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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  December 18, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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you're watching bbc newsroom live 7 it's11am and these are the main stories this morning. thousands of nurses in northern ireland have begun a 12—hour strike over pay and patient safety. if nurses do not stand up then patient safety is compromised every single day, today and thereafter. more than 15,000 officers are taking pa rt more than 15,000 officers are taking part in this industrial action, the first time ever members have gone on strike. relatives of four british soldiers killed in thejuly 1982 hyde park bombing have won a high court civil case against suspectjohn downey former prime minister tony blair attacks jeremy corbyn's leadership and warns that labour will be replaced as a serious political force if it tries
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to whitewash the scale of its election defeat. the result has brought shame on us. we let our country down. to go into an election at any time with such a divergence between party and people is unacceptable. president trump faces a vote on removing him from office today — he writes a furious a letter to top democrat nancy pelosi in which he claims she's declared "open war on american democracy". and bulls eye...fallon sherrock becomes the first woman to win against a man at a darts world championship. i'm an disbelief what i'd just done. looking back on it i'm so proud of myself but at that moment in time ijust couldn't believe what i'd done, i'm still lost for words how i felt. and learning to play the piano, without a piano... how one man defied the odds to play at international concert venues
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good morning, welcome to bbc newsroom live. more than 15,000 nurses have gone on strike across northern ireland to protest about pay and safety levels. it's the first time in its 103 year history that members of the royal college of nursing have joined a picket line. routine medical appointments have beeen cancelled, minor injury units have been closed and there may be delays to some ambulance responses. 0ur correspondent, chris page is outside the ulster hospital for us. as you say industrial action like this has never been seen before anywhere in the uk. a number of trade unions involved, notjust nurses, in whole range of health ca re nurses, in whole range of health care professionals taking part from
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paramedics to social workers to administrators but it is significant for members of the royal college of nurses, 9000 of them have what out, the first time in the unions yesterday that members have taken that step. let's hearfrom yesterday that members have taken that step. let's hear from the top official at the royal college of nursing, the general secretary. we have taken every single step that we can as the royal college of nursing and the nurses to ensure that patient safety continues on the ward. but actually every single day patient safety is compromised in northern ireland because there aren t enough nurses to deliver safe care so actually today is no different. we ve taken special measure to ensure that the wards are covered, particularly for life preserving care, but actually if nurses do not stand up then patient safety is compromised every single day, today and thereafter. the general secretary of the royal
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couege the general secretary of the royal college of nursing. and joint on the picket line in dundonald by a nurse on strike today, andrew high have you taken this step? two things why we are here today, first about pay parity with our colleagues and the mainland of uk and scotland and secondly about staffing levels and northern ireland within our trusts have over 3000 nursing vacancies and approximately the same figures within the independent sector which is about 6000 vacancies within register nurses across northern ireland, that is significant and unprecedented and we are having significant charges in relation to recruiting and retaining nurses and pa rt of recruiting and retaining nurses and part of the issue around attention is around pay parity. we are disappointed our politicians have not been here and resolve this issue before today, no member wants to be
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young today, we would rather have it resolved but our concerns and message have fallen on deaf years and this is about public safety as well. we are here for the patients and the public because we recognise the challenges they face daily as do we and this is about getting this issue brought to the attention of the public and our partitions and get this issue resolved immediately because this is a huge concern to us. because this is a huge concern to us. is it the case that because you paid us. is it the case that because you pa id less us. is it the case that because you paid less than your colleagues in scotla nd paid less than your colleagues in scotland and wales that means it is harder to fell nursing vacancies? that is part of it but it is also about normative staffing, other areas of the uk have legislation and which nurse staffing is enshrined in law and we would be welcome to that
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happening and northern ireland but also about adequate workforce planning which has not happened in northern ireland for years, this has been apparent for years but it has come to an unprecedented level because nurses are finding it difficult to contain patient safety and are working longer than their shifts are, meant to be working 12 hour shifts are working 14 or 16 hours to maintain some level of safety for their patients and colleagues. we are human beings as well, not robots and there's all this much we can do within a working day to maintain the safety of our patient population across our health ca re patient population across our health care notjust within hospitals but communities and nursing homes and gp surgeries. we are calling on the government and politicians to really listen to us because patient safety is being compromised, a population is being compromised, a population is suffering within the health
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service and across public surfaces and we are calling on them to engage immediately and negotiate terms and conditions but equally safe staffing becomes the focus of this government moving forward because not take us a couple of years, this will take up to ten years to attract the right units, to increase numbers which has been done to a small—scale buttress to nurses who want to work in northern ireland because we are now seeing nurses moving to scotland, england and wales and across the globe because of better pay, terms and conditions. thank you. one of more than 15,000 nurses on strike today, he spoke about the political situation, northern ireland has been without a devolved government for three years which is very much a
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factor, a pay what has been given to other health care staff in the uk but not here, talks and going on between parties today and people on the pack if i will be hoping the message goes out to them, they want to see government back as soon as possible so as reforms can be brought and to the health service which is widely acknowledged and northern ireland to be in a state of crisis. relatives of four british soldiers killed in thejuly1982 hyde park bombing have won a high court civil case against suspectjohn downey. it paves the way for a damages claim to be made against him. the attack killed four soldiers from the household cavalry and injured 31 people. the lawyer from the families told the high court there was clear evidence of his involvement in the attack including damning fingerprint
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evidence, he had previously been charged with murdering the four men but that case dramatically collapsed after it emerged he had been given a letter of assurance from the former prime minister tony blair that he was not wanted by authorities for this is the culmination of a long fight for those families. 0ur correspondent angus crawford has been at the high court and joins us now. we had thejudge decided we had the judge decided thatjohn downey was an active participant in the hyde park bombing which caused the hyde park bombing which caused the death of the claimant's father and that participation was part of a concerted plan by the ira aimed at killing or at least during really serious harm to members of the household cavalry. thejudge said that that meant he personally was liable to pay damages to families of the dead. that hearing to discover
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to work out the level of damages will take place at a later date but it is worth reminding you about the events that have led to this court decision. in 1982 a terrible attack and that london in which four members of the household cavalry we re members of the household cavalry were murdered, it is worth reminding you of their names, roy bright two was 36, simon tipper was 19 and geoffrey young was just 19. a car bomb and a morris marina had £20 of explosive packed into it, on the route taken by the household cavalry towards buckingham palace, at exploded, 31 people were injured, four members of the household cavalry were killed outright and seven horses also died and that.
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john downey was never prosecuted for that particular offence although being a member of the ira there was an attempt five years ago but a comfort letter was produced in court said to more than 180 so—called on the run former and active ira member to tell them they were not being actively sought for prosecution. as actively sought for prosecution. as a result the criminal prosecution againstjohn downey, 67, collapsed and it was clear he would never be prosecuted for that crime. families fought to get legal aid and plotted to the high court in a civil context to the high court in a civil context to see if they could find him liable for the deaths of their loved ones and today after this long fight for justice, he has been found liable on the balance of probabilities of being an active participant in that plot to milder those for soldiers.
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—— murder those soldiers. there was a dignified reaction in court, a sense of a long struggle ofjustice being done, they have been speaking of the steps behind me saying may have taken a very long time, it has been a significant effort for all of them but in fact they felt it was vital that justice had to them but in fact they felt it was vital thatjustice had to be done and seen to be done and ifjustice delayed actually is no justice served at last. in terms of what they get ultimately, this is about opening the possibility of damages for the family from john downey, is that actually any prospect of them getting money on is that the basis for this and it is about much more than that? i think would be an
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admission amongst the families that this is symbolic, a sense they have finally had justice, that an individual has been identified as being responsible for the deaths of their loved ones. that has always been the midget name. yes there is a possibility a court, want them significant damages and a previous case of the 0magh bombing, £6 million awarded to the families of the dead against those found liable but at the moment mr downey is on remand facing charges of another alleged ira attack, he is not known to have significant assets. there is a possibility that no money may ever be forthcoming but i think as we heard outside the court significant issueis heard outside the court significant issue is symbolic, it is at last these families believe a measure of justice has been served. thank you.
