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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  December 11, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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you are watching bbc news afternoon live. this is ben brown. r m: its. mainly in the north, quite windy in the south. this is ben brown. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. party leaders target marginal seats across the country with their core campaign messages — hello, you're watching as they try to win over afternoon live — i'm ben brown. today at 2pm. undecided voters ahead party leaders target marginal of tomorrow‘s general election. the nobel peace prize winner seats across the country with their core campaign messages — aung san suu kyi defends her country as they try to win over myanmar against charges of genocide undecided voters ahead at the hague. at the climate summit in madrid, of tomorrow's general election. greta thunberg calls on rich countries to cut their carbon the nobel peace prize winner emissions — and to help poorer aung san suu kyi defends her country countries do the same. myanmar against charges of genocide at the hague. at the climate summit in madrid, how do you respond to the fact that greta thunberg calls on rich countries to cut their carbon basically nothing is being done emissions and to help poorer countries do the same. about this, without feeling the about this, without feeling emissions and to help poorer the slightest bit of anger? the post office pays more than £57 million to settle a case brought by hundreds of subpostmasters and how emissions and to help poorer do you respond to thi postmistresses, wrongly accused basically how do you respond to the fact that basically nothing is being done of mismanaging funds. about this without feeling the recovery efforts on new zealand‘s slightest bit of anger? white island are on hold as increased seismic activity activity suggests the the post office pays more volcano may erupt again. than £57 million to settle a case brought by hundreds of subpostmasters and postmistresses, wrongly accused
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of mismanaging funds. coming up on afternoon sport now on afternoon live with chetan pathak — live, all the sport. it‘s been a good week so far for the english clubs coming up on the sport, tottenham in the champions league, and tonight spurs will be looking and manchester city may have already to avenge that heavy defeat to bayern munich earlier qualified for the last 16 of the in the competition. champions league, but they both have tricky away games tonight as they lverpool and chelsea secured their places in monday‘s look to end the group stages with a draw for the knockout stages of the champions league. nothing to worry about for spurs, they are already into the last 16. win. they‘ll finish runners up in their group whatever happens, and matt taylor bayern munich have already won it. has all the weather. their biggest result was the 7—2 at tottenham. it was the heaviest defeat of mauricio pochetinno‘s also coming up, would you eat managerial career. a chocolate bar if you knew you had to run for 22 minutes to burn it off? researchers suggest a new way butjose mourinho is the new man of labelling food could help people lose weight. in charge of course, beaten by manchester united, yes, but other than that they‘ve won all their other matches. he was asked ahead of the game if he‘s been watching clips of that 7—2 defeat with his players — this was his answer.
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hello, everyone. this is afternoon live — i forget iforget any i forget any image about it. i watch it. i'm ben brown. i watch it a couple of times me and my staff and try to go it's the last day of campaigning through every detail of that match in the general election, but not one single image with all the parties trying to win for the boys, no, not at all. over those crucial floating voters. we are going to focus more the prime minister borisjohnson has been targeting seats in northern england and wales, while the labour leaderjeremy on us than on bayern. corbyn started his day in scotland before moving to the north of england. jo swinson, leader of the liberal democrats, is focusing on constituencies in south—east england, and the snp leader nicola sturgeon has been meeting voters across scotland. manchester city play our political correspondent dinamo zagreb — they are already through as group winners. chris mason has the latest. from football to cricket, a bit of dawn hadn't even thought of breaking this morning and party leaders were history being made in rawalpindi out and about. today. it has been over ten years since boris johnson for the conservatives test cricket was hosted by pakistan, pretending to be a milkman in west yorkshire but with a political ten yea rs test cricket was hosted by pakistan, ten years ago that team bus message, as well as a pint attacked. six policemen and two civilians lost their lives. of semi—skimmed to flog. since then there‘ve been matches pakistan have hosted abroad but nothing replicates playing on home soil.
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pakistani cricket fans have we could tomorrow be been desperate to watch their team compete at home — going into another hung parliament. and now they can. somthing fitting that it‘s sri lanka that is more drift, who are the first team to return. more dither, more delay, there have been reservations, more paralysis for this country, years of questions overs security saying nothing of the economic and many teams not feeling safe disastrous policies of corbyn and mcdonnell. to go there. we have got to move forward, there‘s a strong relationship between both cricket boards we have a fantastic agenda for this and today was day one of the first test in rawalpindi, sri lanka won country, we can get brexit done. the toss chose to bat, in govan in glasgow, sri lanka made a good labour'sjeremy corbyn was also up but the pakistani seamers made before the sun and saying... ttomorrow, the people a breakthough, the lankans all across the uk will go to vote and they have a choice, they can elect a government that they can trust, steadied again and were 202 for five at stumps. they can elect a government that this the fifth wicket to go, angelo matthews bowled by naseem shah on 31.dimuth will eliminate child poverty, karunaratne top scored with 59. they can elect a government that will end the cruelty sri lanka resume and the injustice of universal credit. tomorrow 202 for five. today is all about the leaders lord‘s and hove cricket grounds clocking up the masochistic miles are set to host the final days out on the campaign trail to prove of next year‘s inaugural season of the hundred competition. the women‘s final will take place at hove on august 111th, they have got to be vim, with the men‘s final at lord‘s the following day. the bbc will have live television coverage of men and women‘s matches, the vigour, the vitality, including both finals.
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the verve to govern on friday. tributes have been paid even though, bluntly, to the former manager they're exhausted after weeks of campaigning. jim smith who died yesterday at the age of 79. smith was manager at various clubs lots of videos going out of them including oxford and derby county.. on the stump across the country. he worked with harry redknapp i have visited nurseries! at portsmouth who described him i have very much enjoyed toasting as probably his best ever signing.. marshmallows with four—year—olds! the liberal democrat leader jo swinson has been reflecting anyone who came into contact with on her campaign on her visit him loved him. he was a great to esher in surrey. her last—minute message character a great football man, he goes like this. to people who are at home watching, has great knowledge, great knowledge of the game and he new the play, he if you have a growing pile of liberal democrat leaflets knew players and he was a great on your kitchen table, be in no doubt that the liberal democrats character, pun if to be with, always can win in your seat. made you laugh and he could have a it will be a vote to stop brexit got go at the player, he would blow and to stop borisjohnson and that man must be stopped. up, got go at the player, he would blow up, go go got go at the player, he would blow up, go go a his rocker and his head the election is up in the air and so is this butternut squash. would be red and he would be enter volunteer greengrocer shouting and screaming and ten and scottish national party leader nicola sturgeon in edinburgh. minutes later he would be having a a tory victory can be cuddle and a laugh with him. stopped and in scotland everybody loved him. the players the snp is the main challenger would accept whatever he said, the to the tories and voting for other parties risks helping the tories. rucks and ups and downs but everybody loved being roundjim. so if people don't want to have more rucks and ups and downs cuts to public services, but everybody loved being round jim.
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that‘s all the sport for now. to be dragged out of europe against our will and have borisjohnson as prime minister, thank you. see you later. see you later. vote snp. more now from the last day of the general election campaign, as party leaders target key seats in the hope of winning we don't have any pictures of over undecided voters. the welsh nationalists plaid cymru let‘s go to cardiff and speak to our cymru campaign today, wales correspondent, daniel davies. but here they are campaigning earlier in the campaign. the brexit party leader nigel farage we were? scotland, northern ireland has been in doncaster and the green party says and across england earlier, now we it is raising the alarm will speak to our wales on the climate emergency. correspondent for the picture there. and among those campaigning there today was boris johnson and among those campaigning there today was borisjohnson in wales. in just a few hours, the deafening clamour people are trying to decipher why of campaigning will be borisjohnson went people are trying to decipher why boris johnson went to people are trying to decipher why borisjohnson went to the seat he over. visited, caerphilly, it is not considered a marginal seat, there is isa considered a marginal seat, there is is a hefty labour majority but the the serenity and solitude conservative party convinced their of the polling booth will beckon. message of get brexit done is the country will decide who lives here for up to the next five years cutting through, right across the in election that will bring about a change, whoever wins. country, so borisjohnson chose to in a moment we'll hearfrom tom symonds, make a flying visit to that who's in wimbledon, where the liberal democrat leader jo swinson is campaigning. constituency in south wales. but first to our political correspondent alex forsyth, meanwhile welsh labour, they are who's in south wales trying to consolidate their support,
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with the conservatives... returning to a message that has served them well in recent does this final camp pain they —— elections, saying it is them or us, labour or the conservatives in power. in other words 23 you are day of campaigning feel any tempted by that message to get different from other days of brexit done, bear in mind that you campaigning? it has a bit more of a will have a conservative prime frenetic field because there is a minister beyond that and for people on the left who are flirting with sense that the leaders have to be the idea of voting forked from seen to be out and about, eating up the miles and shaking as many hands flapped or —— michel platini or the as possible, posing in front of liberal democrats neitherer has a cameras and repeating their key realistic chance of forming the next campaign slogans. that is why we saw government. it is down to brass tax borisjohnson campaign slogans. that is why we saw boris johnson up before campaign slogans. that is why we saw borisjohnson up before the break of for mark drayed for. he has been to dawn this morning delivering milk in yorkshire and then he dashed down to derbyshire to pose with a pie that some marginal constituencies, the vale of glamorgan and bridged. as he said was symbolic of his other for the other parties, the plaid than ready brexit deal. we are in cymru leader adam price is focussing south wales here where he is touring ona cymru leader adam price is focussing on a theme that many people may have a paperfactory south wales here where he is touring a paper factory and then we will be in london where there is a huge thought about during this campaign and that is politicians not telling rally. it is a typical final day of the truth. he says there should be a campaigning you get in elections where it is about being seen and law to prevent politicians from lying just as is there is a a law trying to get your message heard. but i think this time, there is a that stops commercial companies from
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real tension in the tory team. there making up bogus claims ability isa real tension in the tory team. there is a sense that this is still all to products, so politicians should be held to the same standard and the play for. no—brainers what is going liberal democrats who only have one to happen tomorrow. the polls, for seatin liberal democrats who only have one seat in wales, they came into this however much we can read into them, campaign with high hopes of building they have narrowed. and for the on that, through their message of conservative party, i think, the stopping brexit, we hear they are nervousness comes from the fact that their strategy has centred on putting brexit right at the front of throwing their resources that the their campaign. they have done a one seat, brecon and radford shire relentless focus on boris johnson's which they won over the summer. so promised to take the uk out of the european union if he wins the their effort goes into retaining majority that he so deserves. but in that order to do that, he needs voters to abandon their traditional party so what are the chances of any loyalties and vote conservative party gaining a majority? instead. and it went to be until jeremy vine has been looking at the numbers. tomorrow that we find out whether that strategy really has paid off or let me show you first of all the result of the last general election — 326 seats needed for a majority in the house of commons, not. tom is with the liberal and the conservatives fell short with 318. labour quite a long way behind — democrats in wimbledon. how is the here we go, 262 for them. and then we have the snp down a bit, liberal democrat leader using the last day of campaigning? to hit some 35, and the lib dems and so on. now, the result of that was constituencies in this part of that the conservatives could not govern with a majority
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surrey and south—west london that in the house of commons. they were short by eight seats, are actually conservative led, as in and we had two years of chaos in parliament. realistically, there are only two they have or had conservative mps until the election was called. she is hitting them with fairly decent parties who can win this election. majorities and where they are not a huge challenge. they are here because this is remain territory and the lib dems believe and say that they are the clearest party in favour of remaining in the eu. so let‘s have a look at both of them now. they are hitting these let‘s look first at constituencies in the hope of the conservatives‘ targets. persuading people to vote along here, i show you the seats they are zoning in on, the ones with the smallest referendum lines and not back the majorities last time — just 20—something labour party or the conservatives votes in it in perth and north perthshire, kensington, derby north, when considering their vote. it is a newcastle—under—lyme, crewe and nantwich, all with majorities big effort by the liberal democrats. of less than 100, really tight. the conservatives aren‘t expecting at one point, we were on one lib to make big gains in scotland, to say the least, so let‘s take dems battle bus and we passed scottish seats out of it another battle bus going the and just look at english and welsh seats here. opposite direction and this is full if they need just eight of people driving up and down in seats, the eighth is ashfield in nottinghamshire. ca i’s let me show you on our map — of people driving up and down in cars saying rude words to brexit and just here. other slogans. so this is where they now, that, of course, presupposes hope they will make some gains. not the conservatives don‘t lose seats. if they lose in scotland, london and so on, they‘ll need more safe constituency seats potentially, but places where they can see some seats from this board. success because of their stance on
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labour have a much bigger hill to climb. let‘s look at the seats brexit. of battle buses roaming they might be focusing on, and we start again with the ones with the smallest, tightest majorities — southampton itchen around the country. let's see what the from the conservatives picture is in scotland and northern ireland. and glasgow south west our scotland correspondent lorna and glasgow east and so on. gordon is in stirling. these are the ones the leader of the snp little labour are zoning in on. sturgeon is expected here later to in order for labour to have an overall majority in the house of commons, they‘d have to take all 32 of these hopefully see off the conservatives. they are targeting seats from seats and they‘d have to go down the next board as well, labour, the lib dems as well. she all the way down these columns here to east kilbride, which is a very, very hard job. has been in edinburgh this morning, sterling later, east dunbartonshire they are not polling well in scotland, so i‘ll take the scottish seats out. also this afternoon. couple of the glasgow seats as well. this campaign i‘ll show you where they have to get to — in scotland has been about brexit, all the way down here, rochford in essex, yes, but also about independence, which is this seat here. if they gain this seat and all the ones before it, the snp‘s message on those on low to they have an overall majority in the house of commons, brexit and yes to independence. but there‘s a 5,500 vote majority there we have seen some slight for the conservatives in rochford.
