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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  December 17, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at two: you ain't seen nothing yet, folks. boris johnson meets his cabinet for the first time since the election — he says he's determined to lead a people's government. the voters of this country have changed this government and our party for the better. and we must repay their trust now by working flat out to change our country for the better. half a million hotpoint and indesit washing machines in uk homes are to be recalled, as manufacturer whirlpool faces a fresh scare over risks of fire. firefighters in australia are battling to prevent raging bushfires from threatening a major power station in new south wales. coming up on afternoon live
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all the sport — katie shanahan. hello, simon. arsenal and everton are edging closer to appointing their new managers. arsenal are in talks with their former captain, mikel arteta. while everton are hoping to secure their number one target, carlo anchelotti. thanks, katie. and darren has all the weather. thanks very much. good afternoon. our weather is a fairly quiet right now, more overnight frost tonight and fog around, too. on the other side of the atlantic the weather has much more energy, some storm damage to look at in the united states later in the programme. thanks, darren. also coming up — and how pop star ellie goulding came to the aid of a driver being shunted sideways by a lorry.
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hello, everyone — this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. he boris he johnson has held his first cabinet meeting borisjohnson has held his first cabinet meeting since his election victory — and promised to pass a law ruling out any extension to the brexit process beyond the end of next year. the uk is scheduled to leave the eu onjanuary 31st, and enter a transition period which is due to conclude next december, but that can be extended for up to two years if talks aren't complete. critics say that ruling out an extention increases the chance of leaving the eu without a trade deal. this report from our political correspondent helen catt contains flashing images. will there be a vote this friday, mr rees mogg? announcements will be made in due course. if mps do vote on the brexit bill this friday it will include a significant change. you ain't seen nothing yet, folks. we will have to work even harder because people have a high level of expectation and we must deliver
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for them. borisjohnson will include a clause in his withdrawal agreement bill to try to try to limit trade negotiations with the eu to less than a year. we will have conversations with the european union about our new relationship which will be based on free trade and friendly cooperation, and the political declaration that the eu have signed up to commits them to finishing those conversations by the end of 2020. under the existing agreement the uk formally leaves the eu on the 31st of january 2020. until the end of december that year it will be in a transition period where uk rules match eu ones. but currently both sides could agree to extend that for another two years if they thought they were unlikely to reach a new trade deal in time. it is that option that borisjohnson intends to rule out in law. critics say that could lead to a no—deal brexit. i understand that the government of course wants to put a deadline on this, they want to put pressure to get a deal done, but this
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is pressure that would be hugely damaging on our own manufacturing capacity in this country and ultimately would cost usjobs. last night boris johnson met his new mps at a reception in parliament. their numbers mean his withdrawal agreement bill will almost certainly pass, but his majority could also offer a way back. johnson is introducing this bill to give himself this firm deadline, but he has a big majority, he could easily introduce a later bill saying, actually, we could extend it now. but it is largely domestic, domestic virtue signalling, signalling that he will commit to what he put on the manifesto to get this deal done by the end of the year. brexit has so far been a tale of missed deadlines. the date for actually leaving the eu delayed twice already this year. that is now pretty set for next month. borisjohnson's move is symbolically important, designed to demonstrate to voters and negotiators that he is determined not to see that sort of drift again when it comes to reaching new trade arrangements with the eu. helen catt, bbc news, westminster.
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let's go over now to the house of commons where there's a lot of activity this afternoon and our chief political correspondent vicki young is there. all the new mps are beginning to get sworn in. before that you end up with the speaker being re—elected, he will not be opposed. right at the end of the last parliamentjohn bercow stood down and lindsay hoyle was elected speaker and he is expected to resume that position today. the swearing in of mps as well but it is traditional the prime minister and leader of the opposition say a few words about the speaker so we will have to watch carefully to see what the town is there. borisjohnson will have a lot more tory mps behind him to cheer him on, the opposite of course true forjeremy corbyn. tonight he will face his mps for the first time in a meeting. the snp riding high, lots of new mps for them, alan smith is
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with me now, he is one of them. congratulations on your election. you were an ma pizza you have experience of what goes on in the eu, what do you make of boris johnson saying he will legislate on the transition period —— you where a mep. he is limiting his own freedom of manoeuvre for the sake of a couple of headlines and it will not work in practice. he already has a majority and he has made his own life more difficult. the eu will close the doors behind us if this deal is nodded through by this place. the next phase will be infinitesimally more complicated than we've seen so far so it artificially plays a time limit is daft. is there a trade deal can be done by the end of 2020, even if it were a bare—bones trade deal? what on earth is a bare—bones trade
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deal? even the language people are using is dumbing down the discussion. it is complicated will ta ke discussion. it is complicated will take time. a deal could be done if there was no change whatsoever, staying in the single market and customs union, but they've already said they don't want that. this is where the conservatives will realise very quickly that united around brexit means brexit and getting brexit means brexit and getting brexit sorted but if they exit the eu on the terms of borisjohnson's deal they still have all the big decisions to make and that will tear them apart because they papered over them apart because they papered over the cracks so far, they will not be able to do so much longer. what is the role of the snp and all of this, you've come back with more mps, bigger parliamentary presence but with the prime minister having a much larger majority. is there much you can do? you wanted to oppose brexit, it's going to happen at the end of january? lam end of january? i am personally conflicted on that, i gave up the european parliament
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after 16 years, i love representing scotland in the european parliament andl scotland in the european parliament and i got a fantastic result in sterling, 51% of the vote, i can't praise our site might are highly enough but there is the wider context despite the fact scotland had a very strong crowd remain vote, because of events elsewhere are beyond our control we will be limited in what we can do to build bridges in that discussion. i will be arguing if brexit does happen and i'm still saying if, i will argue for as close a relationship for the whole of the uk to the eu as possible, as much regulatory alignment as possible. there are still discussions to be had but it's not the discussion i hoped it would be. the other issue you will be in conflict with boris johnson on the other issue you will be in conflict with borisjohnson on is the idea of another scottish independence referendum. he made it clear to nicola sturgeon he will not grant that, it was a once in a generation decision, he says. is there anything you can do to persuade him to grant you that?
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the first thing is i am not sure i trust a single thing borisjohnson says, he said he would rather be deadin says, he said he would rather be dead ina says, he said he would rather be dead in a ditch and deliver brexit on the 31st of october and he did not, he promised lots of things to the dup and reneged on that. i think it's a matter of political calculation, he just lost an election in scotland comprehensively and if he wants to play it smart he needs to come for his own credibility within scotland, changes position because he needs to be serious about the mandate we have, not to run the uk government, but it's quite clear that the people of scotland endorsed scotland's right to choose and rejected borisjohnson to choose and rejected borisjohnson to let see more nuance from his position. thank you very much indeed. the view from the snp. everything kicks off here at 2:30pm. i will talk to you later. thank you very much. we will be bringing you
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that live at 2:30pm, the ceremony surrounding the occasion where those mps are sworn in, 140 new mps, sorry, 109 new mps, many of them of course conservative. we'll bring you that full ceremony a little later on. uk unemployment fell to its lowest level since january 1975, in the three months to october. figures released by the office for national statistics show the number of people out of work fell by 13,000 to 1.28 million. the employment rate — the total number of people in work — rose to an all—time high of 76%, with more than 32 million people in employment. the figures, however, also show slowing wage growth over that period. a teenager who stabbed a lawyer to death as he walked through a shopping centre has beenjailed for a minimum of 15 years. ewan ireland was 17 when he attacked 52—year—old peter duncan at the entrance to newcastle's eldon square shopping centre in august. he stabbed the lawyer with a screwdriver he had just stolen.
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half a million washing machines in the uk made by whirlpool are to be recalled — plunging the manufacturer into a fresh saga about dangerous appliances. the machines, which are branded as hotpoint or indesit, were sold for more than five years, but their door locking system can overheat creating the risk of fire. our consumer affairs reporter kevin peachey is here. we've had a similar scare over dryers, this is different? at this as washing machines, 500,000 under the hotpoint and indesit brands and they could cause a fire. they were sold since october 2014 in the uk, about 20% of those branded washing machines sold here since that time. there is a problem with the door locking mechanism. basically anything but a cold wash and set off anything but a cold wash and set off a chain of events that means it can overheat and cause a risk of fire andi overheat and cause a risk of fire and i asked the vice president of whirlpool, which owns these brands,
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what that had meant for people and homeowners? we are aware of 79 incidents that have taken place in which there has been minimal property damage is no serious injuries. but that is not good enough for us and that's one of the reasons i'm here today and we are announcing a full product recall with a like for like replacement or repair because we need to make sure our customers are safe. that is a replacement or repair which would start in early january but clearly the whole process could ta ke but clearly the whole process could take months. there is no offer of a refu nd take months. there is no offer of a refund and clearly that will i think leave it open to some criticism from customers. in the meantime how do you know if your machine might be affected? the company set up an online checker and a phone line which you can check and a phone line which you can check and put in your serial number or model number, on the inside of the
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door back of the machine got put that into see if it is one of those affected. incredibly, that should have started at 1pm today and they don't seem to be working at the moment, certainly forsome customers. eventually, when people can use those services, they will be able to see if they are effect and then they can go on the list for these repairs or replacements, which will start in early january, but clearly the company is staying up until then you need to either unplug the machine orjust use a cold wash, under 20 celsius. over christmas, for the foreseeable future and potentially for months, no chance of a hot wash at home using your washing machine. kevin, thank you very much. the london fire brigade has been "wasteful" and slow to implement the changes needed after the grenfell tower fire, according to a report by inspectors. they found incident commanders didn't receive enough training, and the service was not particularly well run. london fire brigade acknowledged aspects of its performance were not good enough.
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our home affairs correspondent tom symonds reports. it's a tough, physicaljob, even when there are no flames and firefighters are just demonstrating typical procedures. today's report makes no criticism of those on the front line but it says the london fire brigade is not well—run, it's slow to learn lessons and has a long way to go in improving its efficiency. there's one particular concern — not enough training, especially for incident commanders, and training which is not pass or fail. so what happens if officers don't perform well? nothing. nothing? no, they arejust back on the system. what do you think of that? we've said it is one of the most worrying causes of concern. it's why we've said... we've graded the training that london fire brigade delivers as inadequate, it's got to be sorted out. but it's more than two years since the fire and a year since the then london fire commissioner downplayed
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concerns about training at the grenfell inquiry. i wouldn't expect us to be developing training or response to something that simply shouldn't happen. meaning a fire fuelled by cladding like at grenfell. but that sort of comment and today's report are the reasons she has resigned. the new commissioner says that additional training is being introduced. some affected by the fire aren't keen to criticise front line firefighters, but nabeel lost six members of his family. he's furious at what the inspectors have found. it's very upsetting and disgraceful because the fact of people's lives are at stake and it's very important that we get it right and still two years on, and a half, and they still haven't got it right. it's unacceptable. what happened here will be a turning point for the london brigade, but the inspectors have also released reports today on 14 other english fire services. their conclusions?
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half are doing well and the other half really could do better. tom symonds, bbc news. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the government is to add a new clause to the brexit bill to make it illegal for parliament to extend the process of leaving the european union beyond the end of 2020. half a million hotpoint and indesit washing machines are to be recalled because their door locking system could be a fire risk. firefighters in australia are battling to prevent raging bushfires from threatening a major power station in new south wales. arsenal and everton looked to be getting closer to appointing their new managers. arsenal are in talks with their former captain, mikel arteta. while everton are hoping to secure their number one target, carlo anchelotti.