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former prime minister tony blair is warning that labour will be replaced as a serious political force if it tries to — in his words — "whitewash" the scale of its election defeat. speaking this morning, mr blair who led the party to three general election victories, says labour's problems go far deeper than its brexit stance, or the unpopularity ofjeremy corbyn in some parts of the country. in a speech this morning the former labour leader said the party went in to the general election with what he called " a strategy for defeat" and is now "marooned on a fantasy island". he warned that labour faces electoral oblivion unless it changes course. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is in westminster. he is very clear about what he thinks the issues are, the question is how much has he listened to these days? i suspect the honest answer is not much by many under a labour
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party members but he knows that his comments will be dismissed as those ofa comments will be dismissed as those of a has—been but that is not his game, what he is trying to do is open upa game, what he is trying to do is open up a genuine debate in the aftermath of labour's must defeat since 1935. his fear is that it will in effect be a whitewash, a sticking plaster postmortem and there will be a nip and tuck at the party will not really address the fundamental problems which he suggests are so profound that there is a? about whether labour can any longer expect to be the progressive alternative to the conservatives as an alternative government. his message was carried on with organism vote at the party is finished. it doesn't really get
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to the guts of how grave the challenges now facing which from his point of view is an existential crisis. this is a moment in the labour party's history. it's not like any election defeat labour has ever had. this is a moment when it has got to re—engineer progressive social democratic politics. and it can lead that or, over time, it will be replaced. because there is too much political energy that is not conservative. has analysis is a pretty brutal one which is the party needs to get rid of the far left policies espoused by jeremy corbyn, he dismisses the idea that his policies were popular at the election and if so why unearth that voters decide to vote for boris johnson. the attribute that wasn't
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at brexit, of course that was going to bea at brexit, of course that was going to be a big issue butjeremy corbyn went into it and a state of chronic indecision about what has position was going to be that compounded all the reservations about his leadership and the only way forward 110w leadership and the only way forward now for the party was basically to reverse the jeremy corbyn now for the party was basically to reverse thejeremy corbyn agenda. the takeover of the labour party by the far left turned it into a glorified protest movement, with cult trimmings, utterly incapable of being a credible movement. the result has brought shame on us. we let our country down. to go into an election at any time with such a divergence between party and people is unacceptable. to do it at a time of national crisis, when a credible opposition is so essential to the national interest, is unforgivable.
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he was asked to you like to see take over as labour leader and he avoided giving any sort of answer because he knows full well that what he to put forward a name that would be the kiss of death for that person. nevertheless names are beginning to emerge, keir starmer clearly indicated he will have a crack at it. he though has held back from criticising jeremy corbyn of the ma nifesto criticising jeremy corbyn of the manifesto instead stressing the party must not oversteer to the centre ground so following some considerable way short of the blair analysis when i would expect mr blair's view as the party needs to steer dramatically back towards the centre ground. keir starmer perhaps aware he is to win over the membership which is overwhelmingly still supportive of jeremy corbyn, once to be fairly cautious and any
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criticism of the current labour leadership. fallon sherrock becomes the first woman to win a match at the pdc world darts championship. she came from behind to beat tedd evetts and said afterwards she's proven women can beat the men. liverpool are right in the middle
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of a strange 24 hours. their youngest ever side were thrashed 5—0 by aston villa in the quarterfinals of the carabao cup last night. as their senior team gear up for their first fixture at the club world cup in qatar. they play the mexican side monterrey in doha this evening and its live on bbc two. i'll be back with more on those stories. australia has experienced its hottest day on record. data shows the average national reached 40.9 celsius yesterday. in some inland areas, the temperature rose to more than 45 degrees. it comes as fire services continue to battle a drought and bushfire crisis. forecasters predict the most intense heat could come later in the week so the record could be broken again. joining me now is professor ross bradstock — director at the centre for environmental risk management of bushfires at the university of wollongong. these university of wollongong. temperatures obviously going these temperatures obviously are not going to do anything to improve the situation, what is your current
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assessment? tomorrow, thursday will be another very challenging and dramatic day in terms of the fire situation. we will probably see more loss of property unfortunately. what can be done at this point? it is pretty much a situation of hanging on and triage the problem, all the problems were the arise giving the enormity of active fire at the moment, thousands of kilometres of front, and to be frank exhausted and services and management personnel, it isa services and management personnel, it is a matter of trying to keep the lid on things and more or less fallen back and defending property under the conditions tomorrow. the
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a nswer to under the conditions tomorrow. the answer to this is obvious but spell it out for us, how important is the weather in what has being dealt with? in generalfires weather in what has being dealt with? in general fires are driven by the weather so tomorrow we will see extremely hot and windy conditions, thatis extremely hot and windy conditions, that is one of the critical elements that is one of the critical elements that make fire spread very quickly and the faster they spread a more pressure is on people to deal with them most as they spread faster they become more intense, the energy output becomes very high and those critical conditions we will see tomorrow and superimposed on extremely dry landscapes, vegetation and fuel at critically high levels, historically dry so mixing dry fuel with dry windy weather and all the
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ingredients forfires with dry windy weather and all the ingredients for fires that are almost impossible to control. that is why the authorities tend to retreat back to simply defend lives and property at critical points and the landscape for the can do that relatively safely under such circumstances. the impact of these fires is absolutely devastating. in terms of a longer term impact, two of your specialist areas of research at conservation, biology and landscape ecology what with the long—term impact be? landscape ecology what with the long-term impact be? at this stage we can only speculate because we are still struggling to figure out what has burnt and where but we know there are critical or important conservation assets that have been
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affected so for example world heritage area rainforests which typically will not burn have burnt, populations of threatened fauna and plant species have been affected so for example a lot of prime koala habitat has burnt and it is likely significant losses of koala and other boreal mammals will have been incurred particularly in northern new south wales where there are a very important habitat for these animals. at the moment authorities are struggling to piece together a picture that involves a lot of intelligence about the fires, burn patterns and the section of that information with our knowledge of where key species are just repeated and that assessment is going on
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right now. in many cases people cannot get into the critical areas to evaluate on the ground what has happened so we are very reliant on satellite information and aerial reconnaissance just to piece together the initial picture. thank you. the bank of england says britain's top banks and insurers should be tested — to work out the potential financial hit from climate change to their businesses. in a discussion paper asking for industry feedback , the bank predicted this could happen for the first time as soon as 2021. dr charles donovan is the executive director of the centre for climate finance and investment... putting a price on the potential
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future impact of climate change, how easyis future impact of climate change, how easy is that to do? it is stuff but the bank is responding that people wa nt to the bank is responding that people want to know the money is safe and that revolves around whether banks is guaranteed long—term and climate change imposes a gravure risk and what the bank is asking is to make sure they are ready. explain exactly what you mean when you talk about money being safe. we put money into banks but we also invest in pensions, all of these investments whether they are safer risky can be affected by climate change going forward that is moving to a near—term issue. forward that is moving to a near-term issue. how can it be affected by climate change question mark is not something we have focused on. you think about the physical impact, more frequent rain could mean more funding which could mean the value of houses change, the transition towards electric vehicles
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for automotive manufacturers, need to do that quickly so she prices may suffer, a whole bunch of things banks are involved than in lending to sectors of the economy that are put at risk potentially by these changes coming really fast. could this potentially be an impact on the drive for change? when it is quantified, when the impact of climate change is quantified in this way, could lead to greater change and investment in areas to try to mitigate those costs? absolutely, this is what the governor has been saying that the more transparency thatis saying that the more transparency that is in financial is that you should commit that quantification is and we all can understand where we sit so it is first getting this information on the table and the stress test been talked about for next year as a way of understanding how these things like more frequent
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flooding and changes to the economy towards a clean energy how these ultimately affect the way banks lend. thank you. the actor and singer kenny lynch has died aged 81. he rose to fame singing and performing in variety shows in the 1960s, and had two top ten hits. he performed with the beatles on theirfirst uk tour in 1963 — and had success as a songwriter. lynch, who was born in stepney, east london in 1938, also appeared in nine films, most recently in 2007 crime thriller the riddle, alongside vinniejones and derek jacobi. now it's time for a look at the weather. a rather foggy and frosty start from central and eastern areas which should tend to lift and clear, some lighter skies and then wet and windy
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weather spreading from the west. moving into northern ireland and the west of scotland and wales at the south—west of angled, could be stubborn to clear from eastern areas but brighter spells on the east, temperatures tween three and ten. further west to pitchers between eight and 11 but the wind strengthening through the evening, 60 to 70 on coastal areas, 55 in land and with that heavy rain particularly for the south—west edging east through this evening and overnight taking the strong winds without, generally by the end of the week unsettled and mild for most of us.