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just to be the largest party, labour would still need to go all the way down the screen here to about the 30th seat, shuffles on the stance on morley and outwood, independence because they are saying which used to be ed balls‘s. to vote for snp if you want so a big hill to climb for labour, scotland's future in scotland's but by no means in the bag hands. it is an attempt, i think, to for the conservatives. appeal to beyond their core vote, the voters who want independence no matter what. nicola sturgeon has since described what is —— sent an the post office has agreed to pay more than £57 million to settle a dispute with former open letter to the scottish people subpostmasters and postmistresses, who were wrongly accused of fraud today saying that they can't afford and false accounting. five more years of borisjohnson and it brings to an end a series of court cases about a computer kong people do vote for the snp if system, which was used to manage local post office finances. our personal finance correspondent they want to chop boris johnson out simon gompertz explains the background to the case. of downing street, deny him the keys to number ten. she also said that borisjohnson is to number ten. she also said that boris johnson is and to number ten. she also said that borisjohnson is and i quote, the greatest danger to scotland of any tory prime minister in modern times. it all goes back to the beginning of one other thing worth noting, the the century, the year 2000 when a former leader of the scottish conservatives ruth davidson saying new system called horizon was today that if the snp win 50 or more brought in to manage the finances of seats here in scotland she will go the local post offices, and shortfalls be good afternoon to
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skinny—dipping in loch ness. 50 seats out of 59 in scotland is a appear, in —— began to a peer in their money day after day, the very big ask to be fair, but with people involved said it was as a more than two thirds of seats here result of glitches in horizon the new system. the post office said it in scotland marginal is, we are was their fault. people lost their likely, or it is entirely likely, that we will see seats changing contracts, accused of flawed, false hands in all kinds of directions. accounting, theft. they say they lives were ruined so we have this nicola sturgeon, a very experienced political campaigner who has been the head of her party for three case, for mammoth trials, the post general elections over the last five office lost the first one and then yea rs, general elections over the last five years, is spending her last few sought mediation and the result of hours campaigning right across the it is this settlement of £58 million central belt of scotland hoping to and the post office saying they know make the most of every single potential vote out there. that wrong things happened. the question is how much the individual and chris page is in belfast. postmasters and post mysterieses are going to get. get. money has to be chris, how would you sum up how the campaign has been in northern taken off for legal fees for a firm ireland? it has been intense, that backs litigation, but you can hard—fought, unpredictable, brexit still see individuals getting tens of thousands, perhaps more where has been very much to the four as you would expect given the situation they were worst affected. affected. affected. in northern ireland as regards
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brexit. particular given the nature of the land border with the the government has said thousands of chickens are to be killed republic, it has been such a big after cases of bird flu pa rt republic, it has been such a big part of the whole brexit process. so were confirmed at a farm in suffolk. both of the main unionist parties a one—kilometre exclusion zone has been set up around the site underlined their opposition to the brexit deal as it stands because as near athelington and 27 thousand birds will be culled. they see it, it would separate public health england said the risk to people was very low. northern ireland from the rest of now, would you think again the uk. and the ulster unionist party, the dup, as they have during about eating a chocolate bar previous elections, have entered into a pact in a couple of seats to in a moment alice baxter is going to bring us the latest business news. try to consolidate the unionist vote first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. with one candidate. what has been party leaders target marginal different has been that if you seats across the country with their core campaign messages — as they try to win over undecided voters ahead remain parties have struck an of tomorrow‘s general election. the nobel peace prize winner electoral arrangement, they don't like longer pacts, they would rather aung san suu kyi defends her country caught a tactic, but the principal myanmar against charges of genocide beneficiaries of that, whatever you at the hague. wa nt to beneficiaries of that, whatever you at the climate summit in madrid, want to call it, will be the two greta thunberg calls on rich main nationalist parties. one of countries to cut their carbon emissions — and to help poorer countries do the same. sinn fein‘s top target is north belfast and they will charge take it here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. from the dup. sinn fein are standing the battle for control of uk food delivery firm just eat has
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aside in the seat of south belfast intensified as hostile bidder prosus raises its offer to £51 billion, where the sdlp are challenging hard threatening to upset the agreed merger with dutch rival for another dup seat. the takeaway.com. it‘s a deal that would create one programming party that are not part of the world‘s biggest online of that arrangement are the land food delivery companies. party. they have decided to run in all of northern ireland's constituencies and say they don't do pacts, and are trying to build on the world‘s biggest share listing significant gains made in the got under way in riyadh, with saudi aramco‘s stock rising 10% european elections in northern above the initial public offering price. ireland earlier this year. brexit is very much brought once to prominence and the old—age struggle of unionism versus republicanism and that continues to be the theme of the an all—electric powered seaplane has taken flight in vancouver, canada, election here. there is another in what the operators describe issue that has raised up the agenda as a "world first" for the aviation industry, thatis issue that has raised up the agenda that is the health service. it is and a step towards the "first widely acknowledged that the nhs in all—electric commercial fleet". the short test flight by harbour air and magnix involved ireland is in crisis, there is a six—passenger aircraft fitted industrial action being taken and nurses are said to go on strike next week and new figures have been with an electric motor. published highlighting the fact that northern ireland has the longest hospital waiting times in the whole of the uk. that is very much drawing attention to the political deadlock
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attention to the political deadlock at stormont, there has been a so there‘s a big trade deal devolved government here for four being signed over in the states? yea rs. devolved government here for four years. and although this is a the us, mexico and canada have signed off westminster election, the word is a trade deal that will replace that plenty of the parties have been the 25—year—old north american taking heat on the doorstep from free trade agreement. voters who are very unhappy about it comes after the white house agreed to strengthen the labour the lack of decision—making, the and environmental rules. it also comes ater president donald stasis that has been going on at trump relentlessly ridiculed nafta stormont, and the work the lima card as the worst trade deal ever when he was running for office but instead work will be over on monday —— might of tearing the agreement to shreds he has mostly mostly patched it be hard work will be over on monday. up. so the new agreement, known as the usmca, that is supposed what chances of success they have to replace nafta is in many ways similar to its quarter—century—old will depend on the result on predecessor. thursday and friday morning both in samira hussain is in northern and and nationally. washington for us. why is this deal going through now? and in around 20 minutes we'll be speaking to our political correspondent we have heard that this trade deal in wales to get the latest picture there, so do join us for that. was sort of in the works for a very and of course, it's long time, there has been a big push polling day is tomorrow, but if you still haven t by the white house to try and get made up your mind, check out our ‘how should i vote?‘ guide this push through congress. what to the election to see what the parties are promising — happened was that, it was that the that's on our website — bbc.co.uk/news or on the bbc democrats were looking for a few
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news app. more concession to better protect workers‘ rights, they got some of them and here we have both democrats you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. and the white house calling it a win party leaders target marginal seats across the country for themselves. democrats saying we with their core campaign messages — as they try to win over are able to work with this white undecided voters ahead of tomorrow's general election. the nobel peace prize winner house despite the impeachment aung san suu kyi defends her country hearings. the white house saying myanmar against charges of genocide at the hague. this is a big which for the us at the climate summit in madrid, greta thunberg economy, and this is something that calls on rich countries to cut their carbon emissions — us president donald trump will want and to help poorer to ta ke us president donald trump will want to take on to campaign trail in 2020. so both sides saying it is a countries do the same. win for them. what does it mean for the us economy? that is a good question. in terms of will there be and coming up in sport, jersey a economic boom as a result of moreno takes tottenham to buy in signing this deal. not really. what munich for theirfinal us signing this deal. not really. what us did offer is a lot more moreno takes tottenham to buy in munich for their final game of the champions league group stages certainty, and that is what business looking to avenge their 7—2 defeat is really want, is certainty to be in the reverse game. manchester city able to better plan on the days and look to bounce back from their derby
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weeks and months ahead. this is what day defeat as pack audio take centre this trade deal does. it also could dzagoev. and a ten year wait has perhaps provide a framework or at least some ideas of what a possible us china trade deal may look like. ended as test cricketer returns to pakistan. more and all of those 0k. us china trade deal may look like. ok. thank you. stories at 2:30pm. shall we look at the markets? yeses, aung san suu kyi, the leader of myanmar, has denied accusations of genocide, at the united nations‘ top court. of course, all analysts keeping an a military crackdown in myanmar eye on the polls ahead of tomorrow‘s in 2017 resulted in thousands general election. largely flat but of rohingya muslims being killed, some down, the pound is slightly and more than 700,000 people fled down today against the dollar and to neighbouring bangladesh. the euro. a couple of shares. just aung san suu kyi blamed the violence eat xup 2 shares down through. and mass displacement on militants seeking independence, though she added it could not be ruled out that her country's defence forces used disproportionate force. anna holligan reports through: this company threaten to break up this merger. it would make from the hague. the world‘s biggest delivery food waiting in anticipation service, and then alsojd sport, for a glimpse of the woman thatis service, and then alsojd sport, that is interesting because it has
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they call mother suu. been the best performer all year but today, it is on track for its worst myanmar is shrouded with fake news day in three years,er and that is and many other unfair charges. after one of the big shareholders so this is our chance sold 211 million shares in the sports retailer at a discount. so trailing to prove to the world, down nearly 9 percent. thank you. to give a true picture of what is really would you think again about eating a happening in myanmar. chocolate bar if the packaging told the world was watching you how many minutes of exercise it as for the first time aung san suu kyi responded would take to burn it off. ? to the allegations that myanmar has researchers are suggesting putting that sort of information on the been trying to exterminate the rohingya population. label could help make us all, make a woman once considered a global healthier food choices. human rights icon told thejudges she understood the definition of genocide, but went on to characterise the situation in myanmar as something else, an internal armed type of exercise you need to do to conflict which began when rohingya burn off all those calories. we know militants killed police officers. regrettably, an incomplete
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and misleading factual picture has that the public underestimate the been placed before the court amount of calories so if you ask the of a situation and current state in myanmar. yet it is of the utmost public how many are in this food importance that the court assesses the situation they often underestimate it. we dispassionately and accurately. would like to see physical activity she claims the clearance operation carrying labelling because it gives carried out by myanmar‘s army a meaning and context to burn that which left an estimated 10,000 rohingya dead, was a legitimate response food. as a rough guide to the link to a terrorist threat. between exercise and food, let us though she did concede that individual soldiers put together a lunchtime meal deal. may have made mistakes. a chicken and bacon sandwich roughly mr president, it cannot be ruled out 445 a chicken and bacon sandwich roughly 1145 calories would require 42 minutes of slow running, a chocolate that disproportionate force was used bar 229 calories would need 22 by members of the defence services, in some cases in disregard minutes of running. wash that done of international humanitarian law. or that they did not with a medium mocha coffee. coffee. distinguish enough clearly allup, with a medium mocha coffee. coffee. between fighters and civilians. all up, that is more than an hour and half of running. researchers say aung san suu kyi made no reference such awesome could save 200 calories to the harrowing witness per person per day. would it change our behaviour. i think it would testimony from rohngya survivors,
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frighten a lot of people. a lot of some read out in court yesterday, who talk of military firing squads, people would be interested and more gang rapes and babies thrown into burning buildings. inclined to exercise. it is these rohingya fear their families important with the issue of obesity, are being raised by the state. people know what they are putting in they are urging the judges to agree and how much they need to do to to the gambia's request counter act that, but then i think that with diet culture and that sort for emergency measures to protect the 600,000 rohingya muslims who remain in myanmar. of thing and like eating disorders the woman who many once regarded and stuff, it could cause mental as their greatest hope stood difficulty as well. there is a in court and urged thejudges not disconnect between you are eating to intervene and risk aggravating and the kind of, what you would would expect, the exercise to burn what aung san suu kyi described it off, so putting in a quantifier as a ‘complex conflict‘. number it would make it easier. nutritionist point out we burn the environmental campaigner calories all time. even without greta thunberg has accused governments and corporations of failing to tackle climate exercising and food is a vital change, and hiding behind clever accounting and creative pr. source of nutrition. even small addressing the un climate summit in madrid, she criticised what she said were constant attempts to find loopholes to reductions can make a big impact avoid emission targets. today, greta thunberg has been named time magazine‘s person of the year. across. experts say it could matic a
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our environment correspondent matt real difference to the obesity crisis. mcgrath reports from the summit. just a year ago, she was a little—known swedish climate striker with a home—made sign. but she arrived in madrid for cop25 as the world‘s most famous climate activist. now, we all know that being prime minister is one of the most importantjobs in the uk greta thunberg came to this key — but what do children think climate conference not should be the priority to generate soundbites, she said, but to reiterate for the next government? that the science was clear — newsround have been talking to young people from across the uk about what they would do this was an emergency and the world if they were prime minister. was not treating it like one. we are in scotland. we are in northern ireland. we're in england. we‘re in wales. i was prime minister so, please tell me, how do you react i would cut school down to four days to these numbers without feeling a week. i would make a children's at least some level of panic? parliament. i would help the how do you respond to the fact that elderly, because they are our key to the past. i would have better health basically nothing is being done care, to find a cure for cancer, about this without feeling the slightest bit of anger? because many of my family members have suffered with cancer.m and how do you communicate this because many of my family members have suffered with cancer. if i was prime minister i would help homeless without sounding alarmist? people i would give them food, i would really like to know. water, shoes, clean clothes and a
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bed because you never know if you ms thunberg lambasted the politicians and negotiators are going to become homeless. here, saying they were more bed because you never know if you are going to become homelesslj concerned with finding loopholes would are going to become homeless.” would focus on knife crime, gun in the laws than fixing the problem. crime and gangs because these are dangerous. if i was prime minister i our leaders are not behaving would try and save the planet. and as if we were in an emergency. try to persuade people to use public in an emergency, you change your behaviour. so try to persuade people to use public so less pollution travels through if there is a child standing the air i would cut down plastic in the middle of the road and cars waste. all animals were cared for. are coming at full speed, you don‘t look away because it‘s too uncomfortable. ifi waste. all animals were cared for. if i was prime minister i would stop you immediately run out people from smoking.” and rescue that child. if i was prime minister i would stop while greta‘s impassioned people from smoking. i find it unfair not even has the same punts speech drew great applause from the audience here, —— opportunities, unfair not even has the same punts -- opportunities, ifi her problem was that she was unfair not even has the same punts -- opportunities, if i were prime ministerl speaking to the converted. -- opportunities, if i were prime minister i would make all after many of the key negotiators here school activity frees. there we are, at these talks simply stayed away. protesters in australia have vented their concern about the wildfires that the views of some 206 countries are sweeping the country school—children. let sousse what the and their government‘s lack weather is doing as matt has the latest forecast. of ambition and climate change. good afternoon, the weather is delegates at the cop, meanwhile,
