutes of glory — enough to shift the clouds for west ham and manuel pellegrini. the night had got suddenly darker. patrick gearey, bbc news. we have a lot, a lot to work on, and a lot of things that we can see that we need to get on the training pitch to fix. but at least they have been under pressure for weeks and weeks and weeks, but they haven't won. so to have that mental strength, and do that away from home,
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it was a long time ago, so extremely proud. it is only six months since liverpool won the champions league, but they are in danger of going out at the group stage of this year's competition. they need a point away at red bull salzburg, to be sure of making the last 16. it's a tight group, so a win would take them through as group leaders, but they cannot afford to slip up. we will fight in each challenge, 100%. what salzburg did at anfield. we played really well at the beginning, but then we opened the door for the game. they used it because they are talented, strong. jesse's doing an incrediblejob. so it's just a football game, like it always is. chelsea also have work to do. they know a win tonight at home to lille will see them through, though they could get away with a draw if other results go their way. manager frank lampard knows the significance of games like these. i was fortunate enough to have
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big nights as a player, and they're the ones that stick in your mind. so it's opportunities for the team to — particularly the young boys, and it's quite new to them — to make a mark. so it's good. i like the pressure of this game being a knockout, and we're all talking about it. that's — if we're going to do anything good here, we're going to have lots of these nights. the world anti—doping agency have banned russia from all major sporting competition for four years after the state—sponsored doping scandal. the russia flag and anthem will not be allowed at events such as next year's olympics and paralympics in tokyo and the world cup in 2022. athletes who can prove they are clean will be able it's very important for me, in my opinion, that we take this decision, wada take this decision, all the members of the executive
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committee unanimously. so i think this is a strong message to the sport family, to the sport space, that — a strong message that we will never tolerate dopers, cheats and manipulations. huge ramifications with that ban. i have something to tell you about the weather. carol is here. and you have something exciting to tell us at the end? but now you have put it at the beginning. you are absolutely right. every we have the privilege of sewing your weather on the television, rather like this one sentin television, rather like this one sent in from simon in great yarmouth. you've been voted one of our top ten favourite pictures. let's now reveal who is the first ever winner of the weather watchers picture of the season. here it is — it's tony with this fabulous picture from porthcawl in bridgeland, we can see the huge wave smashing against the water. sony is an amateur
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photographer. he thought this wave looked like a wolf. thanks for taking the time to vote for these pictures. —— tony. go to the website to participate, where you can become a weather watcher. we may show your picture on the television or online. and of course we are other in pictures already for our winter weather picture of the season. a huge congratulations to you, tony, i hope you are watching. today's forecast is rather inclement. we have rain and squally winds. it's been raining steadily across parts of scotland, northern ireland, northern england, wales and south—west england. it's travelling further east. we have beautiful sunrises, but some frost as we saw from diamond's picture in norfolk. the weather in the west is going to
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journey towards the east, eradicating that nice, bright start. the rain is only half the story, the wind is the other half. 50—70 mph across the country, stronger in the south. temperatures today were on the mild side, fairly academic with all of the wind and rain. the combination of wind and rain does mean we could have travel disruptions, so things like branches of trees on the road and puddles and surface water and spray. warnings and perhaps bridge closures, especially for high sided vehicles. do check before you head out. the rain will cross into the east and clear, leaving cooler conditions behind. the rain is taking on with a
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cold front. these temperatures are what you can expect in towns and cities, it will be a little lower in rural areas. because the wind is strong, we aren't expecting issues with frost. first thing tomorrow we have a lot of sunshine around, but a lot of showers and equally. many in the north and west, and in the south some of them merging to give heavier downpours. we will also see hills no almost anywhere, but it is going to be with height, it is not a low—level feature. tomorrow's forecast is the temperature is going back down. they are flip—flopping as we go through this week. highlighted quite nicely here, you can see the blues across the uk, they will be usurped by the milder yellows indicating milder conditions on thursday. so we start off on thursday. so we start off on thursday on a bright note, but then as the weather front comes in bringing this rain, pushing eastwards, again snow with height on the hills. behind all of this we are looking at a mixture of bright
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spells and sunshine. temperatures not so busy in the north, temperatures will be on the low side in the south. great news for sony, isn't it? great news for tony. what isn't it? great news for tony. what is your top tip for weather watchers' picture submissions? it's great if they are clear, picturesque, show mist, fog, have a lot of elements in it. not things like you and your family lot of elements in it. not things like you and yourfamily and a tiny bit of the skyline, not that kind of thing. we want beautiful views that show the weather elements. you don't wa nt show the weather elements. you don't want a sally selby? of course i would! —— selfie.