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hello. this is bbc newsroom live. i'mjoanna i'm joanna gosling. the headlines... thousands of nurses in northern ireland have begun a 12—hour strike over pay and patient safety. the families of four british soldiers killed more than 35 years ago in the hyde park bombing win their case in the high court against suspectjohn downey. former prime minister tony blair warns labour will be replaced as a serious political force if it tries to whitewash the scale
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of its election defeat. president trump faces a vote on removing him from office today. he writes a furious a letter to top democrat nancy pelosi in which he claims she's declared "open war on american democracy". bulls eye. fallon sherrock becomes the first woman to win against a man at a darts world championship. sport now. we are going to jane at the bbc sport cemetery. let's start with history at the darts, where england's fallon sherrock became the first woman to win a match at the pdc world championship. she came from behind to beat tedd evetts at ally pally, and says she did it for women. it is all sinking in a little bit more. the realisation is hitting me
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know. i am still speechless about it. that crowd were amazing last night. i think everyone of them. the crowd gave me a boost in confidence, i relaxed. i played better because of them. am so proud of myself to help put women's dart on the map now. it was always said that women could not compete against the men and the fact that i prove them wrong and the fact that i prove them wrong and in any sport i think women can beat men, wejust and in any sport i think women can beat men, we just need and in any sport i think women can beat men, wejust need more opportunities. wejust beat men, wejust need more opportunities. we just need the recognition and the experience, the opportunity to do it. congratulations to her. to football now. liverpool are right in the middle of a strange 24 hours as the fixtures pile up up. the senior squad are in qatar, but last night, liverpool fielded their youngest side in history against aston villa in the quarter finals of the league cup and were well beaten. jonathan kodja scoring twice. as wesley rounded off
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a 5—0 win for villa. liverpool's first team watched on in doha, they play mexican side monterey in the club world cup later. if they qualify and win saturday's final, they can call themselves the best club side in the world. there's been criticism over the decision to hold the tournament in qatar, managerjurgen klopp says he's the "wrong person" to address concerns over the country's human rights record. there's a time, we are here, we arrived here, we were very welcome, everything is fine, everything is organised like it should be. that's our situation here. 0rganising the competition, wherever it is in the world, that fifa did that, so they have — other people who organise it have to think about these kinds of things and athletes shouldn't. let's stay with liverpool because the red bull salzburg wingertakumi mina—mino is going to have a medical with them today. here he is scoring forjapan at the world cup in 2016. he'll join liverpool on january
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the 1st when the transfer window opens, and they're paying just over £7—million for him. the former arsenal manager arsene wenger has said fans will have to give mikel arteta time to adapt, if he's named the new boss at the emirates. arsenal are in talks with manchester city where arteta is currently assistant to pep guardiola. arteta is expected to be in the dugout when city play 0xford in the league cup tonight. wenger says arteta has the qualities to succeed. there is passion. i believe that arteta has a great future. he has learned a lot as a assistant coach and after that, he will have to... given the fact that he does not have any experience at that level, he will have to get some good alignment with the club.
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tyson fury has agreed to meet anthonyjoshua in the ring — but for now just as sparring partners. fury‘s accepted joshua's offer to help him train ahead of his expected world heavyweight title rematch with deontay wilder, and he did it in typical tyson fury fashion. really, really love to have you encamp, work out for this fight. i will give diamante wilder a proper beating. i hope you mean it. because i would love to have you in the training camp with me. thanks very much by the way and graduations on your last fight. if you are wondering he did that with a puppy dog filter on. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. and he was on the massage table as well. thank you. let's return now to our top story. more than 15,000 nurses have gone on strike across northern ireland to protest about pay and safety levels. it's the first time in its 103 year
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history that members of the royal college of nursing have joined a picket line. earlier my colleague annita mcveigh spoke to dame donna kinnair — who is its general secretary — she explained how important it was for nursing staff to take action. we can see that there are almost 3,000 vacancies in northern ireland and actually every newly qualified nurse in northern ireland is receiving about £1,500 less than a nurse anywhere else in the uk. so i think that what we can see is that if nurses can earn better elsewhere, they will go elsewhere. and i really want to thank every single nurse in northern ireland today for standing up for patient safety. and presumably you would want the money currently being spent, the large sums currently being spent on agency nurses to be given to staff nurses. well, definitely, because every... we know that safety is better when there's continuity of care.
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so any nurse that's working on a ward understands that ward. they understand where the emergency equipment is. they actually understand how to work as a team with their colleagues. agency nurses do come in and provide safe care, too, but it's not as continuous as those that are fully employed by the hospitals that they work in. what concerns do you have for patients today during this 12—hour strike? how well are they going to be looked after? given that, you know, 9,000 nurses and indeed, members of other unions, paramedics and so on are on the picket lines. so we have taken every single step that we can as the royal college of nurses, the nurse in and the nurses to ensure that patient safety continues on the ward, but actually every single day. patient safety is compromised in northern ireland because there aren't enough nurses to deliver safe care. so actually, today is no different. we've taken special measures to ensure that the wards are covered, particularly for life—preserving care.
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but actually, if nurses do not stand up, then patient safety is compromised every single day — today and thereafter. i suppose the irony is that in northern ireland, more is spent per head of population on health care than elsewhere in the uk. but, you know, you're still saying that the money isn't going to the right areas fundamentally. and presumably you would have a message for politicians. the northern ireland assembly hasn't been running for nearly three years now to get back to work and to get back to making decisions that affect health care in northern ireland. yes. northern ireland patients and nurses are being let down by the lack of an assembly in northern ireland. so i would urge that they get back together and ensure that there's local decision—making on the nhs in northern ireland, because actually we've seen the nhs deteriorating over the last ten years more broadly. do you think the bursaries for nurses that the health secretary, matt hancock, has been talking about this morning,
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is that a welcome step? and do you think that will improve recruitment rates? of course, it is a welcome step because we know that the hardship that nurses face in england is real and therefore, any money that comes into bursary is welcome. however, we know that we tuition fees are one of the things that are deterring nurses and the debt that they accrue to study nursing. so obviously that's one step in the right direction, but we have further to go. that is the general secretary of the royal college of nurses. we can speak now to a patient — nick menhinick has been waiting for three years to have a foot operation. he did wait three years, he had the operation. he is on on their waiting list now. nick, thank you for joining us. you are on that waiting list for three years. six months you have been waiting for an eye
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operation and 18 months for a hernia operation. you have got a lot of experience with leading rest. reg retfully experience with leading rest. regretfully sell. are you going to be affected by the strike?” regretfully sell. are you going to be affected by the strike? i think we all are. 0perations have been cancelled, i'm going to get to the back of the queue. however, i have strong feelings... the assembly has not been up and running, the critical structure is a disaster. it has affected the nhs and there is nothing else that i think that nurses can do. this is absolutely monstrous and we, the consumers, are suffering, badly. as a user who has been on the sharp end of it for some time, when you have been involved, what would you see as being the problems? lack of information. iwas
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three years, as i said on a waiting list. i went to see what i thought was a surgeon, and he said there is a12 was a surgeon, and he said there is a 12 month waiting list. 12 months later, i got a letter saying come and see someone else 20 miles away only to be told that you are on the waiting list, but you were given the wrong information, the waiting list sta rts wrong information, the waiting list starts today. a year later, i was then told again the waiting list has been extended and on my birthday this year in january been extended and on my birthday this year injanuary i got a call from a private hospital to say that the nhs has decided to ship you out and you are going private which the nss and you are going private which the n55 is —— the nhs is paying. a cost the taxpayer a fortune. i must have rattled a few cages. it should not have been like that. it was over three years to actually have the procedure done and it was getting painful. i even had a fall in my
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house and had to go to the a&e as a result of the problems i had with my feet. he said that the strike, you expected impact on you and making you have to wait even longer, but do you have to wait even longer, but do you have to wait even longer, but do you have sympathy with the nurses?” must certainly do. when you think what they must get paid, it is pitiful. they have not worked for three years, the assembly, and they are still getting paid. if you turned around to the bbc and said i am not working any more, they would say right, close the door on the way out. and these people are being paid for doing nothing. monstrous. absolutely monstrous. in terms of the money being talked about, one of the money being talked about, one of theissuesis the money being talked about, one of the issues is parity of pay. i think nurses and northern ireland are effectively paid hundred and 15 —— 1000 £500 less than others in the
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uk. the party leaders, which you point out has not been sitting, the total cost of that would be £30 million. some are pointing out that that money could be spent elsewhere in terms of getting people like you off waiting list. a could take hundred and 20 —— 120,000 off waiting list. a could take hundred and 20 ——120,000 people off of the waiting list. when the resources a re of the waiting list. when the resources are finite, where do you think the resource that should be spent? nhs stands for national health service. national is the united kingdom. some people do not like the fact that northern ireland is in the united kingdom, but we are. therefore what ever we are paying should be the same. i do not see the problem. i believe that the nhs in general is terribly top—heavy. there is an awful lot of
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bureaucracy and i do not think it is run efficiently enough. i have been saying for a long time we have put the political ministers of health, but next week you will be minister of defence. they are professional politicians, but they know nothing about thejob politicians, but they know nothing about the job that they are doing. it is absolute chaos and i am sure there is a hell of a lot of money that could be saved through getting rid of reams of bureaucracy or red tape if you want to call it that. it should be run by professional medical people not politicians who don't know an awful lot about real life. nick, thank you very much for joining us live from belfast. members of the us house of representatives will vote on whether to impeach president trump and send him for trial in the senate. in a public letter, mr trump has accused the democratic speaker of the house, nancy pelosi, and her party of an "illegal,
