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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  December 18, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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two charges against the republican president. he could then face trial in the senate. we nowjoin katty kay in washington. welcome to this bbc news special coverage from washington, i am katty kay. it is december 18th 2019 — one of those days that will go down in history. unless something extraordinary happens, this is the day donald trump becomes only the third ever american hello, you're watching president to be impeached. afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. he is being charged today at four: on two counts — abuse of power the families of four british and obstruction of congress. soldiers killed more than 35 years ago in the hyde park bombing under the american constitution, win their case in the high court a president can only be impeached against suspectjohn downey. today, the families have found if he commits what are called what we've always wanted, which isjustice and closure high crimes and misdemeanours. today the house will vote to say mr trump's behaviour on this terrible day. has indeed met that standard.
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thousands of nurses in northern ireland have begun so let's go live to capitol hill. a 12—hour strike over pay and patient safety. the house of representatives this is the chamber in the us in washington has started house of representatives. the process of impeaching the house has just been called president trump. to order with a prayer, then the pledge of allegiance. 19—year old ayoub majdouline has been sentenced to life with a minimum term of 21 years for the gang murder of 14—year—old jaden moodie. coming up on afternoon things will kick off for the day of impeachment. for the first hour, we live, all the sport. will hear debate about the rules of this process. this is from the rules european champions liverpool kick off against monterey shortly and the committee of the house, there are 13 clu b world off against monterey shortly and the club world cup out in doha, at stake people on that committee, nine for them is a place in the final democrats and four republicans, and against south american champions yesterday they agreed how the process will run. they will debate that for an hour in the house, there flamenco. and matt taylor is looking will be a vote on that, then add 10am washington time the impeachment at the weather. a day of change, but process against. with milder conditions come scenes this is a serious day like this, turning wet and windy for members of congress, through the rest of the day, i have a serious day for america, all the details in half an hour. and a very serious day for donald trump. nada tawfik is at also coming up, temperatures further
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capitol hill for us. afield, australia has experienced its hottest day on record with the national average temperature guys tell us what is going on up on reaching a high of 40.9 degrees capitol hill. yes, katty, as you celsius. mentioned, this will be a very long day, a consequential day for the united states as the house of representatives begins debating the impeachment of president trump. we hello, everyone, this are expecting, after the procedural is afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. the relatives of four british votes, six hours of passionate, soldiers who died in the 1982 hyde park bombing angry and very partisan debate about have won their civil case against the convicted ira whether to impeach the president. member, john downey. the families are seeking damages, each side getting equal time. now, after a criminal case against him collapsed. the judge at the high court said she was satisfied john downey from the republicans side, they are was an active participant in the attack. likely to take up the tone we saw sangita myska reports. from president trump in that 6—page diatribe, that letter to nancy pelosi saying that he had done absolutely nothing wrong and this walking out of the high court, the families of the victims was all a open war on american of the hyde park bombing say this democracy and that he, basically, has been a fight that has lasted more than three decades. got less due process that the salem the families here today were told witch trials. democrats will point they would never getjustice, that they should put the past
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out that president trump did not behind them and move on. engage with them at all to come and they, and thousands whose lives were devastated by the ira, speak to the house, to allow any are the forgotten victims. witnesses from the white house to testify, and that they believe they are doing what they are bound by their oath to the constitution to hold the president accountable for the judge gave that decision, but no matter what decision is given, abuse of power, for inviting foreign nothing can bring those intervention into the election, and four boys back. but we have worked tirelessly also for his obstruction of as a family to get that decision, which the judge gave today. congress. they say that cuts to the heart of the difference between a king and the republic, what the described in court as a cold—blooded founders of this country tried to killing, it was the 20th of protect when they set up the july 1982 when an ira car bomb was detonated in hyde park. constitution. what will be really then another device was detonated interesting, katty, is to watch how these moderate democrats debate. under a bandstand close by. about 31 of them are from constituencies that voted for donald amongst those killed, four soldiers trump in the 2016 election, and they from the household cavalry. have said that they came to congress squadron quartermaster corporal roy bright, to fight for the bread and butter lieutenant anthony bailey, lance corporal jeffrey young, issues that americans care about, and trooper simon tipper. but they say it is their duty to john downey was the prime suspect. uphold the constitution, even if it costs them politically. 0k, nada tawfik, we will be back with you
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throughout the course of the special convicted of ira membership in the 19705, programming on capitol hill. let's he was charged ta ke programming on capitol hill. let's take a look first of all as we start with the bombing in 2014. he denied any involvement. this debate on the rules process the criminal case collapsed against him. as part of the good friday agreement, governing the impeachment, what john downey had been sent and on—the—run letter actually constitutes impeachment. and given an assurance put simply, it is the process of he would not face trial. the scheme was heavily criticised. bringing political charges against tony blair, whose government the president. the first stage is today's vote implemented the letters, in the house of representatives, fiercely defended them. which has to be carried by a simple majority. if that's passed, then the articles of impeachment without having done that, we would not have a northern ireland go to the upper house, where the president is put on trial, peace process in place. the victims families didn't give up, with the 100 senators winning legal aid last year to fund this civil action acting as the jury. againstjohn downey. yesterday, many responsible for the most awful acts of terrorism on british soil were living the chief justice of the chiefjustice of the united out their days states was set as judge. —— will in peaceful retirement, believing they would never be held to account for their crimes. butjustice has prevailed. sit. for donald trump to be i wish a criminal case had removed from office, taken part, but yeah, i do feel there isjustice, two thirds of senators would need to find him guilty, i hope there is a degree of closure unlikely in this senate which is for the families who have had held by a republican majority. to be put through this, that is the process that goes who have had to fight tooth forward over the next few days and and nail to bring this months, but today we are focused on case to the court today.
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the relatives of those who brought the house of representatives debating and voting whether to today's case are now due impeach donald j trump. damages from john downey. the cost of their loss debating and voting whether to impeach donald] trump. i am joined is yet to be determined. in the studio by our north america sangita myska, bbc news. editor, john sopel, an extraordinary day for america. yes and extraordinarily serious day for america, troubling, some will take party political delight in it, i do not think that will be the tone at all from democrats in the house, they see this as solemn and reg retta ble, they see this as solemn and regrettable, that is what they were trying to be articulate to their in the last hour, 19—year—old ayoub supporters, and to republicans who majdouline has been sentenced they hope to win over, but to life with a minimum term ultimately, like everything else in of 21 years for the gang murder of 14—year—old jaden moodie america today, it is bipartisan, it in leyton in east london at the beginning of this year. is better, split, divided, and it is 0ur correspondent richard galpin is outside the old bailey for us. going to go along party lines pretty much almost uniquely, the republicans will vote as one bloc, tell us what happened, richard. yes, we have just had the sentence in with thejudge, richard marks, the democrats is another, and we know this is a momentous, historic, saying that this had to be a life unbelievable day, but when i watch sentence saying that this had to be a life sentence because saying that this had to be a life sentence because he had been soccer, i have heard the results before i watch the game, i don't
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know what is going to happen within convicted of murder, but saying that the game, but i know what will the life sentence would be with a minimum of 21 years. that should happen when the referee blows the final whistle, and tonight donald trump will be impeached, and in six potentially go down by about a year when they take into account the 01’ amount of time which ayoub trump will be impeached, and in six or seven weeks' time, after the majdouline had on remand. he also senate trial, donald trump will not went on to say that majdouline was be removed from office. those things seem pretty certain and pectin at one of five people who drove the car this stage. and just to clarify, donald trump, whatever happens in north—east london back in today, assuming the house votes to impeach him, will be an impeached january, prowling the streets, and president. you might not be removed when they saw jaden from office, but there will always january, prowling the streets, and when they sanaden moodie on a mopeds, they targeted him be an asterisk after his name, a deliberately, driving the car right footnote or a primary node macro in into him. he actually catapulted his biography going forward, donald over the vehicle and was then jtrump, the his biography going forward, donald j trump, the 45th president of the united states, the third president clearly seriously injured, lying on to have been impeached. it doesn't the ground, and then that ayoub matter whether the senate vote to majdouline was one of three people remove him from office or not, he who then came out of the car with will still have been impeached by the house of representatives. this knives and stabbed jaden moodie nine times with forceful blows, they is the beginning of the whole
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process that we are seeing, it does not look terribly full at the knives penetrating deep into his moment, but it will be as the days body, and he died, obviously, from a go on. at the moment they are voting on the rules passed by the rules huge loss of blood. the judge was committee last night, they will have describing this as gang and an hour debating those rules to see drug—related violence with planning, and therefore the sentence richard, if anyone objects to how the procedure will be carried out today, richard galpin, thank you very much. do they have amendments to it, that is the kind of thing they are voting on for the next hour. when that is tony blair has delivered a scathing wrapped up, the actual impeachment verdict on labour's performance in debate will start itself. we are the general election and urged getting some inkling into how the president himself is feeling about moderates to take back control from the far left. this. before voting began, the president tweeted, can you believe that i would be impeached today by in a speech in london, the radical left, do nothing the former prime minister warned that the party had to change course, democrats, and i did nothing or it might never win power again. wrong... his intervention comes as candidates to be the next labour leader begin to outline their vision for the future. emily thornberry, the shadow foreign secretary, has become the first labour mp to formally jon, we have also had some announce her candidacy. nick eardley reports. just wondering whether we are going implication of how the president is to be able to count on your vote? feeling, the sense of victimhood, what went wrong, and how does labour this grievance that the democrats rebuild after its worst we re this grievance that the democrats were out to get him from the very election result in 80 years?
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there is a lot of soul—searching first day that he was elected, in a going on in the party. the last man to win an election letter that he sent to nancy pelosi as labour leader says last night. shalli a big rethink is needed. letter that he sent to nancy pelosi labour can keep with last night. shall i take you through some of the words that are used, six the programme and positions ofjeremy corbyn with a new leader, in which case it's finished. or it can understand pages? a tweet is 280 characters, that it must recapture the party from the far left, this was 2800 words, it was like the make radical changes and begin the march back to power. longest tweet you have ever seen, labour has changed since the blair era — and the words he uses to describe the membership is more left—wing, the process, because some try to many policies are more radical, argue that actually donald trump and its candidates to replace corbyn benefits from this politically, he emerge, many are reluctant to change will unite the republicans, but he things too much. is furious. he called it invalid, spiteful, egregious, meritless, terrible, disingenuous, baseless, i think that jeremy corbyn was right preposterous, dangerous, fake, fa ntasy preposterous, dangerous, fake, fantasy and illegal. those are just in 2015 when he said we should be some of the words used in the course an anti—austerity party, we should be against cuts of that letter, and he said that the to public spending. that was a fundamentally witches of salem were given more due important shift in our party, process than him, the witches of and what i'm concerned about in the aftermath of this election is that we oversteer salem in 1692 that because that and lurch to a different position panic in massachusetts. well, they without recognising we re panic in massachusetts. well, they were burnt at the stake, no—one what an important shift that was. suggesting... point of order, they
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we re suggesting... point of order, they were actually hanged. i thought they but can another mp we re were actually hanged. i thought they were burned at the stake, but i representing a north london seat found out the other day that they help labour reconnect we re found out the other day that they were hand! a presidential historian with the north of england? sir keir isjeremy corbyn's said to me this morning that this constituency neighbour, was the most unpresidential letter and so is the other candidate ever written on presidential paper, and it was effectively a very long out of the traps. emily thornberry launched her bid criticising mr corbyn for backing tweet. his letter to president an election and says she's ready to take on borisjohnson. erdogan was up there! don't be a she wrote in the guardian, tough guy! it does seem to be very when the next election comes, personal, when he talks about nancy i would like labour to have a leader pelosi, who said, i pray for the and team in place president every day, and he said, with a strategic vision you are lying when you say you pray to exploitjohnson's failings. for me, you are being spiteful. labour's leadership race won't formally get under way until the new year, maybe impeachment becomes personal. but already there is a slow stream of prospective candidates setting i was here when bill clinton was out what they think went wrong. the biggest question of the contest impeached, and bill clinton was is going to be whether mr corbyn's furious with republicans, furious approach needs a few tweaks with the special prosecutor, ken or wholesale change. starr, there was a sense of personal leadership hopefuls will have to persuade a left—wing membership grievance about theirs. one of the and unions of their merits, and many of mr corbyn's big differences from the clinton allies are preparing impeachment, by the time it got to this stage, there had been some to back their own candidate. expressions of contrition on the pa rt expressions of contrition on the part of bill clinton, i did things i think it's good there
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wrong, i shouldn't have done that, are candidates from the different and he was trying to mitigate the political strands within the party putting their name forward. damage that was being done. donald my preference is for rebecca long—bailey, but i think its welcome trump has fought this by not giving that the members are going to have a real choice. after rejection from the electorate, an inch. he said the phone call was the battle for labour's perfect. i have spoken to many future is under way. republicans who i know wish that donald trump would accept that, actually, it was a bit more complicated than that, the call was not perfect, it was very far from perfect, that you shouldn't ask a foreign leader to investigate a political rival, and we have had the i asked helen catt whether any other testimony of the people who came leadership candidates were likely to before the intelligence committee to say that they thought there was a declare they were running after emily thornberry threw her hat into parade quote quote. —— a quid pro the ring. quo. they said it was odd that foreign policy was being run by rudy sir keir starmer suggested it was something he was giuliani and is not the state seriously considering, lisa nandy, the mp for wigan, is another who department. is motion to adjourn, says she is seriously considering, republicans have proposed a motion and rebecca long—bailey, we have not to adjourn, to put a stop to the heard from her herself, but there whole process, or at least a delay to the whole process. you can see has been a lot of talk about her, she seems to be the candidate that the current leadership are likely to the numbers, 76 democrats have said be back in.