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ac milan are the latest club to criticise a new anti—racism campaign in italy's top league. posters show pictures of monkeys with painted faces. anti—discrimation group fare have called it a "sickjoke". and, jurgen klopp says he's looking forward to the club world cup — despite the fixture congestion that it's caused. liverpool play monterrey tomorrow, with their youth side playing aston villa in the quarter finals of the league cup tonight. a review of the decline in the number of rape prosecutions and convictions across england and wales says the criminaljustice system is so under—resourced it's "close to breaking point". according to figures from the crown prosecution service there were a record 58,000 allegations of rape in the year to march. but fewer than 2000 of those cases led to successful prosecutions. the crown prosecution service inspectorate says a "damning" number of cases are lost during "under—resourced" police investigations. but it's rejected claims that prosecutors are unfairly selective
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about cases they charge. katie russell from rape crisis england and wales says she has serious concerns about the review‘s findings. we are deeply disappointed with it because it says that so little. it is astonishing that the crown prosecution service's attitude appears to be that they are not doing anything wrong and they can carry on as normal. we would expect that the crown prosecution service as a key criminaljustice agency would be as concerned as we are by these com pletely u na cce pta bly low charging, prosecution and conviction rates and the massive disparity between the increase in victims and survivors coming forward and the criminal justice outcomes at the other end. we would expect them to be more proactive in telling us what they intend to do about that. the uk border force agency says it's been dealing with a number of boats carrying migrants that were attempting to cross the channel. following reports that 20 migrants arrived at the port, the home office has confirmed that a number of its officers have been deployed. a spokesman said "border force is currently dealing with ongoing small boat incidents off the kent coast." it has previously warned that trying to make the trip
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across the english channel from mainland europe in a small boat is "incredibly dangerous". boeing is to halt production of the 737 max airliner, which has been grounded for several months. the plane was still being built, despite the model having been banned from flying following two crashes, in indonesia and ethiopia, which killed more than 300 people. companies supplying boeing across the world are expected to be affected by the decision. as politicians gather for a summit to discuss how to help the world s 25 million refugees, the bbc has been told of an increasing number of children self—harming and attempting suicide, in the greek refugee camp on lesbos. there's been a sharp increase in the number of refugees arriving there in recent months and almost 18,000 people are living in one camp there's been a sharp increase in the number of refugees arriving there in recent months and almost 18,000 people are living in one camp which is designed for 2,000. psychologists say they're overwhelmed with the number of young people needing urgent help. right now i will take you over to holyrood, where nicola sturgeon is
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addressing the scottish parliament. somebody who stood unsuccessfully in two west minister and general elections i have a good understanding of how they will feel. it is also worth recognising this was the first december general election in more than 90 years and i suspect the candidates and activists who are still thawing out all hope it is sometime until the next winter election takes place. however, notwithstanding the challenges of bad weather and dark nights it is important to note turnout in scotla nd important to note turnout in scotland actually increased, in fact iam sure scotland actually increased, in fact i am sure will be welcomed by all of us. i am sure will be welcomed by all of us. presenting officer, the election was comprehensively won in scotland by the snp. indeed,... applause you have to go as far back as the election of ted heath in 1970, the yeari election of ted heath in 1970, the year i was born, to find a party that got a higher share of the vote across the uk did in the snp did in
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scotla nd across the uk did in the snp did in scotland last week. by any measure thatis scotland last week. by any measure that is a significant vote of confidence and i and my colleagues will work hard each and every day to repay the trust that has been again placed in us. it was also an endorsement of our election message, that scotland does not want a boris johnson government and we do not wa nt to johnson government and we do not want to leave the eu and that while opinions may differ on the substantive question of independence, we do want scotland's future to be in scotland's hands. by contrast, while the conservative party won a uk wide majority they once again were heavily defeated in scotland, having fought the election on the single issue of opposition to an independence referendum. they lost not just a an independence referendum. they lost notjust a vote share but also more than half of their seats. the conservatives have now lost 17 consecutive westminster elections in scotland, stretching as far back as
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1959. in spite of that, and it is a serious point, we face a majority tory government implementing a ma nifesto tory government implementing a manifesto that scotland rejected. furthermore, 74% of votes in scotla nd furthermore, 74% of votes in scotland were cast for parties that either supported remaining in the eu or were in favour of a second eu referendum. 90% of seats were won by pro—eu or pro—eu referendum party is, regardless we are set to be dragged out of the eu against our will. presiding officer, at such a democratic deficit is notjust undesirable, although it most certainly is, it is also completely and utterly unsustainable. this election demonstrated a fundamental point, the kind of future desired by most people in scotland is very clearly different to that favoured by much of the rest of the uk. it is essential therefore, a future outside of europe and governed by an
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increasingly right—wing conservative government is not foisted upon scotland. instead we must have the right to consider the alternative of independence. that is white later this week in line with repeated election mandates, reinforced once again last thursday, i will publish again last thursday, i will publish a detailed democratic case for a tra nsfer of a detailed democratic case for a transfer of power from westminster to this parliament to allow for an independence that being challenged. a plasma —— that is beyond being challenged. this parliament will also vote on the final stage of the referendum scotla nd final stage of the referendum scotland bill that's put in place a framework for a future referendum. there are already some signs those who previously opposed the referendum, ah, when faced with the democratic reality of thursday's result, are we thinking that decision. i welcome that but i want to be clear. i do not assume an a cce pta nce to be clear. i do not assume an acceptance of scotland's right to
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choose will always equate to sport —— support for independence while i also do not assume everyone who voted snp is ready to vote for independence. i recognise the work we have to do to persuade a clear majority in scotland it is the best way forward for our country. nevertheless, it is clear there is a growing cross—party recognition election mandates must be honoured. that there has been a material change of circumstances and the question of independence must be decided by the people and not by politicians. given the nature of what we are facing in terms of uk governance now, that is now a matter of some urgency which is why this government wants people to have a choice next year. back in the early 19905 when scotland was then also facing the prospect of a fourth tory government with no mandate here, there was a coming together or political parties, communities and
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civic scotland, that resulted in the establishment of this parliament. this parliament of course has achieved much but a new brexit focus tory government presents risks that few could have predicted at the dawn of devolution. i hope in the coming days and weeks we will see a similar coming together around the idea of scotland's right to choose a better future. of course we must also be —— redouble our efforts to protect scotla nd redouble our efforts to protect scotland with the powers we have. this government is determined to do that and i would ask other parties to support us in that task. to cite just one example, the resolution foundation last month published research showing under conservative plans for social security, child poverty could reach a 60 year high. by poverty could reach a 60 year high. by 2023 more than one in three children across the uk could be living in poverty and i'm sure no one in this chamber would find that remotely acceptable. that means our child poverty action plan and work to implement the new scottish child
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payment will be even more important thenit payment will be even more important then it was already. it does now seem then it was already. it does now seem inevitable at the end of january scotland will be taken out of the eu against our will. throughout the bricks are process the westminster government has ignored the wishes of scotland and the views of this parliament and now it seems the prime minister is determined to push through quickly the withdrawal agreement bill. this parliament will have to consider whether or not it will give consent to this but if the uk government was to this but if the uk government was to press ahead without that consent it would be further proof of westminster‘s content it would be further proof of westm i nster‘s content for devolution. and its willingness to tearup devolution. and its willingness to tear up established constitutional rules. the hard brexit poses a real danger to our economy and to social and environmental safeguards at a time that we must substantially step up time that we must substantially step up our efforts to tackle climate change. brexit will also put part of our health service in the sights of us trade negotiators and could mean the nhs has to pay higher prices for
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drugs. of course brexit is the cause of significant uncertainty and worry for our fellow eu citizens who contribute so much to modern scotland. scotland must respond to and seek to overcome these challenges. just as we did in the immediate aftermath of the brexit without the scottish government in january will convene a number of meetings bringing together key groups that represent different aspects of scottish life, including civic society, trade unions and the business community, religious and minority groups and partners in local government. we will engage with the standing council of europe to ensure we take whatever steps we can to retain our relationships with europe and identify ways to ensure our voice and interest are heard. we will listen to the conclusions of the citizens assembly when it reports about the kind of country we should be seeking to build. there is also a particular and immediate challenge that will require cross— party challenge that will require cross—party co—operation. this parliament is required to deliver a budget before the start of the next financial year and scotland's local authorities would expect to set
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their budgets in late february or early march. the uk government has not yet confirmed when it will produce its own budget and with the block grant adjustments for scotland but it may not be until march. —— contingency plans have been under consideration, we think this timetable will require parties to work together. in the spirit in which this parliament was established, and notwithstanding the many disagreements between us. i hope we can find common ground and work together on a range of issues. this is indeed a watershed moment for scotland. we are facing a tory government scotland did not vote for and which many fear will pose a real danger to our country and the fabric of our society. this parliament has a duty proved to predicted values people in scotland voted for. i believe we can only fully do that with independence and that's my letter this week i will take the next steps to secure scotland's right to secure —— right to choose.
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it is all about building a more prosperous and fair a country so we will do everything we can to achieve that with the powers we have right now. we must tackle child poverty, protect the nhs and help it overcome challenges of rising demand and also support an open and innovative an export orientated economy. we must ensure scotland remains an open and welcoming and inclusive country where people treat each other with kindness, dignity and compassion. that is not a task for any one party although i scotland's government we will take a lead, but it is a job for all of us. my commitment is i will seek to work with members across the chamber and with civic scotla nd across the chamber and with civic scotland as we seek the challenges —— as we face the challenges ahead and seek to build a better, fairer, more prosperous scotland people did vote for. applause nicola sturgeon in the scottish parliament making a statement warning of the new danger posed by boris johnson's warning of the new danger posed by borisjohnson's government warning of the new danger posed by boris johnson's government and
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warning of the new danger posed by borisjohnson's government and once again saying there was a strong case for a second referendum on independence. we will keep an eye on events in holyrood but i will take you now to the house of commons because shortly mps, the new mps, the house of commons because shortly mps, the new mp5, 140 of the house of commons because shortly mps, the new mps,140 of them, including the hundred nine conservatives, will begin the process of being sworn in. this is the first sitting of the new parliament, following last week's's election. with me is lieutenant david lee kiki was black roll—out —— black rod in the house of lords until last year. we are looking at a very important ceremony. parliament, you can very important ceremony. parliament, you can see very important ceremony. parliament, you can see it on your screen, it is sitting there but the members of parliament cannot do anything in parliament cannot do anything in parliament until they have been some formalities. the formalities are really interesting if you are a parliament watcher.
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the house of commons itself cannot undertake any business until at least there is a speaker. and at the beginning of a new parliament, and this is a newly elected parliament as you just said, they cannot undertake anything until they have a speaker. so the first point to make is that the speaker is, in fact, elected by the house of commons themselves, but has to be approved by the sovereign. and there is an old tradition where the speaker used to report to the sovereign. and so the sovereign not only approves the speaker nowadays, but used to actually more or less appoint him. or her. so the next formality that you will see taking place in the chamber is the father of the house, and that is the longest serving member of parliament, who will preside over the house, effectively taking the chair. and a royal commission, not the queen herself, the royal commission will assemble
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in the house of lords, which is 100 yards up from the house of commons chamber. we are looking at the corridor. the house of lords will assemble. and the royal commission will assemble in the house of lords and black rod will be dispatched from the house of lords chamber to come down to the house of commons where you will see the doors. we are looking at the corridor. you are looking at the corridor. you are looking at the corridor. you are looking at central lobby. black rod normally starts from the house of lords chamber and it takes about a good minute to walk all the way from the house of lords chamber down through central lobby which you can see on your screen and down to the house of commons chamber. and when he gets to the house of commons chamber, the door is slammed not in his face, herface, black rod is a woman, sarah clarke, who took over from mejust woman, sarah clarke, who took over from me just about two years ago.
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and then she will bank on the door three times with the black rod and will be admitted. and she will give a little speech which essentially summons the house of commons to hear the royal commission on house of lords. so they all decamp. led by the father of the house and the clerk of the house. up to the house of lords. most, if not all, of the mps will follow. and in the house of lords chamber, the royal commission will then instruct the father of the house to repair back to the house of commons and organise the election, or selection, of a new speaker. now, in this case, sir lindsay hoyle was recently selected, elected to the post, just before the general election. and it is assumed that he will be re—elected, reappointed by the commons without anyone standing against him. we are familiar with
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when he was first chosen, that scene where he pretends to be dragged off to his newjob. we are going to see that again, aren't we? yes, it is a ritual we like our rituals. so, having interestingly, once the commons has elected or selected him and then, believe it or not, another royal commission assembles in the house of lords and this will be about one hour later because the house of commons wants to get on with its business. i will get what that businesses immediately. another royal commission assembles in house of lords. they, once again, dispatch black rod down to the house of commons, he once again has the door slammed in her face. he chooses royal commission, he was on it? slammed in her face. he chooses royal commission, he was on mm is essentially appointed by the queen. she has people who help appoint them, but it is a royal commission by order of the sovereign. and they issued the
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sovereign's instruction in the first place for the commons to appoint a speaker. then when they assemble in the house of commons for the second time, two things happen. one is that the royal commission give the sovereign's approbation or approval of the speaker. and secondly, the speaker then gives an undertaking that he will come up well, i hope we will hear it live. well, i know that the country has just received her instructions from the leader of the house of the, so we should be seeing her appearing in the corridor quite soon. “— her appearing in the corridor quite soon. —— the house of lords. she is working out of the lords chamber and she bails to the chair and she has just turned and we should see her for the first time in the ceremony. she appears in this corridor. —— she bails to the chair. is this nerve—racking for black rod to do this? they are made of stem stuff, it is part of the appointment
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procedure. here comes sarah clarke with an escort, as is tradition, of a police officer, who heads the possession. and then the principal or one of the deputy principal doorkeeper is from the house of lords and then black rod herself. and i can tell you that black rod will be thinking at this moment of two things only. one will be, i must make those bangs on the door very firm. because no black rod gets criticised more than if the wrapping on the door is feeble. sarah clarke has done this a few times now, set fair -- has done this a few times now, set fair —— so there are no risks here. let's just join fair —— so there are no risks here. let'sjustjoin in the fair —— so there are no risks here. let's justjoin in the ceremony.
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black rod! members of the house of commons, the lords are duly authorised by virtue of her majesty's mission to declare the opening of parliament, desire the opening of parliament, desire the presence of this honourable house. in the house of peers to hear the commission read. so the lines we re the commission read. so the lines were delivered perfectly and that would have been a second then going through the mind of black rod, and now the house of commons is led by the father of the house —— it would have been the second thing. sir peter bottomley. he will walk out in
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company with black rod. and the clerk of the house. followed by the prime minister, the leader of the opposition. usually the frontbenchers are then allowed by courtesy of the rest of the house. and then the rest of the house follows. and traditionally, this is quite a noisy rabble. and it is part of the ceremony, in a way, of the doors of the commons chamber being banned in black rod's face. it is an expression of the house of commons political independence of the sovereign. and that is what that theatre is about. and when the mp5, i would say, process, as you can see them in the picture, processing up to the house of lords, they go without too much urgency to keep the royal commission waiting. and they
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normally do so quite noisily. and once again, this is traditionally sort of rather obvious sign of their independence. they will behave how they want and they will get there in their own time, and not completely at the behest of either the sovereign or the royal commission. lot of smiling faces we are looking at, some of the new mps as well. mostly, of course, given the make—up of this parliament, the smiles on the faces of conservative members. just looking at the ceremony, we go through this, many people will think, we see this when the queen comes to formally open parliament as well. but the ceremony is important. the pump as some people describe it is an important aspect of all this. the whole business of ceremonies, here in parliament, or anywhere in the country, if you go to the local
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council chambers of the mayoral elections, they all have their ceremonies. let's just listen in. ceremonies. let'sjust listen in. sorry. apologies. my lords and members of the house of commons, we are commanded by her majesty to let you know that it not being convenient for her to be present here in this day in her royal person, she has seen day in her royal person, she has seen fit under the great seal to empower several lords to do all things in her majesty's name which are to be done on her majesty's part in this government, as by the patent will fully appear. elizabeth ii, in this government, as by the patent willfully appear. elizabeth ii, by the grace of god of the united kingdom of great britain and northern ireland and of our other realms and territories queen, head
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of the commonwealth, defender of the faith. to all to whom these presents shall come, greeting. whereas by the advice of our council, for certain arduous and arduous —— and urgent affairs concerning us, the state and defence of our united kingdom and the church, we have ordered a certain parliament to be holding at our city of westminster on tuesday the 17th day of december incident. and for as much as diverse causes and considerations... he is reading out the formal proclamation, as it were, of what the royal commission is. and what the house of commons is then to go away and do, which is to elect a new speaker. let's rejoin. archbishop of canterbury, of all— england and metropolitan. archbishop of canterbury, of all—england and metropolitan. our well beloved and faithful councillor robert james buckland, chancellor of great britain. and others, our councillors here and i have by the