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are bogged down in the arcane producing dramatic pictures today. details of the negotiations. at least for many of you, a few more it could be that, in greta‘s words, glimpses of sunshine, just off the the climate crisis will only be solved by citizens on the streets. coast in east sussex big shower matt mcgrath, bbc news, madrid. clouds, the rain falling from them there and moss of us will see showers through today. some more the president of the european commission, than others, we are almost in ursula von der leyen, has presented what she calls her between weather systems, this is the green deal plan to ensure eu cloud that brought yesterday‘s rain. countries are carbon it is heading in for tomorrow but in neutral by 2050. speaking in brussels, she said the plan was about cutting emissions, creating jobs and boosting innovation. between clouds, shower clouds, a mrs von der leyen said it was a significant moment zone of rain heading eastwards. but for the european community. the showers across the north and west of stott, turning wintry, giving it a covering of snow. this is not just this is notjust our vision for a temperatures, temperatures, around climate neutral content, it is a four five degrees as we finish the day, it will be a chilly evening road map for action. with 50 radical rush hour, showers spreading across steps on your‘s path towards 2050. the east continue through parts of it will take more than a generation scotland, northern ireland, giving a dusting of snow over the higher to reach that goal. we know that ground. cloud increase from the this road map will have to evolve and adapt through the years. it will south—west. lifting temperatures,
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bea but little be a cold and chilly and adapt through the years. it will be a very long and partly bumpy road night across much of scotland, without any question, but it is up england and eastern wales. to us to set the pace, it is up to temperatures close to freezing. so a us to us to set the pace, it is up to us to leave no one behind and we chilly start to election day. that it us to leave no one behind and we thatitis us to leave no one behind and we that it is doable, we are determined to succeed for the sake of this strong gusty winds to begin with, planet and life on it. going more south—westerly through the day. rain in wales, south—west england, maybe two for northern our correspondent gavin ireland and that will gradually work lee is in brussels. northwards and eastwards. turning to is this a new target being snow. 2—300 metres we could get a recommended by the new president of the european commission? well, she covering of snow. chilly here, some parts of eastern england and wa nted the european commission? well, she wanted within 100 the european commission? well, she wanted within100 days, she said, to northern scotland will get through make a difference, to make europe a the day dry but into the evening world leader and become the first consonant on the planet that was that rain hits eastern england. carbon neutral by 2050, that all of its technologies would be green and england. freak showers in the west. admired all over the world for how they keep going and into friday you do business. fossilfuels, she because low pressure is still said, that is old history and past its time, there is no need for it in dragging in, they will be strong, the future. so it is a real strong gusty, touching gale force through
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northern ireland, western england and bold commitment and she said it and wales and towards the south later on too. they could become is your‘s man on the moon moment. there were critics in the audience problematic. sunshine and showers for many of you on friday but the that asked whether it was the correct analogy given how much of a carbon foot print it would require far north more persistent rain. as dsm and on the moon. you will need we‘re far north more persistent rain. as we‘re go into the weekend after a funding, both public and private, to reach a 100 billion euros fund to wild and windy night, a few showers round. more in the way of... and a enable them, poland and hungary, rather cool feel in the of countries that are largely fossil temperatures, the wind will make it and coal —dependent to convert those feel chilly and that chilly feel industries to more green areas. this continues throughout the weekend, has irked a couple of countries, the sunniest conditions in the eastern germans and the danes, wondering if areas, showers frequent in the north, a blustery strong winds the they fund their green technologies further south you are. bye for now. although they didn‘t have theirs funded, but so far, they have over big ideas. the carbon tax, for example, like if somebody wanted to make their headquarters in china but trade in europe, they will be a carbon tax to stop that happening. quite a bold vision involved in
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doing that. 211 countries are already on board, hungary, czech republic, poland already single quite relu cta nt. poland already single quite reluctant. the only part that needs ratifying is the money side of things. that could be a problem as we get into next year. and the eu, like lots of nations, under pressure from environment campaigners like greta thunburg, and she hasjust been named time magazine‘s person of the year and you interviewed her a few days ago, didn‘t you? what did you make of her? i mention this to her ina you make of her? i mention this to her in a conference that she was likely and was certainly the favourite for her influence. i said that to her and asked how she thought she had influenced people in the last year, what have you achieved? she said that she felt she really has got a groundswell of movement with 7.5 million people on monday for the friday‘s future climate process. she said she believes it has helped change some opinions on the ground but felt it
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was worthless that when politically, leaders were doing very little and thatis leaders were doing very little and that is particularly in the climate in madrid and there was a report hello, you‘re watching that there don‘t has been anything afternoon live — i‘m ben brown. today at 3pm. tangible so far. and you wonder if party leaders target marginal seats with their core campaign messages this fits the bill because it was as they try to win over undecided voters ahead of tomorrow‘s general election. spoken about european countries the nobel peace prize winner reducing their greenhouse gas aung san suu kyi defends her country myanmar against charges of genocide emissions by 2030 and greta thunburg at the hague. talks about 70% being a realistic greta thunberg becomes the youngest time person of the year. and better target. —— mike being a today she called on rich countries to cut their carbon emissions and help poorer better target. but the phenomenon of countries do the same. how do you respond to the fact that greater than back to go anywhere, basically nothing is being done she was the person that everybody about this without feeling wa nted she was the person that everybody wanted to see at the summit. she had to be escorted everywhere by police. the slightest bit of anger? she was simply mob, not simply by the crowd but byjournalists as the post office pays more than £57 million to settle well. a case brought by hundreds of subpostmasters and new zealand‘s geological agency has warned that more volcanic activity postmistresses, wrongly accused is expected on white island
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in the next 211 hours, of mismanaging funds. following the eruption on monday in which six people are known to have died. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. another nine are unaccounted for, coming up on the sport, tottenham and manchester city may and more than 20 people have already qualified for the last are still in hospital 16 of the champions league, but they both have being treated for burns. tricky away games tonight as they our correspondent shaimaa khalil look to end the group has sent this update. stages with a win. there has been increased volcano activity on white island today. thanks, and all the you could see thicker plumes weather coming up too. of smoke in the area just above the volcano, we weather coming up too. have had a bit of sunshine and it‘s been growing between we have had a bit of sunshine between these downpours, tomorrow is in intensity throughout the day. greyer and wetter for longer and they will be some snow forcing some we also heard from volcanologists as well. —— for some as well. that there is a higher risk of an eruption within the next 211 hours. new zealand‘s chief of civil defence has also spoken about the implications of those also coming up: would you eat a chocolate bar conditions on the recovery mission. if you knew you had to run for 22 minutes to burn it off? every day that passes with those researchers suggest a new way of labelling food could help bodies unrecovered is a day people lose weight. of anguish for their loved ones who have been affected. there is always a delicate balancing act when it comes to recovery operations where risk to human life hello, everyone, this exists, and right now the science is afternoon live.
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tells us that this is just too high. it‘s the last day of campaigning in the general election — with all the parties trying to win we also heard from a senior doctor over those crucial floating voters. who said that the burns that the prime minister borisjohnson has are currently being treated been targeting seats in hospitals across the country have been complicated by the fact that in northern england and wales, victims were exposed to chemicals while the labour leaderjeremy and gases after the eruption. corbyn started his day in scotland before moving we currently have supply, to the north of england. but are urgently sourcing additional jo swinson, leader of supplies to meet the demand the liberal democrats, for dressing and is focusing on constituencies temporary skin grafts. in south—east england, and the snp leader nicola sturgeon has been we anticipate we will require meeting voters across scotland. our political correspondent an additional 1.2 million square centimetres of skin for the ongoing needs of the patients. these supplies are coming chris mason has the latest. from the united states, and the order has been placed. we also know that an australian dawn hadn‘t even thought of breaking citizen is now being transferred back to sydney for treatment this morning and party and that families of victims have leaders were out and about. started arriving in new zealand. boris johnson for the conservatives pretending to be a milkman in west yorkshire, but with a political message as well as a pint but really, at this point, all eyes are on that island of semi—skimmed to flog. and the possibility of a recovery we could, tomorrow, be mission that‘s become too complicated and going into another hung parliament. that is more drift, possibly too dangerous. more dither, more delay, more paralysis for this country, saying nothing of the economically
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disastrous policies of corbyn and mcdonnell. time for a look at the weather now. we have got to move forward, we have a fantastic agenda for this country, we can get brexit done. are we dreaming of a white in govan in glasgow, christmas? a little bit of snow there. labour‘sjeremy corbyn was also up before the sun and saying... tomorrow, the people little red riding hood, that is the all across the uk will go to vote and they have a choice. one, not robin. shall we start this they can elect a government ain? that they can trust, one, not robin. shall we start this again? a little bit of escapism, we they can elect a government that need that at the moment. snow has will eliminate child poverty, been falling today. it is far too will end the cruelty early to say at the moment if this and the injustice will be here at christmas but we have seen some snowfall today across of universal credit. the hills of part of an opening end, today is all about the leaders scotla nd the hills of part of an opening end, clocking up the masochistic miles scotland and northern ireland. out on the campaign trail to prove glorious scenes like this. we will they have got to be vim, keep you updated if we are going to the vigour, the vitality, the verve to govern on friday. wa ke keep you updated if we are going to wake up to scenes of this again over even though, bluntly, they‘re exhausted, after weeks of campaigning. christmas. shot from a few weeks loads of videos going out of them ago, you can see a fine limit to on the stump across the country. i have visited nurseries! where the snow is there. that line
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is usually where the temperatures is i have very much enjoyed toasting marshmallows with four—year—olds! the liberal democrat leader roughly around freezing. the higher jo swinson has been reflecting on her campaign on her visit you go, the colder it gets. you get to esher in surrey. a little bit of sleet and snow below her last—minute message that and rain at lower levels and goes like this. that and rain at lower levels and thatis that and rain at lower levels and that is what we will see tomorrow. to people who are at home watching, so the hills will see snow, but for if you have a growing pile others it will be a day of of liberal democrat leaflets persistent rain i‘m afraid. what is on your kitchen table, be in no the forecast generally? it is a doubt that the liberal democrats can win in your seat. little bit of sunshine between the it will be a vote to stop brexit downpours today. showing up quite nicely with the shot from the south and to stop borisjohnson and that coast, one of the shower clouds man must be stopped. there any distance. some of these the election is up in the air showers are heavy and we are almost and so is this butternut squash. in between weather systems today. this cloud brings rain today and enter volunteer greengrocer and scottish national party leader nicola sturgeon in edinburgh. tomorrow and this larger lump is a tory victory can be what is bringing some heavy showers stopped and in scotland across england and wales at the that means voting snp. moment. from west to east, still lots around the coast and we have the snp is the main challenger showers across northern ireland and to the tories and voting for other parties risks helping the tories. scotla nd showers across northern ireland and scotland with sleet and snow. that so if people don't want to have more continues through into the evening cuts to public services,
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rush—hour. it will be a pretty to be dragged out of europe against our will and have boris chilly one as well. temperatures johnson as prime minister, vote snp. around four to six celsius and we don‘t have any pictures showers pushed through here during of the welsh nationalists plaid the first part of the evening cymru campaign today, rush—hour. eventually clearing of an but here they are campaigning but here showers continue into scotland and they are campaigning earlier. they were clear across tonight. the brexit party leader nigel farage after initial dip in temperature has been in doncaster and the green party says those temperatures will rise but it is raising the alarm those temperatures will rise but on the climate emergency. those blue colours on the chart are in just a few hours, the deafening clamour of campaigning will be over. an indication of widespread frost the serenity and solitude of the polling booth will beckon. the country will decide who lives and that continues into tomorrow here for up to the next five years in election that will bring morning. the weather fronts start to push their way into my morning and that area of cloud is set to bring about a change, whoever wins. more persistent rain in the morning across northern ireland and wales and parts of northwestern. some snow let‘s speak to our political in northern scotland and northern correspondent alex forsyth, who‘s in south wales ireland too, could cause a covering around 300 metres free time and then with the conservative party. lifting later on. during the eastern borisjohnson in areas in the afternoon it starts to boris johnson in particular, borisjohnson in particular, you have clocked up a fair few miles on get wet weather pushing on. i chilly across the country with rain and that bus, alex. yes, it was always
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sleet and snow in north of england and scotland. heading to the, the way in the latter stages of an election campaign and particularly eastern areas of the heaviest of the in the last 24—hour is, you tend to rain and then turning more showery see the leaders clocking up as many in the west later on. persistent miles as they can in front of the rumours out of the way then as we camera shaking hands, photo head into friday. low still close by opportunities galore. each one of them trying to hammer home the key and we have a run of strong winds message and for the conservative thatis coming in from the north—west and it message and for the conservative that is of course, as it has been isa from the very beginning of this coming in from the north—west and it is a pretty windy day on friday, campaign, that is the prime particularly northern ireland, wales minister‘s of on brexit and the and northern parts of, may be severe gales later on into the south—west. promise that if he has returned to more persistent rain in the very far parliament he will get it done. we north of the highlands into orkney will see if he will get the and then later into shetland again. opportunity to use see if he can. temperatures roughly levels we will see tomorrow. on the weekend, another windy day and some parts of the uk with probably the strongest winds. showers mainly across the that is why we saw borisjohnson up northern areas, what more anyway and about before dawn this morning sunshine and dry weather further delivering a pint of milk and then south you are on saturday. that dashing down to derbyshire to pose with a pie and that is why we have rough story continues into sunday after another spell of wet and windy just heard in south wales he has made a visit to a factory. but weather overnight and many places will see sunny spells, showers in despite all those traditional the north, blustery winds further
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slogans and photo opportunities, south too. that is his houses behind it i think there is a real sense of tension in the camp. this looking. another whether looking is an election where it is all still update —— another whether update a 00:33:09,676 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 little bit later on. to play for. the outcome is far from decided at this point. but quite frankly, no—brainers what is going to happen tomorrow. and for the conservatives, who have put brexit right at the front and centre of this campaign from the very start, the challenge for them is this. in order to deliver, they have to convince people to ditch their traditional party loyalties and come over to them. that is on the basis of brexit above and beyond anything else. whether or not that pays off, well, that is only to be found out when people go to the polls tomorrow. iain watson has been following thejeremy corbyn during the campaign. he says the labour leader is keen to highlight the major differences between his policies and those of the conservatives. he is travelling 500 miles across the country today,
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starting in glasgow and will finish with a big rally in his constituency in london this evening. what he has tried to do is set out really thick red lines, policy red lines between him and boris johnson. so he will be talking about abolishing tuition fees, getting rid of the injustice, as he sees it, of universal credit. but he has another big task in this part of north—east of england, this area voted solidly to leave the european union, 65% voted to leave. the party chairman ian lavery, who was on that stage a few minutes ago, he said this election isn‘t about brexit. he wanted to talk about other issues too. jeremy corbyn‘s task, because some labour insiders are telling me that they expect a net loss of seats on thursday as things stand, his task is to make sure that people who usually vote for him and his party, but voted leave in 2016, tomorrow, will finally stay loyal to labour. our chief political correspondent vicki young is in westminster.