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partisan attempted coup". if convicted by the senate, the president would be removed from office, but that's never happened in us history. gary 0'donoghue reports on an historic day for the united states. without objection, the committee is adjourned. and with that simple strike of the gavel, democrats declared all—out political war on one of the most controversial presidents in america's history. today is a solemn and sad day. not one republican has come out in favour of impeaching the president. this is tribal politics at its most raw. they don't like the president, they don't like the president's supporters and they dislike us so much, they're willing to weaponise the government. so what are the two charges against the president? the first is that he abused his power by pressuring the president of ukraine to investigate one of his main democratic rivals, former vice presidentjoe biden. the second is that he obstructed congress by trying to stop officials from giving evidence, and failing to provide documents. if it's peace and goodwill
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to all you're looking for at this festive moment, then washington is not the place to find it. barring a political earthquake, democrats will shortly vote to impeach donald john trump with their sizeable majority in the house of representatives, making him only the third us president in history to face that fate. good evening. from sex at the white house to a trial for his political life... last time it happened was 21 years ago, almost to the day. those opposed will say no. the republican—controlled house impeached bill clinton for lying to a grand jury and for obstruction of justice, all relating to his affair with a 22—year—old intern — monica lewinsky. but he was cleared in the senate and that's the most likely outcome for president trump, too. they took a perfect phone call that i had with the president of ukraine, an absolutely perfect call —
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you know it, they all know it — nothing was said wrong in that call. to impeach the president of the united states for that is a disgrace. democrats know they won't get the two—thirds majority needed in the senate to remove a president under the constitution, but they're determined to do as much political damage as they can. the president has offered nothing exculpatory to disprove the evidence that has been put forward. instead, he's orchestrated a cover—up. it's left many in the senate and millions across the country asking, "what is the president hiding?" this impeachment process will all be over in a matter of a few short weeks, though its consequences will work themselves out right up to election day next november. gary 0'donoghue, bbc news, washington. there will be live on interrupted
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coverage from those proceedings on bbc parliament. that will be from two o'clock. that will be from two o'clock. in a moment, we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news... nurses in northern ireland have begun a 12—hour walk out in a dispute of their pay and over patient safety. the families of four british soldiers killed more than 35 years ago in the hyde park bombing win their case in the high court against suspectjohn downey. former prime minister tony blair warns that labour will be replaced as a serious political force if it doesn't learn lessons from the failure ofjeremy corbyn's leadership. thank you, joanna. let's get an update on the business news. bet365 boss denise coates has received a £320 million payday, confirming her position as the uk's best paid executive. the co—founder of online gambling firm was paid a £277 million salary, plus dividends as the popularity of
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online gambling continues to grow. fiat chrysler and rival psa group, owner of peugeot and vauxhall, have confirmed a £308 billion merger deal. the deal, which is aiming for annual cost savings of $4 billion through shared purchasing agreements and combined technologies, will create the world's fourth—largest carmaker. the uk's inflation rate held steady at 1.5% in november, that's according to the office for national statistics. that is the same rate of inflation as in october. i'll have more on this injust a moment. so the latest monthly inflation figuers have held steady at a three—year low. after three consecutive lower—than—expected readings for the headline consumer price index, today's announcement represents a small win for the economy and has seen a small move higher in the pound. so what everyday items were the statisticians looking at? well, there were price rises
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across a variety of goods and services such as chocolate, concert tickets and package holidays, offset by falling clothes and hotel costs, and cigarette prices rising substantially slower than this time last year. victoria clarke is a uk economist at investec. victoria, always good to talk to you. that 1.5% inflation figure slightly better than many analysts we re slightly better than many analysts were expecting, they had been predicting around 1.4. but it is still well below the 2% target. yes, there still well below the 296 target. yes, there is a bit of headspace. i think it is the direction of travel which is the interesting thing in the sense that it does not look like there is much i had that suggest that inflation is going to go on a sustainable basis back to that 2%
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mark. if anything perhaps a bit more pressure to cut rates than to increase. that is interesting. i was just going to ask that. let's talk about what went up and down. tobacco price is significantly down on inflation. as did cheaper hotels and closing prices thanks to the discounting. that is right. there are downsides pressures. that is because we didn't have the budget in 2019. that was a slightly technical factor. then they were offsetting factors that could have pushed inflation up, but did not because you had the drags on the downside. particular interest with chocolate prices which was a force upwards. elements in both directions, but
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typically we get this in the inflation month numbers. month to month to get batted around, but it is the trend that matters. it is not even the trend over the next six months it is a longer—term. if you are looking more longer—term, the bank of england still has quite a bit of pay growth. further ahead there could be more inflation to come. ok, we will watch this space. victoria clark peary good to talk to you. in other business stories we've been following... worried owners of hotpoint and indesit washing machines are still struggling to access a recall website to check whether their machine is a fire risk. half a million appliances need to be fixed or replaced as their door locking system can overheat. but manufacturer whirlpool‘s model checker website has been blighted by technical difficulties. mortgage borrowers "unfairly trapped" on high interest rates when their lenders were nationalised are launching legal action against the companies they say are responsible. some 150,000 homeowners are said to have
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been overcharged for years, unable to switch to a cheaper deal after their mortgages were transferred. one man who says he paid an extra £32,000 said it was a "disgrace". the treasury said it was working to "remove barriers" to cheaper deals. the group legal action, brought by the uk mortgage pearson's chief executivejohn fallon will step down next year, a decision announced as the struggling education publisher said it planned to sell its remaining stake in penguin random hous to bertelsmann for £530m. let's have a look to see what the markets are up to. let's have a look to see what the markets are up to. so today's inflation numbers announicng it held steady at a three—year low in december at 1.5% has given the pound a mini boost. it's still down on the day but has edged back up through $1.31.
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it is back down again now. that news that pearson's chief executivejohn fallon will step down next year has sent the company's shares higher this morning. london focussed estate agent foxrons is one of the biggest faller on the ftse 100 today. it is nearly 3%. that is it for me now. learning to play a musical instrument is a great thing for a child to do growing up — especially if they are keen to learn. but it can be expensive, putting it beyond the reach of some families. when 11—year—old andrew garrido's mother said they simply couldn't afford a piano, he was determined to find a way to follow his dream. my name is andrew garrido, i'm an award—winning pianist and musician and, fewer than ten years ago, i learnt how to play the piano on pieces of paper. this is my paper piano, the third version that i drew. i started learning to play the piano on paper because my mum had just been made redundant,
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and lacking funds to afford an instrument or piano lessons, i went online and i drew a keyboard. i used the paper piano between grades one and grade five, after which, my mum saw my commitment, so she borrowed money from family and friends to pay for a keyboard that i could have at home. but i still had to continue to practise on real pianos. so, often, i would go around to local houses who had pianos, and i was allowed to practise for an hour or so a week on those. and i began a tour of practice rooms. i'm now in my third of four years on my current course at the guildhall school of music and drama and i'm loving it, i really am. i made a mistake on the paper piano! it's... you make mistakes, that's the thing. i don't think there's ever been a greater challenge than playing on a piece of paper.
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looking back, having done that, i'm quite ready to face any other challenges that come my way now. never underestimate what you're able to do, and if you think you're at the limit of what you're able to do, try harder. he laughs you can always give more, and you'll be surprised what you're able to achieve when you really search inside yourself for that willpower, for that strength, to achieve what you really, really want to go for. iam i am delighted to say i will be talking to him at 12:30pm. in a moment the weather. we can take a look at some of the most striking images of the day. we cannot. i have tempted us. i do not know where they
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are. we will see them later. let's catch up at the weather. hello there good morning. it has been is rather frosty start to the day. for many of us it will lift. there will be some skies —— it will turn wet and windy. all because of this big area of low pressure. that is going to bring these weather systems further towards the east. the wind is strengthening as well. the wind is strengthening as well. the rain will move its way into northern ireland and western scotla nd northern ireland and western scotland and the southwest of england. in the east, the fog may be stubborn to clear away. temperatures between five to nine celsius. it is by this evening that the wind will strengthen. gusts of 60 to 70 miles an hour. 52 60s —— 50 to 68 further in land. that can strengthen
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overnight or. it will be a milder night compared to the last few nights. temperatures will up at about nine to 11 degrees. thursday we have got this broad area of low pressure towards the west. down these weather systems straddling the uk. the wind is coming from the south and we will lose the frost. it will be mild for many of us for the end of the week. this is thursday. rain across southern areas will move its way to the north. after a brights art, rain will spread its way and later in the day. some drier interludes before more showers. they can be heavy. look at the temperatures. ten to 13, maybe even 14 degrees. we will keep these weather systems and this broad area of low pressure going into friday. more rain spreading out from the south during the day. it could be heavy at times for england and
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wales. and eventually it will go to scotland. in the south drier and brighter into the afternoon. 0ne scotland. in the south drier and brighter into the afternoon. one or two showers around. temperatures about ten or 11 celsius in the south. it will come down in the northern areas about eight or 9 degrees. after a fairly quiet start to this week, the end of the week is looking much more unsettled, but it will be mild for many of us. today certainly the last day of frost. goodbye.
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you re watching bbc newsroom live ? it's midday and these are the main stories this morning: the families of four british soldiers killed more than 35 years ago in the hyde park bombing win their case in the high court against suspectjohn downey thousands of nurses in northern ireland have begun a 12 hour strike over pay and patient safety if nurses do not stand up then patient safety is compromised every single day, today and thereafter. former prime minister tony blair warns labour will be replaced as a serious political force if it tries to whitewash the scale of its election defeat. the result has brought shame on us. we let our country down. to go into an election at any time with such a divergence between party and people is unacceptable.