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advice of our said council, do give and grant by the tenure of these presents unto the said archbishop of canterbury, robert james buckland, chancellor of great britain, peter norman, lord fowler, lord speaker. natalie jessica, norman, lord fowler, lord speaker. nataliejessica, baroness norman, lord fowler, lord speaker. natalie jessica, baroness evans of bowes park, lord privy seal. richard mark, lord newby. so the reading clarke is now introducing by name each of the members of the royal commission. and the members respond by doffing their caps. in the case of the ladies, they know. to begin
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and hold our said parliament and to open and declare and cause to be opened and declared the causes of holding the same and to proceed upon the said affairs in our said parliament, and in all matters arising therein, and to do everything which for us and by us and for the good government of our said united kingdom and other dominions thereto belonging shall be there in to be done. and also, if necessary, to continue, a german anti—perrault keller said parliament. commending also by the tenure of these presents with the assent of our said council, as well or is every, the archbishops, bishops, lords and marionettes and knights, as all others whom it concerns, to meet in our said parliament. but to the same archbishop of canterbury, chancellor of great britain and others our councillors aforesaid or any three
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or more of them, they diligently intend, in the premises in the form of the aforesaid. in witness where are, we have these our letters to be made patent. witness our self at westminster, the 17th day of september, in the 68th year of our reign. by the queen herself, signed by her own hand. my lords and members of the house of commons, we haveitin members of the house of commons, we have it in command from her majesty to let you know that as soon as the members of both houses shall be sworn in, the causes of her majesty calling this parliament will be declared to you. and it being necessary that the house of commons should be first chosen, it is her majesty's pleasure that you, members of the house of commons, repair to the place where you are to sit and there proceed to the choice of some proper person to be your speaker and that you present such a person whom
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you shall choose so here for her majesty's royal approbation. so that is the royal commission over, they have given their instructions for the commons to select a speaker. the father of the house, black rod, the clerk, the serjeant at arms, they bow three times, as they withdraw from the house of lords chamber and the commission responds to those bales by doffing their caps. you can see on the picture black rod escorting the father of the house of commons out of the house of lords chamber. followed by the prime minister, leader of the opposition, the cabinet and shadow cabinet, they now go back to the house of commons chamber and there, they will select or confirm the selection committee election of the new speaker. and
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then,in election of the new speaker. and then, in about one hour's time, the whole process will be repeated, where the speaker will present himself for approbation. so, the father of the house and black rod. black rod, at this stage, takes her leave. and the father of the house leads all the mp5 back into the house of commons chamber. and a smiling borisjohnson, house of commons chamber. and a smiling boris johnson, prime minister, of course, alongside a less smileyjeremy corbyn as they head back to the chamber. and this is where politics will start to kick in and it gets a bit livelier one suspects once they are back in the chamber. well, funnily enough, not. because the first thing that needs to happen once not only the ceremony, but the next one, the approval of the speaker has taken place, only then can the mp5 be
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sworn in. and until mps have been sworn in. and until mps have been sworn in, house commons cannot conduct any business. and that swearing in it will take place during the course of the rest of today and tomorrow. it takes a while today and tomorrow. it takes a while to swear in all 650. so business problem —— proper probably woken —— get under way until tomorrow at the earliest. so is the prime minister ta kes a earliest. so is the prime minister takes a seat, we get our first real look at the make—up of this new parliament. following that election win for the conservatives last week. and now we return to the formalities, as other mp5 take their seats. with me, lieutenant general david leakey, seats. with me, lieutenant general david lea key, he seats. with me, lieutenant general david leakey, he was black rod in house of lords between 2011 and 2018, and has been guiding us through this process which, to the outsider, looks slightly odd and certainly at odds with what used in the house of commons. they are all looking rather well—behaved well—behaved at this stage.|j
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mention early on when you ask me about the ceremonies, why do we have the ceremonies and what purpose?” am required to ascertain whether sir lindsay hoyle is willing to be chosen as speaker. i call sir lindsay hoyle. thank you, father of the house. first of all, i would like to thank the constituents of chorley for allowing me to put myself forward as speaker. i would also like to welcome all new members to house. thank you, sir peter. —— to house. thank you, sir peter. —— to the house. thank you, said peter. may i say many congratulations on your new role as father of the house? of course, this is nothing new to your family. you have great history in this room, as you know. you have served this place and your constituents for 44 and a half years. itjust goes constituents for 44 and a half years. it just goes to show all newcomers become an mp, it really
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can be ajob newcomers become an mp, it really can be a job for life. and i don't think this is the end just yet. can i say, it has been an absolute privilege to serve as deputy speaker for the last nine years? and a speaker for a full two days! i have got to say, it made the election pretty easy, i have got to say. but parliament was dissolved last month and it will be an honour to serve again in this parliament. but hopefully, this time, for a little longer. as i said before, a speaker has to be trusted and trusted, i believe is a deputy. i have a proven track record of being impartial, independent and fair. allowing members to exercise their right to speak macro regardless of the length of service. —— to speak macro it regardless. having served on the
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backbenches. .. regardless. having served on the backbenches... i regardless. having served on the backbenches. .. i would regardless. having served on the backbenches... iwould have regardless. having served on the backbenches... i would have thought the mps would give me a bit of a boost! don't let those who had been here a lot longer starts dictating already! having served on the backbenches myself for 13 years, i understand how important it is for backbenchers to be able to hold the government to account and to promote the causes which are dear to them. on that basis, i submit myself to the house as your speaker and your champion and ensuring that my office is open to all. thank you. so the issue now is whether that will be contested by anyone.” so the issue now is whether that will be contested by anyone. i call the honourable member for wigan to move the motion. i beg to move that sir lindsay hoyle do take the chair of this house as speaker. and i am delighted to propose someone who has beena delighted to propose someone who has
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been a great friend not just delighted to propose someone who has been a great friend notjust me, but for many here on all sides the house. when i arrived in this place nearly ten years ago as a newly elected mp, it was a daunting experience. for those of us who have not spent most of our lives in buildings like these, it can be incredibly overwhelming. and as the former member for north west durham said when she arrived at this place reeks of privilege and finding your confidence and your voice for your constituents takes practice and it takes time. but it also takes friendship and support from other people. and it should be a comfort to all the new members of this house to all the new members of this house to know that you will find a great friend in our speaker. with his typical lancashire warmth, you will always find his door open for a mug of yorkshire tea. and of course... and of course, a hobnob. in fact,
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one of the stories i was told about lindsay a few years ago was a time when he arrived unannounced, as he often does, in another mp's office. sat down and said, right, put the on, then? york city, said the mp? absolutely, he said with enthusiasm. adding, only two good things about yorkshire, the tea and m62 taking out! —— taking you out of it! if there are any yorkshire mps who would like to change their minds, now is the time! but i am sure you won't because above all else, lindsay has always been a fair and partisan deputy speaker, even to those who hail from god is's own country because he knows to privilege some voices over others is to silence people in our communities
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up to silence people in our communities up and down the country. of course, you can take this lack of partisanship a little too far. in 2017, lindsay asked me to come and launch the general election campaign for him and his what was then a marginal constituencies of chorley. there is one junction of the motorway from wigan to charlie and i was driving down the motorway and i saw these enormous billboards, great big blue billboards for a strong and sta ble big blue billboards for a strong and stable chorley. and i started to panic andl stable chorley. and i started to panic and i thought, my god, they are targeting this place! lindsay hasn't got a hope, i have to get there and motivate the supporters and get people out. then i looked closer and on these billboards was lindsay's face! vote lindsay hoyle for a strong and stable chorley. i think the honourable member for maidenhead will be pleased. and it may not have worked out so well for the other side, but it certainly worked out well for lindsay and he
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was returned here and became deputy speaker again. and he was returned here and became deputy speakeragain. and he has was returned here and became deputy speaker again. and he has always made the effort, seriously, to work with people and respect people from all sides of the house and many on this side are deeply saddened by the loss of our friend from this place, the former mp for bolsover. but it isa the former mp for bolsover. but it is a comfort to know that lindsay has a cat named dennis skinner. and be reassured that he never pick sides, he also has a parrot called boris. there is a more serious point to make. when we chose lindsay hoyle to make. when we chose lindsay hoyle to be our speaker, someone back home said to me, i can't believe that he was said to me, i can't believe that he wa s a llowe d said to me, i can't believe that he was allowed to do it. we can and chorley are right next door to each other, they are towns where people have felt for a very long time that things are not working for them. i just let that sink in for a moment. i can't believe that he was allowed to do it. what does it say about how people feel in those communities, communities that have sent shock waves through the political system, many changing hands for the first time in100 years, many changing hands for the first time in 100 years, what does it say
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that they see parliament as a bastion of privilege where ordinary people like them cannot wield power? so for all of us in this house, whether we have won lost, we have done this place a service by electing someone to be our face and our voice for people many miles distant from here to see as one of their own many have known for some time in this place that the system is not working. i have had those conversations in the division lobbies and behind closed doors with members of parliament from all political parties. we can feel the ground crumbling beneath our feet. we have seen it and we have felt it and we must give voice to it. and thatis and we must give voice to it. and that is why i am relieved, i am proud and i am honoured to propose that lindsay hoyle takes the chair today. thank you. lisa nandy emerging as a potential contender to replacejeremy corbyn
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as next labour leader. sir peter bottomley now takes the vote. the ayes have it. the ayes have it. david, he we go, the dragging. so this is another bit of house of commons chamber theatre. the elected speaker showing himself unwilling to go to the chair, so having to be dragged there. and now we hear the next bit of formal proceedings. before i take the chair, a speaker elect, i wish to thank the house for the honour that is again bestowed upon me. i am the honour that is again bestowed upon me. i am aware the honour that is again bestowed upon me. i am aware that it is the greatest on eight you can give to any of its members. i pray that i shalljustify its continuing confidence and i propose to do all within my power to cherish its best traditions. thank you to you.
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i had to get that bit right! before i call the prime minister... ace is now formally put on the table which means the house of commons is in session. —— the mace. means the house of commons is in session. -- the mace. most returning honourable members have to be sworn in i therefore encourage short speeches from party leaders and discourage other members from seeking to catch my eye! as much as i would like to bask in that, i think it is more important that we get members sworn in that is my commitment to the house. prime minister! thank you, mr speaker. mr speaker elect... mr speaker elect, i am sure the whole house willjoin me in sending our condolences to the
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families and friends ofjack merritt and saskia jones, murdered in a terrorist attack near london bridge during the election campaign and we pay tribute once again to the emergency services and to the members of the public for the bravery they showed. mr speaker, congratulations to you on your office and congratulations on the honourable member for wigan who office and congratulations on the honourable memberfor wigan who has just spoken. i don't know about you, mr speaker elect, but as you survey this house, from your eminence, he still speaker elect, from eminence, with the characteristic boom that has brought you such deserved popularity, mr speaker, i don't know what you think, but i mean absolutely no disrespect to those no longer with us, mr speaker, absolutely no disrespect to those no longerwith us, mr speaker, but absolutely no disrespect to those no longer with us, mr speaker, but i think that this parliament is a vast improvement on its predecessor! and indeed, mr speaker, iwould improvement on its predecessor! and indeed, mr speaker, i would say it is one of the best parliament this country has ever produced! with more
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female members than ever before. with more black and minority ethnic members than ever before. and it is also, mr speaker, incarnated in your person, mr speaker, a vastly more democratic parliament because this parliament is not going to waste the time of the nation in deadlock and division and delay. on friday of this week, this parliament is going to put the withdrawal agreement... friday. in the microwave. then this new democratic parliament, this people's parliament, is going to do something, mr speaker. iwonder people's parliament, is going to do something, mr speaker. i wonder if you can guess what it is this parliament is going to do? what is it going to do, mr speaker? i wonder if you can guess what this parliament is going to do once we put the withdrawal agreement back? we are going to get brexit done. mr speaker, i think even your parrot
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would have been able to quote that one buy now! and we are going to be able to get on with delivering on the priorities of the british people. we are going to be able to get on with delivering on the priorities of the british people, transforming the nhs, investing massively in education, in the police, uniting and levelling up across the country and levelling up across the country and the whole of the uk. it is my belief most honourable members in this house belief we should resist the calls of those who would break up the calls of those who would break up the united kingdom. as the parliament of the united kingdom we should politely and respectfully defend that union. i can tell the house after three and a half years of wrangling and division we in this
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government will do whatever we can to reach out across the house to find common ground, to heal the divisions of our country and to find a new and generous spirits in which we conduct all our political dealings with one another that will last beyond this immediate season of christmas goodwill. in that spirit, mr speaker, i congratulate you once again on your election and i look forward to months and years ahead under your guidance. cani under your guidance. can i call the leader of the opposition, the right honourable gemmajeremy opposition, the right honourable gemma jeremy corbyn can ijoin the prime minister in remembering the horror of what happened on london bridge less than three weeks ago, the third time in the last two general election campaigns we've witnessed these appalling and
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depraved terrorist attacks on our communities and our hearts go out to the families of those killed. when the prime minister and i attended a memorial event we had the honour of meeting many of the stu d e nts honour of meeting many of the students that had been at college with jack and they were just devastated and in his memory they wa nted devastated and in his memory they wanted his work and message to carry on and! wanted his work and message to carry on and i think we should remember the very good words of his father david about how proud he was of his son on that day. that attack was an attempt to damage our democracy, halt the process, it did not succeed and it never should succeed to because we have to make sure our democracy is fully intact. mr speaker, i would like to offer my congratulations to the prime minister on winning the election and being returned to office. and i tribute to those members for my party particularly who sadly lost
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their seats in the election and therefore will not be here, in particular, obviously dennis skinner is somebody that comes very much to mind on this occasion. the prime minister in the campaign made many promises and therefore has tremendous responsibility is to live up tremendous responsibility is to live up to. he will be judged tremendous responsibility is to live up to. he will bejudged on tremendous responsibility is to live up to. he will be judged on whether he keeps his promises by the communities he has made them too. ourjob in the labour party will be to hold the government to account and stand up for the communities we represent and for more than 10 million people that voted for our party in the general election because that's what parliamentary democracy is about holding government to account and representing the people that have sent us here on their behalf. can i also, mr speaker elect, offer my congratulations to the honourable memberfor worthing west congratulations to the honourable member for worthing west and taking up member for worthing west and taking up his position as father of the house. i first encountered up his position as father of the house. ifirst encountered him in the woolwich west by—election in
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1975, i was a trade union organiser at the time and i made a very strong recommendation to all my members that they should vote for the labour candidate and not him. some of them went to see him and came back and they said he seems such a very nice man, we might well vote for him. so i don't want to further tarnish his reputation by saying some years ago whenever i was trying to get an all—party consensus together on an early day motion sometimes a difficult task, he would often give ita difficult task, he would often give it a conservative character by supporting such moves and i want to thank him for that and wish him well as father of the house. can i take this opportunity to welcome all newly elected members, it's a very daunting day for them, first aid to be elected on behalf of your constituents. and all the responsibilities that goes with it. there is no greater honour than representing your constituents. one of the greatest strengths of our political system is everyone of us
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represents a community, everyone of has a constituency and we are there to help the homeless and the desperate as well as those better off and closed with a more co mforta ble off and closed with a more comfortable existence is, we represent all of them and that should be the watchword of a house in democracy. this is the first time the majority of labour mps are women andi the majority of labour mps are women and i congratulate all of them who have been elected in 20 of the 26 newly elected labour mps are women, something that compares rather favourably to the performance of the conservative party in this election. this is also, mr speaker elect, the most diverse parliament in history, andi most diverse parliament in history, and i am proud is 41 of the 65 black and i am proud is 41 of the 65 black and minority ethnic mps are on labour benches and i know they will doa labour benches and i know they will do a fantasticjob representing their constituencies and the wider community interests. finally, i want
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to offer my warmest congratulations to offer my warmest congratulations to you as you resume your place in the speaker's to you as you resume your place in the spea ker‘s chair. to you as you resume your place in the speaker's chair. your role goes beyond the pomp and ceremony and thatis beyond the pomp and ceremony and that is something you very well understand and i am keen to work with you as many others are on all the other issues facing this house. this house cannot function without member staff, house staff, security, admin, cleaners, caterers and officials that do so much good work. they all make a contribution to ensure our democracy functions properly. there is also enormous pressure on mp5, staff and others andi pressure on mp5, staff and others and i know you take very seriously the mental health and well—being of all of us and i hope in this house we will ensure that is the case. can i concludes with this, in your house there are portraits of many of your predecessors, all of your predecessors, all of your predecessors, and one of the most famous is of course the speaker who resisted the autocracy of charles
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the first in support of the freedoms of parliament. our democracy needs you as a speaker who will stand firm against abuses of power by the executive order by anybody else. in doing so you are notjust defending the rights of this house but the rights of millions of people who put their faith rights of millions of people who put theirfaith in the rights of millions of people who put their faith in the democratic system to elect a parliament and therefore a government that is answerable to them. our rights and freedoms are a lwa ys them. our rights and freedoms are always precious but also often precarious. democracy is not a given, it is something we have to extend in defence and i am sure you in your role as speaker elect and hopefully speaker very soon will do exactly that. i congratulate you on your election. father of the house. the whole house will want tojoin father of the house. the whole house will want to join with the expression by the leader of the opposition and prime minister about the tragedy from fishmongers hall in london bridge. can i say to the leader of the opposition he only had half of the woolwich west story, i