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vicki, last a is it a little bit more frantic than all the other days just because they‘re trying to cram in as many miles as possible today? yes, i think it is. i think it is also the point in the campaign where eve ryo ne also the point in the campaign where everyone is incredible nervous. if you to speak to any candidate, they will all think they are going to lose at this point. one said to me that if he walks along the street and sees another party‘s poster, they think a search from a party he hasn‘t detected. of course, incredible nervousness. in the conservative that is partly because they have had this consistent poll lead, but nevertheless, they know there are so many seats where it is incredibly close. actually, it is very difficult tojudge. incredibly close. actually, it is very difficult to judge. just a few thousand votes in these places can make all of the difference between quite a substantial majority for the conservatives are back to where we we re conservatives are back to where we were ina conservatives are back to where we were in a hung parliament. privately, labour would admit that winning outright is quite difficult, almost an impossible task at this point. they would have to be a long
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way ahead in the polls to make up the ground from last time around. their best hope really is to perform well, keep the seats they got last time, may be a few extra, and then of course, try and do a deal with the other parties. really going to come down to whether people think this is a election about election about brexit, about getting brexit done as borisjohnson keeps telling everybody, whether it is about something else. whether it is about the end to austerity, ambitious spending plans that labour have and whether really, the voters think that either of those ardent are credible. just looking back on the campaign asa credible. just looking back on the campaign as a whole, you have covered a fair few elections on your time, vicky, what are your thoughts? i think it is interesting is that it is of course, about people choosing their next prime minister. that is obvious. but it is also a campaign where the two main parties, really we have only seen their leaders. that is interesting given that neither of them are particularly popular according to the polls. jeremy corbyn has a big problem and
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is one of the most popular leaders of the opposition there have been. there are also people who have massive reservations like boris johnson. it is coming up on the doorstep according to people who have been out there knocking on doors. i‘ve been to as well. it is d eftly a n doors. i‘ve been to as well. it is deftly an issue. in the end, i think it is going come down to which side are more willing to hold their nose and vote for a leader that they might not actually be desperately keen on. that has made this campaign quite unusual. normally, there is some popularity around, i think the other thing that is most significant that happened at the beginning was nigel farage‘s brexit deciding not to stand in as conservative held seats. that meant for the conservatives that they could focus elsewhere because they knew that without that vote being taken from them they could divert their resources . them they could divert their resources. that has been a problem for the liberal democrats. they have had a very difficult time, what they say is that where their message
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matters, in the remaining areas of the country, they are sometimes controversial as a message, has proved popular. with almost quite soon. “— proved popular. with almost quite soon. —— we proved popular. with almost quite soon. —— we will all know quite soon. and of course, it‘s polling day is tomorrow, but if you still haven‘t made up your mind, check out our ‘how should i vote?‘ guide to the election to see what the parties are promising — that‘s on our website — bbc.co.uk/news or on the bbc news app. aung san suu kyi, the leader of myanmar, has denied accusations of genocide, at the united nations‘ top court. a military crackdown in myanmar in 2017 resulted in thousands of rohingya muslims being killed and more than 700,000 people fleeing to neighbouring bangladesh. aung san suu kyi blamed the violence and mass displacement on militants seeking independence, though she added it could not be
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ruled out that her country‘s defence forces used disproportionate force. anna holligan reports from the hague. waiting in anticipation for a glimpse of the woman they call mother suu. myanmar is shrouded with fake news and many other, er, unfair charges, so this is our chance to prove to the world that it is early —— to give a true picture of what is really happening in myanmar. the world was watching as, for the first time, aung san suu kyi responded to the allegations that myanmar has been trying to exterminate the rohingya population. a woman once considered a global human rights icon told thejudges she understood the definition of genocide, but went on to characterise the situation in myanmar as something else —
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an internal armed conflict which began when rohingya militants killed nine police officers. regrettably, the gambia has placed before the court an incomplete and misleading factual picture of the situation in rakhine state in myanmar. yet it is of the utmost importance that the court assesses the situation pertaining on the ground in rakhine dispassionately and accurately. she claims the clearance operation carried out by myanmar‘s army, which left an estimated 10,000 rohingya dead, was a legitimate response to a terrorist threat, though she did concede individual soldiers may have made mistakes. by members of the defence services, in some cases, in disregard of international humanitarian law, or that they did not distinguish clearly enough between fighters and civilians.
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aung san suu kyi made no reference to the harrowing witness testimony from rohingya survivors, some read out in court yesterday, who spoke of military firing squads, gang rapes and babies thrown into burning buildings. these rohingya fear their families are being erased from rakhine state. they are urging the judges to agree to the gambia‘s request for emergency measures to protect the 600,000 rohingya who remain in myanmar. the woman who many once regarded as their brightest hope stood in court and urged thejudges not to intervene and risk aggravating what aung san suu kyi described as a complex conflict. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines party leaders target marginal seats across the country
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with their core campaign messages, as they try to win over undecided voters ahead of tomorrow‘s general election. the nobel peace prize winner aung san suu kyi defends her country myanmar against charges of genocide at the hague. greta thunberg becomes the youngest time person of the year. today she called on rich countries to cut their carbon emissions and help poorer countries do the same. coming countries do the same. up in sport, josey moreno ta kes coming up in sport, josey moreno ta kes tottenha m to coming up in sport, josey moreno takes tottenham to munich for their final game against the germans looking to avenge their 7—2 defeat in the reverse game. manchester city hope to bounce from their derby day defeat as they go away as well. and test cricket has returned to pakistan as the hosts take ten
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wickets. the environmental campaigner greta thunberg has been named time magazine‘s person of the year. today she accused governments and corporations of failing to tackle climate change and hiding behind clever accounting and creative pr. addressing the un climate summit in madrid, she criticised what she said were constant attempts to find loopholes to avoid emission targets. our environment correspondent matt mcgrath reports from the summit. just a year ago, she was a little—known swedish climate striker with a home—made sign. but she arrived in madrid for cop25 as the world‘s most famous climate activist. greta thunberg came to this key climate conference not to generate soundbites, she said, but to reiterate that the science was clear — this was an emergency and the world was not treating it like one. so, please tell me, how do you react
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to these numbers without feeling at least some level of panic? how do you respond to the fact that basically nothing is being done about this without feeling the slightest bit of anger? and how do you communicate this without sounding alarmist? i would really like to know. ms thunberg lambasted the politicians and negotiators here, saying they were more concerned with finding loopholes in the laws than fixing the problem. our leaders are not behaving as if we were in an emergency. in an emergency, you change your behaviour. if there is a child standing in the middle of the road and cars are coming at full speed, you don‘t look away because it‘s too uncomfortable. you immediately run out and rescue that child. while greta‘s impassioned speech drew great applause
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from the audience here, her problem was that she was speaking to the converted. many of the key negotiators here at these talks simply stayed away. protesters in australia have vented their concern about the wildfires that are sweeping the country and their government‘s lack of ambition on climate change. delegates at the cop, meanwhile, are bogged down in the arcane details of the negotiations. it could be that, in greta‘s words, the climate crisis will only be solved by citizens on the streets. matt mcgrath, bbc news, madrid. the president of the european commission, ursula von der leyen, has presented what she calls her green deal plan to ensure eu countries are carbon neutral by 2050. speaking in brussels, she said the plan was about cutting emissions, creating jobs and boosting innovation. mrs von der leyen said it was a significant moment for the european community.
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this is notjust our vision for a climate—neutral content, it is a road map for action with 50 practical steps on europe‘s path towards 2050. it will take more than a generation to reach that goal. we know that this road map will have to evolve and adapt through the years. it will be a very long and partly bumpy road without any question, but it is up to us to set the pace, it is up to us to leave no one behind and we know that it is doable. we are determined to succeed for the sake of this planet and life on it. our brussels correspondent gavin lee says the new president of the european commission ursula von der leyen‘s goals are not new.
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she wanted within100 days she said to make a difference, to make europe a world leader and become the first continent on the planet that was carbon neutral by 2050, that all of its technologies would be green, it would be admired all over the world for how you do business. and fossil fuels, she said, that is old history, past its time, there is no need for it in the future. so it is a real, it is a real strong bold commitment. it is your‘s man on the moon moment. there were critics in the audience who wondered if that was the best analogy, given the carbon footprint and getting a man to the moon. it involved some big issues, funding for example, public and private, to reach 100 billion euros funds for regions, countries, governments as well, to enable them, poland and hungary for example, countries largely fossil and coal —dependent for example, to convert those countries to green areas. this
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irks a couple of countries. the danes and germans wonder if they are going to fund their green technologies is nobly funded their green technologies as they were a step ahead. —— nobody funded their green technologies. companies who operate in trade in europe but are based in china, they will be a carbon tax to stop that happening. 24 countries are already on board. hungary, czech republic and poland already saying they are pretty relu cta nt already saying they are pretty reluctant with this. the anything that needs ratifying, ben, is the money side of things. that could be a problem as we get into next year. and the eu, like lots of nations, under pressure from environment campaigners like greta thunburg. greta thunburg has just been named time magazine‘s person of the year. you interviewed her a few days ago, didn‘t you? you interviewed her a few days ago, didn‘t you ? what you interviewed her a few days ago, didn‘t you? what did you make of her? i mention this to her and she was a favourite by a long way to
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come that it might become the person of the year. she i asked her how she think she has influenced people and influenced the world in the last year. she said that there were 7.5 million people alone on friday for the future climate process and she said she believes it has helped some opinions change on the ground. but felt it was worthless when politically, leaders were doing very little, particularly at the climate change summit in madrid, there was a lot of talk, but they don‘t think they will be anything tangible coming out so far. and even on this, you wonder whether this fits the bill when greta thinks about and talks about eu leaders, because within this plan, european countries reducing in house gas emissions by 50% by 2030. greta thunburg and other climate activists talk about 70% being a better target for that. that is sometimes why she would say politicians are being too creative to appear to be green but briefly,
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one of a side on this, the phenomena of greta thunburg. to go anywhere, she was the person that everybody wa nted she was the person that everybody wanted to see at the summit. she had to be escorted everywhere by police. she was marked by both the crowd and journalists as well. —— she was marked by both the crowd and journalists. the post office has agreed to pay more than £57 million to settle a dispute with former subpostmasters and postmistresses, who were wrongly accused of fraud and false accounting. it brings to an end a series of court cases about a computer system, which was used to manage local post office finances. our personal finance correspondent simon gompertz explains the background to the case. it all goes back to the beginning of the century, the year 2000 when a new system called horizon was brought in to manage the finances of the local post offices and shortfalls began to appear in their money day after day. now, the people involved said it was as a result of glitches in horizon, the new system, the post office said
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it was their fault. people lost their contracts, they were accused of fraud, false accounting, of theft, they say their lives were ruined. and so we have this case, four mammoth trials, the post office lost the first one and then they sought mediation. and the result of it is this settlement of £58 million and the post office saying that they know wrong things happened. the question, i suppose, is how much those individual postmasters and post—mistresses are going to get. and money has to be taking off the total for the legal fees for a firm which backs litigation, which gets its share. but you can still see individuals getting tens of thousands, and perhaps more where they were worse affected. here are some of the nominations for
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the screen actors guild awards. jared harris and emily watson nominated for their performances into noble. that amazing miniseries. phoebe waller bridge nominated for best actress in flea bag and her male co—star. also, for the crown, olivia colman and helena bonham carter as the queen and princess margaret, nominated for best actress ina drama.jodie margaret, nominated for best actress in a drama. jodie comber nominated in the same category for killing eve. they are just some of the nominations for the screen actor guild‘s awards. just coming in. we will bring you more as we get into them. time for a look at the weather...