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president trump faces a vote on removing him from office today — he writes a furious a letter to top democrat nancy pelosi in which he claims she's declared "open war on american democracy". bulls eye...fallon sherrock becomes the first woman to win against a man at a darts world championship i was in disbelief at what i'd just done. looking back on it i'm so proud of myself but at that moment in time ijust couldn't believe what i'd done, i'm still lost for words how i felt. and learning to play the piano, without a piano... how one man defied the odds to play at international concert venues good afternoon, welcome to bbc newsroom live.
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relatives of four british soldiers killed in the 1982 hyde park bombing have won a high court civil case against suspectjohn downey. it paves the way for a damages claim to be made against downey after a criminal prosecution collapsed five years ago. the attack killed four soldiers from the household cavalry and injured 31 people. angus crawford gave us this update from court. the judge decided thatjohn downey was an active participant in the hyde park bombing which caused the death of the claimant's father and that participation was part of a concerted plan by the ira aimed at killing or at least doing really serious harm to members of the household cavalry. the judge said that that meant he personally was liable to pay damages to families of the dead. that hearing to discover to work out the level of damages will take place at a later date but it is worth
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reminding you about the events that have led to this court decision. in 1982 a terrible attack in london in which four members of the household cavalry were murdered, it is worth reminding you of their names, roy bright was 36, dennis daley, 23, simon tipper was 19 and geoffrey young was just 19. a car bomb, a morris marina had 20lbs of explosive packed into it, on the route taken by the household cavalry towards buckingham palace, at exploded, 31 people were injured, four members of the household cavalry were killed outright and seven horses also died. john downey was never prosecuted for that particular offence although being a member of the ira
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there was an attempt five years ago but a comfort letter was produced in court sent to more than 180 so—called on the run former and active ira member to tell them they were not being actively sought for prosecution. as a result the criminal prosecution againstjohn downey, 67, collapsed and it was clear he would never be prosecuted for that crime. families fought to get legal aid and plotted to the high court in a civil context to see if they could find him liable for the deaths of their loved ones and today after this long fight forjustice, he has been found liable on the balance of probabilities of being an active participant in that plot to murder those soldiers.
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there was a quiet, dignified reaction in court, a sense of a long struggle ofjustice being done, they have been speaking of the steps behind me saying it may have taken a very long time, it has been a significant effort for all of them but in fact they felt it was vital that justice had to be done and seen to be done and ifjustice delayed actually is nowjustice served at last. in terms of what they get ultimately, this is about opening the possibility of damages for the family from john downey, is that actually any prospect of them getting money on is that the basis for this and it is about much more than that? i think there would be an admission amongst the families
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that this is symbolic, a sense they have finally had justice, that an individual has been identified as being responsible for the deaths of their loved ones. that has always been the major aim. yes there is a possibility a court award them significant damages and a previous case of the 0magh bombing, £6 million awarded to the families of the dead against those found liable but at the moment mr downey is on remand facing charges over another alleged ira attack, he is not known to have significant assets. there is a possibility that no money may ever be forthcoming but i think as we heard outside the court significant issue is symbolic, it is at last these families believe a measure of justice has been served.
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more than fifteen thousand nurses have gone on strike across northern ireland to protest about pay and safety levels. it's the first time in its 103 year history that members of the royal college of nursing have joined a picket line. routine medical appointments have beeen cancelled, minor injury units have been closed and there may be delays to some ambulance responses. 0ur ireland correspondent, chris page has been outside the ulster hospital for us. as you say industrial action like this has never been seen before anywhere in the uk. a number of trade unions involved, not just nurses, a whole range of health care professionals taking part from paramedics to social workers to administrators but it is significant for members of the royal college of nurses, 9000 of them have walked out, the first time in the unions history that members have taken that step. let's hear from the top official at the royal college of nursing, the general secretary. we have taken every single step that we can as the royal college
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of nursing and the nurses to ensure that patient safety continues on the ward. but actually every single day patient safety is compromised in northern ireland because there aren t enough nurses to deliver safe care so actually today is no different. we ve taken special measure to ensure that the wards are covered, particularly for life preserving care, but actually if nurses do not stand up then patient safety is compromised every single day, today and thereafter. i'm joined on the picket line in dundonald by a nurse on strike today, andrew why have you taken this step? two things why we are here today, first about pay parity with our colleagues in the mainland of uk and scotland and secondly about staffing levels and northern ireland within our trusts have over 3000 nursing vacancies and approximately the same figures
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within the independent sector which is about 6000 vacancies within register nurses across northern ireland, that is significant and unprecedented and we are having significant charges in relation to unprecedented and we are having significant challenges in relation to recruiting and retaining nurses and part of the issue around attention is around pay parity. we are disappointed our politicians have not been here and resolved this issue before today, no member wants to be here today, we would rather have it resolved but our concerns and message have fallen on deaf years resolved but our concerns and message have fallen on deaf ears one of more than 15,000 nurses on strike today, he spoke about the political situation, northern ireland has been without a devolved government for three years which is very much a factor, a pay award has been given
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to other health care staff in the uk but not here, talks and going on between parties today and people on the picket line will be hoping the message goes out to them, they want to see government back as soon as possible so as reforms can be brought and to the health service which is widely acknowledged and northern ireland to be in a state of crisis. we can cross now to swansea and speak to felicity mckee who is originally from northern ireland but chose to study in wales, so that she could get better access to medical treatment. thank you forjoining us. tell us why you decided to move, what was happening with your treatment? the situation in northern ireland led to me having multiple hospital admissions every week so for example i was studying public health at queen's university and the classes we re queen's university and the classes were held in the royal victoria
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hospital and i would go to class and in the evenings i would have to go into the hospital overnight because i wasn't able to get to the end of a waiting list or access community ca re waiting list or access community care so it is the equivalent of putting a plaster on to a wound that was not healing. it is a huge decision to decide to move away from where you are living because you cannot get the health care you need. it was very daunting but when i look at wales in comparison to northern ireland even though it is the next worst provider of health care competitor northern ireland uk wide difference between northern ireland and wales as night and day. the statistics in northern ireland of 300,000 in august who were waiting to get a first face—to—face appointment with a consultant and a pa rt appointment with a consultant and a part to the uk that would be 11
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million people. it was not possible for me to stay there, i had one doctor decide my situation as tantamount to palliative, and i am a young woman that is not something i wa nt to young woman that is not something i want to hear, i have plans for my future and with the current situation my future just was not northern ireland. how are you now in terms of your health? it has got better management, not necessarily improved but it has improved my quality—of—life, i'm able to access surfaces here in wales that i should have been able to northern ireland but was not, i got to the end of waiting lists for quicker than in northern ireland and able to see suitable professionals that i need to see. it has let me end a position that i didn't notify can return home to northern ireland when i finish university even though i want to.