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was a member of the branch in transport house and knew quite a lot what was going on and which mps were not standing again and elect, it was a marvellous for me. laughter cani laughter can i say to that of the opposition that none of us are always right none of us are always wrong and on theissues none of us are always wrong and on the issues were he and i have a great i think we have been right. —— on issues where he and i have agreed i think we have been right. the advice you might give in private, mr speaker elect, to those joining for the first or second time is the shoulds listen to their whips, by the chair, think of the interest of the constituents and the nation and do what they think is right. i think that's the kind of thing that speakers would remind us to do and can i conclude by saying
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there are many good things to say about many of your predecessors but i don't think any of them have been such a welcome choice as speaker as you. ian blackford. thank you, mr speaker elect, can i associate myself with the remarks of the prime minister and leader of the opposition, and the absolutely dreadful attacks at fishmongers hall in london bridge. we must stand together against terrorism and stand up together against terrorism and stand up togetherfor together against terrorism and stand up together for democracy. they expanded snp westminster group welcomes you mr speaker elect to your new home. in the previous parliament i appreciated the balanced approach taken by the last speaker and have no doubt you will conduct proceedings with the same vigour and transparency. these are uncertain and challenging times, the public are looking at this place for leadership. we owe it to all of us,
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all of those who put their trust in us to conduct debate with respect and treat each other with dignity. i wish you mr speaker elect, the best wishes from the scottish national party and i look forward to taking the case for scotland in this new parliament with integrity and dignity. all the very best to you, mr speaker elect. mr speaker elect. mrspeaker mr speaker elect. mr speaker elect, can mr speaker elect. mrspeakerelect, cani mr speaker elect. mr speaker elect, can i give you heartfelt congratulations from these benches and wish you the very best as you manage the proceedings of this house. your election in the la st this house. your election in the last parliament you struck a chord with many members when you spoke about improving the security of members, staff our families. about improving the security of members, staff ourfamilies. it about improving the security of members, staff our families. it is sad to say you were right to lead on this. not least as we remember at the two young victims of the terrorist attack on london bridge. saskia jones and jack merritt. two
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young people dedicated to helping others whom we should pay tribute today as this house returns. mr speaker elect, i was delighted a new a cce pta nce speaker elect, i was delighted a new acceptance speech before the last election that you spoke eloquently and positively about the speaking rights of smaller parties and i can assure you. . . laughter ican i can assure you, sir, the liberal democrat members want to make their voices heard. not least on behalf of the 3.7 million people who voted for us last thursday. under proportional voting, we would now easily be the third largest party in this house with 70 mps, a fact which i now, sir, you will take account of. you will appreciate, mr speaker elect, the la st appreciate, mr speaker elect, the last few days have been difficult for my colleagues and i, having seen
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our friend jo swinson lose her seat. she consistently said during the election there is an issue even bigger than brexit, namely the climate emergency. and on these benches, we will be seeking your help as we raise this issue and argue for the radical climate change policies thatjo swinson argue for the radical climate change policies that jo swinson advocated. thank you, mr speaker. thank you, mr speaker. thank you, mr speaker. thank you, mr speaker elect and an behalf of the democratic unionist party i want to associate ourselves with the demands of the prime minister. from northern ireland we know all too well the impact terrorism can have and the devastation it reaps on families and our thoughts and prayers are with the families of the victims of that atrocity. could i congratulate you, mr speaker elect com on your re—election a speaker, we regard you as someone re—election a speaker, we regard you as someone who is fair and upholds
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the rights of all members in this house and we look forward to working with you. could i also congratulate the prime minister and the conservative party on their victory in the election and we look forward to working with them going forward. and in particular in relation to the matters the prime minister spoke of, the union of our united kingdom of great britain and northern ireland. as the prime minister takes forward his proposals on brexit we want to ensure northern ireland's place within the uk is secured and that the economic and political and constitutional integrity of the uk is respected. could i also paid tribute to my colleagues, the former memberfor tribute to my colleagues, the former member for belfast north nigel dodds, and the former member for belfast south, emma little pengelly, who are not with us but made a massive contribution to the work of
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this house in the last parliament andindeed this house in the last parliament and indeed for nigel, over many yea rs. and indeed for nigel, over many years. could i welcome the honourable member to our ranks, but also the other members from northern ireland who are taking their seats today for the first time in this house, and welcome the fact they are here and take their seats, unlike others, and will no doubt make a contribution to this house and to the democratic process. mr speaker electron wish you well and all collea g u es electron wish you well and all colleagues well in this parliament and we look forward to outlining the voice of northern ireland along with our colleagues and ensuring our place in this union is secure. she speaks welsh. there has been no doubt in my mind, many of us were present on the day
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in march 2017, the leadership and ca re in march 2017, the leadership and care you showed on that they have inevitably given us the face and pleasure to return you here today and we sympathise with all the victims of terrorist attacks in the intervening time. i would like to ta ke intervening time. i would like to take the opportunity to call on you to work with the senate in wales and the presenting officer in the scottish parliament and the speaker in the northern ireland assembly any spirit of equality and respect and i would come on you to continue to develop the principles of equality and the quality of voice and opportunity much of which was upheld in the speaker at‘s intern scheme which is an excellent scheme and brought people here who would not otherwise have the opportunity. i would like to close by saying all members here today were return in exactly the same way, by the constituents. and those constituents
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all stand equal, regardless of whether their mp is a member of the government or the opposition, of a large party or of a small party or indeed of a single representative here, all those constituents are equal and they deserve respect. and i have every confidence you will ensure their representatives here will have that equality of voice so they can best represent their constituents. we will keep an eye on what's happening during the tributes paid to the new speaker elect, sir lindsay hoyle. we heard from boris johnson and jeremy corbyn, essentially welcoming lindsay hoyle but politics never far away, jeremy corbyn congratulating the prime minister for winning corbyn congratulating the prime ministerfor winning the corbyn congratulating the prime minister for winning the election and saying he had made many promises and saying he had made many promises and he must take responsibility to live up to them. with me in the
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studio, david leakey, black rod of the house of lords until the end of last year. the role of speaker is something they are all talking about, when his predecessor was referred to there were laughs in the chamber, what is going to be going on behind the scenes in terms of what the new speaker and your successor as black rod, what's going on in terms of the houses of parliament? the word reform we keep hearing, is that still very much on the agenda? it was certainly on the agenda of these papers this morning and it is a lwa ys these papers this morning and it is always on the agenda. there was a temple during the roman empire whose door was ever opened when rome was at warand it door was ever opened when rome was at war and it was never closed. the issue of house of lords reform in the palace of westminster is the door that will never be closed. there are lots of pressure is on the house of lords because it is imperfect, people do not like it because they say it is not
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democratically accountable, too many appointed people from all appointed... we better explain what is happening now. the chamber breaks up and they go where? the chamber will adjourn for a while, until the next formal ceremony, which is when the royal commission assembles in the house of lords and black rod is despatched back to the houses of commons to instruct the commons to repair to the house of lords for the approbation of the approval of the sovereign by the new speaker —— of the new speaker. people deliver his oath that he will serve the office faithfully is. on the role of the speaker, there is criticism of his predecessorjohn burkle, he was on italian television shouting order in italian ——john bercow. there are some people who have raised an eyebrow as to whether
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thatis have raised an eyebrow as to whether that is something the former speaker should do what is your view? john bercow is a free citizen and he can do what he likes but i think he will bejudged in time by history can do what he likes but i think he will be judged in time by history as to whether he was a good speaker or bad speaker. there are lots of things for which he absolutely should take credit, he championed a number of causes of reform within the house of commons, the role of backbencher scott role of the select committee, the ability of the house of commons to summon ministers and hold them to account, all sorts of things he did and championed and made the commons more relevant and backbenchers more relevant. on the debit side, some people would say he was not balanced and he compromised the traditional neutrality and impartiality of the speaker by favouring, as some would claim, the opposition parties to the not only
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disapproval but the death benefit of the government of the day in a way that had not been done before. on the brexit issues, he had been avowedly pro—remain and that his handling of the business in the house of commons once again displayed his lack of impartiality and neutrality. there is another thing that the house of commons and the house of lords have had enquiries about harassment, sexual harassment and bullying and intimidation of staff, and in the lengthy enquiry conducted in the house of commons mrjohn burkle did not come out of that very well. i think that's putting it politely. . his record is also i think stained a little bit by the fact that so little bit by the fact that so little happened on that, not all his fault, there were political leaders, party political leaders who could
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and should have done more, some of those were women and they did not, he was never properly investigated, . . . are there investigations to come? there could be because one of the criticisms of the enquiry into sexual harassment and intimidation of staff in the house of commons, the terms of reference were such that historical allegations were put out of bounds which seemed extraordinary. now an ombudsman or commission, independent commission has been set up and historic complaints can now be brought and i think there is some possibility that some people may make complaints and not just about mr some people may make complaints and notjust about mr bercow, against whom there have been allegations, all of which he denies, and other mps as well, some of whom may have left the house. in terms of the overalljudgment on mr bercow, i don't think anything will happen very don't think anything will happen very soon. don't think anything will happen very soon. there is a assumed
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peerage for the house of speaker of the commons and if mr bercow does not receive a period she would be the first speaker i think in history not to have done so, certainly in recent... do you think you should receive one? it is not for me to judge. do you think you should receive one? it is not for me tojudge. it is do you think you should receive one? it is not for me to judge. it is an independent commission from house of lords appointments commission that ru ns lords appointments commission that runs the rule across these appointments but, interestingly, the house of lords reform group that has been looking at reform of the house of lords, sometimes known as the burns group under the private secretary lord burns, recommended should be no automatic appointment to the house of lords for people such as the house of commons speaker. an theresa may acknowledged that report when she was prime minister by writing back and saying she agreed that automatic period should be a thing of the past and i think whether the present government agrees with that, but i think it
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therefore means there will not be such automatic process and if mr bercow was appointed he will be appointed on his merits than by virtue of the post he held. david leakey, virtue of the post he held. david lea key, it's virtue of the post he held. david leakey, it's been a great pleasure speaking to you, thank you for talking us through the procedure of the ceremony, is been fascinating. are you missing are being black rod ? fascinating. are you missing are being black rod? seven years was enough, thank you! let's go live to the house of commons for election of the speaker. every single mp has to take an oath and be sworn in and which takes quite a long time, normally days. this is being sped up slightly because the prime minister and government are determined to move quickly, they want to bring forward the queen's speech on thursday, pretty soon after the last one and on friday they want to introduce the withdrawal agreement bill once more.
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you should get its second reading on friday and they will then go off for a christmas recess before coming back to get the legislation through in january. it was quite back to get the legislation through injanuary. it was quite striking watching the house of commons, a different make up to the house of commons, lots more tory mps, there was not room for them all to have a seat on that side of the chamber. lots of them were standing. you can really get a sense of what a brutal business it is, democracy and elections, two leaders no longer here, nigel dodds for the dup lost his seat, jo swinson for the lib dems lost tires, other people taking their roles. for borisjohnson, a triumph moment lots of cheers as he said he felt this parliament was a big improvement on the previous one and at one point he backbenchers behind him chanting get brexit done, his slogan from the election. for jeremy corbyn, very, very heavy
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defeat for him, not much cheering when he stood up and all eyes more now on who will succeed him when he eventually stands down, lisa nandi, interestingly, was the person nominating the speaker, lindsay hoyle, once more, to resume his seat and lots of people see her as a contender once that leadership race starts. they've all gone back to the house of lords and then there will be back to start swimming in every mp. talk us through the rest of the week because we have the queens opening of parliament on friday, as we heard, the withdrawal agreement bill comes for discussion. yeah, and of course we've been here before, it got its second reading in the last parliament with the help of some labour mps. the last parliament with the help of some labour mp5. the issue there which led to the election was all that lots of labour mps said they would back it at second reading the election was although a lot of labour mps election was although a lot of labourmps said election was although a lot of labour mps said they would back it at second reading there are making it pretty clear, these are mps at second reading there are making
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it pretty clear, these are mp5 from to leave constituencies mainly in the north of england in the midlands, they made it clear they we re midlands, they made it clear they were unlikely to so what the bill's —— unlikely to continue to support the bill's passage through parliament which is what caused borisjohnson to call the election because he thought the house of commons would block the progression of that bill. he can now pretty much do what he likes with the majority of 80, that bill will come forward on friday but did not —— it will not be the tense occasion of knife edge votes in the house of commons, that bill likely to go through on friday and will continue in january bill likely to go through on friday and will continue injanuary once parliament comes back. nearly at the end of this year, thank you very much, we will talk to you later on. you are watching politics europe from bbc news. you are watching politics europe from bbc news. a teenager who stabbed a lawyer to death with a screwdriver
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in newcastle has been sentenced to a minimum jail term of 15 years. ewan ireland was 17 when he attacked 52—year—old peter duncan at the entrance to the eldon square shopping centre last august. police described the attack as shocking and unprovoked. our correspondent fiona trott is in newcastle for us now. was an absently shocking case. in other what used to date were mindless, senseless, northumbria police said, we all probably had the feeling it could have been anyone of us walking home from work that they, like peter was, the 52—year—old lawyer was on his way to the bus station to go home, he accidentally collided with the teenager in a busy shopping centre, there was a tussle and they ended on the floor and the prosecution said whether it was the perceived loss of face justice inherent levels of aggression, the defendant escalated the violence and took out a screwdriver he had stolen along with several others from a shop nearby just minutes along with several others from a shop nearbyjust minutes before. another striking feature of this case was he was just 18 years old,
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ewa n case was he was just 18 years old, ewan ireland, 17 when the attack took place. it had —— he had a significant criminal history. when he murdered peter duncan he had been sentenced for another violent offence and received a 12 month conditional discharge, also released under investigation following an allegation of robbery and the subject of unconditional bail after pleading guilty to affray between 2017 in 2019 he appeared before courts on 17 occasions for 31 criminal offences. there were around 30 of peter duncan's relatives and friends in court, many of them visibly upset when a witness impact state m e nts visibly upset when a witness impact statements were read out, i will read you a bit of the statement from his son. key stages of our lives, marriages, if we have children of our own, and
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he said this, i write about ewan ireland, i was angry he was out free and cannot understand why he was not locked up. if he was dad might still be here today, he did not deserve what happened but he doesn't deserve justice. his killer, ewan ireland, who is now 18 years old, showed no emotion in court today and he has been sentenced to 15 years in prison. fiona, thank you very much. first let's catch up with the weather, darren is here. this is what has been happening. yesterday there were 27 tornadoes that ripped a path through mississippi, alabama and louisiana. what is so unusual about these is that they think that one particular tornado tracked for over 60 miles, before it then faded away and decayed. the other unusual thing about the recent tornadoes is that yesterday there was a tornado
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emergency issued. this is significant, because these warnings are issued when a tornado is expected to hit a heavily populated area. in this particular instance, it was alexandria in louisiana. the last time there was an emergency tornado warning issued was way back in may of this year. which is the peak of the hurricane season, or the tornado season. but if it is not tornado season. but if it is not tornado season, what is going on, how are they happening? you can get tornadoes, as we have seen, they happen year round, you just don't get as many as in tornado season. we had about a month's worth of tornadoes in one day. you need a big temperature contrast, and we get there was a north american at any time of the year. what we have seen recently is very cold air coming down from the north, and really warm and still quite humid air that has been coming up from the gulf of mexico. along that boundary, you see that band of cloud. of course, it is
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a weather front. when the weather front is particularly active, because of the temperature contrasts, it not only produces some heavy rain and a short space of time, produces severe thunderstorms, and in the case of the last 24 hours, it produces tornadoes as well. that is over there, what is happening over here? things are very quiet, different issues as far as the uk where is concerned. we have had some mist and fog around today. it has been really stubborn to left across parts of northern ireland, northern england and across eastern wales as well, because there has been a shield of cloud around. it has prevented the sun getting to it and breaking up the fog. this was earlier on in herefordshire. this was the picture earlier in north yorkshire. you can see the thin, high cloud, that veil of cloud. where the cloud is thicker, we have had some rain. there has been moving away from oxfordshire and hampshire, heading towards the south—east of england and east anglia. there are still some more of that around into
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the evening. temperatures about three back row —— three degrees. we'll soon see the back of this drab weather in the south—east. it might meana weather in the south—east. it might mean a bit more mist and fog forming for northern ireland, parts of northern england and into the midlands as well. across many parts of the country, there will be a touch of frost, —5 or so in the north—east of scotland. the fog in northern ireland will soon lift, and it will last a little bit longer, in these grey areas. lifting low cloud, drifting northwards. either side of that will be some sunshine. the wind will pick up, steady rain into west wales and northern ireland. it will lift the temperatures. still quite chilly across eastern scotland and much of eastern england, particularly if you are stuck under that greyness. by the end of the afternoon, looking at gales in the south of england and west wales, development across northern ireland, the far south—west of scotland, together with heavy bursts of rain.