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weather presenter of the year. i think you have it wrapped up. this is the view just think you have it wrapped up. this is the viewjust a short while ago in the highlands. a bit of a wintry day in the hills of some in the uk. but yesterday you were chatting about a major storm heading to iceland, they have had a good deal worse. just take a look at some of this footage that has been coming in. it has been fairly bleak, not just for the farmers, but for all there. some very potent low pressure there. some very potent low pressure there. the first red weather warning put in place there yesterday. winds on hills touch 120 miles an hour and 90 miles an hour on some of the roads. the capital of iceland, 76 miles an hour gusts reported. 200 centimetres of snow possible in a few spots but with winds blowing, that strength is going to be pretty difficult to work outjust how much
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snow has fallen. still being pummelled at the moment. the picture across the north atlantic, ben. the wraparound of cloud there. that is where the low pressure has been bringing the stormy conditions. that is going towards the faroe islands at the moment. oakley and shetlands have seen some low gales today. it is bringing gusty winds and showers to northern parts of the country in the uk. not the persistence know that iceland has, but the same low pressure system has been using some wild conditions and wild seas in auckland and shetland. we are almost between weather systems, the cloud across western europe, that was yesterday‘s rain and the cloud here behind me at the moment will bring tomorrow‘s weather. a story of sunshine and showers through today. one of the shower clouds drifting across the cumbrian fells short while ago. you can see the cloud and
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the rain started pushing, that produced snow and some hail as well. at least most of us have seen some sunshine between the downpours today. just to show you where they are, as we head towards the evening rush—hour, some pushing eastwards towards england and wales, very wintering in scotland and northern ireland, snow in the high ground. very windy conditions in the far north as well. as the evening rush—hour, it is then thing and that is likely to see them. if you are dry today, you will be lucky before the day is completely out and a cold rush—hour, cold at four to seven celsius. turning cold quite quickly and temperature is looking in overtown, west wales, devon and cornwall after an initial date. at elsewhere, the blue colour on the chart indicates widespread frost across england, scotland, and wales with icy conditions into tomorrow morning. the big picture tomorrow morning, election day, outbreaks of
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rain becoming heavy and persistent through the morning, part of northern ireland, wales, south and southern parts of england. we see that push its way northwards into the cold air turning to snow on the hills of northern england, southern and central scotland. some eastern areas of scotland and another scotla nd areas of scotland and another scotland will stay dry through much of thursday daylight hours, but it will feel rather chilly in the breeze. calls for scotland and north—east england, barely big above three degrees in the afternoon. but the rest of the rain and lots of showers packing in the west into thursday. that low pressure system is though close by on friday bringing in some strong winds across the north west. we can see gales in places and sunshine in shower days for some, staying pretty wet across parts of orkney and shetland and the northern highlands. temperatures tempered by the strength of the wind. going into the weekend, after
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a pretty wild night across open areas, it looks like a bright day for saturday across many parts of and wales, only one or two showers, but strong gale force winds continue. she was more frequent in opening and, scotland and northern ireland through the weekend and more rain will spread its way across the weekend with snow i have a higher ground on saturday. —— snow over higher ground on saturday. easing down compared to what we will see on saturday. keep up—to—date on our website and we will have more in half an hour.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. party leaders target marginal seats across the country with their core campaign messages — as they try to win over undecided voters ahead of tomorrow‘s general election. the nobel peace prize winner aung san suu kyi defends her country myanmar against charges of genocide at the hague. greta thunberg becomes the youngest time person of the year — today she called on rich countries to cut their carbon emissions and help poorer countries do the same. how do you respond to the fact that basically nothing is being done about this, without feeling the slightest bit of anger? the post office pays more than £57 million to settle
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a case brought by hundreds of subpostmasters and postmistresses, wrongly accused of mismanaging funds. recovery efforts on new zealand‘s white island are on hold as increased seismic activity activity suggests the volcano may erupt again. sport now on afternoon live with chetan pathak — it‘s been a good week so far for the english clubs in the champions league — and tonight spurs will be looking to avenge that heavy defeat to bayern munich earlier in the competition. aramco. liverpool are through as is chelsea. they had work to do. unlike totte n ha m they had work to do. unlike tottenham who are into the knock out stage but they will be looking to avenge their heavy defeat earlier it was the first time spurs had conceded seven goals in the entire
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history of the club. butjose mourinho of course is the new man in charge, beaten by manchester united yes but other than that they‘ve won all their other matches. he was asked ahead of the game if he‘s been watching clips of the 7—2 defeat with his players — this was his answer: i forbid any image about it. i watch it. i watch it a couple of times me and my staff and try to go through every detail of that match but not one single image for the boys, no, not at all. we are going to focus more on us than on bayern. manchester city play dinamo zagreb — they are already through as group winners. cricket. a bit of history in rawalpindi with test cricket back 36 first time since 2008 when the sri lanka team bus was attacked and six policemen and two civilians lost their lives.
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since then there‘ve been matches pakistan have hosted abroad but nothing replicates playing on home soil. pakistani cricket fans have been desperate to watch their team compete there — and now they can. there‘ve been reservations, years of questions overs security and many teams not feeling safe to go there but there‘s a strong relationship between both cricket boards and today was day one of the first test in rawalpindi. sri lanka won the toss chose to bat, a day of fluctuating fortunes which ended with the sri lankans 202 for five at stumps. this the fifth wicket to go, angelo matthews bowled by naseem shah on 31. he took two wickets. dimuth karunaratne top scorer so far with 59. lord‘s and hove cricket grounds are set to host the final days of next year‘s inaugural season of the hundred competition. the women‘s final will take place at hove on august 14th, with the men‘s final at lord‘s the following day. the bbc will have live television coverage of matches, including both finals. the former south african captain
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graeme smith has agreed to become cricket south africa‘s director of cricket butjust in an acting capacity. he‘s agreed to do the job for three—months until the start of the next season of the indian premier league, which is expected to begin in march. the announcement comes just 15 days before the first of four tests against england which start in centurion on boxing day. tributes have been paid to the former manager jim smith who died yesterday at the age of 79. smith was manager at various clubs including derby county and oxford united. he also worked with harry redknapp at portsmouth of course, who described him as probably his best ever signing. anyone who came into contact with him loved him. he was a great character, a great football man. he had great knowledge, great knowledge of the game and he knew the play, he knew players, and he was a great character, fun to to be with, always made you laugh.
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and he could have a go at the players, he would blow up, go off his rocker, and his head would be red, and he would be shouting and screaming, and ten minutes later he would be having a cuddle and a laugh with them. everybody loved him. the players would accept whatever he said, the rucks and ups and downs, but everybody loved being aroundjim. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. back to the election now — and our digital team have been looking at how social media platforms are being used during this campaign. back in 2017, labour supporters swamped sites like facebook and twitter — so is that any different this time? bbc trending‘s marianna spring is with us and has been looking at this. what strikes you as different about this election then? so, we have been
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trawling through facebook group, twitter, instagram and different platforms and looking at what is going on. there are big themes that keep coming up. the first is like you said in the introduction, labour backin you said in the introduction, labour back in 2017 had really successful network of pro corbyn pages, and obviously their official party content obviously their official party co nte nt has obviously their official party content has continued to do really well, but this is the kind of stuff thatis well, but this is the kind of stuff that is run by official parties, and this time round for two reasons, it hasn‘t managed to be as influential as back in 2017 firstly because facebook‘s algorithms have changed, and prioritised family and friends over posts from pages like these, but secondly you have actually two new echo system, pro brexit pages and anti—brexit payments and groups, wes these you have content being created and they don‘t necessarily match up with a party in the same way that the pro labour ones do, you
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have this on a pro—remain page, sharing a people that is encouraging people to vote tactically to get rid of borisjohnson people to vote tactically to get rid of boris johnson and people to vote tactically to get rid of borisjohnson and you have similar things on pro brexit pages where you have a user has created this to give their verdict on one of the general election debates and these groups are interesting because it is how they have shifted, they could change what we see happening tomorrow, particularly the pro—brexit groups which after nigel farage decide his brexit party would stand down in conservative seat, we have seen they are united in who they are going to vote for, the conservatives, while the pro—remain group still talk about tactical voting but are yet to decide who they are going to back. you have that side of things, you have the missing voters on social media we have noticed, so that is, we have frequently heard from admins of groups and pages older conservative voters are shyer about posting on o line or don‘t use it at all. it is
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not just those voters who aren‘t shouting, you have younger voters who don‘t use facebook as much as they did in 2017. facebook‘s audience has got older and they are using instagram. we have seen screen shots of tweets, one that appeared on an influencers instagram story, a jeremy corbyn treat. she has a million follower, he is a fitness blogger and people like lily allen have posted things similar to this, and we can‘t measure the metric, it is difficult to tell how many people have seen them. so it is difficult to work out how that younger audience who have been using instagram and the older audience could be influenced. the other thing is scrolling new, so our habits have changed, and we now alljust use our phones all the time, which means that there are only two types of content that will really cut through this election, you either have to make this election, you either have to ma ke stuff this election, you either have to make stuff that is quirky and weird or you have to do really simple
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content, like these screen shots of tweet, we have more examples of tweets byjeremy corbyn and boris johnson that have done well on social media, not necessarily on twitter but they have been posted on facebook and instagram. i am sure eve ryo ne facebook and instagram. i am sure everyone has seen facebook and instagram. i am sure everyone has seen the videos that have gone viral too. funny videos made by the party leaders that are bizarre or broadcast clips of a politician being grilled that have done well. the final thing is there is no digital election that, the digital election feeds into what is happening on the ground, and what is going on online and off line, they are almost indistinguishable. you can‘t differentiate between them. we have noticed that on facebook groups or dodgy bar chats, people will talk about them in real life. it is impossible a talk about the digital election as something separate. generally, the parties are devoting more resources than ever before to social media, and they are having to bya social media, and they are having to
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by a don‘table as you said, some of the people on facebook are older so they need to get on to instagram to target the younger voters. exactly. i think the important thing is there are two different types of content. you have the stuff the parties themselves are pumping out and creating and they are trying to hard to make things that are bizarre or simple. but you have all of this content, all of the memes and links and groups they are being run by people who are sitting in their living rooms and are not affiliated with parties. people who are interested in politics. yes, they arejust as interested in politics. yes, they are just as important this election as the spin—doctors the and people who are siding with digital strategy. it is good for democracy, yes? er, perhaps in some ways and people teal more. powered to be involved but on the other hand these spaces are not very well regulated, they can spread misinformation, in they can spread misinformation, in the groups we have seen stories catch on and spread that are not
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true, like the one to do with the little boy in the hospital in leeds and whether that was true or not. so, these are spaces that, yeah, aren‘t necessarily having to adhere to the same standard that maybe perhaps party content does. thank you for that insight into thank you for that insight into the digital election. now, would you think again about eating a chocolate bar or packet of crisps if the packaging told you how many minutes of exercise it would take to burn it off? researchers at loughborough university are suggesting that putting that sort of information on labels could help us all make healthier food choices. dominic hughes has the details. food already carries information about calories, fat, sugar and salt content, but researchers say the current system is poorly understood and it‘s not having an impact on rising levels of obesity. so what about labelling that tells you the amount and type of exercise you‘d need to do to burn off
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all those calories? we know that the public consistently underestimate the amount of calories — so, if you ask the public how many calories are in this food, they often underestimate how many are in it — so we would like to see physical activity carry equivalent labelling, because actually it gives a meaning and context to the amount of exercise or physical activity required to burn that food. as a rough guide to the link between exercise and food, let‘s put together a lunchtime meal deal — a chicken and bacon sandwich, roughly 445 calories, would require 42 minutes of slow running. a chocolate bar, 229 calories, would need 22 minutes of running. wash that down with a medium mocha coffee — that‘s 290 calories and 28 minutes of running. all up, that‘s more than an hour and a half of running. researchers say such a labelling system could save nearly 200 calories per person per day, but would it really change our behaviour? i think you‘d frighten a lot of people. you‘d go, urgh!
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i think people would be... i think a lot of people would be interested and more inclined to exercise and know what they've got to do to work it off. it's really important with the issue of obesity and stuff right now that people know what they are putting into their bodies and how much they need to do to counteract that, but i also think that, with diet culture and all that sort of thing and eating disorders and stuff, it could cause a lot of mental difficulty as well. there is a disconnect between what you are eating and kind of what exercise you would expect to burn it off, so i think putting a quantifiable number on it would make that connect easier so people understand it more, myself included. nutritionists point out that we burn calories all the time, even without exercising, and that food is a vital source of nutrition as well as energy. but even small reductions in the calories we consume can make a big impact across the whole population. experts say this is a simple, cheap measure that could make a real difference to the obesity crisis.
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in a moment alice baxter is going to bring us the latest business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live. party leaders target marginal seats across the country with their core campaign messages — as they try to win over undecided voters ahead of tomorrow‘s general election. the nobel peace prize winner aung san suu kyi defends her country myanmar against charges of genocide at the hague. greta thunberg becomes the youngest time person of the year — today she called on rich countries to cut their carbon emissions and help poorer countries do the same. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. the post office is to pay almost £58 million to settle a long—running dispute with sub—postmasters and postmistresses. it brings an end to a mammoth series of court cases over the it system
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used to manage local post office finances since 1999. the world‘s biggest share listing got under way in riyadh, with saudi aramco‘s stock rising 10% above the initial public offering price. the state oil company, which produces more than a tenth of global crude supply, will be raising a record 26.6 billion dollars. an all—electric powered seaplane has taken flight in vancouver, canada, in what the operators describe as a "world first" for the aviation industry, and a step towards the "first all—electric commercial fleet". the short test flight by harbour air and magnix involved a six—passenger aircraft fitted with an electric motor. an all—electric powered seaplane has taken flight in vancouver, canada, in what the operators describe as a "world first" for the aviation industry, and a step towards the "first all—electric commercial fleet". the short test flight by harbour air and magnix involved a six—passenger aircraft fitted with an electric motor. so saudi aramco has made its stock market debut in riyadh. the state oil company, which produces more than a tenth of global crude supply, will be raising a record
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26.6 billion dollars. it produces a tenth of global crude production so this has been a massive. this is big. really big, it is all part of the saudi arabia kingdom‘s attempts to move away from their reliance on oil, so they are brive tieing assets but this is the real jewel brive tieing assets but this is the realjewel in the crown, there has been a government push to try to up the massive valuation, to some $2 trillion. when it launched the company had a valuation of $1.7 trillion, these markets are difficult to fathom, and it quickly surged to o some 1.8 trillion in early trading, sameer hashmi was watching aramco‘s stock market debut in riyadh. was watching aramco‘s stock so much happened in the first hour of trading, it shows there is huge appetite and demand for the stock,
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and has been driven by locals saw the investors affluent and retail investors then you have friendly allies here in the gulf. countries like the united arab emirates and kuwait. they have pumped in money which have given a cushion to this ipo. it's a which have given a cushion to this ipo. it‘s a crucial ipo for saudi arabia, notjust saudi aramco, the country plans to use this money to fund their ambitious plan of diversifying the economy by investing in products but also take away the saudi economy from oil, and the whole project is being driven by crown prince moment and results are out today, from global tourism group, tui.
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ruts no not great today. prophets had fallen 24.5%, revenue has grown but its missed expectation, the company is citing brexit uncertainty, that is put people off booking holiday, currency fluctuation but also a big factor has been the grounds, globally of the 737 max and fewy owns a large fleet of them and they have been grounded following the global ban. let us get more on this on the results are. dig a bit deeper under the numbers. bethel loh is a markets analyst for thinkmarkets. good to talk to you, to what degree are these disappointing results for tui down to the grounding of the boeing 37 please? i am not sure if
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he can hear me ok. if you can hear me, can you hear me? i think i think sadly that we can‘t, what a shame. 0k. sadly that we can‘t, what a shame. ok. we will do that later. we will. i will be back in the next hour to talk you threw what is going in the markets. analysts are keeping an eye on the polls and we have seen the pound move lower against the euro and dollar today. ok. all right. for the moment thank you very much indeed. tomorrow‘s general election will be the first to be held in december since the 1920s. so how do voters feel about mixing their christmas shopping with a visit to the ballot box? jon kay has been to nottingham to find out. one more shopping day until the election. and at nottingham‘s christmas
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market, decisions to be made. it is a bit like voting. you look at what is on offer, weigh things up and then hope you have made the right choice. i pay a lot for university. we meet nadia looking for presents, but thinking of the ballot box. it is time to be grown—up, time to make a decision. have you made your choice? have you? sort of, yes. i have been looking into it. i have been doing my research, being a grown—up for the first time. yes, i think i know. is this your first election voting? yes. i am a bit nervous because i don‘t really know what i‘m doing but i hope i learn... you are taking this really seriously. yeah, a lot of people my age are taking it seriously this year. we want to get involved and prove that we want to get involved. whatever the weather on polling day, it can still be freezing here.