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classes are on strike because the site is not safe for patients because of staffing levels day—to—day, what would you identify from your experience as the issues? staffing issues is definitely a problem, definitely funding so it is not simple that there is not stuff on the ground, it is a funding issue as well and there is also institutional issues within the health service. the fact is we have had multiple government reports from stormont saying what needs to be fixed to make the health service in northern ireland sustainable and most of those have not been implemented, they have been gathering dust on a shelf. it is not as simple as fixing the nurses pay and bring it in line with the uk, there are other issues. nurses pay is one piece of a very large jigsaw and unfortunately it is the tip of the iceberg, there is a lot more to be done and i would like to see staff better supported because we do
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have a brain drain in northern ireland because why would you want to come to work somewhere where you are going to have to work extra hours... we have to leave it there, thank you. we can carry on talking, we just thank you. we can carry on talking, wejust had to thank you. we can carry on talking, we just had to say goodbye to viewers on bbc two but you were saying concerns about the brain drain, your sorrow at thinking you may not be able to return but obviously it is still a situation you care about deeply. what would you care about deeply. what would you like, what would change things? a report said he did at least1 billion to make a dent in the can situation, money would definitely help, if we can shake that magic monetary that seems to be able to make other things happen that would
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be very useful but it has to be used appropriately and strategically placed within the health service to help fix the cracks currently there. there is no point throwing money at the situation without pinpointing what it needs to go. we need better support and the secretary of state to ta ke support and the secretary of state to take this seriously. people at home and seeing this as a political football to try and get the dup and sinn fein and other parties into stormont but people's lives are not particle footballs, people and pain on waiting lists are citizens of the uk and they deserve to be able to access uk and they deserve to be able to a ccess ca re uk and they deserve to be able to access ca re like uk and they deserve to be able to access care like anyone else in the uk within the nhs. thank you. the first person to officially declare they are standing as the
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next labour leader is emily thornbury. she previously warned that backing brexit would be a act of political folly so she is now setting out her pitch to be the next leader and the guardian. there was also an article by keir starmer but he has not formally said he is going to be standing after the departure ofjeremy corbyn but there are plenty of names and the frame so now emily thornbury confirmed, keir starmer potential, and possibly yvette cooper and others. she said she will become decision over christmas. norman smith joins us from westminster. emily thornbury the first to confirm. the first to formally say she is definitely going formally say she is definitely going for it, shadow foreign secretary,
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pressing labour to adopt a remain position, she was highly critical of jeremy corbyn for his halfway house neutral stance, questioning how that would go down in the general election. the fact the party membership and still overwhelmingly remain will help her cause as of the fa ct remain will help her cause as of the fact she was seen to have done pretty well when she stood in for jeremy corbyn at the ministers questions. she has also not been an out and out common supporters, while twojeremy out and out common supporters, while two jeremy corbyn out and out common supporters, while twojeremy corbyn but not one of those closely identified with the corbyn team. had difficulty may be she will be fishing in similar what is true other female mps, jess phillips, yvette cooper signalling she may have a go so a lot of people because they have to get 22 labour
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mps to back their meth they want to get on the ballot paper so that is the first hurdle but i suspect emily thornbury has decided there is no point hanging around because there has been in a lot of huffing and puffing with people not actually nipping puffing with people not actually pipping the head above the parapet. this is after we had the explosive intervention from tony blair saying u nless intervention from tony blair saying unless the party got its act together and ditched corbynism and sectarian ultra left parties at was the end of the road for the labour party, putting the blame very squarely on corbyn politics. his hope was to instigate see this debate about what the party does next. have you listened to what he said. the takeover of the labour party by the far left turned it into a glorified protest movement,
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with cult trimmings, utterly incapable of being a credible movement. the result has brought shame on us. we let our country down. to go into an election at any time with such a divergence between party and people is unacceptable. to do it at a time of national crisis, when a credible opposition is so essential to the national interest, is unforgivable. the other figure to tentatively put his head above the parapet this morning was sir keir starmer who adopted a cautious approach interviewed and the bbc and the guardian who he didn't think the party should oversteer to the centre ground. the difficulty both he and emily thornbury will have is trying to win over corbynites who will have a decisive say on who the next leader as because i do not think emily thornbury or keir starmer will be viewed as true believers in a
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corbyn project. the headlines on bbc news... the families of four british soldiers killed more than 35 years ago in the hyde park bombing win their case in the high court against suspectjohn downey nurses in northern ireland have begun a 12—hour walk out in a dispute of their pay and over patient safety former prime minister tony blair warns labour will be replaced as a serious political force if it doesn't learn lessons from the failure of jeremy corbyn's leadership the first woman to win a match at the pdc world championship says female darts players need to be given "more opportunities". fallon sherrock came from behind to beat ted evetts at ally pally in london. she was only one of two
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female players to qualify for the tournament and says she's proud to put women's darts on the map. liverpool are in the middle of a very strange 24 hours as the fixtures pile up. the senior squad are in qatar, but last night, liverpool fielded their youngest side in history against aston villa in the quarter finals of the league cup and were well beaten. jonathan kodja scoring twice. wesley rounded off a 5—0 win for villa. liverpool's first team watched on in doha, they play mexican side monterey in the club world cup later. there's been criticism over the decision to hold the tournament in qatar, managerjurgen klopp says he's the "wrong person" to address concerns over the country's human rights record. there's a time, we are here, we arrived here, we were very welcome, everything is fine, everything is organised like it should be. that's our situation here. 0rganising the competition, wherever it is in the world, that fifa did that, so they have — other people who organise it have to think about these kinds of things
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and athletes shouldn't. and the head coach of the england women's cricket team says her nationality won't stop herfrom coaching the side to the best of her ability. lisa keightley is australian, and took over from mark robinson in october — becoming the first full—time female head coach of the team. she follows eddie jones and trevor bayliss in becoming an australian in charge of an england team — but says it doesn't matter where she's from. coaches matter where she's from. coming from different countries coaches coming from different countries and coaching different teams is not really seen as a thing, it is just hopefully you are getting the best person for the job and to feeds well and that environment and what they are looking for and as an australian you have a lot of those qualities because england and australia we do a lot of things are very similar so i don't think it's a big thing but it definitely gets mentioned. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for
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you in the next hour. let's return to our main story this hour — the news that relatives of four british soldiers killed more than 35 years ago in the hyde park bombing have won their case in the high court against suspectjohn downey. speaking outside the royal courts of justice, the relatives of the british soldiers made this statement. say that young was made a victim three times over, the first time by the ira and john downie when they detonated the bomb, the second when a catastrophic failure by the british government led to downey being issued and on the run letter, the third when his criminal trial collapsed as a result. sarahjane and the families were told they would never get justice and the families were told they would never getjustice that they should put the past behind them and move on, they add thousands was lives were devastated by the ira and the forgotten victims. yesterday
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many responsible for the most awful act of terrorism on british soil we re act of terrorism on british soil were living out their days in peaceful retirement believing they would never be held to account for their crimes but justice would never be held to account for their crimes butjustice has prevailed. today after 37 years john downey has been found responsible for the death of lance corporal jeffrey wrong, tripper simon tipper, corporal major roy bright and will te na nt corporal major roy bright and will tenant anthony daly. todayjohn downey extradited from ireland is now awaiting trial on charges related to further terrorist murders. today the forgotten victims are finally remembered. sarahjane and the brave families gathered here west to tell them that they matter how many years have passed justice add well and be done. they invited british government to meet with them to ensure it never fails them or other victims and veterans again. thank you.
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that was the lawyer speaking on behalf of the families. let's get more now on the news that the families of four british soldiers killed more than 35 years ago in the hyde park bombing have won their case in the high court against suspectjohn downey.we can speak to mark tipper now who's brother was killed in that ira bomb in hyde park in 1982. what are your thoughts today having won that case? it has been a difficult past six years since the case was dismissed from the old bailey. today the families have finally found what we have always wa nted finally found what we have always wanted which is justice and closure on this terrible day. no one can know how much pain has been suffered over the last 37 years by all of the fourfamilies over the last 37 years by all of the four families plus the other boys who were injured that day, it has been a long time which has taken its
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toll on the families. your brother was just toll on the families. your brother wasjust 19 toll on the families. your brother was just 19 years old, your fight has been going on for years, how much has it impacted on all of your lives? it impacts deeply. not many days go by without you think of your loved ones you have lost then issues come to the forefront again and you see that dreadful day pictures and we re see that dreadful day pictures and were under the top or one could possibly be the people you love so very much and it never goes away, the pain is always there. it never will, even today we have justice we now know thatjohn downey as the hyde park bomber still does not bring back the people that we loved.
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how important was it to you to have this day in court? we have been denied this day in court before by the british government with the on the british government with the on the run letters, also issued a queens pardon, they thought maybe we would walk away and that day when there was a stay of prosecution put on this case that would be had but believe me we are stronger than that, we brought the case all this way forward. today we have found just this and we as victims will not let government led us down again. you have obviously been through incredible difficult times over the yea rs incredible difficult times over the years and i imagine one of the ha rd est was years and i imagine one of the hardest was when the murder case againstjohn downey hardest was when the murder case against john downey collapsed hardest was when the murder case againstjohn downey collapsed when it emerged he had a guarantee against prosecution issued by the government. can you tell me how you felt when that happened. sick to the
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stomach to know that the people you put ina stomach to know that the people you put in a position of trust ie government to look after us could a sit down with terrorists and give them get out ofjail free cards. it does not wash, that is why the public have supported us so greatly through this campaign and also the news channels and national papers have supported as, they knew we were denied justice. we have done no wrong, all over asked for was justice. this case paves the way for a damages claim againstjohn downey. firstly it does the money even matter, do you expect to see any? is it much more a symbolic victory?m i want money i will go to work tomorrow, this was not about money, it was about justice
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tomorrow, this was not about money, it was aboutjustice which we tomorrow, this was not about money, it was about justice which we found for those four boys who are prepared to put their lives for our great nation, we found justice for them and they will be proud of the families who have not let them down. todayis families who have not let them down. today is honestly a really important moment for you, you have said that overall of those years since your brother was killed there has really been a day could buy you have not thought about him. going forward to you think you can have any sort of peace to grieve him? it sounds like i suppose it is primarily been a matter of fighting for a lot of you over that time. it has been a huge fight that takes its toll on you, it has only been recently that my shoulders were not as broad as i thought they were, it had to go for counselling. it hurt as much today as it did on the 20th ofjuly1982.