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the rain comes on, the weather front, and will push northwards and eastwards during tomorrow night, bringing in much milder air across the whole of the uk. it will feel different for thursday. for northern scotland, a dry day with some sunshine, early brightness in northern ireland. on the whole, a lot of cloud. showery bursts of rain developing, especially in the south and west. a southerly wind means it will be milder everywhere. significantly so for the eastern side of the uk, after all of the chili have had of late. things are a bit messy, low—pressure swirling round to the west, the weather front bringing heavy rain into friday morning, probably pushing away. the details may change, but essentially it is unsettled through friday, and into saturday as well. showers and some longer spells of rain. southerly wind, so it is mild, perhaps not quite as mild across many parts of the country as it will be on friday.
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the latest headlines off the government is to add a new close to the brexit bill to make it illegal for parliament to extend the process beyond the end of 2020. members of parliament return to the commons — the new commons speaker is formally elected, and new mps are sworn in. half a million hotpoint and indesit washing machines are to be recalled — because their door locking system could be a fire risk firefighters in australia are battling to prevent raging bushfires from threatening a major power station in new south wales a review of the decline in the number of rape prosecutions
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and convictions across england and wales says the criminaljustice system is so under—resourced it's "close to breaking point". sport now on afternoon live with katie sha na han. two premier clubs looking for managers and they could be facing each other on saturday? yes that adds some extra spice to the occasion doesn't it? as everton and arsenal both face each other in the early kick—off on saturday. so, arsenal are in talks with their former captain mikel arteta — who's been pep guardiola's assistant at manchester city for the past three years. now, this is the second time he's come into the frame after being interviewed following arsene wenger‘s departure last year. but narrowly lost out in the latter stages to the more experienced unai emery. arteta made 150 appearances for arsenal between 2011 and 2016. club bosses have been spotted outside arteta's house, but guardiola insists he's still a manchester city coach, for now.
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he is part of our group, and our staff, and he stays here. so, when we have any news, new news, i will know it, you will know it, and we will know what happens. for now, he is here. tomorrow, he will travel with us. he trained today, we prepared for the game, and that's it. everton meanwhile are keen on bringing their number one target carlo anchelotti to the club. he was sacked by napoli last week, but had great success at chelsea where he won the premier league and the fa cup in 2010. the 60—year—old spent monday in rome with his wife, but formally received an approach from everton early on monday evening. talks are thought to be ongoing but what we do know is duncan ferguson will continue in his role as caretaker manager for the league cup quarterfinal against leicester on wednesday. and liverpool are playing tonight,
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but it might be a team a lot of people will not be familiar with? this will be a strange one for liverpool as they play aston villa in the quarter finals of the league cup tonight, but their entire first team squad are out in doha for the club world cup. these are the latest pictures we have in from liverpool training in qatar. they play the mexican side monterray tomorrow, live on bbc two, so their youth team will instead play the carabao cup game. a good opportunity for those players though. but this marks the start of a very busy run of fixtures for the european champions. managerjurgen klopp says he is focussed on winning in qatar, despite the fixture congestion that the tournament has caused. yes, iam yes, i am excited about it now, because we are here. that is the only reason we are here, we are here to win the tournament. we will see if we can do it or not, but it's not about that, it is about always making the best of it. so in a premier league season like this, if you talk to me about the schedule andi you talk to me about the schedule and i say this is not cool, that is
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my opinion. but in this specific moment, preparing the next game, it is moment, preparing the next game, it i5100%. moment, preparing the next game, it is 100%. and that is what it's like here, 100%. there's been widespread criticism surrounding serie a's new "no to racism" campaign, after they used images of monkeys in their posters. well, ac milan are the latest to voice their concerns. this comes less than three weeks after italian football clubs made a pledge to combat racism in football. these are the images. milan say they strongly disagree with the posters and weren't consulted about them. anti—discrimination group fare say the campaign was like a sickjoke, but the artist behind it has defended his work. translation: to answer the question i heard a minute to go, why are monkeys? an initiative against racism, and you are using monkeys? yes, because at some point it is impossible to tell people in the stadium that it is inconceivable to call someone a monkey, just because he is black. i thought maybe i will teach them that we are all monkeys, turning the concept around. so, in
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my view, the monkey becomes the spark to teach everybody that there is no difference. it is not like somebody is a man and someone else a monkey. at this point, if some people really care about telling a black person that they are a monkey, then we are all monkeys. england's women have won the first of three t20 matches against pakistan in kuala lumpur. opener amyjones top scored with a half century as england reached 154 for four from their 20 overs. in reply, pakistan were all out for 125. and, skateboarding will feature as a new sport at next year's tokyo olympics, but not at the paralympics. japanese skateboarder ryu—sei oochi, is almost completely blind and hopes that one day it might. oochi was born with perfect vision, but since being diagnosed with an eye condition at the age of seven his sight has deteriorated. he now needs a cane to navigate in his local skatepark near tokyo. dropping in off large ramps and riding rails are all done by feel rather than sight. ouchi has certainly impressed
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the local skateboarding community as well as growing following on social media. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. if you have been watching over the last hour, you will have seen the ceremony at the house of commons and the house of lords, the process of swearing in new mps the house of lords, the process of swearing in new mp5 is under way. they have already elected the new commons speaker, so lindsay hoyle. let's go over to vicki young, who is there. as you say, a new parliament, a new look house of commons, a lot more conservative mps, much to the delight of boris johnson. more conservative mps, much to the delight of borisjohnson. some downhearted labour mps, not surprisingly, after the heavy defeat at the election. they are having a break, then the swearing in of every mp, that will start over the next
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couple of days. peter bottomley is the new father of the house, and he will explain what that means. it was ken clarke, and it is because you are the longest serving mp, continuous service, is that it? margaret beckett was elected before me,| margaret beckett was elected before me, i pay respect to her, but she had broken service, lost in lincoln and was re—elected in derby south, so and was re—elected in derby south, soi and was re—elected in derby south, so i have the role that lindsey skinner would have had, so i have the role that lindsey skinnerwould have had, ken so i have the role that lindsey skinner would have had, ken clarke added, edward heath had it, a number of steepest people. what does it mean in terms of what you have to do? you had a role today, as you re—elected the speaker. what does it mean, being farther up the house question on nothing, you get it with no merit, you have no response abilities and no pay. i am supposed to convert those that need comforting, provide a bit of quiet when things get too noisy, and generally remember things before most other were born. it means that
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you tend to get called to ask questions, including at prime minister's questions? that is possibly right, it is not something i would normally want to use. he tried to do something in the past, when things need pulling together. there are times in the past when speakers, like jack weatherall, and has got out of control, would call me because i could act as a sprinkler, just trying to divert people away from anger, and into purpose. parliament is here to hold government to account, and help government to account, and help government to account, and help government to work. it is here to respect opposition, but not let them win too often. it's a mixture. as one of the longer term mps, i think ican do one of the longer term mps, i think i can do that as much as anybody else can but i don't claim i was elected to this position, i wasn't. when you think back to when you were
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elected, 1975, things have changed quite a bit. what was it like then? the obvious changes that there were many more women. when my wife was elected, there were 24 mp5. margaret thatcher was the seventh woman in the cabinet, my wife was the ninth. the tories now have nearly as many women mps as labour, there are many more people of black and asian heritage, and that is a great welcome. we are finding that people can get elected, sometimes to their surprise, and if anybody can hear that bell, somebody has asked the officers has somebody tried to escape, the police say they have not lost one yet, the mp5 will stay here until they have done their duty, get signed in and take part in debates. sir peter making the point that parliament has changed a lot since he was elected in 1975. let's get more now only prime minister's brexit plans. speaking in the house of commons, borisjohnson
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said the new parliament will be vastly more democratic and will not waste the time of the nation in deadlock, division and delay. earlier, he said he would legislate to stop trade talks running further than the end of next year. that raised concerns about a new deal brexit. with me as a senior research fellow from the centre for european reform. the prime minister saying it could be done and dusted within a year, the trade talks, is that the sense where you are? it will be a tall order, no doubt about it. in any case, it has been the baseline scenario that the eu has been entertaining for quite a while, that we have only 11 months to finalise the trade talks. but even if it was possible, then it means that we are talking about very basic, bare bone
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free trade agreements. does the fact that he has a large majority in the uk parliament changed his position, if you like? he is in a much stronger position in these talks, and is that accepted in brussels? what electoral victory merely means for the brexit process is clarity, when it comes to the first phase of negotiations. so, the eu leaders can be pretty sure that the ratification process will be finalised. i think there is still under clarity with regards to the second phase of negotiations. roughly speaking, i'm not sure whether a greater or co mforta ble not sure whether a greater or comfortable majority in the commons
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actually gives prime minister's greater leverage. i think the eu has started preparing for the second phase of negotiations. if you look into what brussels has been doing, it has been putting negotiation structures in place, so it is ready to kick off the trade talks. is there a sense that a hard brexit is still possible, if the trade talks don't go as borisjohnson says they will? absolutely. if they are not finalised by the end of december, if we can hold the prime minister by his word and the eu does not request an extension. so in fact, no deal
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has not been taken off the table, particularly if the uk does not request an extension. by the end of june, the decision would have to be taken. the one thing that has been missing for several years is the word you have used several times, clarity? it's not because eu leaders are fans of brexit or borisjohnson himself, but indeed they know that they can move on, and start getting ready for the negotiations on the future. but as we just discussed, on this
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programme, the trade negotiations are going to be an uphill struggle. here is where certainty ends. as we are speaking, the chief brexit negotiator, in a many are familiar with, michel barnier, would say that it would do its utmost to meet the deadline and agree a deal with great britain before the end of next year. if you like, the mood music, at least, is on track for next year? the eu has been working on this baseline scenario, we have 11 months, and it helps to focus minds. it will probably boost eu unity. if they say the eu will crack, they might be wrong. if you look into the scope of the agreement, which will be narrow. i wouldn't expect too
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much divergence of interest in the eu to appear. the government is to add a new clause to the brexit bill , to make it illegal for parliament to extend the process of leaving the european union beyond the end of 2020. firefighters in australia are battling to prevent raging bushfires from threatening a major power station in new south wales a review of the decline in the number of rape prosecutions and convictions across england and wales says the criminaljustice system is so under—resourced it's "close to breaking point". here's your business headlines on afternoon live. half a million hotpoint and indesit washing machines are being recalled by their manufacturer whirlpool, over fears they pose a risk of fire.
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it's the latest in a string of product safety scandals involving the company. shares in boeing and its suppliers have been falling after the plane—maker announced it will temporarily suspend production of its 737 max aircraft injanuary. the newest model of the world's biggest selling plane has been grounded for nine months while investigations continue into two crashes which killed 346 people. the pound — along with shares on the ftse 250 index — have been falling today after downing street's promise to make any delay to the brexit transition period illegal. against the dollar, the pound has lost a large part of the gain it made after the conservatives won a decisive majority in parliament with investors fearing the risk of a no—deal brexit is rising again. lots of people nervously checking their washing machine models today. half a million should be,
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confusingly it is from will pull, but it affects brands hotpoint and in —— indisit. you might want to look into it. but he might have a hard job doing so, because the website has crashed and the customer helpline has been overwhelmed. some people will have a sense of deja vu, we had problems, not with washing machines? previously it tumble dryers that were affected, 5 million of them posed a fire risk and were recalled. the regulator in instance had to force will pool into action. the latest batch will have a nervous wait over christmas until these machines can be fixed. in the meantime, they have been told to unplug them, not to use them. if you feel like you have to use your
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washing machine, they say if you do have to hear, put them on the cold cycle of 20 degrees or less, that is the official advice. we can talk to martin allan, the technical director of the electrical safety charity electrical safety first. thank you for being with us. pretty terrible timing, in the last few weeks before christmas. better late than never that action has been taken? absolutely, the fact that whirlpool have taken the action to make sure consumers are aware of a risk, before they are ready to roll out the replacement programme, it should be applauded. consumers really need to be made aware, and the advice is to be made aware, and the advice is to unplug the machines and don't use it. it's better to then use family and friends, you can use the local launderette, rather than using the machine, under any other circumstances. it is good to take early action, then the replacement programme will start in the new year. to make it clear for people that are worried their machine is
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affected by this, what is your advice to those that feel like they have to use their machine? there is this advice from whirlpool, putting them on a setting of 20 degrees or less. i'm not even sure my machine has a 20 degrees or less setting. yes, that is their advice, they have obviously weighed that up against the level of risk and so on. i think our advice would be that it is better not to use the machine, and to work with family, friends, use local services and the local launderette, that is a better option than taking risks. whirlpool has taken that advice. the primary advice is not to use it in the first place. thank you forjoining us with that advice. breaking news on the so—called black cab rapistjohn worboys. we are hearing he has beenjailed for life after admitting to four further sexual assaults against women. worboys, who now goes by the name ofjohn radford, was jailed indefinitely in 2009
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for attacks on twelve women after they got into his black cab in london. you might remember the controversy after the parole board overturned a decision to release him and ruled that he should remain in prison, citing his sense of sexual entitlement. then a further trial followed, and that is what we have just heard the result of, that he has been sentenced to life for that. sarah caulker has the background to the case. john worboys offered his victims champagne laced with sedatives so he could sexually assault and rape them. in 2009, he was jailed for attacking 12 women. earlier this year, he admitted robbing four more women between 2000 and 2008 in
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london. the 62—year—old was ordered by thejudge to london. the 62—year—old was ordered by the judge to come to the old bailey from wakefield prison for sentencing. more potential victims have come forward. becky believes that he drugged her in bournemouth. she has waived her right to anonymity. he was pretty premeditated from the get go. i was a woman on my own. very quickly, he produces a story about how it was a quiet night, he went to the casino and won money from the casino. and then he produces a bottle of champagne. he is feeling really bad, because he's got to drive the car, he can't celebrate his winnings. and he can't celebrate his winnings. and he is highly manipulative, and relentless. i am not particularly interested in talking to him or in particularly impressed, but he goes on and on. to the point when it becomes easier tojust on and on. to the point when it becomes easier to just accept a drink to shut him up. after his first trial a decade ago, john worboys was told he would only be
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released when he was no longer deemed a danger to the public. but last year, there was public outrage when the parole board recommended him for early release. that decision was overturned after an appeal at the high court by some of his victims. in becky's case, the cps decided not to prosecute. victims. in becky's case, the cps decided not to prosecutem victims. in becky's case, the cps decided not to prosecute. it doesn't make you feel safe in the world when the justice system does not protect you. he would be out walking around, and let's not forget that he is a famous case. there are lots of not known people that have been released under the same unsound system. it shouldn't be up to the victims to make people safe. becky speaking there, one of the victims of the black cab rapist, john worboys, sentenced to life at the old bailey with a minimum term of six years for attacking four more victims, as the court heard he remained as dangerous as ever. that
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was the ruling at the old bailey and we will be hearing from sarah caulker, our correspondent, later on. on afternoon live, time for a look at the weather with darren bett. it has been a cold day, where the fog has lingered across parts of northern ireland and the west midlands. we got some sunshine arriving from northern and western areas, shield of cloud covering a good part of england. the thickest cloud has been to south—eastern areas. that is where we have seen most of the wet weather. some rain across oxfordshire and hampshire, moving its way eastwards. it remains rather damp and dreary across east anglia and the south—east. some clearer skies developing elsewhere as we head towards the early evening. pretty chilly, temperatures three degrees or so, sharp showers in the south—west for a while. we will soon see the back of the low cloud, misty, damp weatherfrom the south—east. clearer skies over night, many places will be dry. the odd shower through the channel and northern scotland, more fog for northern ireland and the midlands.