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we also heard ofjess phillips, the mp for birmingham yardley, whose name has been bandied no, 51 republicans have said yes, about recently as well, this won't past, democrats are so we need to know how many of those determined to push ahead with this will start to step impeachment vote and process today, forward and say, yeah, no, i am going to run. but we are getting some implication in the meantime, tony blair, an excoriating attack on his own party! even now, a few minutes into the process , even now, a few minutes into the process, that the republicans' plan yes, completely pulling no will be to disrupt. proceedings, punches, describing the because as the president said in his manifesto as a 100 page wishlist that was full in no—one, and he said letter to nancy pelosi, they don't see this as legitimate, they don't when it comes to the future the whole impeachment process as direction of the party, there was a risk that the only people talking legitimate, they see this as a the language of reality were those who do not aspire to lead it. political attack against donald trump. these numbers give us the first indication of the republican of course, tony blair won that landslide victory in 1997 and was determination to obstruct and delay re—elected twice, a proven vote the process and the democratic winner labour previously, and he did determination to say, no, we will take seats which have since gone back to the conservatives in areas carry on. anthony zurcher is our like, for example, the medway towns in kent, areas that were not north america reporter, also here in naturally labour, but he won washington with us. anthony, i am them for the blair era. but he is a very divisive figure inside the party now, tempted to start by asking you, as something i think he recognises. an american who works at the bbc, he was asked who he thought should be the next leader, what are your thoughts and feelings he said it would be unwise to answer that.
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this morning? well, as you mentioned so he has been very critical of labour and the direction it before, they say is an historic day, but it is a day that we knew how it has been going in recently anyway, was going to play out. that is one so no surprise, of the remarkable things, it has but a very strongly worded attack. been 80 days since nancy ploughs the opening of a formal impeachment investigation, and there haven't helen catt. been any major twists and turns. —— the house of representives has started the process nancy pelosi. we had some testimony of impeaching donald trump. the democrat—controlled house is almost certain to vote that was revelatory, that people to impeach the president, have called a blockbuster, but it making him only the third us head of state to face didn't change the equation at all, a trial in the senate. we are looking at almost a straight he's highly likely to be cleared party line vote with only a couple at trial because that chamber is controlled by members of his party. the president has called the process of democrats voting against impeachment, one former republican an "attempted coup" and "scam". here's democratic lawmaker, voting for impeachment. so, you jim mcgovern opening proceedings and laying out his party's view on why lawmakers need to impeach the president. know, the drama is because of the historic nature of this, not because 0ur inquiry is simply to answer the of the outcome. do you think that following question. data president americans around the country have trump and his top advisers corruptly withhold official government actions been tuning into this process, to obtain an improper advantage in paying attention to the details. the next election? we now know, several times donald trump has urged through the hard work of our
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his supporters to read the investigative committees, and transcript of the call between because of the president's own himself and the ukrainian prime admission, that the answer to that question is yes. the president minister, zelensky, at the heart of all this, do you think that they are withheld congressionally approved military aid to ukraine, a country paying attention to this? you travel around the country a lot, you were under siege, not to fight there following the campaign trail, corruption, but to extract a what is your sense? my sense is that personal political favour. corruption, but to extract a personal politicalfavour. president they were paying attention early on, trump refused to meet with ukraine there was hearings in the president president in the white house until he completed the scheme. intelligence committee, gordon sondland talking about there being a all the while, leaders in russia, quid pro quo with the white house the very nature holding a large part visit are being used to pressure the of ukraine hostage, the very nation ukrainians to open this that interfered with our elections, investigation, that he believed that had another meeting in the oval military aid was also being held up 0ffice just last week. the for that purpose. those were dramatic moments, and i think that a had another meeting in the oval 0fficejust last week. the president of the united states endanger our national security. the president lot of times you wonder if it really undermined our democracy. and the cut through and people start paying attention outside of the washington president, a successor to the same bubble. it felt like there was office as george washington and moments will start to do it, but abraham lincoln, betrayed his oath when this moved back over to the judiciary committee and the debate to preserve, protect and defend the was about the history of constitution of the united states. impeachment, and it's kind of became afamiliar these aren't opinions. these are impeachment, and it's kind of became a familiar partisan battle, then i u nco ntested these aren't opinions. these are
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think the american started tuning it uncontested facts. out a bit more, and if you look at and here's one republican, debbie lesko, responding powell's, what has happened since to the impeachment proceedings. the process began was that people i serve on thejudiciary committee. i also serve on the rules committee. who don't like donald trump are in favour of removal, people who like i have spent hours and hours and hours reading transcripts, looking him don't want him going anywhere, so at documents, hearing testimony. him don't want him going anywhere, so if there was the idea that this impeachment process would somehow i can tell you one thing, i believe change the political dynamic in this this is the most unfair, politically country, and then the process itself, that is not the case. what has happened is that impeachment has been bent to the pre—existing biased, rigged process that i have partisan divides within this seen in my entire life. country. ok, it is 9:15am in here are the facts. washington, another 45 minutes of there is no proof, none, this particular process, and i want that the president has committed to get to what is behind the an impeachable offence. impeachment, the tech talk of the relationship with ukraine that has not one of the democrat landed donald trump in the position witnesses, not one, was of becoming the third american able to establish that the president president to be impeached. butjust committed bribery, treason or high crimes and misdemeanours, picking up, jon sopel, on what
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anthony was in, you havejust come as required in the us constitution. back from michigan, it will be a 0ur correspondent swing state in the election, and you have been talking to a democratic nada tawfik is in washington. congresswoman there who was in this difficult position of having to we know what donald trump has been thinking about this, he has been tweeting it. yes, as americans are decide, and what she felt was the watching this very passionate and evidence and constitutional duty to angry display of partisan politics do so? this is a newly elected in the house as both sides lay out extremely conflicting, contrasting congresswoman in a district 30 miles narratives, in fact what they north of detroit, she gets elected believe happened, you have president trump, of course, live tweeting his in november 2018. two years previously, during the presidential reaction to it all. he says he won't election, donald trump won that be watching the proceedings, but he district very comfortably, so she is is definitely watching the coverage of the proceedings, and how it is in... it is like a district has been led to her, and she is making a decision now that will probably lead playing across the nation. both to her early departure from front sides, democrats and republicans, saying that this is going to set an incredibly important precedent, but line politics. but she thought this they disagree about what it is. for democrats, they say this is about defending the constitution of the was a line that shouldn't be united states and the integrity of crossed, asking foreign leaders to elections by holding president trump
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accountable for inviting foreign intervene in domestic politics, so interference in the elections. they there was a suggestion that there say it is their duty to uphold their might be to impeach the president oath of office, to protect the after the mueller report. that didn't happen, and nancy pelosi was constitution. republicans, and the other hand, really hitting back, pretty determined, but after they saying there's been no evidence, got details of the whistle—blower‘s account of what happened on the everything that the democrats has been putting forward so far has been phone call with president zelensky of ukraine, i think that changed hearsay, they have talked about the process , hearsay, they have talked about the process, in a point of view, being things, and the evidence that came before the intelligence committee unfairto changed things. one other thing i process, in a point of view, being unfair to the president, being illegitimate, and so again very would say, i spoke to a number of the republican hecklers who had come contrasting views from both parties, very, very partisan debate at the to this congresswoman‘s town hall moment in the house, and president meeting, and it was really striking trump watching this, wanting that they had a very partial view of republicans to fight back, to follow what unfolded, there was no quid pro up republicans to fight back, to follow up on his six—page letter to speaker quo, the president had done nothing wrong, joe biden was the one who had nancy pelosi, a diatribe denouncing acted in a high—handed manner when this process and painting himself as he was vice president, and they knew the victim. nada tawfik in a little bit of each of the stories, washington, thank you very much, we are expecting that result in the early hours of the morning our time, but not the widest sense of kind of what. .. every time certainly later on tonight. you but not the widest sense of kind of what... every time i said, it is watching afternoon live, these are more complicated than that, because our headlines.
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it wasn't just, you the families of four british more complicated than that, because it wasn'tjust, you know, there was soldiers killed more than 35 years a ukrainian prosecutor, it wasn't ago in the hyde park bombing justjoe biden who want to disperse win their case in the high court and gone, it was the eu, the imf, it against suspectjohn downey. the house of representatives in washington has started was republicans, and they look at me the process of impeaching president trump. 19—year old ayoub majdouline has been sentenced to life blankly, because people are getting with a minimum term of 21 years their news through the filters that for the gang murder they choose to get them through. and of 14—year—old jaden moodie. so they choose to get them through. and so they are having their prejudices reinforced, if you like, so that if you think donald trump is a guilty liverpool are in doha man and should be hung, drawn and for the club world cup quartered, you have heard everything and face mexican champions, monterrey in their second game to convict. if you think he is an in less than 24 hours. a win this evening will take them innocent man, there is no area of through to the final. the former arsenal manager ambiguity whatsoever, you think arsene wenger thinks that arteta could have a bright future donald trump is the person who at the emirates, if he's handed should walk scot—free from all of the vacant manager's job. this and there is no case to answer. fallon sherrock has made history by becoming the first woman to win a match at the pdc world and itjust this and there is no case to answer. and it just shows this and there is no case to answer. and itjust shows how hyper partisan championship. she says female darts players need people are, and how limited the sources of information that they are getting their news from, everything to be given "more opportunities". they are getting is reinforcing the view that they already hold. is 0k, i will be back with more on the let's check back in on capitol hill stories after have passed. and these rules process that is more than 15,000 nurses have gone
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on strike in northern ireland going on up there. nada tawfik is up in a dispute about pay and patient safety. there, are we getting any sense from about two thirds of them are members what has happened so far, i see of the royal college of nursing, which is taking strike action there has been this motion to adjourn that republicans have for the first time proposed in order to delay the whole in its 103—year history. they're unhappy about being paid less than colleagues process , proposed in order to delay the whole process, democrats voting it down, elsewhere in the uk. are you getting a sense of how the many appointments and treatments have been cancelled because of the strike, day will unfold ? and a number of minor injury units are closed. are you getting a sense of how the day will unfold? i think it is going chris page has spent to bea day will unfold? i think it is going to be a very long day, katty, with republicans trying to throw a pay the day in dundonald. for roadblocks... we will be here thousands of nhs workers are on picket lines, for roadblocks... we will be here for a very long time! let's be dozens at this site on the outskirts of east belfast, they would usually honest, they are trying to show looking after patients, president trump that they are on his side, they have really not hidden the fact that they are impartial but they say the reason here, they are here to protect the they are standing outside president, to walk in lockstep with on this soaking wet day is because they care so passionately about their jobs. the white house, and if president they argue that the health service trump is letter gives any here is under increasing strain, indication, they are already in a and that has led them to take fighting mood, so this is likely to a step they hoped bea fighting mood, so this is likely to be a very long drawn—out process, they would never have to. horns toot but certainly that will not take support for the strikers taking part away from the significance of this in a picket unlike any before. moment. and how many members... we the royal college of nursing
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has existed for 103 years, have got just a moment. and how many members... we have gotjust a few members in there this is the first time its members at the moment for the rules process. have walked out of work. it is a very sad day for nursing at what stage do you think the whole chamber fills up and all democrats and all our colleagues and republicans are taking part in that it had to come to this. this process? yeah, originally we this goes against the grain for all nurses. the main thing is had heard from speaker nancy pelosi definitely patient safety. that she wanted to showjust when we go to wards had heard from speaker nancy pelosi that she wanted to show just what a we see a staffing deficit solemn moment this was for and it is actually very democrats, and she had wanted them concerning for all of us. all on the floor at nine o'clock. as you say, it is starting to fill up. more than 15,000 nurses i think shortly it will be filled, are on strike, but many other health care professionals are taking part in this industrial action too, just as they start to vote on those from paramedics to social rules procedures, which will really guide how the rest of the day goes, workers to administrators. their basic message goes ahead. but, you now, here on is they want to be paid the same as nhs staff in the rest of the uk. capitol hill, i have to say we have seen many members capitol hill, i have to say we have seen many members doing interviews, the relatively low wages mean trying to get the view across on the it has been difficult to filljobs, there are more than 7000 vacancies morning programmes, on other across the health service programmes, trying to show that in northern ireland. 2800 of those are in nursing positions. they, really, at the party on the to fill the gap, more right side of history. we have than £200 million has been spent president trump retweet in doug on agency staff in the past year, which has led to pressure collins, the minority from the on existing staff. in a survey, almost half of workers
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said they felt unwell as a result of work—related stress, republicans side, on fox and friends with a third thinking of leaving. at, really defending the present, so nurses say they can't provide even though he says he will not be watching procedures, he is very much the care they want to. watching procedures, he is very much watching the coverage, but very early hours, everyone drawing battle 0ur priority is keeping patients safe, and i don't feel at the minute lines, drawing out their pr moves, i can keep them safe all the time. really. nada, as we go into this i go into work sometimes, and i'm thinking, how are we going to get through this day? important day, remind us what we now of the voting intentions of both urgent services such as cancer treatment won't be affected sides, how many democrats have said by the walk—out today. they are not going to vote to emergency departments impeach the president, and are there will remain open, but many outpatient appointments have been called off. any republicans who will switch hospital managers are warning sides and vote to impeach? well, on there is serious disruption. this is an anxious time for people the republican side, they are all, worried about their physical at this point, we expect, going to and mental well— being, so we have really added to that anxiety by having to make cancellations. we will do our utmost vote against impeachment, there will to reschedule those appointments be no breaks in the republican side. as soon as we possibly can, 0n the democrats, there are about 31 but it is going to take some time. moderate democrats, 27 of which have
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the strike is happening come out to say they will vote to as politicians at stormont take part in more negotiations impeach the president, saying that they have really had to, as we heard jon sopel sing, many of them saying they have had to search their souls, they have had to search their souls, they believe it is their duty to aimed at restoring the stormont government. health care reforms have been left uphold the constitution and uphold on the shelf without ministers. their oath to the constitution, even this is the front line where the political deadlock though it might hurt them collides with the most politically. now, there are a few valued public service. members, one in newjersey, who the it is a christmas of president has been tweeting about in the last few days, a democrat who crisis in hospitals here. has said that he will switch parties well, the westminster government and become a republican. now, says it can't step in because health care is a devolved matter, it should be the responsibility democrats have been at pains to point out that this is a republican of local politicians, macro who was really in danger of but the northern ireland secretary losing his seat in newjersey, he is meeting the five main had become unpopular because of his stormont parties as part support for the president, even of those talks this afternoon, and i understand he is planning though he is a democrat with to invite them to a health summit to take place tomorrow constituents who do support a lot of to try to resolve this issue. president trump's agenda. so there that was chris page. area president trump's agenda. so there are a few that we are still looking pat cullen is the director at, but again, katty, this will be a of the royal college vote very much along partisan lines. of nursing in northern ireland and is a registered nurse. shejoins me now from belfast.