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this will never leave me. i love my brothers, he was a good boy, he would have put his life on the line for this country and eventually paid with his life. there must be great solidarity amongst family members having gone through this together, do you take some comfort in that? as a team we hyde park families have been strong. i think we have been respectful, we could have spoken out in bad ways but we have not, we have kept ourselves together stop we had the finest team around us with the lawyers who have been wonderful even at times we were at our very lowest ebb. matthew has kept us going. even so it is still hard. 0ther ebb. matthew has kept us going. even so it is still hard. other families out there will be in the same
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position as the hyde park bombing families, the london branch families, the london branch families, manchester families, have they been denied legal aid? i believe so but legal aid is offered to the perpetrators. we as a victims have to keep fighting for people we have to keep fighting for people we have lost and loved. just to explain people who do not know the issue of legal aid, you were turned down five times, you try to get crowdfunding to raise the money to take this to court. in the end just last year you actually were given access to funds. yes we were given access last year. we had to take them to the high court where they said in their defence that the hyde park bombing was not in the public interest. if this is not in the public interest, ido this is not in the public interest, i do not know what is. we fought tooth and nail for that. i do not know what is. we fought
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tooth and nailfor that. matthew i do not know what is. we fought tooth and nail for that. matthew and his company looked after us for 14 months without any payment. what more can we ask from them? they have supported us this way, found the right people in the lord brandon to support us in court. hs shows that if you are strong and you remain as a team, you will get through this. and if there are any victims out there who wish to speak to us, we will offer as much help to them as we can. thank you very much indeed for joining we can. thank you very much indeed forjoining us. brother of trooper simon tipper who was killed in the hyde park bombing at the age ofjust 19. members of the us house of representatives will vote on whether to impeach president trump, and send him for trial in the senate. he's accused of pressuring ukraine for personal gain and obstructing the impeachment process. mr trump has made his thoughts clear about the process.
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in a six—page open letter he accused the democratic speaker of the house, nancy pelosi, and her party of an "illegal, partisan attempted coup". he says he's the victim of an open war on democracy and claims the charges he faces are "completely disingenuous, meritless, and a baseless invention of your imagination". he also claims the impeachment process, which is set out under the us constitution, is "nothing more than an illegal, partisan attempted coup that will, based on recent sentiment, badly fail at the voting booth." if convicted by the senate, the president would be removed from office, but that's never happened in us history. 0ur correspondent nada tawfik is in washington. talk us through what happens later today. while they day kicks off shortly injust a today. while they day kicks off shortly in just a few hours. the us house of representatives will have six hours of debate evenly divided between democrats and republicans. we expect it to be passionate, angry and yes, directly on partisan lines.
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republicans are likely to follow on from the president's town. the defiant tone saying he did absolutely nothing wrong, that his phone call with president zielinski with the ukraine was perfect. democrats will try to impress on the american public that they believe they are protecting the institutions of this country and that president trapp must be held accountable for inviting interference in the elections. it will be very interesting to see how the 31 moderate districts —— the 31 moderate districts —— the 31 moderate democrats who hold districts that president trump one peary they have said in town house in recent interviews that they have had to search deep to decide what to do and while they did not come to washington to impeach a president, they are ok if they have to take a political hit because they think it is imperative that they do what they believe is right, which is in this case impeach the president. after the debate, we will have the
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historic vote. in all likelihood president trump will become the third president in all history to be impeached by the house of representatives, it will stain his presidency forever. what this means long—term, no president has ever been removed from office. when this goes to the republican—controlled senate, he is likely to face an acquittal. thank you very much. there is live uninterrupted coverage of those hearings from two o'clock on bbc parliament, we will have coverage here on the bbc news channel. right now it is time for only at the weather. we have a rail mixed bag for the weather. some hazy spells of sunshine particular across south. we still have some lingering fog. it is turning mild for a good chunk of
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scotland, temperatures are going to struggle to get above freezing. 0vernight tonight we are looking at a lot of strong winds. gusts around 60 or 70 mph. a lot of strong winds. gusts around 60 or70 mph. later a lot of strong winds. gusts around 60 or 70 mph. later in the night, it is going to get very windy in the western islands of scotland at the same time we will see rain returning to england and wales. the wind is pushing mild air in. so temperatures are going to rise overnight. we will have temperatures around nine or 10 degrees. thursday, rain at times sums up the weather. the rain heaviest across wales. the driest and brightest weather will be in the north of scotland. that is your latest weather. hello, this is bbc newsroom live with joanna gosling.
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you can see sitting next to me is someone who learned to play the piano by paper. he had a paper keyboard. i will be talking to him inafew keyboard. i will be talking to him in a few moments about how he managed to do that. right now at 12:30pm here is the summary of the latest news. the families of four british soldiers killed more than 35 years ago in the hyde park bombing win their case in the high court against suspectjohn downey. thousands of nurses in northern ireland have begun a 12—hour strike over pay and patient safety. emily thornberry, the shadow foreign secretary has become the first mp to formally enter the labour leadership race. president trump faces a vote on removing him from office today. he writes a furious a letter to top democrat nancy pelosi in which he claims she's declared "open war on american democracy". bulls eye. fallon sherrock becomes the first woman to win against a man at a darts world championship.
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i mentioned andrew garrido learning to play a musical instrument. it is a great thing for a child to do growing up — especially if they are keen to learn. but it can be expensive , putting it beyond the reach of some families. when 11—year—old andrew garrido's mother said they simply couldn't afford a piano, he was determined to find a way to follow his dream. i will speak to him in a moment, but first this report. 0h, i will speak to him in a moment, but first this report. oh, i'm afraid andrew, we are not going to play the report. you are going to describe what we were going to do. but we we re what we were going to do. but we were going to see was you, you created a paper keyboard. i know that you looked at music tutorials and you practice by playing in the paper. what gave you the idea to do that? hs felt like the next best thing to do. it was at the height of
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the financial crisis and i came home one day and asked for piano lessons and that was simply not possible. i googled how to play the piano or music lessons and i began to pick up bits of theory. and it was just as the instructor was playing little sort of bits and bobs of music that i was copying them back on the paper keyboard. and it wasjust i was copying them back on the paper keyboard. and it was just by the association that i... through repetition i began to hear what i was hearing through my headphones just in my head. by the action of playing. that is incredible determination for an 11—year—old. what made you so determined? as i started, i began to find this wealth of incredible music. and i think it is something that is really particular to classical music where it is just this breath on the motion
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of power of strength, feeling. i had not experienced that in any of the other music i was learning. as i was discovering more and more of that, it grips you. it really does. and i had to get into it, really. how long was it before you got to play on an actual piano? i played in piano lessons eventually. but i was still practising on paper. it was only two yea rs later after i practising on paper. it was only two years later after i had done the three exams that we finally raise money to pay for a keyboard. it was not until another 4.5 years that i was able to finally raise money for a piano. you have gone on and made it your career. that is right. tell us it your career. that is right. tell usa it your career. that is right. tell us a bit about that, where have you played? in italy, scotland, france.
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it has been a brilliant experience. there is nothing like the feeling of a live performance, really, and being able to share something that you work on for months and months. you finally get to that point of sharing with an audience and it is brilliant. you showed how determination can lead to actually delivering a dream that you have when it might not seem feasible. what would you say to the other kids out there? anybody, watching who might have a goal, a dream in mind and think they don't know how to make it happen. i would say two things. if you are a young person and you want to get into music or anybody, never underestimate yourself. i think the strength of the human mind is an incredible thing. if you think you have given it all, there isjust thing. if you think you have given it all, there is just that extra margin. i also think that if you or
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anybody around anybody who wants to get into music, support and. never underestimate them. even if it is just listening to and playing from time to time. that is fine. any bit of support matters when you are beginning to take up music. we all need and like encouragement. thank you very much. andrew garrido, congratulations. doctors in the uk are the first in the world to trial a new way of delivering chemotherapy, which could improve its success rate and lead to fewer side effects. the royal marsden hospital in surrey is testing acoustic cluster therapy, which uses ultrasound waves to target tumours, without attacking nearby healthy cells. our health correspondent, laura foster, has more. nerves are common when you're a patient in hospital, even more so when you're the first person in the world to receive a new treatment. you feel quite vulnerable, but it's also very exciting. am i a guinea pig? it's quite nerve—racking.