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junior training night at nottingham‘s ice rink. this surprise winter election has been tough going. hard—fought. and many voters have told us they are feeling exhausted by a blizzard of misinformation. give me some words to describe this election campaign. what has it been like? farcical, embarrassing. hockey dad lee tells me it has left him cold. the campaign is too dirty, too demeaning. has this election made you more cynical about politics than you were before it started? i studied government in politics as a kid at school, i did it at a gcse level, so i do take a keen interest, but politics now is not what it was when i was studying it, that is for sure. it is a real...a real mudslinging match, isn‘t it? what is tougher — the politics at this election or what they are doing out there? what they are doing out
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now, i could not do it. but i couldn‘t run a country either. with time running out, it seems lots of voters are still undecided. in the city centre, we find this woman late—night shopping. what is harder — choosing who to vote for or choosing something for your husband? choosing who to vote for! what the party says on the economy is key. when you say something, mean what you say, notjust try and get people behind you. if you were to give our politicians a mark out of ten for their behaviour, what would you give them? a six. it has been the worst one i have ever known. it is terrible. what has made it bad? the lies and the insinuations and everything else. gary and christine are not feeling much festive election cheer either. you are going to vote, right? definitely, yes. we have four granddaughters and i said you must vote. emily pankhurst tied herself to a railing. so you can vote. some of us could be voting in horrible winter weather tomorrow. but today, it is the
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campaign‘s final flurry. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with matt taylor there was more sunshine round today than yesterday. between two weather system, this brought yesterday‘s rain, this will bring the longest speu rain, this will bring the longest spell of rain through tomorrow but the they channel 4 testify cloud indication they are shower clouds and that coherent area of white, thatis and that coherent area of white, that is the area of prolific showers. the odd heavy one, the odd rumble of thunder too. through the evening rush hour a chilly old feel. temperatures round four or five for many. so we go into the night on a
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cold note. outbreaks of rain. you will notice through the night in northern ireland, wales south—west temperatures rise. scotland, northern ireland blue colours on the temperature chart, an indication of the widespread frost and icy conditions in parts of scotland too. here is the big picture, election day of course, the weather systems set to work in, with its strong and gusty winds, particularly in the southern half of the country, dry, bright but frosty start to the east, staying here, dry through much of the morning, but there as the weather fronts work in, heavy rain for most, turning to snow and a covering of snow in the hills and northern england and central scotla nd northern england and central scotland during the afternoon in particular. one or two spots in east anglia will stay dry, fin iish on a dry note wales and the south—west, but the evening, the heaviest of the rain will be in eastern england, that clear, plenty of showers pack into the west. that is because we still have low pressure with us as
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we go through the night into friday. the low pressure system pushing eastwards, drawing in colder air again as we gradually go through the day. friday rain, northern half of scotland. elsewhere back to sunshine and showers, there could be a line of more persistent showers into parts of north—west wails, one to watch. temperatures in the south—west should rise a bit compared to what we are seeing today. saturday, blustery day to start the weekend, england and wales in particular have been a wild and windy night in the south. showers most frequent, wintry over the higher grounds and staying chilly into sunday, after a spell of rain sleet and know, showers on sunday mainly in the north staying windy across southern mainly in the north staying windy across southern areas.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live, i‘m ben brown. today at 4pm... party leaders make their last minute pitches in marginal seats trying to win over undecided voters ahead of tomorrow‘s general election. the murder of 14 year old jaden moodie. a teenager is found guilty nobel peace prize winner aung san suu kyi defends her country, myanmar, against charges of genocide at the hague. greta thunberg becomes the youngest time magazine‘s person of the year today she called on rich countries to cut their carbon emissions and help poorer countries do the same. how do you respond to the fact that basically nothing is being done about this without feeling the slightest bit of anger?
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coming up in sport, tottenham and manchester city may have already qualified for the last 16, but they‘ve both got tricky away games tonight as they look to end the group stages with a win. and matt has all the weather. well, ben, at least there was a little bit more sunshine between the downpours through today. but into tomorrow, it looks likely to be greyer and wetter for longer. there could be some over snow northern hills. more in half an hour. also coming up, a sad story from bristol where more than 600 christmas presents for children have been stolen from a community santa‘s grotto.
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hello, welcome to afternoon live. a man‘s been found guilty of murdering the teenager jaden moodie in east london in january earlier this year. the 14—year—old was stabbed to death while on a moped in leyton. ayoub majdouline, who 5 19, was also found guilty of possessing a knife. this case was described as a senseless and horrific attack. today, 19—year—old ayoub majdouline has been found guilty of murdering jaden moodie in leyton earlier this year. the jury of eight men and four women spent about nine hours deliberating and reached a majority verdict. when the guilty verdicts we re verdict. when the guilty verdicts were read out a short while ago at the old bailey, members of the victim‘s family were relieved whilst
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the accused kept as head bowed down and didn‘t show any emotion whilst walking out of the dock. this is been a high—profile case and jaden moodie was the first teenager to be stabbed to death in the uk this year and is the youngest victim of knife crime in london so far in 2019. another young life cut short because by knife crime in london. jaden moodie was brutally murdered. the final moments of his life are ca ptu red final moments of his life are captured on this shocking cctv footage. his family wanted them to be shown. the 14—year—old‘s body is catapulted onto the road after being thrown off his mopeds by a stolen black mercedes. a hooded gang, armed with large knives, thenjump out black mercedes. a hooded gang, armed with large knives, then jump out and repeatedly stabbed and kick him. in an attack lasting just 14 seconds. he ends up bleeding to death. jaden
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moodie was stabbed nine times, his injuries included a punctured lung and liver, as well as several slash wounds on his back. the teenager‘s pa rents a re wounds on his back. the teenager‘s parents are still coming to terms with their sons there. when i finally did get to see him, he was laid out in the crucifixion pose and thatis laid out in the crucifixion pose and that is when ijust... i haven't moved on since that. that image. jaden moodie love sport and had plans tojoin jaden moodie love sport and had plans to join a boxing academy. the teenager had only moved to london from nottingham six months before he was murdered. jaden moodie was ambitious, he loved life, he loved his family and his grandma, and he wasjust fun his family and his grandma, and he was just fun to be around. because he would always playjokes and pranks on others and things. during
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the two—week trial, the jury heard thatjaden had the two—week trial, the jury heard that jaden had links the two—week trial, the jury heard thatjaden had links to a gang and sold drugs to them. on the night of his death he was targeted by a love rival gang in the east london area. on the night he was killed, some of the residents living on this road here in leighton reported seeing the gang members stomping and stamping on the teenager before the cart wheel spun away. the 14—year—old was left quivering with trails of blood coming away from his body. today, 19—year—old ayoub majdouline has been found guilty of murdering the teenager. he admitted in court he was involved in county lines drug dealing in london, hampshire and suffolk. his dna was found inside a pairof suffolk. his dna was found inside a pair of yellow rubber gloves and on a knife discovered in a drain near to where the stone car was recovered. he was always such fun. but basically, i have to live with
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it, do note i mean? he has gone. may god rest his soul. jaden moodie had only moved to london six months before he was killed. and thejury in london six months before he was killed. and the jury in this court during the hearing heard that he had fallen into the wrong crowd in nottingham and was hoping to make a fresh start with his mother here in london. unfortunately, his life was cut short and he was murdered earlier this year. today, 19—year—old ayoub majdouline has been found guilty of his murder and also guilty of possessing a knife. he is facing a lengthy prison sentence and that sentence will take place over the next coming weeks. it‘s the last day of campaigning in the general election, with all the parties trying to win over those crucial floating voters. the prime minister borisjohnson has been targeting seats in northern england and wales, while the labour leaderjeremy
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corbyn started his day in scotland before moving to the north of england. jo swinson, leader of the liberal democrats, is focusing on constituencies in south—east england, and the snp leader nicola sturgeon has been meeting voters across scotland. our political correspondent chris mason has the latest. dawn hadn‘t even thought of breaking this morning and party leaders were out and about. boris johnson for the conservatives pretending to be a milkman in west yorkshire, but with a political message as well as a pint of semi—skimmed to flog. we could, tomorrow, be going into another hung parliament. that is more drift, more dither, more delay, more paralysis for this country, saying nothing of the economically disastrous policies of corbyn and mcdonnell. we have got to move forward, we have a fantastic agenda for this country, we can get brexit done. in govan in glasgow, labour‘sjeremy corbyn was also up before the sun and saying... tomorrow, the people all across the uk will go to vote and they have a choice. they can elect a government that they can trust. that
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will eliminate child poverty in britain. they can elect a government that will end the cruelty and the injustice of universal credit. today is all about the leaders clocking up the masochistic miles out on the campaign trail to prove they have got to be vim, the vigour, the vitality, the verve to govern on friday. even though, bluntly, they‘re exhausted, after weeks of campaigning. loads of videos coming in of them out on the stump across the country. i have visited nurseries! i have very much enjoyed toasting marshmallows with four—year—olds! the liberal democrat leader jo swinson has been reflecting on her campaign on her visit to esher in surrey.
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her last—minute message goes like this. to people who are at home watching, if you have a growing pile of liberal democrat leaflets on your kitchen table, be in no doubt that the liberal democrats can win in your seat. it will be a vote to stop brexit and to stop borisjohnson and that man must be stopped. the election is up in the air and so is this butternut squash. enter volunteer greengrocer and scottish national party leader nicola sturgeon in edinburgh. a tory victory can be stopped and in scotland that means voting snp. the snp is the main challenger to the tories and voting for other parties risks helping the tories. so if people don't want to have more cuts to public services, to be dragged out of europe against our will and have boris johnson as prime minister, vote snp. we don‘t have any pictures of the welsh nationalists plaid cymru campaign today, but here
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they are earlier in the campain. the brexit party leader nigel farage has been in doncaster and the green party says it is raising the alarm on the climate emergency. in just a few hours, the deafening clamour of campaigning will be over. the serenity and solitude of the polling booth will beckon. the country will decide who lives here for up to the next five years in an election that will bring about a change, whoever wins. our chief political correspondent vicki young is in westminster. vicki, or the party leaders could be really clocking up the miles today ona really clocking up the miles today on a pretty frantic last eight campaigning. and you wonder how much it really makes is a difference but it really makes is a difference but it is about the don‘t knows and the waiver is trying to shore up the support and persuade those who still haven‘t decided and persuade them to go to the polls tomorrow. i think we
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can tell where the key areas are. it is the midlands, the north—west of england and it is wales. and you can tell that because jeremy england and it is wales. and you can tell that becausejeremy corbyn and borisjohnson tell that becausejeremy corbyn and boris johnson have tell that becausejeremy corbyn and borisjohnson have spent an awful lot of time campaigning there. really, it is about whether this election is about brexit or whether it is about other things as well. for labour, very much concentrating on the nhs, on ending austerity, spending priorities, and i think the question is whether people believe borisjohnson when he says that a vote for him will get brexit done, or whether there is still some scepticism. there is novel long way to go even if they get a deal through and the small matter of the trade deal with the eu. equally, on the labour side, a large number of spending pledges, are they credible? do the numbers add up? in the end, when people vote, it will come down to those two things probably, and then you look at the liberal
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democrats multi—campaign. they have very much focused on brexit. they say the big issue for them is that when the bracket party decided to stand out in tory seats, it made it a lot harderfor them because stand out in tory seats, it made it a lot harder for them because they say that then the remain vote is more likely to be split. whereas the brexit vote is more likely to get behind the conservatives. our ireland correspondent chris page is in belfast. let‘s get your reflections on the election campaign as far as northern ireland is concerned. it has been intense and hard —fought ireland is concerned. it has been intense and hard—fought and really, fascinating. brexit has generated a new dynamic in this election campaign. the two main unionist parties the democratic unionists and the ultra —— ulster unionist parties are enacting a pack to get behind the best placed unionist candidate. but what is different in this campaign is that the two nationalist
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parties, sinn fein and the sdlp, have gone into an arrangement as well. they don‘t characterise this asa well. they don‘t characterise this as a packet, they describe to talk about it in terms of being a kind of anti—brexit tactic. but the outer workings of that is that in two seats currently held by the pro brexit dup will, well, the chances of north belfast being taken have increased and it is been said that people should vote for sinn fein there. like in south belfast, sinn fein is running there and saying that they should vote for the sdlp. that is one exam plot how brexit has broken the mould in a sense of the limit in northern ireland. one party standing in all 18 constituencies in northern ireland and says they don‘t
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do pacts. they also want to build on the gains they made in the european council elections in northern ireland earlier this year for some there is no doubt that i think the constitutional question, the identity of nationalism and unionism, britishness and irishness, that has been the focus again and the focus again on the land but with the focus again on the land but with the irish republic which has been such a huge part of the whole brexit process. another issue has really risen up the agenda in the last few weeks, that is the health service in northern ireland. it is widely acknowledged that the nhs here is now in crisis. new figures published just a few weeks ago underlining the fa ct just a few weeks ago underlining the fact that hospital waiting times here are the worst in the uk by far. also, health workers here have taken industrial action, nurses set to strike next week. all of that highlighting one of the effect, the big effects of the lack of a devolved government here at stormont, another big issue in this campaign. earlier we spoke to our wales correspondent, daniel davies, who was in cardiff. he said there was a question mark
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over why borisjohnson had gone to a seat with a labour majority... people are really trying to decipher why borisjohnson went to the seat that he visited. it is not considered a model seat, there is a hefty labour majority there. but nevertheless, the conservative party convinced that their message of get brexit done is cutting through right across the country. borisjohnson chose to make a flying visit to that constituency in south wales this afternoon. meanwhile, welsh labour, well, they are trying to consolidate their support returning to a message that has served them well in recent election saying it is them or us. it is labour or the conservatives. in other words, if you are tempted by the message of getting brexit done, bearin the message of getting brexit done, bear in mind that you will have a conservative prime minister beyond that and for people on the left, people voting or flirting with
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voting for the lib dems or applied country, neither of those has a realistic chance of forming the next government. it is down to brass tacks for the welsh labour leader and how he has been to some marginal constituencies today. constituencies where labour and the conservatives are going to as for the other parties, plaid cymru focusing on the truth and the leader of said body saying that they should be a law preventing people from making up bogus claims as there is for companies. politician should be held to the same standards. liberal democrats, who only have one seat in wales, they came into this campaign with high hopes of building on that through their message of stopping brexit, well, we hear they are throwing all of their resources at their seat and all their efforts
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going into retaining their ground there. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. party leaders target marginal seats across the country with their core campaign messages, as they try to win over undecided voters ahead of tomorrow‘s general election. the murder of 14—year—old jaden moodie, a teenager is found guilty. the nobel peace prize winner aung san suu kyi defends her country, myanmar, against charges of genocide at the hague. manchester city hope to bounce from their derby day defeat as they go away to zagreb. and test cricket has returned to pakistan wickets against sri lanka.