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want a sally selby? of course i would! -- selfie. thank you for that, carol. you are watching brea kfast. that, carol. you are watching breakfast. it is 7:51am. we have jeremy corbyn on the way, we have done a meet the leaders series. since the general election has been called, the plan has been to speak to every major leader of the seven major parties. and we have the last one of the state with 48 hours to go. jeremy corbyn is going to be in bolton, but will be speaking to us through an interview with louise in bolton. we have tried to give all of the political leaders quite a bit of time and speak to them about their policies and the general election campaign, but also learn a little bit more about them as a person. louise will be doing that with jeremy corbyn after eight a.m.. there have been different styles of
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interviews with leaders, we know one thing you don't like is when people get interrupted over time or things get interrupted over time or things get to saudi. so what we try to do is let people tell their story —— too shouty. so we have tried to give leaders time to explain what they believe in and why and what their policies are and, i think, when naga was speaking to prime minister boris johnson if you weeks ago, and then we have had the green leader in as well as nicola sturgeon, jo swinson, nigel farage, and the leader of plaid cymru, when you get to speak with them and get some time, they really appreciate the chance to explain what they would do if they could lead the country. so, 8am, just to confirm we will havejeremy
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corbyn who will be talking to us at some length on election eve. just 48 hours to go. yesterday was a rather big issue, earlier we were speaking to chris mason, our political correspondence, talking about what happened in leeds with borisjohnson and an itv reporter. chris mason is with us now. you heard from a conservative robert butland, he was defending borisjohnson conservative robert butland, he was defending boris johnson and conservative robert butland, he was defending borisjohnson and what he did yesterday. he conceded it took him a while and he could have acted differently. we haven't had many off—the—cuff moments which have then been discussed and looked at in great detail. by the way, i love the idea of election eve eve, it's like the 23rd of december, christmas eve
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eve, and additional date built into the calendar of the election. but you are right, dan about moments. things in an election campaign, events that shape the conversation for a little while. things happen in the news so quickly. i wonder how long the row in leeds involving little jack will last. because it plays into a theme that labour us so, so comfortable talking about, they have tried to make the whole campaign about the nhs, i think that is why you saw the conservatives dispatching matt hancock to the infirmary within hours of this story developing. i thought in that campaign, the conversation joe developing. i thought in that campaign, the conversationjoe pike had with the prime minister, boris johnson was clearly very
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uncomfortable and tetchy and i thought that was quite something. all of the leaders are very exhausted, they have been zipping across the country for days, weeks and months on and, it feels like in this campaign. everyone is human. he did get there by the end of the interview and you acknowledge that with robert butland. it was a grim image to look at, but it will allow jeremy corbyn, and i think in a couple of minutes when he is talking with louise, he will probably make the case that borisjohnson doesn't at the lives of ordinary people and in his view, a labour government would be more in tune. the conservatives make the argument that they will put more money into the nhs and there will be development at that hospital in west yorkshire. so election eve eve as sally said. i am sure many of us this morning have already decided which way to vote,
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there are also a lot of people who haven't made that decision. we have 48 hours to go. we've spoken to all of the leaders on bbc breakfast, and just after the news headlines on 8am, louise will be talking to jeremy corbyn in bolton on the sofa we have there. that will complete the set of all of the leaders we have spoken to you over the last few weeks. and that is why we are seeing politicians make the dash around the country. they know at some point, even now, there are some people who have not made up their minds. we will also bejoined by david purtill on the programme. but right now, the news, travel and weather wherever you are. see you in a few moments. good morning from bbc london.