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are the only republican who has said he will vote in favour of impeaching a sad day, and i wonder if this was donald trump is not technically ado a sad day, and i wonder if this was a do you ever thought you would still a republican, from michigan, save. a do you ever thought you would he left the republican party, he has save. no, in my 38 years as a registered nurse, i never thought one day i would find my selves out said that... we are waiting to hear one day i would find my selves out on picket lines standing up for patients and standing up for nursing from about ten democrats who have not declared, but a lot of those and saying enough is enough, we moderates, in the course of the last cannot continue on, we cannot cope 24 moderates, in the course of the last 2a hours, have said they will come any longer with the crisis we have on board, stick to party lines. it got with staffing vacancies, and the fa ct isa on board, stick to party lines. it got with staffing vacancies, and the fact is, once we have got so many is a different process from 1998, vacancies in our service, and with when bill clinton was impeached. 0f the low pay that nurses in northern course, that was republicans ireland are facing, when you compare bringing articles of impeachment it across the four uk countries, we against a democratic president, and are losing nurses, too many out of 31 republicans in that instance our system to be able to cope, and crossed to the other side and said with the fact of no—one listening, that they would vote not to impeach nurses have had to move to the action they have taken today. every bill clinton. we are not going to nurse on the picket lines today was see that much crossing of party lines this time around, are we? it devastated, i spoke to them as they isa arrived on this morning, and whilst lines this time around, are we? it is a different time we are in. yeah, they were incredibly emotional, they we re they were incredibly emotional, they were also saying they had really absolutely, and interesting to note heavy hearts getting up this that during that time bill clinton's morning, when they should have been
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approval rating was around 70% at getting up for work, putting on their uniforms and be providing care that time, and impeachment, even at for patients. that is what they its highest point, was around 30%, wa nted for patients. that is what they wanted to do, but with no—one listening about the staffing crisis, even then, low support for they felt they had been pushed this impeachment. now, looking at support for impeachment, it is about 50%, way. inevitably patients will suffer very divided across the country, but today. well, every nurse in northern if you break it down by party, you ireland made every effort possible get a very different picture. more to not add to the suffering of than 80% of democrats support patients. patients in northern impeachment, among republicans it is ireland are faced with an incredible about 6%, so we see how hyper challenge, every single day in the partisan this whole process has health service, and our challenge is borne out by a waiting list, 306,000 failed to people across the country who, you know, have been getting the people on our waiting lists, one in majority of their analysis and six people sitting on waiting lists for more than 40 years. that is not information from the news sources that many feel have confirmed their a tolerable position. if that was own biases, their own political translated across to the english views, so that certainly has played population, that would mean 11 into it. remember, president trump, million young people deaf people on since he came into office, this waiting lists, so why would anyone country has been deeply divided, and think that is good enough for the the president has used that as an people of northern ireland? —— 11 argument throughout this impeachment process , argument throughout this impeachment process, saying that since he got million people on waiting lists. that is why the nurses are speaking
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into office, the democrats have disliked him and that is why they out, saying the people in northern are doing this, really trying to ireland deserve better, they deserve a world—class health service that detract from the facts of this has the proper staffing levels to impeachment, really trying to frame ca re has the proper staffing levels to care for them each and every day, it as impeachment, really trying to frame itasa impeachment, really trying to frame it as a witch hunt, a hoax. nada and that is the reason nurses have tawfik on capitol hill, for the given upa and that is the reason nurses have given up a day's paid today to stand moment, thank you very much. let's on picket lines. those nurses that go outside congress, and my are actually the lowest paid in the colleague nick bryant is there, health service, and here they are outside the senate side. impeachment today speaking up on behalf of their patients, and i cannot commend them is do not come along very often in enough, and with a heavy heart they american history, but you and i have have been pushed in his direction. been here to cover two of them, just describe a shift in a hospital, which either makes us incredibly old and what it is like for a nurse and what you describe are circumstances all means that the process results that shouldn't have to be put up that come to start becoming the norm, what is going on?” with. well, for example, two days ago our nurses arriving to any one that come to start becoming the norm, what is going on? i think both of those are correct, katty! yeah, i of our hospitals, and what they was here in 1998, as you were as found was, within our emergency well, i was here in 1998, yeah, no departments, as well as caring for the flow of people within those person on the planet had actually departments, there were 30—40 people seen an person on the planet had actually seen an impeachment process play out in each hospital sitting on back then, and it all seemed so much trolleys, waiting to get hospital
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beds, and those nurses are also more dramatic, didn't it? it was also fresh and new. it was these trying to provide care for those. those are the most vulnerable, ill constitutional civics lesson from and sick people that you can have hell overlaid by this tawdry daytime within your health system, sitting on beds on corridors, lined up soap opera, the dramatis personae without having privacy screens, without having privacy screens, without having privacy screens, without having access to the proper was so soap opera, the dramatis personae was so much more dramatic, this equipment to care for those marital drama playing out between bill clinton and his wife hillary, patients, and that is no way to treat what is mostly the elderly who even at that stage we thought population in northern ireland. had presidential ambitions, you had nurses want better for our patients, they are telling us that they don't that relationship between monica lewinsky and bill clinton, and we called it the monica lewinsky get a chance on a 12 hour shifts to scandal, but we should have called have a comfort break, they do not it the bill clinton scandal. monica get their lunch break, they don't lewinsky was only a little bit older even get a drink of coffee during than his daughter. you had this the day, simply because there is not dramatic relationship layout between the day, simply because there is not the time or nurses to allow that to bill clinton and newt gingrich, his happen. and every nurse in northern great tormentor, newt gingrich ireland is working at least 2—3 probably the most influential hours every week over the shift of non—president in american politics for the past 50 years, and of course unpaid hours to try and keep the it wasn't bill clinton who ended up health service going. and frankly, losing hisjob, it was newt gingrich. we try to make the 1998 from our perspective, we can say that nurses, those on the front line who are the lowest paid, are
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mid—term election a referendum on carrying the weight of the health the present‘s behaviour, and service on their shoulders, trying opposition parties do not generally to provide a service against all lose seats in midterm elections, but odds. it strikes me, just listening he ended up losing hisjob, and the to you, that this could backfire a bit, if i am a young man or woman quy he ended up losing hisjob, and the guy he replaced him, bob livingston, it turned out he had had watching now, the last thing i am extramarital affairs as well, and he thinking about is going into had to step down as speaker at the nursing, and yet your problem other huge vacancies. nursing is an very day that bill clinton was impeached. it was just so dramatic, the nation was riveted, and i sense incredible profession. what other profession enables you and allows thatis the nation was riveted, and i sense that is not the case now. i think a you to be with people when they come lot of people are thinking, well, into this world, but also to be at another week in trumpland. and yet their bedside or in their home when they leave this world? that is an in some ways perhaps this is more absolute privilege that no nurse serious, i have spoken to ta kes for absolute privilege that no nurse takes for granted. so i don't republicans who were in the house at believe that our profession should the time of bill clinton's believe that our profession should be seen as a challenge and shouldn't be seen as a challenge and shouldn't be something that people should feel impeachment, republicans who voted to impeach bill clinton, who have is an absolute privilege to be in. said, you know what, in retrospect, what we need to do is, when those yes, he committed perjury and that people into our profession, highly was a crime, but perhaps we should skilled, highly trained, that we have censured him, because it was treat them decently, with respect, about a marital affair, and when you the same as any other nurse working look at what is at stake today, in the uk. that is not a hard thing democrats will say, what is at stake to do, that is all they are asking
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todayis democrats will say, what is at stake for, nothing more than that, and to today is the nation's security, it is protecting the democracy of give them the skills and resources america, protecting the democratic they need to look after patients, process. this is about a foreign and that is please fill the power intervening in american vacancies that are within our service so that we can continue to democracy, and although perhaps the country is not, as you suggest, is ca re service so that we can continue to care for people of northern ireland. tuned in as it was during the thank you very much for your time this afternoon. clinton impeachment, perhaps this is a lot more serious. yeah, i think a website for customers to register you are absolutely right, katty, and washing machines that could be a the clinton impeachment was a pretty frivolous impeachment, you can't fire risk is up and running again. imaginea frivolous impeachment, you can't imagine a president being impeached in the middle of the cold war of around 500,000 appliances are being essentially having an affair with an recalled because the door locking intern, i mean, he was accused of system recalled because the door locking syste m ca n recalled because the door locking system can overheat. simon gompertz lying under oath and obstructing gave this update. justice, but essentially it felt like a puritanical impeachment it is so frustrating against bill clinton. this is far for customers of whirpool who own hotpoint or indesit washing machines and were told more serious, but as you say, the at one o'clock yesterday lunchtime that there was a recall and they public are less riveted, and i think needed to check on the website it speaks of how far more partisan whether they were affected and book a pick—up to have theirs replaced politics has become. impeachment in or to have them repaired. 1998 was an incredibly polarising that was their choice, episode in american life, i was and i haven't been able to find out, stood here on capitol hill 20 years and that is particularly difficult
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ago, and the atmosphere was toxic, for them because they have also been told that because of the risk but it is even more sulphurous now. of a fire from these faulty electronic door locks, 0ne but it is even more sulphurous now. one of the corollaries of that is they should either not use them, unplug them and not use them, people kind of almost expected or only use them on the coldest washes. so what do they do? impeachment to happen the moment the we have been promised by the company that it has been revamped and will be up democrats got a majority in the house of representatives. i know nancy pelosi was reluctant to go and running this afternoon. down that path, she remembers the at the same time, the telephone history, she remembers newt gingrich, she remembers bob helpline seems to have been livingston stepping down, she overwhelmed, they say remembers that bill clinton left they are taking thousands of calls office with the highest approval ratings of any departing president, today but people are being held on the line for 20 minutes or more, and then it is dropping off. but the seriousness of the i have just got in touch with them allegations against donald trump and they say please call back later actually did lead her to go down in a recorded message, so very frustrating this impeachment path that we find for people who are concerned about their washing machines and when they will be repaired. ourselves in today. ok, nick bryant outside the senate on capitol hill, australia is sweltering we are still checking in, there you in record temperatures. 90, we are still checking in, there you go, they are still voting on this it endured its hottest average daily high yesterday of motion to adjourn the whole process, 40.9 degrees celsius, to put a delay in it, not to have and some areas in the interior have posted more than 45 degrees. the impeachment debate go ahead as speedily as the democrats would