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and an insight into the mind of tiger woods later as well. the environmental campaigner greta thunberg has been named time magazine‘s person of the year. today she accused governments and corporations of failing to tackle climate change and hiding behind clever accounting and creative pr. addressing the un climate summit in madrid, she criticised what she said were constant attempts to find loopholes to avoid emission targets. justin worland covers climate and energy for time magazine — and joins us now. tell us your reasons for making your personal of the year and putting her on her cover. —— putting her on your cover. one reason is the way that she has changed the discussion around climate change. you can agree with her or not, but she is changing
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the discussion and has invigorated climate activists and has brought millions of people to the street, building momentum that previously wasn‘t there. the second reason is that she embodies the global youth uprising. we see it in hong kong, we see it with the kids in the us who are protesting gun violence. she is an avatar of all of these different young people standing up. even though she doesn‘t necessarily align with those of us. she is, amazingly, she is amazingly articulate, isn‘t she? when you say that she is putting so much pressure on world leaders, do you think she is actually affecting policy when it comes to, you know, nation states deciding their endowment policies and strategies? it is complicated. she doesn‘t go to a world leader and say, you have to enact xyz policy or
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law, she mostly stays out of the nitty—gritty of supporting particular policy agendas. but at the same time, it is hard to see how a world leader would not respond to pressure from young people on the streets. in our story, we have a quote from the president of france, president macron, talking about how he has been changed by seeing the protesters on the street. we have a quote from a republican leader here in the us who says, this is creating a real pressure on us in the us who says, this is creating a real pressure on us to change our ways. she is not coming up with the nuts and bolts of different legislation or regulation, but she is creating that social pressure thatis is creating that social pressure that is really forcing change. as you say shot, she embodies the younger generation, and if this sense, it is that younger generation who are saying that they are the ru ns who are saying that they are the runs that will suffer from the effects of climate change. absolutely, i mean, it is one thing
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to bea absolutely, i mean, it is one thing to be a world leader who is, you know, going to be around for a few more decades, may be. and it is another thing to be someone who is going to be bearing the things she has done has been to reframe the conversation around climate justice. it is not just conversation around climate justice. it is notjust about people in ireland nations who are suffering, but about future generations. she is from stockholm, she is from one of the wealthiest countries per capita on the planet. for her to be concerned, you better bet that somebody in the us or in the uk should be concerned as well. and by putting her on the cover and making her time magazine person of the year, are you, in a sense, joining her campaign for environmental change? no, it is not... we are not endorsing her, the time person of the year is a recognition of an individual or group of individuals‘
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influence. we are not endorsing her. i would say separately that climate change, you know, climate change is real and is change, you know, climate change is realand is an change, you know, climate change is real and is an issue that needs to be solved. and so there is not any sort of question there. but the way in which it is solved is to be debated. this is not an endorsement, but of course, she is right in saying that climate change is a serious and pressing issue that needs to be solved. justin, thank you very much for being with us. let‘s catch up with the latest campaigning in the general election — it‘s the last day before polling and we heard from our correspondents in wales and northern ireland — now we can speak now to our scotland correspondent lorna gordon who‘s in dunbartonshire. a pretty bleak day here in the
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centre of scotland. an area which the leader of the snp nicola sturgeon has been crisscrossing. she started across in edinburgh earlier on, heading up to stirling and is head coming here in the next hour or so. head coming here in the next hour or so. it really points to one of the kind of key themes of the scottish election campaign. that is that a lot of the seats in scotland here, more than two thirds of them, our marginals. i statement that because stirling is a seat that the snp are targeting and hope to win from the conservatives this seat. this seat dunbartonshire is the seat that jo swinson would like to win this time around. when it comes to marginals, there is a good chance in scotla nd marginals, there is a good chance in scotland that we may see seats crossing in every direction. the snp message throughout this campaign, the themes really, brexit and independence. they say no to brexit and yes to independence. that
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message has evolved as the time has gone on in the weeks have progressed. they are now saying that a vote for the snp is a vote to take scotland‘s future to be decided here in scotland, in scotland‘s hands. in a sense, what they are trying to do is appeal beyond their core voters. in an open letter today to the scottish public, nicola sturgeon said that the snp are the progressive party of scotland, and that a vote for the snp would look borisjohnson out of number ten. in fa ct, borisjohnson out of number ten. in fact, she said, and i quote, boris johnson is the greatest danger to scotla nd johnson is the greatest danger to scotland of any tory prime minister in modern times. so nicola sturgeon, the leader of the snp, campaigning ha rd the leader of the snp, campaigning hard today. all of the leaders of the parties today using every last minute of this campaign to try to get those voters who are still to make up their minds to vote for
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them. the key messages here, a lot of marginals, a lot still to play for, and i think this weather points to the other issue perhaps, that they will all face, that is turn out. they will hope for good weather tomorrow. they will hope the weather doesn‘t put their supporters coming out to vote for them. thank you very much. aung san suu kyi, the leader of myanmar, has denied accusations of genocide, at the united nations‘ top court. a military crackdown in myanmar in 2017 resulted in thousands of rohingya muslims being killed and more than 700,000 people fleeing to neighbouring bangladesh. aung san suu kyi blamed the violence and mass displacement on militants seeking independence, though she added it could not be ruled out that her country‘s defence forces used disproportionate force. anna holligan reports from the hague. waiting in anticipation for a glimpse of the woman
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they call mother suu. myanmar is shrouded with fake news and many other, er, unfair charges, so this is our chance to give to the world to give a true picture of what is really happening in myanmar. the world was watching as, for the first time, aung san suu kyi responded to the allegations that myanmar has been trying to exterminate the rohingya population. a woman once considered a global human rights icon told thejudges she understood the definition of genocide, but went on to characterise the situation in myanmar as something else — an internal armed conflict which began when rohingya militants killed nine police officers. regrettably, the gambia has placed before the court an incomplete and misleading factual picture of the situation in rakhine state in myanmar.
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yet it is of the utmost importance that the court assesses the situation pertaining on the ground in rakhine dispassionately and accurately. she claims the clearance operation carried out by myanmar‘s army, which left an estimated 10,000 rohingya dead, was a legitimate response to a terrorist threat, though she did concede individual soldiers may have made mistakes. mr president, it cannot be ruled out that disproportionate force was used by members of the defence services, in some cases, in disregard of international humanitarian law, or that they did not distinguish clearly enough between fighters and civilians. aung san suu kyi made no reference to the harrowing witness testimony from rohingya survivors, some read out in court yesterday, who spoke of military firing squads, gang rapes and babies thrown
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into burning buildings. these rohingya fear their families are being erased from rakhine state. they are urging the judges to agree to the gambia‘s request for emergency measures to protect the 600,000 rohingya who remain in myanmar. the woman who many once regarded as their brightest hope stood in court and urged thejudges not to intervene and risk aggravating what aung san suu kyi described as a complex conflict. nominees for the 26th annual screen actors guild awards have been announed at the pacific design center‘s silverscreen theater in west hollywood, with plenty of british talent up for awards. christian bale and taron egerton have been nominated in film catageories while olivia colman, jodie comer, helena bonham carter
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and phoebe waller—bridge have all been nominated for television roles. colman has been recognised for her leading role in netflix drama the crown and is up against her co—star bonham carter and killing eve‘s comer while waller—bridge is nominated for outstanding performance by a female actor in a comedy series for fleabag. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello, more sunshine between the shower clouds through today but we have the showers. some showers heavy with hail and funder and the northern half of the country covering sleet and snow. they continue this afternoon and into the east and west. showers working its way across wales and england. chilly tonight this evening as well.
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tonight are the showers will continue across western areas through tonight and then more in the way of cloud preceded by some hill snow. temperatures rising here through the night but much of scotland, east of wales and much of a monday cold night with some frost and icy conditions into tomorrow morning. tomorrow morning is election morning and it will be a windy day across many parts of the uk, particularly around the south. outbreaks of heavy and persistent rain turning eastwards, the cumbrian fells and central parts of scotland with snow. temperatures here at two or three degrees. the rain spreads further north into the ceiling and then further showers.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. party leaders make their last minute pitches in marginal seats — trying to win over undecided voters ahead of tomorrow‘s general election. the murder of 14—year—old jaden moodie — a teenager is found guilty. nobel peace prize winner aung san suu kyi defends her country myanmar against charges of genocide at the hague. greta thunberg becomes the youngest time person of the year — today she called on rich countries to cut their carbon emissions and help poorer countries do the same. the post office pays more
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than 57 million pounds to settle a case brought by hundreds of subpostmasters and postmistresses, wrongly accused of mismanaging funds. sport now on afternoon live with chetan ben. the good thing for city and spurs they don‘t have much work do but they don‘t have much work do but they will want to win. city in particular. city in particular. this is the trophy they‘re desperate to win of course, pep guardiola‘s won everything else, but has until now been thwarted in the champions league. but has until now been thwarted they are already through to the knockout stages as group winners but head to croatia tonight to play dinamo zagreb on the back of that 2—1 defeat to manchester united on saturday. it was their fourth defeat of the season in the league and one that leaves them 14 points behind the leaders liverpool —
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who they beat to the premier league title so spectaculraly last year. but they‘ve had injury problems, like aymric lapote, and players not at the same level as last season which means guardiola‘s currently on one of the poorest runs in his time at city — and he reckons fans will have to wait a bit longer to see an improvement. the way we play, our game is still there, but to reach that level, we have to improve in some department, specially in the boxes and right now, you tell me right now, we are not ready but in february, we will be better, after that happen. tottenham meanwhile will looking to avenge their 7—2 defeat earlier this season when they go to bayern munich — tough test for them. but spurs are already through as runners up with the german champions having won the group.
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and test cricket back in pakistan. it is back, first time since 2009 when the sri lanka team bus was attacked and six policemen and two civilians lost their lives. since then there‘ve been matches pakistan have hosted abroad but nothing replicates playing on home soil. pakistani cricket fans have been desperate to watch their team compete there — and now they can. there‘ve been reservations, years of questions overs security and many teams not feeling safe to go there but there‘s a strong relationship between both cricket boards and today was day one of the first test in rawalpindi. sri lanka won the toss chose to bat, a day of fluctuating fortunes which ended with the lankans 202 for five at stumps. this the fifth wicket to go, angelo matthews bowled by naseem shah on 31. he took two wickets. dimuth karunaratne top scorer so far with 59. the spectators gave really support,
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they are telling us welcome, so those are the positive things, when we are here, when we are travelling the other countries there are no supporters from the other country, i think the pakistan always, they were giving a good warm welcome, as always. giving a good warm welcome, as always. both teams have gone through their final preparations for golf‘s presidents cup between team usa and an international team — not including european players. it‘ll be played over three days in melbourne, with this man tiger woods playing for and captaining team usa. they‘ve dominated the biennial competition since it began in 1994. and rickie fowler says woods could be the reason why. because he never switches off. everyone knows he doesn‘t sleep a whole lot, so, i think a lot of the text that we get are, you are having to wa ke text that we get are, you are having to wake up to in the morning that he has sent in the middle of the night. that is part, he can‘t sleep because he is thinking so much about what‘s going on.
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about what‘s going on. tommy seymour has become the second player to retire from the scottish international side in the past seven days. he announced his decision hot on the heels of former captain john barclay who quit last thursday. tthe 31—year—old won 52 caps after making his debut in 2013. and in tennis, australia‘s ash barty has been named as the wta player of the year after winning her first grand slam singles title and reaching the top of the world rankings. the 23—year—old who quit the sport to play cricket in 2014. before returning to the game a couple of years later. became the first australian to win the french open since 1973 earlier this year. that‘s all the sport for now. as we‘ve been hearing a 19—year—old man has been convicted of murdering 14—year—old jaden moodie — who was knocked off a moped and stabbed to death. detective chief inspectorjohn hughes of the metropolitican police is making a statement at the old bailey.
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good afternoon. my name is detective chief inspectorjohn hughes, i am here to speak to you this afternoon regarding the recent verdict we have had in the trial relating to the murder ofjaden moodie. had in the trial relating to the murder of jaden moodie. this had in the trial relating to the murder ofjaden moodie. this was a shocking and brutal murder of a 14—year—old boy, who stood no chance against his attacker, i am pleased thejury against his attacker, i am pleased the jury recognised the overwhelming evidence against ayoub majdouline. it is clear he went out that day with intent to cause really serious harm. this is clearfrom with intent to cause really serious harm. this is clear from the face coverings they use, the yellow gloves and the lengths they went to to destroy try to destroy evidence. my to destroy try to destroy evidence. my thoughts and gratitude go to jayden‘s family for their support throughout the trial. their courage in the face of such tragedy, is to be admired, and is truly humble. our investigation is not over. we know five people were in that car on that
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night, and my officers and i will continue to work to bring jayden‘s murderers tojustice. we know continue to work to bring jayden‘s murderers to justice. we know that allegiances change and we would ask anyone with information to contact my team, on 02083453734. if you want to co nta ct my team, on 02083453734. if you want to contact us anonymously by crimestoppers. thank you. i will not be taking any questions. that was dcijohn hughes. after 51 days, the election campaign is finally drawing to a close. in a moment we‘ll be discussing how it‘s gone — and what the parties can do in the final hours of campaigning — but first let‘s get the reflections of our political editor laura kuenssberg. we have been to birmingham twice, scot twice, what are we are doing to do today? if you are thinking about who who you are going to vote for or you haven‘t made up your mind yet
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here are a few thoughts of what‘s been going on. the main reason we are having this election is because of brexit. if borisjohnson is lucky enough to get a majority, then u nless enough to get a majority, then unless something weird happens we will leave the european union at the end of next month. that is why all the time you hear him go on and on about his main slogan which is if you haven‘t heard it about his main slogan which is if you haven't heard it get brexit, get brexit, get brendan boyle done. labour on the other hand will promise another referendum. in a funny way not much has changed during the campaign, so the tories have been broadly ahead with labour struggling to close the gap, the liberal democrats haven‘t really made the breakthrough that people thought they might do a few months ago. they have really struggled and the snp who look like they will be able to stay dominant in scotland. but it has been strange in way this campaign, after all the massive turmoil of the last few years, things have been stable, with the
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tories trying all the oisin tymon to focus on brexit, taking us out of the european union injanuary and labour trying to hammer home the message they believe governments decisions in the last decade or so had a bad impact on people round the country, and particularly on the health service. nhs. our nhs will be properly funded. there is a big dislike that you find both the main party leaders and that is a problem we have heard particularly from labour candidate, we hear people aren‘t convinced byjeremy corbyn but borisjohnson has a problem with trust, there is nothing new in suggesting he has got a bit of an unusual relationship with the truth and the question about who you can believe has been a big part of this campaign. so, read the polls all you like, the tories are broadly aed head and labour struggling to close the gap. predicting anything in politics this day is not that predicting anything in politics this day is not that smart.