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i'm tarah welsh. with an ageing population, one of the big challenges facing all politicians is how to improve social care. and one community group in south east london says it's gone from helping a handful of older people to having around 600 adults on its books. the caribbean social forum in woolwich is run by volunteers without any external funding or support. but as their members age they sometimes struggle with the needs that brings. a few people, i think, who have been here with dementia, and i think it's very, very difficult because people with dementia, often they can remember things from the past but not more recent things. so they might remember the music that's playing and so forth, but obviously there's a big need for more than we can provide at the moment. well, with two weeks to go until christmas, if you haven't yet put up your tree, you're not alone. but some people say they're going for an eco alternative this year. arborfield tree care in reading says people can rent a tree, then injanuary, it's collected,
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repla nted and cared for until the following year. i think we've really bought into the fact that you can — you own your tree, they replant it and itjust seems like such a great concept. it's something that we value, i think, so that's why we've come to buy a tree here. staying with the festivites... look what's appeared in greenwich. a postbox that plays the sound of elves when you post a letter. it's one of four post boxes in the uk decorated by royal mail. let's ta ke let's take a look at the travel situation now. there are minor delays on the metropolitan line. on the roads, it's really slow approaching the blackwall tunnel. there are queues from the black prince interchange on the a2 to woolwich road flyover. in highgate, hampstead lane is closed from the village to hampstead heath for repairs to a burst water main. in edmonton, meridian way is closed northbound from conduit lane for electricity work.
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now, the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a chilly start out there this morning. we have got a little bit of high cloud but the temperatures around zero in some spots. so, a patchy frost. however, that will soon change. cloud increasing, its going to turn rather wet and rather windy. so, some hazy sunshine to start with first thing, but the cloud thickening. outbreaks of rain moving from west to east, some heavier bursts in there. temperatures today getting up to around 11 celsius, but, we've got quite a brisk south—westerly wind, so it probably won't feel that mild at all. into this evening, the rush hour, some heavier, more persistent rain, it clumps together. so, wet and windy for the first part of the evening. that clears out of the way and the sky clears, temperature drops again to low single figures. we do hang on to a bit of a breeze, though, so should be frost—free tomorrow morning. now, for wednesday, again some heavy showers on the cards, could get a rumble of thunder, some hail mixed in to those. and then for thursday it is going to stay rather wet and windy. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address.
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bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent in the studio. our headlines today: up to 13 people have died and 47 seriously injured after a volcano erupted in new zealand. the country's prime minister says questions must be asked. good morning. this morning it is time for the last of our leadership interviews ahead of the general election, this time the turn of the labour leader, jeremy corbyn.