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like. it is unlikely to happen, but the heatwave is expected to intensify over the next few days. it means there may be a delay in the record comes as australia getting to the vote on the rules, battles severe drought and huge bushfires which authorities andi getting to the vote on the rules, and i tell you at the beginning of the process that they would vote on the process that they would vote on the rules are ten o'clock local say are uncontrollable. time, that is in 30 minutes, but it may actually be pushed back, and we might see this happening during the now it's time for a look course of the day, this political at the weather with matt taylor. tactic the republicans are likely to hello, a milder end use in the course of the day in to the week is on its way. order to stall this is a form of but with it will come some pretty protest against the impeachment wet and windy weather itself. it is getting on for half over the next few days, past the hour, with checking in on already starting to arrive in the west of the country. how we got here, why donald trump is some of you see lingering fog, today going to become only the third particularly northern england, that takes a while to shift. american president ever to be impeached, what did he do, what it is said that he did, what is his relationship with ukraine, let's heavy rain around this evening, ta ke relationship with ukraine, let's take a quick look. strong to gale force if not severe gale falls winds, impacting on without objection, the committee is adjourned. travel plans and some of the bridges and with that simple strike of the gavel, democrats declared all—out political as well, wet and windy weather war on one of the most controversial through the night, no higher ground presidents in america's history. today is a solemn and sad day. of scotla nd through the night, no higher ground of scotland before drying out later, reining across parts of the midlands, south and eastern england, not one republican has come out in even into dawn. temperatures tonight
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favour of impeaching the president. this is tribal politics higher than daytime, and incredibly at its most raw. they don't like the president, mild night compared to of late. they don't like the president's supporters and they dislike us so much, they're willing cloudy and damp start across many to weaponise the government. parts, sunning for scotland and northern ireland, strong winds around the hebrides to begin with so what are the two charges against the president? gradually easing off, but then more the first is that he abused his heavy rain pushing up from the south power by pressuring the president later in the day. of ukraine to investigate one of his main democratic rivals, former vice presidentjoe biden. the second is that he obstructed congress by trying to stop officials from giving evidence, and failing to provide documents. if it's peace and goodwill to all you're looking for at this festive moment, then washington is not the place to find it. barring a political earthquake, democrats will shortly vote to impeach donald john trump with their sizeable majority in the house of representatives, making him only the third us president in history to face that fate. good evening. from sex at the white house
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to a trial for his political life... last time it happened was 21 years ago, almost to the day. those opposed will say no. the republican—controlled house impeached bill clinton for lying to a grand jury and for obstruction of justice, all relating to his affair with a 22—year—old intern — monica lewinsky. but he was cleared in the senate and that's the most likely outcome for president trump, too. they took a perfect phone call that this is bbc news. our latest headlines: i had with the president of ukraine, the families of four british soldiers killed more than 35 years an absolutely perfect call — ago in the hyde park bombing you know it, they all know it — win their case in the high court nothing was said wrong in that call. against suspectjohn downey. the house of representatives to impeach the president of the united states in washington has started for that is a disgrace. the process of impeaching democrats know they won't get the two—thirds majority needed in the senate to remove a president president trump. under the constitution, but they're determined to do as much 19—year—old ayoub majdouline has been sentenced to life political damage as they can. with a minimum term of 21 years the president has offered nothing for the gang murder of 14—year—old jaden moodie. exculpatory to disprove the evidence australia has experienced that has been put forward. instead, he's
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its hottest day on record orchestrated a cover—up. it's left many in the senate and with the national average temperature reaching millions across the country asking, a high of 40.9 celsius. sport now on afternoon live "what is the president hiding?" with katie sha na han, liverpool are right in the middle of an extremely busy 24 this impeachment process hours — tell us more. will all be over in a matter of a few short weeks, though its consequences will work themselves out right up to election day next november. yes, liverpool have to play two games in less than a day. gary 0'donoghue, bbc jurgen klopp says that theyjust "have to deal with it." he's spoken in recent weeks news, washington. about his frustations over the fixture congestion his side are facing. liverpool could still win five trophies and will have played 31 that is how we got there. 0utside games before the new year. capitol hill you can see the live so, last night, their youngest ever pictures. we have been watching inside the chamber, this is what is side lost 5—0 to aston villa knocking them out of the league cup, happening outside where there is a as liverpool's first team are out in doha getting ready for their club world cup game pro—impeachment, if you can call it such a thing, rally going on of against monterrey, which kicks off less than an hour's time. and we can now cross live to doha critics of donald trump who are and join our reporter, there to say that he should indeed 0lly foster. be impeached today. it is clearly where i believe there is some inciting very, very strong feelings key team news, 0lly? on either side. anthony zurcher is there is. virgil van dijk, he missed
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with me and the studio. as we watch training on monday. we washed him for 15 minutes in the rain yesterday these pictures, it is interesting to look at the polls because polls have not shifted too much. we have a two —— we watched him for 15 minutes in the rain yesterday. he is ill so he months of hearings, testimony from will miss the semifinal against civil servants and diplomats in ukraine at the time, testimony from monterey. it is national day here in people supporting the president that we look at the opinion polls, the qatar and there was an enormous american public has not really celebrate cherry cake. it a 30 foot changed its position. it shows a long. i wonder whether virgil van very divided nation. i think it also gives us a clue about what the 2020 dijk snuck an extra few to many slices of that which is why he can't presidential election is going to make the match tonight. they have look like because it is very hard to had to tweak things. we expect imagine somebody who does upholster that they support donald trump being jordan henderson to drop into the removed from office is going to turn centre back position alongsidejoe around and change in six or seven gomez. we have got trent months and decide they will support donald trump for re—election, and alexander—arnold at fullback. andy the same goes for people who are standing by him through all of this. robinson at full—back, trent alexander—arnold the bench. 0xide it seems like if they are standing by him through that, they are not going to flip and vote against him. no matter what, i think we are chamberlain, sala, foramino looking at a very close presidential alexander—arnold the bench. 0xide chamberlain, sala, for amino on the election with people's mines are bench. i don't thinkjurgen klopp largely made up and the battle will was ever going to field his be fought in a very narrow area in a
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strongest team. he will say that for few states with a few voters who could swing one way or the other or the final at the weekend. the trying to get the basic to turn out. that may be the lasting resilient champions are waiting. he effectiveness. it is possible that has had to change things around a people are not laser focused on little bit. they stayed up late these impeachment hearings because watching aston villa last night. there have been a lot of that was a bit of a horror show. investigations of donald trump's presidency, as the president himself they will hope to put on a much better showing the semifinal that says. democrats came into office and sta rts better showing the semifinal that starts in the next hour. it sounds within minutes they wanted to get me like a fantastic cake, but what can for something. they is investigations against his we expect from monterrey this relationship, his campaign relationship, his campaign relationship, with russia. i wonder evening? four times they have been whether if the public has merged into one. several days after donald the champions league winners. that is what got them the tickets at this trump was inaugurated, massive world cup tournament. monterrey protest marches took place here in scored a couple of crackers in their washington, dc and across the nation. in about the same spot where quarterfinal. they have already played one match to getting to the that protest is happening right now. exactly. you had this groundswell of opposition to donald trump that has gone on ever since then. earlier semifinals. we can't read too much this year injune, i saw an old lady in california to bernie sanders into it but we heard from nicolas rally holding up and impeachment sanchez, their centre half yesterday
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sign, that was before the ukraine and he says they are going to be stuff. she was passionate about it. there is a reason why donald trump incredibly motivated for this because they say meeting liverpool, is making this argument, because he wa nts to is making this argument, because he wants to paint this is just part of who they considered to be the best clu b a long campaign against him. in his who they considered to be the best club side in the world come on form view, it could undercut the new at the moment, is going to be a once evidence that could change people's opportunity. they play a very mines. if they just view it as expansive style, watch out for those another way they are trying to be out to get donald trump. but they long—range shots. liverpool should have too much for them, even with are two very separate things. there all those changes, but they are be was the investigation into russian going out to try and cause a massive collusion with a trump campaign and upset to get into that final against the brazilians champions on there is this ukraine investigation, and when you look at what has saturday. it is going to be good. happened in the ukraine thank you very much. 0llie foster investigation, it has happened very fast, it is very distinct and it all reporting there. you can watch the match live on bbc two and the began... let's have a recap. they iplayer from 5:15pm this evening. let's turn our began... let's have a recap. they began in aboutjune when president trump started asking about american attention to dance because there is some rather good news. aid, military aid, to ukraine and yes, this is a special moment for darts. whether he could uphold it, whether fallon sherrock has he could put a block on it. right. become the first woman to win a match at the pdc that was the first thing that world championship. happened behind the scenes. nick she's now calling for female darts
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players to be given more "opportunities" in the future. she was only the fifth woman to ever mulvaney was the budget and it is play in the event and one of only also donald trump us chief of staff, two women to qualify for this year's competition. talking about withholding this, the here she is after a memorable conversation behind the scenes, and night at ally pally, for all the punters too, inklings began to spread to people as she came from behind within the administration and state to beat ted evetts 3—2. and sherrock admits that she's proud department, bill taylor in ukraine to put women's darts on the map finding out about this. and then after a dramatic victory in london. it'll come elated with that august phone call with president zelensky and donald trump. he didn't talk about military aid, zelensky brought iamso i am so proud of myself to put it up and then donald trump talked women's doubts on the map. there was about the favour is that america a lwa ys women's doubts on the map. there was always criticism that women could not compete against men, we were not wanted, which included reopening this investigation into 2016 russian good enough, so the fact i have election hacking and also intojoe proved it wrong. in any sport, i think women can prove themselves, we biden who, as we all know, is can beat the men, wejust need more running against donald trump. there opportunities. there are more women we re running against donald trump. there were people listening in on that who can play to my ability, if not call who were nervous about what the better. we just need the president said. when the president recognition, experience and used that now famous phrase" do us a opportunity to do it. she plays in favour, though" people were nervous. the second round on saturday in london. there is more on this story there are people who were nervous on the bbc sport website. goodbye and people who raised objections to
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for now. it. within the national security council and white house. this information was passed along to us diplomats on the ground in ukraine and became increasingly apparent that didn't catch us out at all. that there was a secondary us foreign policy that was being conducted by rudy giuliani, donald now on afternoon live, let's go nationwide — and see what's happening around the country — in our daily visit trump's personal lawyer, and also to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. other people within the in belfast this afternoon we're joined by tara mills bringing us administration who went the latest on those strikes by nhs traditionally involved, gordon nurses in northern ireland. sondland who wouldn't normally be we are getting an update from her in just a moment. amy garcia from look north in leeds involved in ukrainian policy, who will be teaching us how we can be are conducting a separate foreign policy which set of big alarm bells. more eco—friendly this christmas. back with you shortly, amy. we heard from the sme from people but first tara, we've seen this story like bill taylor that this is very in the headlines today and it's unusual and it was undermining the a dispute about pay for nurses roots of foreign policy. that is why in northern ireland when compared where we are today. let's go to capitol hill and take a listen to to the rest of the uk. what is going on in the chamber of house with —— house of many appointments in treatments and hospitals across northern ireland representatives. members have notice have been cancelled and a number of thereof. the house will come to minor injury units have been closed today. a knock—on effect on some order.