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some frost around, a patchy frost for many parts of the uk. maybe one or two icy patches as well. in the morning the fog will lift in northern ireland, the wind strengthens and we get rain arriving. this fog lifting into low cloud, drifting up towards the north—east of england and staying rather chilly. either side of that, some sunshine. the win strengthening to bring rain into south—west england, south wales and northern ireland, lifting temperatures. still chilly for a good part of scotland and north—east england. gail is arriving in the south—west of england, west wales, by the end of the afternoon and evening, pushing northwards into northern ireland and south—western parts of scotland. together with the rain, which will be quite heavy at times as well. the weather fronts will push the rain northwards and eastwards through the night, bringing in mild air across the whole of the country by thursday. it will probably feel a bit different. we will find some dry weather and sunshine across northern parts of scotland, for a while in northern ireland. on the whole, a lot of cloud on thursday, some showers and longer spells of rain
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developing, especially in the south and west. with a southerly wind, it will be mild everywhere, and feel much milderfor scotland will be mild everywhere, and feel much milder for scotland on will be mild everywhere, and feel much milderfor scotland on the north—east of england. as we head towards the end of the week, it gets a bit messy. we have essentially got areas of low pressure spinning around to the west of the uk for a while, that rain could be heavy for eastern areas and then it pulls away. it essentially stays unsettled through friday and into saturday, some showers and perhaps longer spells of rain, a little bit of sunshine, southerly breezes in many parts of the country, still mild.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 4pm... john worboys — the so—called has been jailed for life at the old bailey — with a minimum term of six years — for attacking four more victims. you ain't seen nothing yet, folks. boris johnson meets his cabinet for the first time since the election — he says he's determined to lead a people's government. members of parliament return to the commons — the commons speaker is formally re—elected, and new mps prepare to be sworn in. i think that this parliament is a vast improvement on its predecessor. cheering and indeed, mr speaker, i would say that it is one of the best parliaments that this country has ever produced. half a million hotpoint and indesit washing machines in uk homes are to be recalled, as manufacturer whirlpool faces
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a fresh scare over risks of fire. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. could arsenal and everton both have new managers in the dugout when they face each other this weekend? arsenal are in talks with everton edging ever closer to the number one target carlo and gelati. and looking at the weather for isaac,. that is more frost and fog on the way to natick and then the weather will start to change from tomorrow onwards. it will get milder and wetter and windier. all the details later on. also coming up... and how the singer — ellie goulding — came to the aid of a driver — being shunted sideways by a lorry.
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hello, everyone — this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. our top story this afternoon, in the last few minutes john worboys, the so—called black cab rapist, has beenjailed for life with a minimum term of six years, for attacking four more victims. worboys, who now goes by the name ofjohn radford, was jailed indefinitely in 2009 for attacks on 12 women after they got into his black cab in london. the court was told he remains as ‘dangerous' as ever. sarah corker is at the old bailey yesjohn yes john worboys yesjohn worboys is a serial sex offender who preyed on young women. he would make up a story that he had won the lottery come into money on the horses and would offer
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passengers drinks, though strings we re passengers drinks, though strings were laced with sedatives. he was sentenced to life in prison today with a sentenced to life in prison today witha minimum sentenced to life in prison today with a minimum of six years. the judge said that your early race, i do not know when you will be ace —— that you are a risk, i do not know when you will not be a risk. as the sentence was when you will not be a risk. as the sentence was read when you will not be a risk. as the sentence was read out, whereby basically no reaction. —— were boys. he is known as the black cab rapist who drugged his victims and then attacked them. he offered them drinks laced with sedatives so that he could sexually assault and rape them. in 2009, he was jailed for attacking 12 women and then, earlier this year, worboys admitted to drugging for more women between 2000 and 2008 in london. the 62—year—old was ordered by the judge
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to come to the old bailey today from wakefield prison for sentencing. and more potential victims have come forward. becky believes worboys drugged her in bournemouth. she has waived her right to anonymity. he was pretty premeditated from the get go. and i was a woman on my own. very quickly, he produces a story about how it has been a quite night, he went to the casino, when the money from the casino and then produces a bottle of champagne and he is feeling really bad because he has got to drive the cab so we cannot celebrate his winnings. and he is highly manipulative and relentless. i am not particularly interested in talking to him or impressed, but he goes on and on and on to the point when it becomes easier tojust accept a on to the point when it becomes easier to just accept a drink to shut him up. after his first trial took a decade ago, worboys was told that he would only be released when he was no longer deemed a danger to
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the public. but last year, there was public outrage when the parole board recommended him for early release. that decision was overturned after an appeal at the high court by some of his victims. in becky's case, the cps decided not to prosecute. of his victims. in becky's case, the cps decided not to prosecutem does not make you feel safe in the world when the justice system does not protect you and it does not feel like it does when it is —— it does not feel like it does what it is supposed to do. he would be out walking around, and let's not forget that he is a famous case, there are lots of not knowing people who have been released under the same unsound system been released under the same unsound syste m d oes been released under the same unsound system does not it should not be up to the victims to make people say. becky's case was not pursued. the crown prosecution service said there was not enough evidence to prosecute, but she wanted to highlight the number of potential victims that there are and police said that they believe the defendant may have attacked more than 100 women. we heard in court today
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evidence from a psychiatrist who said that the defendant had been fantasising said that the defendant had been fa ntasising about offending said that the defendant had been fantasising about offending since 1986. there was a report, from a probation officer who said that worboys was a potentially dangerous today as he was when he was sentenced a decade ago. thejudge commended for bravery, dignity and courage of victims are coming forward. thank you very much. borisjohnson has held his first cabinet meeting since his election victory — and promised to pass a law ruling out any extension to the brexit process beyond the end of next year. the uk is scheduled to leave the eu onjanuary 31st, and enter a transition period which is due to conclude next december, but that can be extended for up to two years if talks aren't complete. critics say that ruling out an extention increases the chance of leaving the eu without a trade deal. this afternoon, mps returned to parliament where they'll be sworn in over the next two days.
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a warning that this report from our political correspondent helen catt contains flashing images. will there be a vote this friday, mr rees mogg? announcements will be made in due course. if mps do vote on the brexit bill this friday it will include a significant change. you ain't seen nothing yet, folks. we will have to work even harder because people have a high level of expectation and we must deliver for them. borisjohnson will include a clause in his withdrawal agreement bill to try to try to limit trade negotiations with the eu to less than a year. we will have conversations with the european union about our new relationship which will be based on free trade and friendly cooperation, and the political declaration that the eu have signed up to commits them to finishing those conversations by the end of 2020. under the existing agreement, the uk formally leaves the eu on the 31st of january 2020. until the end of december that year, it will be in a transition period
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where uk rules match eu ones. but currently, both sides could agree to extend that for another two years if they thought they were unlikely to reach a new trade deal in time. it is that option that borisjohnson intends to rule out in law. critics say that could lead to a no—deal brexit. i understand that the government of course wants to put a deadline on this, they want to put pressure to get a deal done, but this is a pressure that would be hugely damaging on our own manufacturing capacity in this country and ultimately would cost usjobs. last night boris johnson met his new mps at a reception in parliament. their numbers mean his withdrawal agreement bill will almost certainly pass, but his majority could also offer a way back. johnson is introducing this bill to give himself this firm deadline, but he has a big majority, he could easily introduce a later bill saying, actually, we could extend it now. but it is largely domestic, domestic virtue signalling, signalling that he will commit to what he put on the manifesto to get this deal done
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by the end of the year. brexit has so far been a tale of missed deadlines. the date for actually leaving the eu delayed twice already this year. that is now pretty set for next month. borisjohnson's move is symbolically important, designed to demonstrate to voters and negotiators that he is determined not to see that sort of drift again when it comes to reaching new trade arrangements with the eu. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. mps have undertaken their first duty in parliament this afternoon, and have re—elected sir lindsay hoyle as the house speaker. the chorley mp took over from john bercow — who stood down before the end of the last parliament. he was returned to the post unopposed at the start of the new parliament and will be sworn in this afternoon. the prime minister addressed the commons saying this parliament was the best the country had ever produced. i think is a vast improvement on its
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predecessor. and i would say, mr speaker, that this is one of the best parliaments that we've ever produced. with more female members than ever before, with more black and ethnic minority members than ever before. and also incarnated in your person, mr speaker, big a more democratic parliament. this parliament is going to put their withdrawal agreement... friday? and then this new democratic parliament, this people's parliament is going to do something, mr speaker. you can guess what it is. what is this parliament going to do? mr speaker, i wonder if you can guess what this
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permit is going to do? we are going to get brexit done. the leader of the opposition, jeremy corbyn, reminded in the constituencies he secured from the labour party. the leader of the opposition, jeremy corbyn, reminded the prime minister that he must live up to his word, espcially in the constituencies he secured from the labour party. mr speaker, i would like to offer my congratulations to the prime minister on winning the election and being returned to office. and i want to pay tribute to those members from my party, particularly, who sadly lost their seats in the election and therefore will not be here in particular, although many of you remember but obviously, dennis skinner is somebody that comes very much to mind on this occasion. and the prime minister in the campaign made many, many promises and therefore has tremendous responsibilities to live up to. he'll be judged on whether he keeps those promises or not by the communities that he's made them to. ourjob in the labour party will be to hold this government to account and stand up for the communities that we represent.