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a long—awaited victory for arsenal. they beat west ham for their first win in 10 games — relief for stand—in manager freddie ljungberg. it isa it is a relatively dry and bright start in eastern areas, but cold. in the west we already have heavy rain, winds picking up, that will move across the whole uk today, with the strongest gusts of wind in the north and the west. more in ten minutes. remember the ice bucket challenge? tributes are paid to the man who inspired it, raising more than £150 million for charity. good morning. it's tuesday the 10th of december. our top story: five people are confirmed to have died, with eight others still missing, after a volcanic explosion at a popular tourist destination in new zealand. white island remains too dangerous to access, but aerial reconnaissance flights have detected no further sign of life there. earlier, police said
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they were launching a criminal investigation — but have since clarified that at this stage, they're only considering doing so. this morning we've been hearing some remarkable stories from those that experienced the eruption. earlier, geoff hopkins told us what he saw. there was nothing. it was silent. there was nothing. it was silent. there was no tremor, there was no shaking, there was nothing to really say other than the visual thing that we could see was the huge plume of stea m we could see was the huge plume of steam and ash that was rising into the air. i know, as you say, there was not much sound, you see this. then what happens? do you return to the island ? then what happens? do you return to the island? you are thinking about what was happening to the people who are still there? we are probably only 200 metres off the shoreline. the ash cloud started to envelope
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the entire island. we went inside the entire island. we went inside the cabin and there were about 30 people on the boat, we immediately headed back to where we had left, where the other boat was anchored. the crew on the boat we were going to need to rescue people. you couldn't see the island, it was com pletely couldn't see the island, it was completely covered in ash. very eerie. i don't want to make this sound like a glib question, but how was it like when you return to the island and you are treating some of those people, looking after some of them? those people, looking after some of them ? presumably that those people, looking after some of them? presumably that it's quite traumatic for those of you on the boat, seeing what has happened to certain people? the tour party on the boat, there was a silence, really, amongst people as we headed back. a fee people were in tears, there was shock. let a few people we re there was shock. let a few people were in tears. we knew there were
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people still on the island. when we went back to where the boat was anchored, the ash started to clear, we could see there were people on the beach, people in the water, everything was covered in a perfect layer of grey ash, we could see the wrecked helicopter upon the island and immediately the crew of the boat launched inflatables and started picking up the injured. we did not know what we were dealing with until the first one started coming on, and as they did, they were horrific burns. we took 23 people off the island before we started heading back to mainland, every single one of them was badly, badly burned. an incredible account earlier on this year, we heard from geoff hopkins who was on the island half an hour before it erupted and then returned
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to look after some of those who were injured. borisjohnson has been criticised after initially refusing to look at a picture of a sick four—year—old boy who had to sleep on the floor of a leeds hospital. the picture in the daily mirror ofjack, who had suspected pneumonia, spurred complaints about nhs cuts. breakfast‘s tim muffett is at leeds general infirmary this morning. remind us of what happened, tim? not the easiest of days for the prime minister on the campaign trail. many of this stems from events which took place here at leeds general infirmary. he was quizzed by an itv reporter and asked to look at a photograph that featured on the front cover of the daily mirror, a boy asleep on a floor at this hospital. he initially did not look at the photograph and then he took away the phone belonging to the reporter and put it in his pocket. let's look at it.” and talking about this boy, how do you feel, looking up that photo?”
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have not had a chance yet. look at it now, prime minister. look at it now. he eventually looked at the picture and apologised about it, and apologised to the reporter for taking away his phone. health secretary matt hancock was dispatched to the hospital to try to relieve some of the damage, he was heckled by protesters as he left. many political leaders really dwelling upon this and making comment about what they thought happen. jeremy corbyn said we should bea no happen. jeremy corbyn said we should be a no denial, the conservatives caused this crisis by depriving the nhs of the funding it needs, liberal democrat leaderjo swinson said the prime minister would not look at the photo because he did not care about anyone but himself and ian blackford, the snp's westminster leader, said the prime minister has no empathy and no moral compass. not the day of campaigning he expected, it did not go the way he planned.