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this is acoustic cluster therapy, which aims to make anti—cancer drugs more effective. but how? one problem with chemotherapy is that the drugs flow around your whole body. acoustic cluster therapy is going for a more targeted approach. here, patients are also given micro—droplets. an ultrasound machine detects when these arrive at the tumour and turns them into gas bubbles, filling and stretching the micro—vessels inside the tumour. it means more of the drugs are pumped into the tumour directly. then, hopefully, the lesions will respond better, the cancer will shrink more so then you can cure maybe more patients who are in that situation. this trial is at a very early stage and it's still not clear whether there might be any long—term side—effects to the treatment. but if chemotherapy can be made more effective, then it could mean fewer people suffering the side—effects such as nausea and hair loss, and it could make those difficult tumours, the ones that were previously thought to be untreatable, it could mean
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they start responding to chemotherapy drugs, too. you hope that there's a more easy way or a more gentle way of treating people. hopefully, you know, this will happen. one day there will be a chemo where you don't have these side—effects. but there would need to be many more tests and trials before we can get close to that. laura foster, bbc news, sutton. joining me live in the studio is professor jeff bamber from the institute of cancer research who helped develop this technology. welcome. thank you for coming in. what was your role in it? that is a very good question. the project is a wonderful example of collaboration between industry, academia and the nhs. industry in oslo, a company cold phoenix solutions, they make the acoustic clusters. my team at the acoustic clusters. my team at the institute of cancer research
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which has spent the last six years developing the techniques for applying it. and now in the hospital, they are applying it in patients. it is a trial at this stage. how long can it be before it is rolled out? that depends on how the trial goes. we will probably know in a year or so. is a small trial, just 35 patients are so. but it takes time to recruit those people. anybody that has been around chemotherapy knows how absolutely gruelling it can be. this could be in incredible breakthrough. indeed, from a patient‘s perspective, all you are having is an extra ultrasound sound at the same time is your chemotherapy is delivered. is a good situation for them. and it is an ordinary diagnostic ultrasound. from a technical perceptive is that
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we inject the acoustic clusters and we inject the acoustic clusters and we can see these on the ultrasound and activate them to help the drug get more into the tumour in higher concentrations. what are your best hopes, i don't know how you... whether you have statistics in terms of measuring the potential success at this stage because it is twofold it is reducing the side effects and improving the success treating the cancer. at the moment, we are adding this treatment to one of their tumours. we don't want to interrupt their chemotherapy treatment. 0ur success has been measured in the lab where we have studied lots of
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different tumour models as we cool them. and in a variety of different human tumours, it has been extremely successful over the past six years. in various tumours, pancreas, prostate, rectal. when you say extremely successful, can you give a comparison with traditional therapy? in doses of the drug come in some cases, that would not have been therapeutic, the tumours would still carry on growing, we managed to achieve in some cases complete remission with the tumours disappeared. iam not remission with the tumours disappeared. i am not pretending that that is going to happen in this trial. we do not expect that, but thatis trial. we do not expect that, but that is the best we have achieved in the lab. there is always progress in the lab. there is always progress in the area of treating cancer and it is obviously... we have come a long
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way, a long time, i guess, but incremental improvements on the time. how excited are you about this? the excitement is substantial, but we have to be careful. we have to temper that excitement. be good scientists and measure what is happening and report the results when they are available. professor, thank you forjoining us. today, the most seniorjudge in the land is being honoured by members of the judiciary and the legal profession, ahead of her retirement. supreme court president, lady brenda hale will officially retire from her post when she reaches her 75th birthday in january. lady hale, famously ruled the government was unlawful in asking the queen to suspend parliament. in her valedictory speech, she spoke of some of the highlights of her career and also responded to some of the insults she has received.
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"brenda will be a source of some anxiety." laughter. but you do have to feel a bit sorry for all those male institutions which have had to adjust. but i adjust the law lords did. of course some stereotyping lived on. why else was i put in charge of art and interiors when we moved into this building? while others were in charge of the more serious business of funding, staffing and security? ifjudge brenda has inspired a younger generation to believe in the ideals ofjustice, fairness and equality, and to think that they might put them into practice, judge brenda will retire content. so can i end by wishing you all a very happy and a peaceful christmas? thank you. applause. that was lady hale signing out. now here is on the business is with
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alice. let's get a business update. the boss and co—founder of online gambling firm bet365 denise coates has received a £320 million pound payday, confirming her position as the uk's best paid executive. fiat chrysler and rival psa group, owner of peugeot and vauxhall, have confirmed a £308 billion pound merger deal. the deal will create the world's fourth—largest carmaker. the uk's inflation rate held steady at 1.5% in november — that's according to the office for national statistics. it's the same rate of inflation as in october. injune this year, the financial conduct authority announced plans to radically overhaul how banks charge customers for their overdraft facilities. guy anker is the deputy editor of money saving expert.
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hejoins me live. banks have pledged to become much more transparent in the way that they charge customers for overdraft fees and etc. and the way they display the overdraft. talk us way they display the overdraft. talk us through the changes. it is not so much that the banks are transparent, they have been told to be. thanks when you ask for your balance have to show it to you. it seems simple. before to date they could have shown a secondary figure which is an infallible balance. so let's say that you had another £500 as an overdraft. they could have said that your overdraft was £1000, but some of that was not your money obviously. separately overdraft charges... this change has to happen by april. for lots of people it is
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going to mean they pay more. have all banks signed up to this? it has been driven by the fca. are all signed up and will be making the changes at the same pace? today is the change for how available bala nces the change for how available balances are displayed. how much they actually charge, again, that is going to affect all the major banks. this will not happen in full until april. some of the charges will have already been changed. nationwide building society now charges 39.9% as an overdraft rate. that changed a few weeks ago. hsbc, first direct, etc they are all going to be going up etc they are all going to be going up to 35 or 39 depending by march or april. more will follow because they have to. today is stage one, stage
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two will be happening in april when banks will not be allowed to charge more. these changes have already seen some high street banks and online banks move their rates to a higher level. could this mean that customers are going to end up paying more ultimately? people who are within their limits, some of them will undoubtedly pay more. people who go beyond their limit the underaged overdraft, they will pay last. they are not suddenly in a good position because they have gone from a very expensive rate to a expensive rate. it reinforces the message that an overdraft is a debt and it is an expensive debt and it is not your money. when you are doing your budget, do not see it as your money to spend. ok, thank you. it is good to talk to you. 0k,
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your money to spend. ok, thank you. it is good to talk to you. ok, let's have a quick look at the markets. so today's inflation numbers announicng it held steady at a 3 year low in december at 1.5% has given the pound a mini boost. it's still down on the day but has edged back up through $1.31. that news that pearson s chief executive john fallon will step down next year has sent the compa ny‘s shares higher this morning. london focussed estate agent foxrons is one of the biggest faller on the ftse100 today. that's all the business news. hundreds of thousands of people are facing a wait of months to have their faulty and potentially dangerous washing machines replaced. whirlpool recalled half a million appliances yesterday because of a fire risk, but customers are struggling to get information because of problems with its website. the company has apologised for the glitch but insists that while the site is still suspended for the time being, it is due to be up and running shortly. dan johnson reports. more than 500,000 of these washers are at risk
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of sparking a fire if a part in the door lock overheats. it's happened to 79 indesit and hotpoint machines already. that prompted a clear warning to customers. as soon as they make contact with us and as soon as we get them registered, all our employees will work flat out to get these issues taken care of, remove the product from the home free of charge or provide a full repair. all 2500 of our team are committed to doing just that and more. but the website whirlpool set up crashed yesterday, and so did the phone line, too. now, they announced this recall. they said they'd planned for it, but it looked like they couldn't cope with the response from their customers. so on the company's twitter feed, there's now a list of the models that are affected. the advice is to unplug the machine and wait for a repair or a replacement, or you can reduce the risk by running it at a lower temperature.
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fires started by whirlpool tumble dryers were much more serious. the washing machines haven't caused anything on this scale. but repairs and replacements won't begin untiljanuary at the earliest, and could take months, leaving many customers without a washing machine over christmas. avoiding further damage to the company's reputation now depends on how smoothly it handles this recall. dan johnson, bbc news. jane hill will be here and just a few moments with the news. here is the letter. there was a beautiful sunrise ca ptu red there was a beautiful sunrise captured across the skies. the cloud in question has been streaming its way over the recent hours. it is turning cloudy with outbreaks of rain. eastern area some sunshine, we still have some fog patches. it will
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be slow to lift into low cloud. it will stay cold here. temperatures will stay cold here. temperatures will be struggling in scotland, by a northern ireland england and well, temperatures are between eight and 11 degrees. there will be some places that struggle to see temperatures get much above freezing. this evening we will see strong winds working aim towards the average seacoast. strong winds working aim towards the average seacoast. they could get up to 70 miles per hour. later in the night, we will see some very strong winds working into the western isles. it is one of those nights that the temperatures will be rising and suddenly the winds will be pushing increasingly mild air. temperatures will be nine or 10 degrees at the max. 0ver temperatures will be nine or 10 degrees at the max. over the next few days, low pressure will be in charge in the west. it will be bringing pulses of heavy rain across the country. on thursday, the focus of the heaviest rain will be across
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wales, parts of the midlands and southern england. particular into the afternoon. but across northern ireland —— northern parts of scotland, temperatures will be ten to 13 degrees. the rainbow pushed towards the north. followed by more rain. it will be in southern areas of england. given that this rain will be falling on saturated ground, increasingly toward the end of the week, there is a risk of localised surface water flooding. friday, week, there is a risk of localised surface waterflooding. friday, the wet weather it will continue to go to the north. for most of the uk it will be a cooler kind of day with temperatures going back to normal more or less. some milder air hanging about. it will stay and settled into the weekend and there isa settled into the weekend and there is a risk of seeing lorraine across the far south of england. that is your weather.
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relatives of four soldiers killed in the 1982 hyde park bomb win their civil case against a convicted ira member. a high courtjudge says john downey was an active participant in the attack, which killed four people and injured 31. nothing can bring those four boys back, but we've worked tirelessly as a family to get that decision. we'll have the latest from the high court. also this lunchtime... more than 15,000 nurses are on strike in northern ireland in a dispute about pay. tony blair urges moderates in the labour party to take back control from the far left — or risk never winning power again. the us lower house votes later today on whether to

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