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facial skills to wear nursing cover has been cut back. 20,000 staff are on strike, 15,000 are nurses and clegg may continue. november 20 almost 5000 appointments have been cancelled today. there is 2019, shift's significant history to all of this. clegg may continue. november 20 nurses and health workers did not ta ke nurses and health workers did not take this decision likely and all 2019, shift‘s action... the chair year there have been public metres around the country where nurses have declines to conquer in a proposed action of the ranking minority told their own personal stories of the pressure they are under. you member. the ranking minority member shall have the right to refer to the will be aware there are significant committee for decision. the question nursing shortages here and that has whether such authority shall be so also played a part in the pressure, exercised and the chair shall convene the committee promptly to along with that pay disparity. not render that decision, subject to the only do we have the highest nursing va ca ncy only do we have the highest nursing vacancy rates in the uk, we also noticed procedures for a committee have the worst waiting times, meeting under clauses in rule 11. on including cancer and emergency november 21 2019, pursuant to clause department. 0ne two jay one of rule 11, the rules of including cancer and emergency department. one was supporting the house of representatives, all republican members on that select nurses because of the excellent treatment she had received and she committee on intelligence wrote to wa nted treatment she had received and she wanted to support the nurses in chairman shift demanding to call witnesses at a minority day of their plight. they say they are striking with a heavy heart but hearings. whereas subsequent to it those we spoke to felt they have no
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other option. i have been nursing for 37 years. this is so receiving the request, chairman unprecedented of us to have to strike but nurses are so fed up. they have just had enough. why are schiff refused to schedule hearings. we not paid the same as england and he without consultation in violation scotland? we not paid the same as england and scotland ? why do we not paid the same as england and scotland? why do we not have equality of pay? we are not second of section three of house resolution class citizen. i cried on the way up 660, unilaterally transmitted additional records and other here because it is the first time materials to the committee on the everl here because it is the first time ever i have felt so sad that the judiciary. whereas chairman schiff politicians have left us in this compelled to documents and in violation of clause two k six of state. you haven't got enough people on the floor and you are going home rule 11 of the rules of the house of absolutely exhausted. you are staying way past your time. representatives publicly used these absolutely exhausted. you are staying way past your time! absolutely exhausted. you are staying way past your time. a lot of angen staying way past your time. a lot of documents to smear the personal anger, a lot of upset. i am attorneys of the president. a wondering if there are any solutions journalist. and to create a false in sight for the nurses. there were narrative about a sitting member of 11th hour talks last night and this whole picture is further complicated congress and current and former by the fact we do not have a congressional staff. 0n multiple occasions, in both closed doors functioning assembly. the five main depositions at public hearings, he political parties last night pleaded with the secretary of state to personally intervene to avoid abused his power by unilaterally today's strike but he declined. restricting public lands of there are further strikes planned
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forjanuary and there are further strikes planned for january and other there are further strikes planned forjanuary and other health unions have already been carrying out questions and... questions by industrial action over the last couple of weeks and that has directing witnesses not to answer affected everything from surgery to certain questions from republican members and staff. 0n multiple hospital appointments and community services. downing street said today the best and quickest way to result occasions in both closed or depositions and public hearings, chairman schiff abused his power by failing to follow proper parliamentary procedure... what there is —— resolve the result is to get store mount up and running. we're hearing there is republican talks began on monday but there is objections to how this whole big issues beyond the health strike impeachment investigation has been that need to be resolved. many carried out. they are objecting to northern ireland are now saying this the fact that that some of their is the main issue and it should be witnesses they felt weren't allowed concentrating the minds of all of the competitions around the talks to be given enough time by the table. thank you very much indeed. democrats, that they were witnesses they wanted to have call to democrats did not want. this is let's go now to amy. you have been looking at how to be more procedural to some extent but it environmentally friendly this also gets to the root of the christmas. how? festival, iwant to animosity between the two sides and doa christmas. how? festival, iwant to do a test with you to see how iam animosity between the two sides and i am absolutely sure, i suspect a environmentally friendly christmas is going to be. are you a glitter historian could give me the nuts and bolts on this, that when bill and metallic wrapping paper with clinton was being impeached, there fa ncy and metallic wrapping paper with fancy ribbon type of man or do you we re clinton was being impeached, there were democrats who objected their wrap your gifts in newspaper? no ways in which the impeachment presence at all. well, that's good.
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hearing had been carried out as well. this is sort of power for the cause, what you would expect republicans to be doing today, trees, do you go real or artificial? putting on record that they are not happy with the way that this that is your christmas present this impeachment process has been carried year. i got your name wrong. thank out. you heard there the lady you. i go with realtrees. turkey mentioning adam schiff. he is the head of the intelligence committee, the democrat on the intelligence ought not roast? turkey. take a look committee. i spoke to adam schiff this morning, the chairman is dreaming of the committee. i asked at these statistics. the average him whether they were impeaching family has a carbon footprint of 52 donald trump not just him whether they were impeaching donald trump notjust on the merits tonnes a year and at christmas time, of this particular case but also to this is made up of travel to visit send a message to other countries family and friends, home energy that might want to interfere in because we really need to crank up american elections. we take this that heating to welcome our guests seriously, do not interfere, do not mess around with our elections and most of all animal products. all because we have a process for of this could have been avoided. dealing with that. it was wrapping paper, according to rap uk, interesting because what he said to yorkshire charity, we could make a me was that they were trying to send a message and we are a functioning cardboard motorway stretching from democracy, we believe in the rule of leeds to lapland and back 111 times law, we are not a dictatorship, we with all the cardboard packaging that we consume and christmas. that have these processes and we must
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have these processes and we must have those processes stuck to. there is terrifying, isn't it? we have been getting top tips of how we can is concern amongst some foreign have a more eco—the christmas policy types here in washington, without losing that festive cheer. republicans and democrats, that if festival, talk to your family and they do not uphold the rule of law, if they do not stick to the friends about not wanting tat for constitutional laws, then that christmas. recent research suggests we waste £2 billion on unwanted message makes it harderfor america christmas gifts. make your own gifts, may be by sustainably buy to say you must stick to the rule of second hand because pre—loved is law. america is under multiple cheaper and it is a lot less subsequent presidents, it was barack wasteful. what about decorations? we 0bama's policy, president bush's all love them, don't we? go for less policy saying we are going to tinsel and plastic decorations and central european countries and press the rule of law. it is harder to say make more handmade decorations instead. although if you do already that when you're on to limit own have tinsel and those sorts of things, don'tjust go through them president is being impeached. away, the longer you keep them, the more eco friendly it is. under that when you're on to limit own president is being impeachedm that when you're on to limit own trees, do we buy real or do we president is being impeached. it is something that was objected against by putting and... they view the artificial? if you buy artificial, it needs to be used for up to nine yea rs it needs to be used for up to nine years to it needs to be used for up to nine yea rs to have it needs to be used for up to nine years to have less impact than americans as meddling and using these calls for democracy as a way natural alternatives. this family to peel them away from the russians run christmas sayy tree company,
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influence. here we have policy that says feedback says they are have been american policy up until recycling trees by making them into now being changed around where donald trump has a different view of us russian relations and perhaps a woodchip and using netting made from potato starch. it is softer and more gentle to use, it doesn't hurt your different view of ukraine. that is pa rt different view of ukraine. that is part of the reason by these foreign hands. it breaks down quickly if you policy hands who predate donald haveit hands. it breaks down quickly if you have it outside for a week in the trump's administration have been rain and it is very expensive but diplomats, bill taylor goes back to we, as an industry, have to buy it the late 805, they were so shocked and use it because that will allow the manufacturers to make more and and surprised and expressed their 5urpri5e and surprised and expressed their surprise when they found out about start to bring the unit costs down. the way that foreign policy towards when the trees come back and we ukraine wa5 the way that foreign policy towards ukraine was being shifted over the past six months or so. now we have re cycle when the trees come back and we recycle them, we will ship them, put another boat going on. you can see them onto a hard standing, mix them with manure and add bacteria and we the members there, they go and take are using that as a mulch that we their red cards and their green can put on the young trees that we cards, their way of voting yes or plant in april. you've got props? no. this i think, if i'm right, is take a look at this. if you buy any the rules of the impeachment last minute christmas presents, make process. this is no longer a motion to adjourn the whole thing, this is the motion that is on the table. your own packaging. isn't it to adjourn the whole thing, this is the motion that is on the tablem that right? this is going to bring beautiful? take a look at these up that right? this is going to bring up the debate on the rules. this is
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bringing out the document, the rule decorations. beautiful paper chain to start the debate, a vote on garlands and crocheted one here. i am sure you have got plenty of time whether to adopt the role. at this in your hands to do that. if you point it may not happen until around fa ncy in your hands to do that. if you fancy trying something slightly different, go for it not roast noon so point it may not happen until around noon so it is about to start the process to start a vote. to start a rather than pigs in blankets. we will try all sorts tonight if you process to start a vote. to start a wa nt to process does that the vote. welcome will try all sorts tonight if you want to chew in at 6:30pm. that to congress. a5 tree, is that nine years old? don't process does that the vote. welcome to congress. as we were talking there, and i think it is important look at that! it has lots of plastic to remind people of how we got there decorations. i didn't put the tree up, don't look at me. we have used present call, and then the that for 20 years so i think we are 5ub5equent present call, and then the subsequent concerns about that call doing all right. the thing in your of whether the president was asking for a political favour in hand, you're not going to put that of whether the president was asking for a politicalfavour in return of whether the president was asking for a political favour in return for military aid and a visit to the up hand, you're not going to put that up anywhere? that is beautiful, why white house. in september, nancy not? 0r up anywhere? that is beautiful, why not? or maybe some pasta shells on pelosi on the 25th of september, string instead of tinsel? yeah. it nancy pelosi says this amounts to is an option. merry christmas. thank grounds for an impeachment investigation. the investigation sta rts investigation. the investigation starts and we have a whole slew of you very much. look north, 6:30pm witnesses come forward and talk about president trump's relationship tonight and newsline with the latest
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with ukraine, what he wanted from ukraine and most essentially whether on the nurses strike. if you would there was a quid pro quo in the president saying you can have your military aid you can have your visit to the white house, but in return i like to see more on any of those wa nt to the white house, but in return i want you to investigate my main political rivaljoe biden. did the stories, you can access them via the bbc iplayer. a reminder, we go investigation, anthony, establish nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm here on afternoon live. a5 conclusively that that happened? investigation, anthony, establish conclusively that that happened ?|j think conclusively that that happened?” think that what critics have said about the investigation is that it we we re at 4:30pm here on afternoon live. a5 we were reporting earlier... didn't. the reason it didn't is you didn't. the reason it didn't is you did not have anyone testifying it's just been announced first—hand that donald trump said that the scottish government will end its franchise agreement this. had gordon sondland saying... to run scotland's railways three years earlier than planned. transport secretary michael matheson says that the government he is the right person on this, is considering one option being explored is public ownership. it comes after a high number of cancellations saying that that was his and criticism of overcrowding and the cost of tickets. understanding of what the president let's go now to our political wa nted understanding of what the president wanted but he also said that donald correspondent andrew kerr trump, towards the end of all of who's in edinburgh. this is a big call. it is. good this, when it became public, said no quid pro quo, there isn't going to afternoon. in an unexpected cancellation at holly —— holyrood. be any exchange, he just wants zele ns ky to be any exchange, he just wants zelensky to do the right thing. the people who were in the oval office
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and talked to the present, who could be in losing franchise it was unexpected. and talked to the present, who could beina and talked to the present, who could be in a position to testify, people they got it in 2015 and it came to like mike pompeo and mick mulvaney, this pointjust the chief of staff who was director they got it in 2015 and it came to this point just now they got it in 2015 and it came to this pointjust now and the scottish government use that break clause. of the 0mb that put that on us aid the transport secretary decided it to ukraine —— put that hold on aid. wouldn't be value for money for the taxpayer to go ahead with that. there has been a whole lot of the white house has said they should criticism of a palio and scotrail not testify and they have respected because of the service it has been this despite the fact there has been running because of overcrowding, high railfares congressional requests and subpoenas to bring them in. you are hearing from democrats now as it moves over running because of overcrowding, high rail fares and running because of overcrowding, high railfares and cancellations. he has taken the controversial to the senate, they want to be able decision to end that early. it goes to the senate, they want to be able to subpoena them in that senate for another two years but will end trial to get people like mick three years earlier. it is the mulvaney to come in and talk about what they knew, what the president decision. the idea of public told them, whether there was any ownership, how realistic is that?” direct instructions to hold up think that might be a long way down military aid in exchange for ukraine doing these favours for donald the line. michael matheson was trump. ok. i am being given talking about that but i think first of all we have to think what other information that what we are seeing being voted on right now in the bidder might we get in the future, house of representatives is actually a motion that has been tabled by a so more bidder might we get in the future, so more realistically perhaps when the next bidding round comes around,