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thank you, tim muffett in leeds. chris mason is in westminster this morning. as we wait to speak to jeremy corbyn on the sofa in bolton with louise, what happened in leeds yesterday really is a big topic of debate. we haven't seen many moments in this election campaign which have been unscripted, if you know a timing? i think that is exactly why this is significant. -- if you know what i mean? it was beyond the choreography of the dash around the country the leaders do, the scheduled photocalls. this started at the yorkshire evening post, it ended up in the daily mirror and then involved an itv reporter. the prime minister was awkward, tetchy and uncomfortable in that moment in that interview. yes, the leaders are all exhausted, they have been on the
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road for weeks, but it became something the conservatives had to very quickly react to, dispatching health secretary matt hancock to the hospital, as tim reflected. it is continuing in the question space by conservatives this morning. robert buckland, the senior conservative, was on the programme in the last half hour. thrusting these things and people, they need to understand and people, they need to understand and take in what it is all about, he did that and apologised, and the expression, and his view about he saw, i think, expression, and his view about he saw, ithink, was expression, and his view about he saw, i think, was a expression, and his view about he saw, ithink, was a human expression, and his view about he saw, i think, was a human reaction any of us would have, those of us as parents and those who are not parents and those who are not parents would take the view that this is a concerning incident. politically, the reason this is significant, one point is obvious, polling day is 47 hours away, the polls open at 7am on thursday. the daily mirror has another picture this morning, a nine—month—old baby
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called lily in chester sleeping on a chair whilst waiting for a hospital bed or proper treatment. the conservatives say they are putting lots of money into the nhs, the nhs an absolute focus, they talk about specific measures they have planned for leeds general infirmary if they wina for leeds general infirmary if they win a majority, but this is territoryjeremy corbyn is very, very comfortable on and it is quite useful for very comfortable on and it is quite usefulfor him, given very comfortable on and it is quite useful for him, given this very comfortable on and it is quite usefulfor him, given this is very comfortable on and it is quite useful for him, given this is the kind of thing he would have wanted to talk about, irrespective of these front pages. aside from this, which topic to the parties want us to speak about, two days out? topic to the parties want us to speak about, two days ounm topic to the parties want us to speak about, two days out? it is no time for album tracks at this stage, they play what they think is absolutely key to getting their vote out and getting those who might aspire to vote for a particular party out. borisjohnson will return to the theme of brexit and what he says as the danger of a hung parliament and the political
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paralysis he thinks would result if that was the outcome on thursday. jeremy corbyn, the focus will be the nhs. that was the plan for these last few days from labour irrespective of these stories involving children and the wait for treatment, but i think he will step that up, conscious there is a theme running in the national conversation, irrespective of his campaigning messages. you will get that from the conservatives and labour, you will get core messages from the likes of the snp, plaid cymru, the green party and the brexit party as this sprint finish towards the line of 10pm on thursday gets under way. as sally said, it is election eve eve. a very interesting assessment from mr mason, no time for album tracks, play your greatest hits! and sprinting towards the
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line, ithink hits! and sprinting towards the line, i think they will be crawling! they will be tired. the man who helped inspire the global fund—raising phenomenon known as the "ice bucket challenge" has died at the age of 34. pete frates was diagnosed with als — a degenerative condition that affects the nervous system — seven years ago. in 2014, he was instrumental in starting the ice bucket challenge, where people poured cold water over themselves and posted footage on social media. an estimated £160 million was raised worldwide. earlier, peter's friend jack dunn told us how proud he was of his achievements. he was an amazing human being, a person who was selfless and giving and kind—hearted and a wonderful father and husband. he is a person who used his celebrity to help find a cure for this horrific disease that so ravaged his own life, he has a remarkable human being. it would have been easy to succumb to the very human emotions of anger or
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self—pity that he devoted the rest of his life to helping find a cure for als so the others would not have too suffer as he did. everything he did was done out of selflessness and a caring spirit. i am sure many of you remember watching those videos into thousand 14. we promise tojeremy corbyn at 8:10am. he is coming, louise has the red sofa, with a have an extended interview with the labour leader two days out from the general election. slightly earlier than usual, we will go to carol kirkwood who has the weather and an incredible photograph. this is the peak of autumn 2019, the first time we have run this competition and tony won, well done. notjust a competition and tony won, well done. not just a beautiful competition and tony won, well done. notjust a beautiful picture but it shows what many of us will see today if you live by the coast. we are