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and for the more than ten million people that voted for our party in the general election, because that is what parliamentary democracy is about, holding government to account and representing the people that have sent us here on their behalf. let's go over now to central lobby and our chief political members of the cabinet are currently being sworn in. it is a very quick pa rt being sworn in. it is a very quick part of the ceremony as they swear allegiance to the crown, the queen and followed by other members of parliament and then the new members as well. is that process continues, let's go to achieve political correspondent —— correspondent political vicki young
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sinn fein do not take their seats, but everyone else does have to go through this. it has been speeded up. sometimes the gap between a general election and the swearing in at the queen's speech can be weeks. on this occasion, it is going to be just days. the swearing in will going today and then tomorrow and in any queen's speech on thursday. not long since the last one. it seems. on friday, boris johnson long since the last one. it seems. on friday, borisjohnson and the government very keen to prove that they are moving quickly on promising sketch make delivering what they promise on the general election. the terms of a diverse, things like the money, citizen's rights, it did get through last time at second reading, but labour mps, according to boris johnson, are making very clear that they would not back that bill through its entire passage through parliament, so he called at the general election and, having spent
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perhaps a couple of years saying that nothing has changed, everything has changed. that was very obvious in the house of commons today. a lot more conservative mps, there were not enough seats for all of them. and some rather miserable —looking and labourmps are, and some rather miserable —looking and labour mps are, of course, after that heavy defeat in the election. borisjohnson will that heavy defeat in the election. boris johnson will want to that heavy defeat in the election. borisjohnson will want to show that heavy defeat in the election. boris johnson will want to show that he is getting on with things after that, there will be a parliamentary recess over christmas. then they will come back, of course, —— he will come back, of course, —— he will want to come back wanting to fulfil that deadline, end of january, breaks a day, if everything goes according to plan. but the majority of 88, no reason why that legislation cannot get through that deadline —— brexit day. with a majority of 80 there is no reason why that cannot cope there. just to be clear, when we say no deal, in those terms, we are talking about the possibility of a trade deal. pa rt the possibility of a trade deal. part one was the withdrawal agreement. that has the bill that
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will start going through on friday. the next stage is to work out what her future relationship is the next stage is to work out what herfuture relationship is going to be with the european union. how close we might be aligned with their rules and regulations or how much we might diverge. the johnson rules and regulations or how much we might diverge. thejohnson has made it clear that he does want to diverge from those rules, to be different from the european union and that makes that trade agreement, those talks, more complicated, more tricky. can he really get it done with an eager? what was going on was that there is a transition period, so we that there is a transition period, so we leave at the end of january, but then nothing effectively changes. where any standstill situation while those talks go on about a trade agreement. and they are destined to end at the end of next year, apparently. there was the possibility of extending a transition period, but borisjohnson is saying that he is going to amend the bill to say, actually, that is not going to happen. it is a bit perplexing, given that he is putting into law something that he does not
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wa nt to into law something that he does not want to do anyway and if things do not go according to plan, there is the possibility can reverse that decision, so it does not mean that he is there is not going to be an extension, but what he is trying to say symbolically to the country and the eu is that we're not going through that again, missed deadlines, things not going to plan, he wants to make things different this time. it will be incredibly difficult. the eu say they are not entirely sure that it is possible to do it within a tight deadline. thank you very much. we can speak now to mep mairead mcguinness who is vice—president of the european parliament. i'm just wondering, now there is a sense of clarity, at least, how you would assess the relationship between the eu and uk in the few months? i hope it is going to be a very good relationship. i think the fa ct very good relationship. i think the fact that we're now settled on a diverse date and that will happen has helped both sides to settle down and look to the future, so i think that in terms of the new year, we're
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going to have to look at what the uk and the prime minister wants from the future relationship. i think some are curious to think sketch may understand the logic of this idea of not extending the transition period because, essentially, what it amounts to is deleting a line within the mistral agreement that has not even been ratified through the house of commons or european parliament. it is what it is and the prime minister has a bird because he has a significant majority in the house of commons. as we move towards the end of this year, we're hoping that he relationship will be good and strong to survive and sustain the second pa rt to survive and sustain the second part of this process because if we thought the first three issues were complicated any withdrawal agreement, and they were, i think the next phase has an added layer of complexity because it will cover just about everything else. every industry, including security,
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pharmaceuticals, food, you name it. and what we will be talking about then will be the detail. if the uk wa nts to then will be the detail. if the uk wants to diverge from the european union in terms of rules and regulations, how that e, and we need to understand that. and i think all of these things require time, so i suppose that the reason why the negotiators from the upa and the european union had agreed in the withdrawal agreement on the possibility of extending beyond december 2020 was that it might be necessary. what is happening in the uk today suggest that the prime minister does not think it will be necessary and i hope it will be right, we can do all this wonderful work ina right, we can do all this wonderful work in a short period of time, but expense would say otherwise. you're sounding a little sceptical about it. it had. is that if you are a concern that a trade relationship with the united states and the apparent keenness of this prime minister to develop one could be at the cost of a better relationship and a trade deal with
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the eu? i think you can only speculate on that and of course the us president has sent out warm waves toward the united kingdom and the uk will be free when it is not a member of the european union to do its own trade agreements. it also must look at its relationship with the european union. it is very, very important for both sides, for the uk economy, jobs and indeed in the european union, so i think it would not be a case where you could not suggest you can ignore the european union and deal just suggest you can ignore the european union and dealjust what the us. it would not balance out. whatever those discussions are, whether it is playing well against the other, when it comes down to working out the agreements, look what happened in the past. we struggled for a long period of time to explain why ishehs period of time to explain why isher‘s where important, citizens‘ rights, the northern ireland question, and money, and i hope it does not take us long for people to understand the complexity of a trading relationship. remember, this is the first time that you will see
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two parties that are perfectly aligned pulling apart. your posting where it is, but the uk is moving away. that is kind of a first. one does not know how to even navigate that unusual territory so we‘re going to have to do that. we‘re going to have to do that. we‘re going to have to do that. we‘re going to have to get beyond the rhetoric and i hope that brexit we can get it done finally in december 2020, but i also know that whatever happens, whether we achieve that or not, the uk and europe are going to have to have a very strong relationship and i think it over christmas, that might seep into other consciousness and make us work towards the scenario where we are closely aligned and where we continue the strength of our relationships and we do not try, if you like, to undermine one by the other. i do not think that is how the world prospers or how europe or the world prospers or how europe or the united kingdom should continue. you see going beyond the rhetoric andi you see going beyond the rhetoric and i would not suggest that boris johnson was not taking seriously
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before the selection —— taken seriously before the selection, but is there a sense in brussels and across the eu that he now can be taken more seriously given the strength of his mandate in the uk parliament? i think you've got to treat a premonition with all seriousness, either before the election. of course you have to do that. and respect his very significant majority, so there is no question that europe understand that, but also we have to reflect on how the prime minister was able to sit down with the irish taoiseach the overnight car and navigate a very difficult agreement —— lee when it came to the good friday agreement, he was able to say, yes, ican agree agreement, he was able to say, yes, i can agree to checks on the irish sea. and therefore, we would hope that he will show the same flexibility and level of understanding of the complexity of our future relationships. understanding of the complexity of ourfuture relationships. and i think perhaps the past might bode well for the future and the prime minister has shown an ability to
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suggest one course of action and then, through a period of negotiation, take a very different road. i had optimism there. well, one has to be optimistic on christmas. we are here in strasbourg andi christmas. we are here in strasbourg and i am actually sad as well, if i may say, because we had lots of good friends in the uk and european parliament over a long period of time and they were great workers and, funnily enough, even at the brexit party people are being more friendly. that is very strange. i think it‘s the christmas spirit. friendly. that is very strange. i think it's the christmas spirit. the best present of the european parliament, mairead mcguinness. thank you very much for your time. the leader of the scottish national party nicola sturgeon says that scotland is facing a watershed moment, following the snp‘s comprehensive win in last week‘s general election. speaking in the scottish parliament, she said the country was now at odds with the rest of the uk, which returned a majority conservative government. the fact is that this election
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demonstrated a fundamental point. they kind of future desired by most people in scotland is very clearly different to that favoured by much of the rest of the uk. it is essential, therefore, that a future outside of europe and governed by an increasingly right—wing conservative government is not foisted upon scotland. instead, we must have the right to consider the alternative of independence. that is why, later this week, in line with repeated election and its reinforced once again last thursday, i will publish again last thursday, i will publish a detailed democratic case for a transfer of power from westminster to this parliament to allow for an independence referendum that is beyond legal challenge. half a million washing machines in the uk made by whirlpool are to be recalled, plunging the manufacturer into a fresh saga about dangerous appliances. the machines — which are branded as hotpoint or indesit — were sold for more than five years, but their door locking system can overheat creating the risk of fire. earlier, i spoke to our consumer affairs reporter kevin peachey for more details.
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they were sold since october 2014 in the uk. about 20% of those branded washing machines are sold here since that time. and there is a problem with the best door locking mechanism, basically, anything but a cold wash can set up a chain of events which means that it can overheat, because at the risk of fire and! overheat, because at the risk of fire and i asked jeff newell, vice president of whirlpool, which owns these brands, —— jeff president of whirlpool, which owns these brands, ——jeff neville. what that means four people and homes? we are aware of 79 incidents that have taken are aware of 79 incidents that have ta ken place are aware of 79 incidents that have taken place in which there has been minimal property damages and it was serious injuries, but that is not good enough for us. —— and no serious injuries. that is not good enough for us. we are announcing a full product recall whether you like—for—like replacement or a repair because we need to make sure that our customers are safe. so that asa that our customers are safe. so that as a replacement or a repair, which
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would start in early january, but clearly the whole process could take months. and there is no offer of a refu nd months. and there is no offer of a refund there. and clearly, that will leave it open to some criticism from customers. in the meantime, how do you know if it is your machine that might be affected by this question at the company has set up an online checker and a phone line. you can check, put in your serial number or model number and find that on the inside of the door or back of the mission, and put it in to see if it is one of those affected. incredibly, that should have started at1pm incredibly, that should have started at 1pm today and it does not seem to be working at the moment, certainly for some customers. eventually, when people can use the services, they will be able to see if they are affected and then go on the list for these repairs or replacements which will start in early january. the company a sing up until then, you either need to unplug the machine or just use a cold wash —— the company
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are saying up until then. as over christmas and for the foreseeable future, potentially months, no chance of a hot wash at home using your washing machine. the uk border force agency says it‘s been dealing with a number of boats carrying migrants that were attempting to cross the channel. following reports that 20 migrants arrived at the port, the home office has confirmed that a number of its officers have been deployed. our news correspondent ian palmer is in doverfor us and joins me. we‘ve heard from the home office that there is an ongoing incident with small boats of the kent coast. they cannot tell is anywhere at the moment, but what we do know is that at least 20 migrants were picked up off the kent coast early today. possibly involving up to four or five boats. i should say, that there are unconfirmed reports that this incident could involve as many as 60
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migrants, but as i say, that at the moment is unconfirmed. the newly elected mp for dover, natalie elphick is calling for an urgent meeting with the home secretary, priti patel, to discuss the latest incident and she is basically saying that what has happened is, of course, extremely worrying and she says that the british government spends tens of millions of pounds, gives tens of millions of pounds to the french authorities to secure the french coast and what has happened todayis french coast and what has happened today is extremely worrying. of course, coming at a time it with temperatures as they are, this is getting a more and more dangerous thing to be trying to do. well, simon, 79 people on december the 4th we re simon, 79 people on december the 4th were picked up in one day. one single day. 1700 people have made
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the crossing from the french coast over to the english coast this year. the french authorities say that they have apprehended at least 1100 migrants in the 12 months of this year. so this is a growing problem. as you say, it is incredibly cold. the french coast, you can sit on a good day from here, it is 20 miles away, —— see it. it is known that body heat will leach from your body extremely quickly if you‘re wet. what they are attempting to do is extremely dangerous. but of course, from the french at 30‘s point of view, the days very, very short and that means that policing the french coast is incredibly difficult —— the french authority‘s point of view. thank you very much.
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the singer ellie goulding was among a number of people who came to the rescue of a driver who‘s vehicle was being pushed sideways by a royal mail lorry down one of london‘s busiest roads. footage of the incident showed the car being pushed by a van as other cars honk their horns to get the attention of the driver. lizo mzimba reports. the astonishing footage has been viewed by millions on social media. hey! what‘s wrong?! the sight of a car being pushed sideways down a busy west london road by a royal mail lorry. other drivers try to get the attention of the vehicle. eventually they succeed, its driver expressing astonishment, insisting he did not see it or know that the car was there. i honestly didn‘t see! you didn't see?! ididn‘t see! the incident was witnessed by pop star ellie goulding, who went over to check that the driver of the car being pushed was ok. reports have identified him as a man who worked with a popular motoring youtube channel. ellie goulding spoke to radio 1 this morning. we drove up right next to it to be like, mate,
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you have a car on you, and then we stopped and we did not know what state the guy was in. luckily he was completely fine. thank goodness. yeah, but we had no idea, we could just see the side of the car and we got out and he was really shaken, he messaged me last night to say he is ok. 0k. but it was just mad. a spokesperson for royal mail said, "we are very concerned about this incident, we sincerely hope nobody was hurt and are investigating as a matter of urgency." police said they had attended the scene, spoken to those involved and no arrests had been made. lizo mzimba, bbc news. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with darren bett. we‘ve got some were cold and perhaps foggy weather overnight. at the
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earlier rempel. it has been clearing away from hampshire and the north—east. these are showers in the south—west could be rather heavy as they head through the english channel. we will see the back of that tramp and daily weather from the 30s that tramp and daily weather from the 305 this evening —— that damp and dreary weather from the south—east. it is going to be cold overnight, too, it has not been much ofa overnight, too, it has not been much of a freezing in one or two places today so frost is quite likely for many parts of the country. tomorrow we will see that frog lifting in ireland. —— frog lifting in ireland. some sunshine i decided that, but a strengthening wind will blow in some outbreaks of rain to south—west england, western parts of wales, especially to northern ireland. lifting temperatures here, a chilly day for eastern scotland and north—east england.
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john worboys — the so—called " black cab rapist‘ — has been jailed for life at the old bailey — with a minimum term of six years — for attacking four more victims. the government is to add a new clause to the brexit bill, to make it illegal for parliament to extend the process of leaving the european union beyond the end of 2020. members of parliament return to the commons — the new commons speaker is formally elected, and new mps are sworn in. and was it half a million hotpoint and indesit washing machines are to be recalled — because their door locking system could be a fire risk firefighters in australia are battling to prevent raging bushfires from threatening a major power station in new south wales a review of the decline in the number of rape prosecutions and convictions across england and wales says the criminaljustice system is so under—resourced it‘s "close to breaking point". sport now on afternoon live.
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yes as everton and arsenal could have new faces in the dugout when they play face each other in the early kick—off in the premier league on saturday. arsenal are in talks with their former captain mikel arteta — who‘s been pep guardiola‘s assistant at manchester city for the past three years. this is the second time he‘s come into the frame after being interviewed following arsene wenger s departure last year. but narrowly lost out in the latter stages to the more experienced unai emery. arteta made 150 appearances for arsenal between 20—11 and 20—16. club bosses have been spotted outside arteta‘s house, but guardiola insists he‘s still a manchester city coach, for now. he is part of our group, and our staff, and he‘s still here. so, when we have any news, new news, i will know it, you will know it, and we will know what happens. for now, he is here. tomorrow, he will travel with us. he trained today, we prepared training for the game, and that‘s it.
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everton meanwhile are keen on bringing their number one target, carlo anchelotti to the club. he was sacked by napoli last week, but had great success at chelsea where he won the premier league and the fa cup in 2010. there are reports that the 60—year—old was in rome yesterday where he formally received an approach from everton. talks are thought to be ongoing but what we do know is duncan ferguson will continue in his role as caretaker manager for the league cup quarter—final against leicester on wednesday. 0k, ok, liverpool are playing tonight, but some of the players might not be familiar? this will be a strange one for liverpool as they play aston villa in the quarter finals of the league cup tonight, but their entire first team squad are out in doha for the club world cup. these are the latest pictures we have in from liverpool training in qatar.
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they play the mexican side, monterray tomorrow, which is live on bbc two, so their youth team will instead play the carabao cup game. a good opportunity for those players though. but this marks the start of a very busy run of fixtures for the european champions. managerjurgen klopp says he is focussed on winning in qatar, despite the fixture congestion that the tournament has caused. yes, i am excited about it now, because we are here. that is the only reason we are here, we are here to win the tournament. we will see if we can do it or not, but it‘s not about that, it is about always making the best of it. so in a premier league season like this, if you talk to me about the schedule and i say this is not cool, that is my opinion. but in this specific moment, preparing the next game, it is 100%. and that is what it‘s like here, 100%. there‘s been widespread criticism surrounding serie a‘s new "no to racism" campaign, after they used images of monkeys in their posters. well, ac milan are the latest to voice their concerns. this comes less than three weeks after italian football club‘s made a pledge to combat racism in football.
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these are the images. milan say they strongly disagree with the posters and weren‘t consulted about them. anti—discrimination group fare say the campaign was like a sickjoke, but the artist behind it has defended his work. translation: to answer the question i heard a minute ago, why, monkeys? "an initiative against racism, and you are using monkeys?!" yes, because at some point it is impossible to tell people in the stadium that it is inconceivable to call someone a monkey, just because he is black. i thought maybe i will teach them that we are all monkeys, turning the concept around. so, in my view, the monkey becomes the spark to teach everybody that there is no difference. it is not like somebody is a man and someone else a monkey. at this point, if some people really care about telling a black person that they are a monkey, then we are all monkeys.
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england‘s women have won the first of three t20 matches against pakistan in kuala lumpur. opener amyjones top scored with a half century as england reached 154 for four from their 20 overs. in reply, pakistan were all out for 125. and, skateboarding will feature as a new sport at next year‘s tokyo olympics, but not at the paralympics. japanese skateboarder — ryu—sei oochi, is almost completely blind and hopes that one day it might. oochi was born with perfect vision, but since being diagnosed with an eye condition at the age of seven his sight has deteriorated. he now needs a cane to navigate in his local skatepark near tokyo. dropping in off large ramps and riding rails are all done by feel rather than sight. ouchi has certainly impressed the local skateboarding community as well as growing following on social media.