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republican congressman to say that they could be a public sector bidder the democratic chair of the that could come in for that. there intelligence committee adam schiff who we were talking about earlier to isa that could come in for that. there is a company called carmack that is say that mr schiff abused his power. run publicly that runs the fairies that is what is being voted on at are in the inner and upper hebrides. the moment. they are voting on whether to vote on that particular the labour party want the service to motion, as far as i understand. this be nationalised. for that to happen is all signs of objections, in scotland, we would have to have more powers devolved taken from roadblocks, hurdles, that the westminster here to edinburgh. republicans are going to be putting... i don't know if they can michael matheson was talking about a carry on doing this was the debate possible public sector operator. i think perhaps that could be some way has happened on impeachment itself down the line. andrew, thank you very much. alice is here with the or if this is their big window to stall things effectively. because they are stalling things. we are meant to be voting on the rules in about ten minutes' time and that is not going to be happening. yes, or business news in just at least starting the debate on the very much. alice is here with the business news injust a moment. rules in about ten minutes' time when you are going to hear members first the headlines. of the rules committee talk about it the families of four british soldiers killed more than 35 years on each side. essentially there was ago in the hyde park bombing win their case in the high court against suspectjohn downey. a resolution introduced by the the house of representatives republicans that was going to be in washington has started critical of adam schiff and the vote the process of impeaching
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president trump. 19—year old ayoub majdouline has been sentenced to life now, you see these democrats voting with a minimum term of 21 years for the gang murder yes in favour, that is to move it out of the way and move on to the of 14—year—old jaden moodie. next round. this is what the republicans are going to do today. they are going to keep trying to throw sand in the gears, delay things, try to push his vote later and later. at this point now, we are thank you. thinking about an impeachment vote here's your business on both articles in the evening here in washington, dc, perhaps at the headlines on afternoon live. same time donald trump will be in bet365 boss denise coates has received a £320 million michigan. in battle creek michigan. the battle lines are drawn in battle payday, confirming her position creek. the republicans might even as the uk's best paid executive. wa nt creek. the republicans might even want this to be pushed into the the co—founder of online gambling middle of the night possibly. you firm was paid a £277 million salary plus dividends as the popularity of can imagine donald trump campaigning on the saying that in the middle of online gambling continues to grow. the night, the forces of the fiat chrysler and rival psa group, establishment trying to remove him owner of peugeot and vauxhall, from office. a reminder, last week have confirmed a £30.8 there was a critical vote in one of there was a critical vote in one of billion merger deal. the committees and it was going to be held in the middle of the night was of the democrat said, hold on a the deal, which is aiming for annual cost second, we know what is going on savings of four billion dollars here, we know the politics and the through shared purchasing
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optics of this, we are going to agreements and combined technologies, will create delay it and have the vote in the the world's fourth—largest car—maker. daytime. we want this to be above the uk's inflation rate held steady board. maybe the democrats want is at 1.5% in november — to be while the cameras and on and that's according to the office for national statistics the world is watching. i suspect if said.that is the same rate of inflation as in october. it goes late into the net, democrats i'll have more on this may well say the same thing, do it injust a moment. you have an update surrounding the tomorrow. and then we do a show whirlpool washing machine recall. tomorrow, i guess. back on the absolutely. simon has been talking ukraine issue. the republican and toa absolutely. simon has been talking to a member of whirlpool who has the president counter arguments all confirmed the recall will formally of this, is you are just inferring that the president was acting in bad faith. when the president said on start on january the 9th. start onjanuary the 9th. this comes after hundreds of owners have had a the call to present zelensky of ukraine, do as a favour, though, in very fraught 24 hours trying to access the website to see if their relationship to military aid and to machines are a fire risk. let's see the white house, he was meaning do if we can listen to our the white house, he was meaning do the united states a favour, though. correspondent talking to geoff noel. he was acting in the country's interest, he was doing his picture ata it has been an unfortunate interest, he was doing his picture at a duty to protect american situation. it is not the way that interests and try and investigate any of us would want to start a whether the previous administration had been corrupt in its dealings recall, especially something so with ukraine. does this come down to important during the holidays. it is such that we have done everything we can to resolve it, we have done
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whether you believe president trump was the acting in good faith or everything we can to improve, and whether he was acting in bad faith? i'm proud to say with these folks that have worked so hard that we are 0rju5t whether he was acting in bad faith? up that have worked so hard that we are up and running and we believe or just whether he whether he was acting in bad faith? 0rju5t whether he has the powers to strongly that we will be up and do this. presidents have broad running through the balance of this foreign policy powers and even if he week and in the next week and the was acting in bad faith, that was week and in the next week and the week thereafter. we have extended not a technical violation of the our hours this evening for our law. 0ne not a technical violation of the law. one of the things you hear time and time again from the republicans professional call service folks. we will be open this weekend. we are and time again from the republicans and donald trump himself is there doing everything we can to make sure was no criminality here, there was we connect with and engage with our no law that was violated to impeach customers. president for high crimes and misdemeanours, you need some sort of there have been problems with the technical violation of the law, like helpline already, hasn't there? bill clinton lying under oath in there has. january night is when the 1998. the democrats will counter recall is going to start. let's have back that. impeachment is not about a look at the markets. -- january a criminal trial, it is about abuse of power and the president behaving the 9th is when the recall will ina way of power and the president behaving in a way that upholds the dignity start. well, the ftse100 gained another and high office. but that is few points — driven by overseas earners — something that, when it comes down as the pound remained underwater. to it, impeachment is a... or in the sterling, which recevied a mini boost in the morning thanks to that better—than—expected november worlds words of gerald ford, it is what the inflation data, has now
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slumped back to where it was before the uk december 12th general election. majority of congressmen believe impeachment to be. it is up to your 0ne analyst i was talking to suggested that borisjohnson's surprise hard—line stance on brexit killed the tory rally before it could bloom. interpretation of what that phrase means. they wanted this to be a political act, they left it in the but the questions now is, did it really die hands of politicians, notjudges, or is it only playing dead? not the supreme court. this was and one indicator that shows something that the house of investors haven't given representatives, every single one of up is the ftse 250, comprised the people in this chamber stands mostly of uk companies. for election every two years, and unlike the pound, british midcaps the senate voting with the higher are still comfortably above their pre—election levels, part, the senate voting with the higher which gives a slightly more pa rt, two the senate voting with the higher part, two thirds, to remove from office. that is where the system was postive picture for the uk economy. designed. we have been right in the let's get a little bit more on this. weeds of this. let's zoom back out let's talk through all of this to 50,000 feet and talk about what now is michael hewson, today means for the united states of chief market analyst, cmc. america, what it means to president donaldj america, what it means to president donald j trump. america, what it means to president good to talk to you. at least you donald] trump. when you listen to the way donald trump was talking
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didn't forget my name.” yesterday about this being a dark good to talk to you. at least you didn't forget my name. i would never forget your name. it is really good mark on the contrary, if you read to talk to you. i want to talk to his 6—page letter at the end he is talking about history willjudge the democrats badly for this. it is all you about the disparity that we have about how history, historians, the seen you about the disparity that we have seen between the pound and the american people down the road are going to view this. donald trump, he performance of the ftse 250, giving lived through the nixon impeachment, he saw what happened with bill clinton, he knows that this is a slightly differing insights into how the uk economy is doing. 0f significant event. this is something that will be put in his political obituary pretty close to the top, in slightly differing insights into how the uk economy is doing. of course, the uk economy is doing. of course, the ftse100 received that left and the same way it is for bill clinton. and the way richard nixon was the ftse100 received that left and the pound at the beginning of the remembered. this is a lot of session thanks to that better than expected inflation data coming at manoeuvring of how americans in the 1.5% for november. the same rate decades will... how they are written that we saw in october, better than about what happens here. that is it, some were expecting but still way off the 2% target for the bank of isn't it? donald trump will go down england. yes. the bank of england as donald trump 45th president,, in are meeting tomorrow, the likelihood is they will keep rates unchanged. the inflation level is at 1.5%, the impeach. it will. that is why i lowest since 2016. that for me is
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think for all the republican strategists who are looking at this good news because if you compare it to the wages numbers which are 3.5%, and thinking cleverly how there may be political advantage to be wrought it means that uk consumers have been from this, how this could unify the receiving a real earnings boost republican party, how it could be a stick to beat the democrats with in since february 2018 in real terms. the 2020 election, i don't think wages have been rising faster than that if you are donald trump in the 0val that if you are donald trump in the oval office this morning, thinking inflation. i don't buy into the about what this means, you are narrative that the pound has fallen on the back of concerns of a hard feeling... isn't as great, this is brexit. we are still well over one going to work out nicely. i think year of that. you have to put it in you are feeling very upset that this the context of where we were in september 2000 19, two or three has been the issue. a phone call to months ago. we were trading at one the president of ukraine onjuly 25. .25. we picked up 1.35 in the wake i bet when donald trump put the phone down to president zelensky, he of the conservative party landslide didn't think this could be the and now we are starting to slide moment that defines my presidency. back. there is scope to slide back a he probably thought it was one of the most inconsequential calls that bit more but overall, ftse 250 is at he was going to be dealing with that record highs and the ftse100 is week and that month. and when you still near four month record highs and the ftse100 is still nearfour month highs. 0verall, still nearfour month highs. overall, we have seen a bit of a look at the letter that he wrote to slide back in the pound but if you look at the bigger picture, i am nancy pelosi that knew when i was still fairly optimistic. on that
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speaking about, that 6—page letter thatis speaking about, that 6—page letter that is one of the longer tweets front, is it used in ever written in history, it gives us a sense of how the president is feeling on this historic, fateful -- is it —— is it too simplistic a question. morning for him. yes. the other is it —— is it too simplistic a question. isita —— is it too simplistic a question. is it a mixed picture. it is. i thing that was striking about the would argue it is the british letter, which again is very much mid—caps because for the last two to what we have learnt about donald three years, british mid—caps have trump in these past 2.5 years that we have been reporting, nearly three been held down by what i would call a corbyn nationalisation discount. yea rs we have been reporting, nearly three years now, in the white house. he that is no longer there. we have now got a five year tory administration, swings from extreme pugnacious, nationalisation is off the table, pugilistic attitude to extreme and asa self—pity. see both of those things nationalisation is off the table, and as a result, i think, alice, as we head into 2020, the ftse 250 has in this letter to nancy pelosi. you have always hated me, he says at one the potential to go quite a bit higher. that is a really interesting point. you can scarcely hide your indicator. what about the pound? hatred for me. there are other throughout this brexit journey, times, this is wrong and i am indicator. what about the pound? throughout this brexitjourney, the pound has really been our barometer writing this that in 100 years time, for the progression of talks and for the american people will know that the economy as a whole. what is your this is what happened to me and it prediction for that? we did see it must never happen to an american president again. there are
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game that many boost this morning. legitimate complaints. whether it is an impeachable offence, that is for it subsequently slumped back. is all other people to decide. there was hopes of a stronger pound now gone? something very odd unfolding about 0r hopes of a stronger pound now gone? or could we see that comeback?” the conversations with ukraine. suddenly, out of nowhere, military certainly think that it could come aid that had been agreed was back. we may slip back to first. suddenly halted on the orders of the white house. it was then reinstated the day after it became apparent markets generally don't go in that a whistle—blower had come straight lines. what we could see forward. there has been evidence is, given the pound is the best given by lifelong public servants in the united states that there was performing currency this year, we could see a little bit of something wrong going on. it seems a profit—taking as we head into year end. as long as we don't drop below legitimate issue for congress to look at. again, this is hyper 1.25 against the dollar, i could partisanship in america and among potentially see the pound going back the american people and people are unable to see beyond their own toi.25 potentially see the pound going back to1.25 or potentially see the pound going back to 1.25 or potentially 1.4. lastly, silos, if you like. we will see what i want to talk about fiat chrysler attempting for a second time to get this merger with persia on the oxo. unfolds. we will see what unfolds in the next few hours. we will have it isa this merger with persia on the oxo. that vote at the end of today. you it is a £38 billion deal it will have been watching a bbc new special create the world's fourth largest on the impeachment process. we will car—maker, lots of money on the table, but the savings they are have more on this throughout the
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day. on the bbc. hoping to make across these companies are really aggressive. they are. and they aren't. if you look at the savings they are looking to make, we are talking 3.7 billion euros and yet we are supposed to believe there will be no plant closures and no job losses. maybe good afternoon. let's take a look at the weather over the next few days. that was the trade—off with the french government that peugeot had todayis the weather over the next few days. today is certainly a day of change to make when they agreed this deal today is certainly a across the country. northern and with fiat chrysler. thejob eastern areas, sunshine at the to make when they agreed this deal with fiat chrysler. the job losses moment. it is a bit chilly across in italy are romantic given the the north and east but already employment there as well. and things have been deteriorating weather—wise. this is the view, if you can call it that in penzance. elsmere port raises questions because of brexit questions. these weather fronts are pushing their way 0verall, because of brexit questions. these weather fronts are pushing overall, i think this merger is theirway in, these weather fronts are pushing their way in, increasingly wet and addressing the wrong problem. they increasingly windy weather. to the are looking to invest in electric east of that, we had some lingering fog today across the north of cars, driverless cars, they are england. that has slowly started to going to need an awful lot more than clear as this rain pushes in. 3.7 billion euros. and they are heaviest rain in parts of south going to be the fourth largest wales, devon, cornwall on parts of global car—maker and yet the somerset and dorset. that will edge northwards and eastward through this bestselling suv provider in europe afternoon. murky across northern england, clearer skies across other and those suvs are pushing climate parts, but a pretty chilly day. two