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looking at very gusty winds and some heavy rain. squally winds around the rain, we will all see it, it will be moving from the west towards east. it has been moving steadily across parts of scotland, northern ireland, northern england, wales, south—west england and some of this rain is heavy. in the east, it is a dry and brighter start. we have seen beautiful sunrises and some frost. through the morning the rain will continue to move from the west towards the east, we will all get wet at some stage, that is half the story, the wind is the other half. windy wherever you are, the strongest gusts will be in the north and the west, 50 or 60 mph gusts across northern ireland, south—west scotland, northern england, 60 or 70 mph gusts across north wales, the northern and western isles, especially with exposure and height. we are in pretty good shape at temperatures, double figures, but fairly academic because of the wind and the rain. that combination could
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lead to travel disruption. the wind will be strong enough to break branches on small trees, for example, you might find them on the road. the same with bridges, you could find some speed restrictions or may be some closures, especially in high sided vehicles, ferry crossings etc. by that in mind if you are travelling. you can see the yellow in the charts this evening and overnight, they clear as the cold front moves away onto the near continent, replaced by the greens, indicating cooler conditions, and the blues. two, three, four orfive is the temperature intends in cities, culture in rural areas, but because it will be windy we should not have issues with frost. —— colder in rural areas. tomorrow sta rts colder in rural areas. tomorrow starts bright with sunshine, windy and the north—west, showers drift eastwards from the west, again with
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height we will see some snow, particularly in the hills of scotla nd particularly in the hills of scotland and northern england, and in parts of wales and the mothers we could see, —— see some later in the day. you will notice the difference in temperatures, the temperatures are going down through the course of tomorrow. the blue indicates the lower temperatures tomorrow, they will be replaced by the milder yellows coming our way with a clutch of weather fronts. the day started the north and east with brighter skies, as the fronts come in from the west they will introduce rain, bumping into the colder air, falling as snow in the northern half of the country. behind that, a return to bright skies, sunshine and showers. with winds in the north it will be cold, but pushing further south, those temperatures once again start to recover. the weather is all over the place. it is, and i heard this
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no word, exciting! forsome the place. it is, and i heard this no word, exciting! for some people, not everyone. if you like sledging. —— i heard the snow words. throughout the election campaign, we've been speaking to each of the party leaders. this morning, in the last of our extended interviews, labour leaderjeremy corbyn is with louise. good morning, you join me with the bbc breakfast sofa, we're joined by the labour leaderjeremy corbyn and blackrod, thank you forjoining us. just to be clear, over the last few weeks we have spoken to every political leader from a major political leader from a major political party, you are seven out of seven, thank you very much. lucky seven or something. we have been trying to look at your policies and talk about you. i know you have spoken a lot about the nhs, let's start with that. what has it come to when politics is all about the treatment of a four—year—old boy second hospital, being used as a
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political football, when second hospital, being used as a politicalfootball, when his mother had said she does not want that. politicalfootball, when his mother had said she does not want thatm is an example of what is happening in our nhs, it is obviously awful for that little boy and the family the way they were treated, but it does say something about our nhs when this happened, and all the research shows there is a very large number of hospitals where patients are at risk because of staff shortages, a lack of equipment, poor maintenance of hospital buildings. it isa maintenance of hospital buildings. it is a serious issue, it is a political issue, how we fund the nhs. the royal college of physicians has said it does not want the nhs used as a political football, they have looked at all the manifestos and said the promises made are not physically possible, the plans are not credible. well, i think it has to bea not credible. well, i think it has to be a political decision whether we have an nhs, how it is funded and what political parties decide to do with it if they gain a majority in