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with me now is sonia sodha, former advisor to ed miliband, now chief leader writer at the observer and jamesjohnson — who was senior research and strategy adviser to prime minister theresa may between 2016 and 2019. james you said you conducted the postmortem into the last election, how would you compare the conservatives handling of that election, and this one? well, mine that conservative campaign i think we all know was pretty woeful, in 2017, you know, there was the strategy didn‘t quite match the candidate, and the manifesto obviously went wrong, there was the issue over tv debates. this time the conservatives will be happier with how the campaign has gone. it hasn‘t been exciting, it hasn‘t had lots of ups and downs, it has been boring that has favoured the conservatives in this occasion where they went into it with a good lead and they have managed to largely maintain that. there have been a few wobbles this last week but they are largely happy. is that how you see it sonia?
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they have kept their opinion poll lead for what it is worth? worth?m looks like they have kept that poll lead although it has narrowed in re ce nt lead although it has narrowed in recent day, we saw a very large poll from yougov last night, which suggested that the conservative majority was going to be smaller than when they did that same poll a few weeks ago, so there is evidence that the gap is narrowing, one thing the conservatives have done is sort of keep boris johnson away from some of keep boris johnson away from some of the big set piece interviews, so we had jeremy vine saying this morning as well, he won't come on radio 2 even though all the other leaders have done it. they have played a cautious game. as james has said there have been a number of gaffes which i think have started to cut through, with voter, boris johnson's reaction to being shown that dreadful photo of the four—year—old boy sleeping on a pile of coats, in a hospital, with suspected pneumonia, he didn't answer the question and pocketed the
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phone. that has not gone down well with voter, that is coming through. this morning we had the fridge incident where boris johnson appeared to go into a refrigerated unit to avoid questions from a journalist from itv. so there is a real sense the prime minister has sought to evade scrutiny. people call this the brexit election but there has been talk about the national health service for one thing. there certainly has been, in particularly the last week. the nhs is one of the biggest concerns that voters have about the conservative brand and certainly labour will be hoping in this last week, they can get the liberal democrats and greens on their side but they can also get back some of the wavering conservatives by invoking the information, but i would say one thing, this has come through in the research i have been doing strongly, is though voters might be talking about public services in this campaign, they ultimately do after talking about that come back to saying i am voting conservative. the reason why is the pow other after that get brexit done message, which
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seems to sort of have persuaded this campaign underneath, i mean not for us campaign underneath, i mean not for us watching borisjohnson who has been saying it on repeat but voters seem been saying it on repeat but voters seem to be carrying that message, i suspect on the day tomorrow people will think that in the backs of their minds. one thing about the election is you have two leaders from the two major party, the two candidates to be prime minister if you like, neither of whom are hugely popular, and about both of whom a lot of voters have a lot of questions. yes i think that is right andl questions. yes i think that is right and i think if you look at the polling, we have jeremy corbyn who in the past few weeks his figures suggest he is one of the least popular lead others the opposition, borisjohnson went popular lead others the opposition, boris johnson went into this campaign less popular than theresa may, so both of these men are marmite figure, we live in that two party. is. one of these men is likely one of them, will be prime minister, or getting towards downing street on friday morning so it is between the two. for a lot they are
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marmite and people are thinking about which is the least bad option, it isn't a great way to feel when you are going into the polling booth and casting your vote. and we have seen and casting your vote. and we have seen them head—to—head in the tv debates, how do you think the election has been between the two? the tv debays were good forjeremy corbyn, he performed better than people thought he would but he needed more than that, especially in that second bbc debate. he needed to have a cut through moment and turn it upside down. i expect the conservatives banked that. i think with the leaders and their popularity they are divisive and be no means is borisjohnson wildly popular but he is popular where it matters n the seats in the north and midlands, idid matters n the seats in the north and midlands, i did a focus group and you know, it was remarkable how some of the voters who voted labour were saying boris johnson of the voters who voted labour were saying borisjohnson is one of us, and that was quite striking moment. he has a real issue with women, he does have a women problem,
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particularly in some of those seats so particularly in some of those seats so it is true he attracts support from men but there is big gap between what men and win say, and i think you know, if the result isn't what the conservatives hope on friday morning, that will be a lot of food for thought for them. do you think those leave voting labour constituencies or hitherto labour constituencies or hitherto labour constituencies should be crucial in terms of the election battle ground. they are absolutely going to be crucial. whether the seats stay labour or whether you see some of the seats turning blue on, in the early hours of friday morning is going to be quite a strong indication of whether the conservatives are going to win some of the seats they need to get a majority and they absolutely do need to win seats, that have a long tradition of being labour, if they are going to get the majority they need. so that will be a key test i think on friday morning. and a few months ago we thought that the brexit party would be crucial in
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this, but has their withdrawal been critical to borisjohnson‘s chances. it only made the difference in three seats in the modelling i have done. what it made a difference is how nigel farage view was viewed. we saw 80% of the brexit party coming from the conservatives and to coming from labour when you look a the two. that is now 50—50 in the areas they are standing in. that is important because it means in a lot of the seats the brexit party is taking votes off labour, just as much as it is the conservatives. in some seats that will cancel each other out and in some more conservative, some more labour. overall cc hq compared to what they thought might happen at the start will happily take 50—50. and of course this is the first christmas election we have had for many years, almost a century i think, will that make any difference, the weather, it is dark
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and people are doing christmas shopping, we don‘t know what turn out is going to be it is hard to say for sure, but it is true if you look at what pollsters are saying who have looked at what has happened in the past, there isn't really any strong historical evidence having a winter election depressed turn out. in fact if you look at february 74245 is one of the highest turn outs we are seen post—war. i think people may not feel very enthusiastic about the options on the table, but they certainly care, so the table, but they certainly care, soi the table, but they certainly care, so i would be surprised if we saw turn out way down and people were attributing that to the weather. economy prediction from both of you? we have to be careful. things might change in the last couple of days, as it stands i think the conservatives are on track for a small majority, but look, the risk ofa small majority, but look, the risk of a hung parliament, there is a chance of a large conservative majority. anything could happen i am going to be boring, i think the most likely outcome is a small majority,
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a hung parliament is absolutely not all the table and that is what last night's poll showed, there is going to be more polls comes out tonight. labour activists will be looking at the polls and drawing some inspiration enthusiasm for them for polling day tomorrow. great to talk to you both of you. thank you very much both of you for being with us. the post office has agreed to pay more than 57 million pounds to settle a dispute with former subpostmasters and postmistresses, who were wrongly accused of fraud and false accounting. it brings to an end a series of court cases about a computer system, which was used to manage local post office finances. our personal finance correspondent simon gompertz explains the background to the case. it all goes back to the beginning of the century, the year 2000, when a new system called horizon was brought in to manage
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the finances of the local post offices, and shortfalls began to appear in their money day after day. the people involved said it was as a result of glitches in horizon, the new system. the post office said it was their fault. people lost their contracts, they were accused of fraud, false accounting, theft. they say they lives were ruined. so we have this case, four mammoth trials. the post office lost the first one, and then sought mediation, and the result of it is this settlement of £58 million and the post office saying they know that wrong things happened. the question is how much the individual postmasters and post mistresses are going to get. money has to be taken off for legal fees. for a firm that backs litigation, which gets its share, but you can still see individuals getting tens of thousands, perhaps more where they were worst affected.
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in a moment alice baxter is going to bring us the latest business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live party leaders target marginal seats across the country with their core campaign messages — as they try to win over undecided voters ahead of tomorrow‘s general election. the murder of 14—year—old jaden moodie — a teenager is found guilty. the nobel peace prize winner aung san suu kyi defends her country myanmar against charges of genocide at the hague. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. as we‘ve just been hearing — the post office is to pay almost £58 million to settle a long—running dispute with sub—postmasters and postmistresses. it brings an end to a mammoth series of court cases over the it system used to manage local post office
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finances since 1999. the world‘s biggest share listing got under way in riyadh, with saudi aramco‘s stock rising 10% above the initial public offering price. the state oil company, which produces more than a tenth of global crude supply, will be raising a record 26.6 billion dollars. an all—electric powered seaplane has taken flight in vancouver, canada, in what the operators describe as a "world first" for the aviation industry, and a step towards the "first all—electric commercial fleet".the short test flight by harbour air and magnix involved a six—passenger aircraft fitted with an electric motor. how has the pound been doing ahead of tomorrow? in a word volatile. hung parliament is looking, markets
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a bit, we have seen it down and up, it was down on tuesday, at the guess beginning of this morning, it rallied a little bit, but trading taking place between narrow margins so taking place between narrow margins so it is not all about the general election, over in the states we have got the federal reserve meeting, to make a vote on interest rate, they are expected to keep them steady. that affecting the currency and the ongoing us china trade discussions so ongoing us china trade discussions so all of that feeding into this heightened volatility we are seeing within sterling. let us get more on this now. let us get more on this now. fiona cincotta is a market analyst at city index. we were saying the pound, is it has been down, up, this state of heightened volatility, is that set to continue do you think? yes, i think for the time being that will continue, obviously pound traders have been looking to the election, they are been trying to gauge what is going to happen, notjust for the elections but to gauge what will happen thereafter. specifically as
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far as brexit is concerned. so this is the big deal as far as the pound is the big deal as far as the pound is concerned. it wants to know whether the conservatives are going to get the overall majority they need to push brexit through, and brexit deal can continue and the uk will leave the uk, the eu with a deal. that is important because it brings an end to this brexit uncertain they has dragged on the uk economy for three—and—a—half years, a hung parliament for example would probably see a continuation of that brexit uncertainty, so that is the fears as far as the pound is concerned. yes. some traders have been telling us they plan to step through the night to monitor the pound. it is too tight to call. another big story, the post office, it is set to pay almost 58 million to settle this dispute with some staff. how big a blow is this for the post office, both in terms of
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reputation and also financially. comely. this is a huge payment they are paying out here, but it is drawing a line under this, a case that has been going on for to a long time. the legal costs were mounts, so time. the legal costs were mounts, so to be able to draw a line under it and to be able to move forward is important here. as far as the people who have been accused or surfed as a result of this, it is important for them to be able to move forward too, so, the fact that we are able to get that line in the sand, will be good for the post office going forward. 0k, for the post office going forward. ok, we will have to leave it there. good to talk 20 you. a quick look at the markets. this is how the ftse100 is looking. it deabandon and went into positive territory, the pound, that has also recovered some ground. just eat shares are in positive territory
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amid the talk of a move. jd sports an interesting... the ftse‘s best performerfor the day an interesting... the ftse‘s best performer for the day has its worth day. so lots going on, the world‘s largest oil company with its largest ipa. you brought it now, we all know that being prime minister is one of the most importantjobs in the uk — but what do children think should be the priority for the next government? newsround have been talking to young people from across the uk about what they would do if they were prime minister hi, newsround. we are in scotland. we are in northern ireland. we are in england. and we are in wales. if i were prime minister, i would cut school down
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to four days per week. i would make a children‘s parliament because children need a voice. i would help the elderly because they are our key to the past. i would have better health care to find a cure for cancer because many of my family members have suffered with cancer. if i was prime minister, i would help homeless people. i would give them food, water, shoes, clean clothes and a bed. because you never know if you are going to become homeless all of a sudden. i would mainly focus on knife crime, gun crime and gangs as these are extremely dangerous to our communities. if i was prime minister, i would try and save the planet. and try to persuade people to use public transport so less pollution travels through the air. i would cut down plastic waste. i would make sure that all animals were cared for. building more parks and increasing our effort into recycling. if i was prime minister, i would stop people from smoking. i find it unfair that not everyone has the same opportunities. if you are wealthy or poor, you should all be able
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to attend university. if i were prime minister, i would make all after—school activities free so that children after—school activities free so that children who couldn't afford it could find out their new hidden talents they didn't know they had. clive will have more news at the top of the hour, it is clive at five. now though, time for a hello. still showers round at the moment, though some across eastern england, still packing in in north and west of scotland. wintry over the higher ground and a chilly start to the night. temperatures this evening only round three to six. and with that in place clear skies for many, it will turn cold quickly. we will see cloud increase, temperatures lift through the night. but elsewhere, eastern parts of wales, england and scotland are
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widespread frost and icy conditions. best of the brightn‘t to start the day in northern and eastern areas, heavy rain becoming her session tent will work from west to east. turning to snow on the hiring ground, southern and central parts of scotla nd southern and central parts of scotland too, again, a covering of snow possible and it will be chilly across eastern area , snow possible and it will be chilly across eastern area, particularly south—east scotland, temperatures round two or three degrees. heavy rain to the east and showers packing
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today at 5: on the last day of campaigning for tomorrow‘s general election, final pitches for your vote. all the party leaders have been out on the campaign trail, trying to reachwaivering voters. we‘ll bring you the very lastest camnpaign news from around the country. also, on the bbc news at 5: a teenager is found guilty of the murder of 14—year—old jaden moodie, who was stabbed to death in east london. our investigation is not over. we know five people were in that car on that night and my officers and i will continue to work to bring jaden‘s murderers to justice. aung san suu kyi appears at the hague to reject accusations myanmar‘s military committed genocide, against rohinga muslims. greta thunberg, the teenage
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