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or three celsius in bed to nine or emissions up quite considerably so they're going to be pushing into 10 celsius in the south—west. that much increased climate targets over the course of the next two years. we re 10 celsius in the south—west. that were pushed all parts to this that will be a challenge for them. evening but with it we will see strong winds and not a great evening it is and it is a whole other rush hour. heavy rain and a strong discussion. good to talk to you as wind. 60 to 70 mph in some spots. ever. cmc markets. that is where he that will have an impact on bridges is from. ftse100 having an uptake. and travel plans. snow for a term across the scottish highlands tonight. that could give a slight dusting in places. rain continuing the pound slumped against both the to the south and east. temperatures dollar and the euro. thank you very much. you are tonight will be higher than daytime values for many. temperatures climbing to between nine and 11 watching afternoon live. now it is celsius into the morning. this is time for a look at the thursday morning. we are bringing weather with matt taylor. it is a warmerairupfrom spain, day of weather change across the uk thursday morning. we are bringing warmer air up from spain, portugal and some parts of the mid—atlantic. compared to the chilly conditions we have had this week. quite a bit of through the day, it will be cloudy through the midlands and southern sunshine as we saw in county durham england, rain comes and goes, earlier. this is what is coming your heavier later. brighter weather for way, some grey, wet and windy scotla nd heavier later. brighter weather for scotland and northern ireland. given conditions. notice the white horses the fact we will see temperatures on on the sea behind me in cornwall. it the fact we will see temperatures on
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the climb, we could see highs of is linked to this weather system around ten to 13 celsius. it will here. ahead of it we have dense fog feel much different to what it has across parts of northern ingot which done. heavy rain to finish across is taking a while to shift. it will the south, that will push remain grey for some throughout the northwards, some rain heavy at times overnight and other pulses following day. towards northern areas, we have on. it will be another mild night a little bit of clear sky around. rain gathering from the west and taking us into friday. they will be a big? 0n how wet friday will be. temperature contrast evident. this low pressure is still with us. temperature starting to creep closer and closer to double figures in this it will bring the heaviest rain across central and eastern parts of south west. not just the country, hopefully easing off into the north sea. but things were and closer to double figures in this south west. notjust mail the air but wet conditions for the evening gradually turned right from the west. just how quickly that happens. rush hour in the western areas, severe gale force winds. when there will be blustery winds across the country at this stage, but with the country at this stage, but with picking up in scotland and northern ireland as well. snow gathering the rain around, the round is saturated, an ongoing risk of diluent giving a covering in parts flooding. 0verall, as we go to the of scotland. let's throughout in second of the day, things will cool parts of central, southern and down. the weekend is looking a eastern england. note the little bit fresher with sunshine and temperatures. tomorrow morning they showers. that is how it is looking. are higher than they were this simon mccoy has afternoon live next. afternoon because milder air is coming up from spain, portugal and the mid—atla ntic. coming up from spain, portugal and the mid—atlantic. it is with us for
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all of their stay. we will be windier because the hebrides but across the rest of scotland and northern ireland, in the sunshine it will feel completely different to late. elsewhere, fairly cloudy with a few showers in the morning, heavy bursts of rain with rumbles of under starting to work later on. temperatures, all of us with the exception of potentially shetland, between 12 and 13 or 14 celsius. into friday, windy and rainy, heavy at times, and given we have saturated ground in many areas of the country. more low—pressure on friday, we will have to keep a clear eye on the risk of flooding. uncertainty as to how heavy the rain will be on friday. and how quickly it was clear. it will be a wet day. brighter conditions to the south and west potentially later on. temperature slowly on the slide for the weekend.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at three: the families of four british soldiers killed more than 35 years ago in the hyde park bombing win their case in the high court against suspectjohn downey. today, the families have found what we've always wanted, which isjustice and closure on this terrible day. the house of representatives in washington has started the process of impeaching president trump. this is the scene there now. today at five — more than 15,000 if the democrat—majority nurses strike in northern ireland, house votes in favour, following a week of industrial proceedings move to the senate, where a two—thirds majority action by nhs staff. is needed to remove more than four and a half thousand the president from office. appointments have been cancelled already as a result of today's a police constable is among 16 men charged as part of an investigation into allegations of historic action, over pay and patient safety. it isa child sexual exploitation. it is a very, very sad day for nursing and all our colleagues and
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this goes against the grain for all nurses. we'll be talking to one of those nurses on the picket line. the other main stories liverpool are playing in the club on bbc news at 5: victory for the families of four world cup out in doha, at stake is a soldiers killed more than 30 years place in the final against the south ago — a civil court rules suspectjohn downey was an american winners. matthew taylor has "active participant" in the hyde park bombing. the weather, have you spelt something? yes, which way is it? former prime minister tony blair this way! it is a day of change, warns that labour will be "replaced" simon, things are getting milder, but strong winds, high waves and lots of rain, details in half an hour. worked in rehearsal! also coming up, australia has experienced its hottest day on record with the national average temperature reaching a high of 40.9 celsius.
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hello, everyone, this is afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. the relatives of four british soldiers who died in the 1982 hyde park bombing have won their civil case against the convicted ira memberjohn downey. the families are seeking damages after a criminal case against him collapsed. the judge at the high court said this morning she was satisfied john downey was an active participant in the attack. sangita myska reports. walking out of the high court, the families of the victims of the hyde park bombing say this has been a fight that has lasted more than three decades. the families here today were told they would never getjustice, that they should put the past behind them and move on. they, and thousands whose lives were devastated by the ira, are the forgotten victims. i wish a criminal case had taken
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part, but yeah, i do feel this is justice, i hope there is a degree of closure for the families who have had to be put through this, who have had to be put through this, who have had to be put through this, who have had to fight tooth and nail to bring this case to the court today. the judge gave that decision, but no matter what decision is given, nothing can bring those four boys back. but we have worked tirelessly asafamily back. but we have worked tirelessly as a family to get that decision, which thejudge gave as a family to get that decision, which the judge gave today. described in court as a cold—blooded killing, it was the 20th ofjuly 1982 when an ira car bomb was detonated in hyde park. then another device was detonated under a bandstand close by. amongst those killed, four soldiers from the household cavalry. squadron quartermaster corporal roy bright, lieutenant anthony bailey, lance corporal jeffrey young, and trooper simon tipper.
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john downey was the prime suspect. convicted in the 19705, he was charged with the bombing in 2014. he denied any involvement. the criminal case collapsed against him. as part of the good friday agreement, john downey had been sent and on the run letter and given an assurance he would not face trial. the scheme was heavily criticised. tony blair, whose government implemented the letters, fiercely defended them. without having done that, we would not have a northern ireland peace process in place. the victims families didn't give up, winning legal aid last year to fund this civil action againstjohn downey. yesterday, many responsible for the most awful acts of terrorism on british soil were living out their days in peaceful retirement, believing they would never be held to account for their crimes. butjustice has prevailed.
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i wish a criminal case had taken part, but yeah, i do feel there is justice, i hope there is a degree of closure for the families who have had to be put through this, who have had to be put through this, who have had to be put through this, who have had to fight tooth and nail to bring this case to the court today. the relatives of those who brought today's case are now due damages from john downey. the cost of their loss is yet to be determined. colour white myska, bbc news. a police constable is among 16 men charged as part of an investigation into allegations of historic child sexual exploitation. pc amjad ditta, also known as amjad hussain, is one of those named by west yorkshire police in charges relating to alleged offences against three teenage girls in halifax between 2006 and 2009. the force says the alleged victims were aged between 13 and 16 at the time the offence occured.
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more than 15,000 nurses have gone on strike in northern ireland in a dispute about pay and patient safety. about two thirds of them are members of the royal college of nursing — which is taking strike action for the first time in its 103—year history. they're unhappy about being paid less than colleagues elsewhere in the uk. many appointments and treatments have been cancelled because of the strike, and a number of minor injury units are closed. chris page has spent the day in dundonald. thousands of nhs workers are on picket lines, dozens at this site on the outskirts of east belfast, they would usually looking after patients, but they say the reason they are standing outside in the soaking wet days because they care so soaking wet days because they care so passionately about their jobs. they argue that the health service here is under increasing strain, and that has led them to take a step they hoped they would never have too. horns toot. support for the strikers taking part in a picket unlike any before. the royal college of nursing
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has existed for 103 years, this is the first time its members have walked out of work. it is a very sad day for nursing and all our colleagues that it had to come to this. this goes against the grain for all nurses. the main thing is definitely patient safety. when we go to wards we see a staffing deficit and it is actually very concerning for all of us. more than 15,000 nurses are on strike, but many other health care professionals are taking part in this industrial action too, from paramedics to social workers to administrators. their basic message is they want to be paid the same as nhs staff in the rest of the uk. the relatively low wages mean it has been difficult to fill jobs, the relatively low wages mean it has been difficult to filljobs, there are more than 7000 vacancies across the health service in northern ireland. 2800 of those are in nursing positions. to fill the gap, more than £200 million has been
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spent on agency staff in the past year, which has led to pressure on existing staff. in a survey, almost half of workers said they felt u nwell half of workers said they felt unwell as a result of work—related stress with a third thinking of leaving. nurses say they can't provide the care they want to. however priority is keeping patient safe, and i don't feel at the minute ican safe, and i don't feel at the minute i can keep them safe all the time. i go into work sometimes, and i'm thinking, how are we going to get through this day? urgent services such as cancer treatment won't be affected by the walk—out today. emergency departments will remain open, but many outpatient appointments have been called off. hospital managers are warning there is serious disruption. faces an anxious time for people worried about their physical social well—being, so we have really added to that anxiety by having to make cancellations. we will do our utmost
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to reschedule those appointments as soon as we to reschedule those appointments as soon as we possibly can, but it is going to take some time. the strike is happening as politicians at stormont take part in more negotiations, towards the restoration of the stormont government. health care reforms have been left on the shelf without ministers. this is the front line where the political deadlock collides with the most valued public service. it is a christmas of crisis in hospitals here. well, the westminster government says it can't step in because health ca re says it can't step in because health care is a devolved matter, it should be the responsibility of local politicians, but the northern ireland secretary is meeting the five main stormont parties as part of those talks this afternoon, and i understand he is planning to invite them to a health summit to take place tomorrow to try to resolve this issue. that was chris page. tony blair has delivered a scathing verdict on labour's performance in the general election and urged moderates in the party to take back
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control from the far—left. in a speech in london, the former prime minister warned that the party had to change course, or it might never win power again. his intervention comes as candidates to be the next labour leader begin to outline their vision for the future. nick eardley reports. just wondering whether we are going to be able to count on your vote? what went wrong, and how does labour rebuild after its worst election result in 80 years? there is a lot of soul—searching going on in the party. the last man to win an election as labour leader says a big rethink is needed. labour can keep with the programme and positions ofjeremy corbyn with a new leader, in which case it's finished. or it can understand that it must recapture the party from the far left, make radical changes and begin the march back to power. labour has changed since the blair era — the membership is more left—wing,
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many policies are more radical, and its candidates to replace corbyn emerge many are reluctant to change things too much. i think that jeremy corbyn was right in 2015 when he said we should be an anti—austerity party, we should be against cuts to public spending. that was a fundamentally important shift in our party, and what i'm concerned about in the aftermath of this election is that we oversteer and lurch to a different position without recognising what an important shift that was. but can another mp representing a north london seat help labour reconnect with the north of england? sir keir starmer isjeremy corbyn's constituency neighbour, and so is the other candidate out of the traps. emily thornberry launched her bid criticising mr corbyn for backing an election and says she's ready to take on borisjohnson. she wrote in the guardian, when the next election comes, i would like labour to have a leader and team in place a strategic vision
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to exploitjohnson's failings. labour's leadership race won't formally get under way until the new year, but already there is a slow stream of prospective candidates setting out what they think went wrong. the biggest question of the contest is going to be whether mr corbyn's approach needs a few tweaks or wholesale change. leadership hopefuls will have to persuade a left—wing membership and unions of their merits, and many of mr corbyn's allies are preparing to back their own candidate. i think it's good there are candidates from the different political strands within the party putting their name forward. my preference is for rebecca long—bailey, but i think its welcome that the members are going to have a real choice. after rejection from the electorate, the battle for labour's future is under way.