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the next parliament. the nhs has to be properly funded, at the moment it is not. they say the plans are not credible. i disagree, our plans are com pletely credible. i disagree, our plans are completely credible, we have put forward a spending plan which will, i believe, give sufficient resources to the nhs while properly funding the maintenance issues and on a wider level the education issues surrounding nurse training, doctor training and defending behind that. we have 40,000 nurses vacancies in the nhs, buildings crumbling, very expensive deals in which some of those places were built and we have privatisation within the nhs which often does not fit in with the nhs culture. can i ask about labour's record on the nhs, in wales, the labour administration oversees health in wales, it has a poor record. it does not. let me tell viewers, failed to meet key a&e
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targets for at least a decade, a&e waiting times in september were the worst on record, is that not poor? 0f worst on record, is that not poor? of course a&e waiting times it's obviously a bad record, anywhere, whether it happens to be. the welsh government has lost 1 whether it happens to be. the welsh government has lost1 billion in funding from the uk government, welsh government has put more money proportionally than england into the nhs in order to try to improve services. the issues had to be about investment in the nhs across the piece. in september, where labour has been in charge, waiting times at the worst on record. in 2010, there we re the worst on record. in 2010, there were just about 2 million people waiting for operations, there are now 4 million across the uk. the situation has got markedly worse, satisfaction ratings with the nhs in 2010 were around 90%, they are very much lower than that now. the
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differences the underfunding of the nhs for the past nine years during austerity. lets talk about your plans for funding and money, austerity. lets talk about your plans forfunding and money, on brea kfast plans forfunding and money, on breakfast shadow secretary jonathan as hworth told breakfast shadow secretary jonathan ashworth told us the four day week would not apply to the nhs, a new ed slater the shadow chancellor said it would, which is it? it will not be. the nhs, over a period increases in productivity will lead to lower working time i was but it will not be. the nhs. when we did happen and how would you funded?” be. the nhs. when we did happen and how would you funded? i said funded through productivity in all industries and places of work. can i ask you about the theme at the heart of this election, trust in politics, trust in politicians and trusted leaders? we will look at your ma nifesto, leaders? we will look at your manifesto, first of all. the ifa says the manifesto is not a credible
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prospectus —— the ifs says. and the institute for fiscal studies say they will not be able to deliver all they will not be able to deliver all the spending is promised at the party is not being honest with voters. let's go to that point of being honest with voters. we are the only party which produced a full ma nifesto only party which produced a full manifesto with a constant document beside that, we have gone through it in great care, studied it very carefully, and the ifs has some criticisms or concerns it has raised. other economists think it is a very credible and sensible document, they point out the lack of investment in britain in infrastructure and public services, in industry as a whole, has to be addressed. it also said it relied on taxes unlikely to raise the sum is the party said they will. we believe the party said they will. we believe the tax increases we proposed on corporation tax particularly will raise the money necessary, in any event they will still be lower than
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the corporation tax rate in 2010. you say it was fully costed but two days later you added nearly 60 billion p to the bill when you said you would pay back the waspi women who missed out on state pension, so how do you... it is fully costed for the entire programme, the waspi women, it is a moral debt which should and must be paid, we will pay through it either through headroom or borrowing, but it will be paid. these women have been abominably treated by other government.” these women have been abominably treated by other government. i am not arguing with the principle but i am trying to find out where the money comes from. it is a huge amount. it is paid over seven years, not all straightaway. you have made a lot of promises in the manifesto, we have talked about what the ifs says, there are too many promises, you cannot get them all done either financially or logistically. we have
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gone through all the gamut of policy areas affecting our society. housing, health, education, legal reforms, poverty, injustice, universal credit, we have gone through those issues and cannot go on as through those issues and cannot go onasa through those issues and cannot go on as a society being so unequal, 4 million children living in poverty, 130,000 uncertain of the housing, thousands ref sleeping and huge levels of personal debt, often middle—aged people paying for kids to go through university or the social care of their elders. our ma nifesto social care of their elders. our manifesto was bold but it is achievable and very serious and we are very achievable and very serious and we are very determined to carry it out. do you accept it will put the —— the borrowing debt on the country for to come. it will redress the balance between the richest and the porous, it will tax fairly the top end of the scale and it will give our children better schools, better education and decent chances of