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now on afternoon live, let‘s go nationwide — and see what‘s happening around the country — in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. david rhodes is in newcastle with the details of the rmt—led metro drivers strike in the city. a news nationwide debut for vanessa baffoe from look east who‘s in long melford talking about a church there which is undergoing a restoration project to replace its stained glass windows. on the busiest travel weekend of the year upto a quarter of a million journeys on the tyne and wear metro could be cancelled as plan to train drivers stage a 48 hour walk—out this weekend. yes, it‘s going to be a massive week for travellers across the uk, as the christmas holidays get under way. in the north—east, the tyne and wear metro, which connects newcastle to sunderland, it carries 100,000 passengers every day, and it is very
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important for those cities, especially when it comes to christmas and new year. there is a dispute between the rmt union, which looks after train drivers, and the country that runs the metro, naxos. there is a big dispute. if things are not sorted by friday, there will be no services across the tyne and weir network, friday and saturday this week, we have been out talking to passengers this morning and this is what they told us about the planned strike. basically, it means i can't go home until the 24th. because i've got my classes, and thenl because i've got my classes, and then i can't get home to visit my family. the last time they were on strike, i was late for work by about an hour. i understand why they are doing it. it‘s a compromise between convenience and workers‘ rights. it doesn‘t bother me too much.
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convenience and workers‘ rights. it doesn't bother me too much. we have the rmt on one side, they say they will not see any changes to the terms and conditions of their drivers. they want to make sure that their drivers have defined breaks when it comes to the working day, they want to make sure there is to find rest periods when it comes to the rotor, and they are adamant they don‘t want to see these terms and conditions change. on the other hand, naxos say they want to see changes made to the workforce, so it is more flexible. nexus say they have offered their drivers a 15% pay rise. this is what both sides of the argument i‘ve had to say to us. rise. this is what both sides of the argument i've had to say to us.” think there is a deal to be done on terms and conditions. we have gone a long way to addressing the trade unions terms and conditions, over £250,000 into this, in our second meeting, another five drivers. at the moment, the management team, while a few things are agreed in principle, nothing has been finally agreed. who, in their right mind, is agreed. who, in their right mind, is a trade union representative that represents a broad workforce, would
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reject a 15% pay increase? simply not true. the reality is that my members are expected to sell their terms and conditions, to self finance these proposals. it is not, andi finance these proposals. it is not, and i emphasise this, a pay award. david, we have a new parliament. is the government planning to make this sort of strike action more difficult in future? potentially, it depends what comes out of the queen‘s speech. on thursday, the government has been talking about making rail companies run some sort of skeleton service at the very least, even if there is strike action cold. we have seen there is strike action cold. we have seen problems in the south—west of england and problems between leeds and manchester when it comes to strike action. the government is potentially looking at mandating that rail companies will have to run some sort of skeleton service even if they strike, the rail companies and unions say it would be undemocratic. there may be a bill on
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thursday in the queen‘s speech. we are not sure but it has been talked about in government circles. thank you for this. let‘s go to vanessa, of the holy trinity church. there is quite a restoration project going on. tell us about it. absolutely. the church i am standing in, holy trinity church, as you mentioned, dates back to the late 15th century. the windows we are talking about we re the windows we are talking about were also created around the same time. let me give you a little tour, so time. let me give you a little tour, so you time. let me give you a little tour, so you can time. let me give you a little tour, so you can get an idea of the journey that the windows have been going through. they started their journey way up there. that is where they were positioned originally. that is all because of the reformation. they survived the reformation, when henry viii broke away from the catholic church and formed the church of england. he wa nted formed the church of england. he wanted a divorce, but the pope would not grant him a divorce. the reformation has been described by a man called simon ed, who described
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it as the brexit of the 16th century. that is because of those reasons that i mentioned. you know, king henry viii, breaking away from the catholic church in rome. let‘s hear from the catholic church in rome. let‘s hearfrom simon the catholic church in rome. let‘s hear from simon and the catholic church in rome. let‘s hearfrom simon and see the catholic church in rome. let‘s hear from simon and see what he has got to say about these windows and the people that we can actually see in these windows. what you have to remember is that english medieval churches were full of stained glass. 90% of it was destroyed in the reformation and the civil war. a good deal of our survived because it was very high up. that, in itself, is very important. but secondly, the types of images that we have, they don't show saints in the main, they show secular people, they show friends, family, colleagues of the main donor, the main financer of the church. they are all seriously grand figures, several lord mayors of
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london up there, if you people had their heads chopped off, various duchesses and so on i think of it asa kind duchesses and so on i think of it as a kind of ok magazine for the late 15th century, these were celebrities. what margot vanessa, you make me feel like i was in my history lesson, just a few years ago. thisjob is not going to be quick, it is going to take some time. it will take some time. actually, i will go back a little bit into history, in the 19th century, those windows were moved from above the church. during the reformation, people could not reach them, and damage them. so that is why they survived. they moved them in the 19th century to what you can see behind me. you can see some scaffold. that is because a lot of work has been going on today. they have moved in there so that more people can see them. this work is costing a lot of money. the work that has been done so far cost in the region of about £70,000. but it‘s only a small fraction of the window. it took about three months
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to complete. but that is just one down in seven to go, because we have about seven more windows to go. those windows are slightly bigger than the ones that have been completed. they will cost about £100,000 each. altogether, we are looking at about 800,000, and five yea rs looking at about 800,000, and five years for the project. vanessa, that is fascinating. thank you very much. there is more on look east to, don‘t look so relieved, it wasn‘t that bad, that was your debut! it was! you got through it, well done. stop it! plenty more tonight. if you are worried about travel this weekend, thatis worried about travel this weekend, that is the place to watch. thank you both very much tonight. that is nationwide. if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can more on any of those stories, you ca n a ccess more on any of those stories, you can access them through the bbc iplayer. we go nationwide every
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weekday afternoon at 4.30 on afternoon live. an extreme heatwave is forecast for australia this week, as firefighters continue to battle dozens of ferocious wildfires on both sides of the country. officials in new south wales said the situation is unprecedented, and that the fires could reach a major power station which generates about ten per cent of the state‘s electricity. phil mercer reports from sydney: blanketed in a bushfire haze is the mount piper power station. it came under a sustained attack by embers from an out—of—control mega fire near sydney. the facility generates 10% of the electricity in new south wales. conservationists warn that, should stockpiles of coal ignite, toxic fumes would aggravate air pollution across the region. nearby in the blue mountains national park, crews battled other severe blazes. it‘s hand to hand combat that‘s repeated in many other places.
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there‘s more than 100 fires burning throughout the state. any one of them could cause us problems over the ensuing days, so whilst we are concerned about this, we also need to keep in mind that there‘s a lot of communities still very close to fire. as the fires rage, so does the political debate about the impact of global warming. a group of former senior emergency officials has accused the australian government of not taking the threat of climate change seriously. here in new south wales, the fires are totally unprecedented. more country has been burned, more homes lost, three times more homes lost than our worst previous fire season in history, and the fires are still burning. we have a heatwave coming, who knows what that will do? in western australia, a schoolboy reported missing in a bushfire north of perth was able to escape the flames by driving a pick—up truck on his own to safety after his father and brother had gone to fight the blaze. lucas sturrock, who is 12, also
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managed to rescue the family‘s dog. this crisis is showing the best and worst of australia. the heroism and dedication of firefighters stand in stark contrast to the actions of arsonists, who are thought to be responsible for many of the nation‘s bushfires. phil mercer, bbc news, sydney. the business news is coming in a moment. john worboys — the so—called "black cab rapist" — has been jailed for life at the old bailey — with a minimum term of six years — for attacking four more victims. the government is to add a new clause to the brexit bill, to make it illegal for parliament to extend the process of leaving the european union beyond the end of 2020. firefighters in australia are battling to prevent raging bushfires from threatening a major
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power station in new south wales. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. half a million hotpoint and indesit washing machines are being recalled by their manufacturer whirlpool, over fears they pose a risk of fire. it‘s the latest in a string of product safety scandals involving the company. the pound — along with shares on the ftse 250 index — have been falling today after downing street‘s promise to make any delay to the brexit transition period illegal. against the dollar, the pound has lost a large part of the gain it made after the conservatives won a decisive majority in parliament with investors fearing the risk of a no—deal brexit is rising again. unemployment has fallen to 3.8% — its lowest level since 1975. new figures show there were 1.28 million people out of work during august, september and october, a drop of 13,000.
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have you done all of your christmas shopping? pretty much. smoke! not so smug when the fat credit card bill lands on my doormat next month. it plays into this warning from a debt charity, a surge of direct to consumer credit offers, from retailers. i know that by now and pay later schemes are becoming increasingly popular. the money on mental health policy institute has told the bbc that they think it is becoming too easy to borrow significant amounts of money without proper warnings to consumers about the implications of what happens if january and february comes around and you can‘t really pay it back, you can‘t afford to. katie alpen is the head of research and policy there. thanks for being with us.
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aren‘t there the usual credit checks in place for these direct to consumer offers? there are some checks. but from what we can tell, they are relatively limited, given that we are often talking about a couple of hundred pounds taken out ata time. couple of hundred pounds taken out at a time. our concern is that customers can take out several hundred pounds of credit very easily, and it might be easy to take that out now, and there is pressure to buy presents, money could be tied before christmas, but paying it back injanuary or before christmas, but paying it back in january or february could be a different matter. we are particularly concerned about people in the uk experiencing mental health problems, who might find it harder to manage spending, and might find it harder to understand and remember the complicated terms and conditions, and could get into really serious troubles. let's talk a little bit about terms and conditions, crucially, the interest rate that was charged. we are used to retailers driving sales by offering you 0% finance. many consumers are very offering you 0% finance. many consumers are very glad to take it. does this apply to these deals as well? up yes. it is by now, pay
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nothing for a bit. as long as you pay back on time, the credit is free. sadly, if something happens in your life and you are not able to make that re payment your life and you are not able to make that repayment on the way that you initially expected, people would then be charged additional sums. sometimes these are relatively small, sometimes there are much higher interest rates. either way, it could be hard to meet the additional cost if you have not planned for them. the regulator must be happy, because it is happening? they have done lots of work, but it was a couple of years ago. we know that the sector is changing very quickly with the offer is being made online. it's quite difficult to see the extent to which consumers understand the agreements they are taking out, in terms of conditions. you check a single box and then you are loaned the money. we think that people have to look more carefully at what retailers and creditors are doing to make sure they really understand the terms and conditions of the loans they are taking out. thank you very much.
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somebody has tweeted me and told me that i need a new type of christmas. that one is lovely. it doesn‘t really match. that is deliberate. what is happening in the markets? lots of investors are not happy with the policy move by the government today, seeking to rule out a extension to the brexit transition. basically saying that it is putting no deal squarely back on the table. whatever certainty came with there being a government with a solid majority, many analysts are saying it is surrounding uncertainty. the ftse100 ended the day up very fractionally, it is worth pointing out that it is very internationally focused, the ftse ended down. out that it is very internationally focused, the ftse ended down” out that it is very internationally focused, the ftse ended down. i have not seen ftse all before. i‘ve not seen not seen ftse all before. i‘ve not seen that? that is all of the ftse companies. well, i know that, but i‘ve not seen that before. companies. well, i know that, but
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i've not seen that before. and these are the biggest companies focused on the uk economy, so that is a bigger barometer of what is happening in the domestic economy. similarly, the pound, a week ago, whenever the election results came in, it was up close to a $1.35. now that no—deal is back on the table, it is down to $1.31. let's is back on the table, it is down to $1.31. let‘s get the thoughts of an investment manager. thank you for being with us. the movement of the pound today, do you think that is a sign of things to come, the uncertainty, is it behind us?” think investors have realised that nothing in politics is ever certain. so, following the huge gains that sterling saw at the back of last week, the election win by the tories, that was a relief rally, it meant there was a bit more certainty, at least around the immediate path of brexit. now, a spanner immediate path of brexit. now, a spanner in the works with potential cliff edge at the end of next year,
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that has meant there is a lot more uncertainty for what brexit is going to be. i think investors had a bit of relief, but we knew that this was only the beginning of phase two for brexit, in terms of negotiating what the eu deal would look like. brexit, in terms of negotiating what the eu dealwould look like. in spite of the uncertainty which has pervaded for the last few years now, unemployment figures today suggest that the economy is actually doing pretty well, it is at a 45 yellow?” think the market has been very resilient, and almost at odds with what we are seeing in the economy more broadly. when you look at the labour market, as you have said, it is at historical lows in terms of unemployment, wage growth has been creeping up, it has slowed a bit but it is still fairly robust. i think that might be a reason why, even against the background of uncertainty, businesses are still hiring, because arguably that is an easier option to do than big capital investment in things like technology, because if the environment changes, it is much harder to reverse. when we look at
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the broader economy, manufacturing data that has come out more recently, that is pointing to a downturn. i think that is something that the bank of england is going to be looking at as we go through the week, in terms of what the labour market is doing, versus what we are seeing in the manufacturing sector. 0k, seeing in the manufacturing sector. ok, thank you very much forjoining us. that is it from me, back to you. we can‘t talk about pigs in blankets. there is more about that on the website. because you are not going to get it here! let‘s have a look at the weather with darren bett. a cold day, particularly where the fog has lingered across northern england and the west midlands. we did get some sunshine arriving at northern and western areas. we have a shield of cloud covering a good pa rt a shield of cloud covering a good part of england today. the thickest of the cloud has been toward south—eastern areas. this is where we have seen most of the wet weather, some rain across oxfordshire and hampshire. that is moving its way eastwards. it remains rather damp and dreary across east
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anglia and the south—east. some clearer skies developing elsewhere as we head towards the evening. pretty chilly, temperatures three degrees or so, sharp showers in the south—west. we will soon see that misty, damp weather moving away this evening. clearer skies overnight. many places will be dry. the odd shower through the channel. some more fog for northern ireland, northern england and the midlands and some frost around. patchy frost for many parts of the uk. maybe one or two icy patches as well. in the morning, the fog will lift in northern ireland, with some rain arriving as well. this fog lifting into low cloud, towards the north east of england. either side of that, some sunshine. further west, the wind strengthening to bring rain into south—western end, west wales and northern ireland, lifting temperatures here. still quite chilly for a good part of scotland and north—east england. gales will be arriving in the south—west of england, west wales by the end of the afternoon and through the evening, pushing northwards into northern ireland and south—western parts of scotland. together with the
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rain, which is going to be quite heavy at times. those weather fronts will push the rain northwards and eastwards through the night, bringing in mild air across the whole of the country by thursday. it will probably feel a bit different. we‘ll probably find some dry weather and sunshine across northern parts of scotland, may be northern ireland. on the whole, a lot of cloud around for thursday. showers and longer spells of rain developing, especially in the south and west. with a southerly wind, it will be mild, and feel much milder for scotland on the north—east of england. as we head towards the end of the week, it gets a bit messy, really. we have essentially got areas of low pressure spreading around the west of the uk for a while. that rain could be heavy for eastern areas, and then it pulls away. essentially it stays unsettled through friday and into saturday. some showers and perhaps longer spells of rain, a little bit of sunshine, southerly breezes for many parts of the country. still mild.
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today at five — john worboys — the so—called "black cab rapist" — has been jailed for life at the old bailey. he‘ll serve a minimum term of six years — for attacking four more victims. the court heard he remains "dangerous as ever". one of the most prolific sex offenders in the uk has been sentenced for more crimes against women but police believe that he may have attacked more than 100 passengers. we‘ll have the latest from the old bailey. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. boris johnson meets his cabinet for the first time since the election — he says he‘s determined to lead a people‘s government. the voters of this country have changed this government and our party for the better. and we must repay their
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