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social care for those that need it later in life. i want to move on because we had so much to get through, let's talk about trust and brexit, your position, you will negotiate a deal within three months, yes? then a second referendum, the new deal against remain, and you will remain neutral. i will be the honest broker that will make sure two things happened... can ijust. .. will make sure two things happened... can ijust... thank you. full ca ll happened... can ijust... thank you. full call labour supporters in the north of england, where you are today, who voted leave, is that not a betrayal? no, we are saying we would negotiate as it would be a balance negotiating team of people of different personal opinions and parts of the country, we would negotiate with the eu on a deal that would protect trade and jobs and the northern ireland peace agreement. i think those are an essential basis. cani
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think those are an essential basis. can i take you back to those labour supporters, i know you will speak to them today... i have been talking to them today... i have been talking to them for years. he said to them after the referendum that you had to respect the decision of the people, at the end of 2016 you voted for the brexit process to start, 2017 the labour party campaigned on a jobs first brexit, 2017, you said you would not support a second referendum. people will now hear you saying something entirely different. we put forward in our manifesto, after long discussion and debate, public debate, labour party debate, parliamentary debate, all of that, that the deal being offered by the prime minister is not acceptable to us and,i prime minister is not acceptable to us and, i suspect, to lots of other people, and the implications of his deal with the united states is not a cce pta ble deal with the united states is not acceptable either. i believe it reasonable that we negotiate a credible leave option, which would be leaving the eu but maintaining that very important trade
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relationship, and put that alongside remain any referendum to bring the matter to a close. i am not representing 48% or 52%, i am here to make sure everybody‘s representative. but are you representing labour supporters who voted for leave? i am representing everybody, saying brexit is a crucial issue which we must deal with, but there are issues about investment, austerity and poverty which need to be dealt with. who will be dealing with age? many members of your shadow cabinet are remainers, they have said that, your brexit secretary sir keir starmer is a remainer, who will do the deal and how do people trust people who are remain to do the deal?” how do people trust people who are remain to do the deal? i will be appointing ministers representing different parts of the country whose personal views are different, both leave and remain, they will be part of the negotiating group and there will be a back—up advisory group
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made up of trade unions, business and academics, to advise on this process so there is a credible deal. so new ministers? by which we would leave the european union alongside remain, but remaining the basic principle of trade with europe. united when i said new ministers, is that what you mean? —— you noted.” will not be naming new ministers. you can if you want to. no thank you. some labour activists have been telling us that you are a problem on the doorstep, people do not want to vote for you personally. we are putting forward a manifesto with very clear policies, i am very proud of its contents, i am very proud of the way our party has developers policies. myjob is to deliver it and carry it out, that is what i
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will do as leader of the party, and i want to be in government in order to carry that out because i am fed up to carry that out because i am fed up with the levels of poverty, injustice and inequality in modern britain. some candidates are not even putting you in your leaflet. britain. some candidates are not even putting you in your leafletm isa even putting you in your leafletm is a parliamentary election, not presidential, in which we elect members of parliament. i am the leader of the labour party and am very proud. but if you are not a vote winner you are a hindrance on the doorstep, is that helping the party? what helps the party is having a public debate about the inadequacies of what this government has achieved, and austerity, but also putting forward a very clear vision for the future which has an awful lot of support and an awful lot of people had joined the labour party because they are inspired by the idea that you can live in a society where we have a government serious about reducing inequality and giving real chance and hope for eve ryo ne and giving real chance and hope for everyone to get a decent education. i want to ask you about something
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which has dogged the campaign, the concerns about the way the labour party has handled accusations of anti—semitism. you appear to have lost many corejewish labour supporters? there were not any proper processes in place, against many members. one is too many i have set upa many members. one is too many i have set up a fast—track process. anti—semitism is one of the nastiest forms of racism.

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