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0ur political correspondent helen catt is in westminster. emily thornberry has put her head above the parapet, who else are we expecting and when? yes, emily thornberry is the first person to say she explicitly wants to be a candidate, but others have tested the water, sir keir starmer suggested it was something he was seriously considering, lisa nandy, the mp for wigan, is another who says she is seriously considering, and rebecca long—bailey, we have not heard from her herself, but there has been a lot of talk about her, she seems to be the candidate that the current leadership are likely to be back in. we also heard ofjess phillips, the mp for birmingham yardley, whose name has been bandied about recently as well, so we need to know how many of those will start to know how many of those will start to step forward and say, yeah, no, i am going to run. in the meantime, tony blair, and excoriating attack on his own party! yes, completely
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pulling no punches, describing the ma nifesto pulling no punches, describing the manifesto as a 100 page waitlist that was full in no—one, and he said when it comes to the future direction of the party, there was a risk that the only people talking the language of reality were those who do not aspire to lead it. of course, tony blair won that landslide victory in 1997 and was re—elected twice, a proven vote winner labour previously, and he did ta ke winner labour previously, and he did take seats which have since gone back to the conservatives in areas like, for example, the medway towns in kent, areas that were not naturally labour, but he won them for the blair era. but he is a very divisive figure inside the party now, something i think he recognises. he was asked who he thought should be the next leader, he said it would be unwise to answer that. so he has been very critical of labour and the direction it has been going in recently anyway, so no surprise, but a very strong and pointed it out. helen, thank you very much, helen catt in westminster. the house of representives
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has started the process of impeaching donald trump. the democrat—controlled house is almost certain to vote to impeach the president, making him only the third us head of state to face a trial in the senate. he's highly likely to be cleared at trial because that chamber is controlled by members of his party. the president has called the process an "attempted coup" and "scam". 0ur correspondent nada tawfik is in washington. so, nada, talk us through, they have sort of started proceedings, they will warm later? yeah, that is exactly right, we started this morning with a view motion is put forward by republicans to delay procedures a bit, saying that the impeachment inquiry was illegitimate, that the democrats had broken house rules, both of those failed, one wasn't even put to a vote, and now we have in the house vote, and now we have in the house vote on the rules of procedure, basically laying out how the debate will go forward. then we get to the real meat of the day, this will be a
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long debate, more than six hours long, with both sides given equal time. it will be a passionate, angry and very partisan debate as democrats and republicans draw out the battle lines, either in support of or against impeachment. now, at the moment, there is no republican who is breaking ranks. we expect all republicans to vote against impeachment, one independent to aft actually left the republican party, justin amash, will vote with the democrats to support impeachment. he actually broke with his party over the issue. in terms of democrats, it will be interesting to watch or the moderate democrats won districts that president trump carried in 2016, how they vote. the majority have said they will support impeachment, saying that even though it could hurt them politically, it is their duty to uphold their oath to the constitution, because they think it is clear that the president invited foreign interference in the
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election. but still if you democrats, around ten, who have not announced how they will vote. but as you say, it is expected later tonight that president trump will be impeached, only the third american president in us history, and then it will go to the senate, where the republicans have control. nada, a lot of people are obsessed and watch every minute of this, what sort of time do we expect that vote? days could go, in washington, around nine or 10pm tonight. anyone who has been paying attention to the impeachment inquiry up until now knows that washington has spent many late nights debating the articles of impeachment, which to bring forward, two microparticles will be voted on today, abuse of power and obstruction of congress. —— two articles. but it will be a late debate, and because this is almost inevitable, the vote, both parties are using this to put forward their
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arguments, really looking to the election in 2020 nada, thank you very much, nada tawfik there. another late night in prospect. you are watching afternoon live from bbc news. the scottish government has announced it will end the scotrail contract early, the minister has said that the deal would come to an end early in march 2022, he said work was under way to examine the options for scottish railways, including them being run by the public sector. there has been considerable political pressure on ministers over the service provided with labour highlighting a high number of cancellations, overcrowding, and the cost of tickets. so march 2022, we know who will lose that contract, we do not know who will take it on, we will keep you abreast of any developments on that. you're watching afternoon live,
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these are our headlines. the families of four british soldiers killed more than 35 years ago in the hyde park bombing win their case in the high court against suspectjohn downey. the house of representatives in washington has started the process of impeaching president trump. a police constable is among 16 men charged as part of an investigation into allegations of historic child sexual exploitation. liverpool are in doha for the club world cup and face monterray in their second game in less than 24 hours. a win this evening will take them through to the final. the former arsenal manager arsene wenger thinks that arteta could have a bright future at the emirates if he's handed the vacant manager's job. fallon sherrock has made history by becoming the first woman to win a match at the pdc world championship. she says female darts players need to be given "more opportunities". i will be back with more on those stories after 3:30.
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mortgage borrowers who say they were trapped on high interest rates when their lenders were nationalised have begun legal action. some 150,000 homeowners claim they have been overcharged for years, because they were unable to switch to a cheaper deal. andy verity reports. it was at this reservoir near rochdale that neville herron and his wife bought a bungalow in 2003 with a northern rock mortgage at a fixed interest rate. five years later, when northern rock collapsed, his loan was transferred to the government company northern rock asset management, or nram. soon after, his mortgage payments became much harder to manage. i was having to work two jobs, late at night, coming home at 11 o'clock at night. travelling about and working really hard and finding that our friends had been able to do all sorts of things that we couldn't do. we couldn't understand, and it was putting a great strain on our marriage. why we couldn't do the same as other people could do, change the car, go to the bahamas and other places? and we were just doing day trips to places like blackpool
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and things like that. it was only years later that neville realised he was paying £600 a month when a competitive mortgage would cost only £350. but neville could not switch loans because northern rock had lent him too much against the value of his house. he was trapped on a standard variable interest rate. we were on something like 6% or 7% which was a lot more than other people were on. so i then worked out how much i would have paid had i been given a fixed rate and it was well over £32,000 i paid extra. neville's loan was among 270,000 former northern rock mortgages transferred from the government owned company nram to private companies just over three years ago. part of the biggest privatisation in british history, it cut government debt and made big profits for the private companies who now collected the repayments. but thousands of the borrowers were effectively mortgage prisoners, paying far over the odds with no chance of moving to a cheaper deal. today they are launching legal action against their former and current lenders to try and get
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some of their money back. some people have gone into arrears when they would not otherwise have been. some people have been repossessed. the core mortgage prisoner complaint is that they are charged a higher rate because they're prisoners, because they cannot escape. the lenders to the treasury sold the loans to told us they are committed to supporting the customers and some are offering customers a new mortgage deal. but some of the mortgage prisoners are now going into the christmas season with the prospect of repossession hanging over them. andy verity, bbc news. a website for hotpoint and indesit customers to register washing machines that could be a fire risk is up and running again after suffering technical problems earlier. around half a million appliances are being recalled because their door—locking system can overheat. 0ur personalfinance correspondent simon gompertz, has given this update. it is so frustrating for customers
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of whirpool who own hotpoint indesit washing machines and were told at one o'clock yesterday lunchtime that there was a recall and i needed to check on the website whether they we re check on the website whether they were affected and book a pick—up to have theirs replaced or to have them repaired. that was their choice, and i haven't been able to find out, and thatis i haven't been able to find out, and that is particularly difficult for them because they have also been told that because of the risk of a fire from these faulty electronic door locks, they should either not use them, unplug them and not use them, or only use them on the cold est them, or only use them on the coldest washes. so what do they do? we have been promised by the company that it has been revamped and will be up and running this afternoon. at the same time, the telephone helpline seems to have been overwhelmed, they say they are taking thousands of calls today but people are being held on the line for 20 minutes or more, and then it is dropping off. i havejust got in touch with them and i say please
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call back later in a recorded message, so very call back later in a recorded message, so very frustrating for people who are concerned about their washing machines and when they will be repaired. simon gompertz. doctors in the uk are the first in the world to trial a new way of delivering chemotherapy, which could improve its success rate and lead to fewer side effects. the royal marsden hospital in surrey is testing acoustic cluster therapy, which uses ultrasound waves to target tumours without attacking nearby healthy cells. 0ur health correspondent laura foster has more. nerves are common when you're a patient in hospital, even more so when you're the first person in the world to receive a new treatment. you feel quite vulnerable, but it's also very exciting. am i a guinea pig? it's quite nerve—racking. this is acoustic cluster therapy, which aims to make anti—cancer drugs more effective. but how? one problem with chemotherapy is that the drugs flow around your whole body. acoustic cluster therapy is going for a more targeted approach.
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here, patients are also given micro—droplets. an ultrasound machine detects when these arrive at the tumour and turns them into gas bubbles, filling and stretching the micro—vessels inside the tumour. it means more of the drugs are pumped into the tumour directly. then, hopefully, the lesions will respond better, the cancer will shrink more so then you can cure maybe more patients who are in that situation. this trial is at a very early stage, and it's still not clear whether there might be any long—term side—effects to the treatment. but if chemotherapy can be made more effective, then it could mean fewer people suffering the side—effects, such as nausea and hair loss, and it could make those difficult tumours, the ones that were previously thought to be untreatable, it could mean they start responding to chemotherapy drugs too. you hope that there's a more easy way or a more gentle way of treating people. hopefully, you know, this will happen. one day there will be a chemo where you don't have these side—effects.
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but there would need to be many more tests and trials before we can get close to that. laura foster, bbc news, sutton. uk's most senior judge uk's most seniorjudge has been honoured by members of the judiciary ahead of her retirement. lady hail will retire from her post when she reaches his 75th birthday in january. she will go by the title ba roness january. she will go by the title baroness hail of richmond. in her valedictory speech, she spoke of some of the highlights of her role and also responded to some of the insults she has received over her career. "brenda will be a source of some anxiety." laughter but you do have to feel a bit sorry for all those male institutions which have had to adjust. but adjust the law lords did. of course,
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some stereotyping lived on. why else was i put in charge of art and interiors when we moved into this building? while others were in charge of the more serious business of funding, staffing and security? ifjudge brenda has inspired a younger generation to believe in the ideals ofjustice, fairness and equality, and to think that they might put them into practice, judge brenda will retire content. so can i end by wishing you all a very happy and a peaceful christmas? thank you. applause. learning to play a musical instrument is a great thing for a child to do growing up, especially if they are keen to learn. but it can be expensive, putting it beyond the reach of some families. when 11—year—old andrew garrido's mother said they simply couldn't afford a piano,
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he was determined to find a way to follow his dream. my name is andrew garrido, i'm an award—winning pianist and musician and, fewer than ten years ago, i learnt how to play the piano on pieces of paper. this is my paper piano, the third version that i drew. i started learning to play the piano on paper because my mum had just been made redundant, and lacking funds to afford an instrument or piano lessons, i went online and i drew a keyboard. i used the paper piano between grades one and grade five, after which my mum saw my commitment, so she borrowed money from family and friends to pay for a keyboard that i could have at home. but i still had to continue to practise on real pianos. so often i would go around to local houses who had pianos, and i was allowed to practise for an hour or so a week on those. and i began a tour of practice rooms. i'm now in my third of four years on my current course at the guildhall school
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of music and drama, and i'm loving it, i really am. i made a mistake on the paper piano! it's... you make mistakes, that's the thing. i don't think there's ever been a greater challenge than playing on a piece of paper. looking back, having done that, i'm quite ready to face any other challenges that come my way now. never underestimate what you're able to do, and if you think you're at the limit of what you're able to do, try harder. you can always give more, and you'll be surprised what you're able to achieve when you really search inside yourself for that willpower, for that strength, to achieve what you really, really want to go for.
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right, it is time for the weather, matt has been waiting patiently for it. let's talk australia, where was that and when was that taken? the big story at the moment, as we have been reporting, record—breaking heat as well, so i thought we would discuss what is behind it, shall we? hot weather, i guess unusually hot, 40.9 degrees, and that is when you ta ke 40.9 degrees, and that is when you take the maximum temperatures from every single observation site in australia and average it out, so you can guess a lot are above, phenomenal heat. someone was talking about hitting 50 degrees by the weekend, is that possible? 50.7 would be the all—time record, but for australia as a whole, a good
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justification of climate over time, all of the weather stations are well above where they should be, hence that record—brea ker. this is really worrying given the bushfires they are having to deal with. and it may get with during this week, because new south wales has so far avoided the heat, but it could be on its way. this is the indian ocean, big temperature contrasts, out towards the west, across the africa unusually warm waters, flooding reported of late. to the east and around australian waters, temperatures lower than average, changing the weather patterns. when you get to the colder waters around australia, it limits the low pressure systems, the rain that they have got, so drought conditions, very hot, unusually dry for the past few years, and things have been heating up. the likes of adelaide experienced the worst temperatures. higher
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temperatures this summer 39 celsius. we rounded it up. take adelaide, these are in the wrong order now. wildfires. what people don't know is all these graphics fell apart. those are wildfires. these are recent ones from the last 24 hours. that heat is pushing its way eastwards. top row here, temperatures in adelaide not just one day 40 celsius put four consecutive days above 40 celsius. it could get up to 46 celsius. they have not been alone. also canberra and melbourne about to heat up as well. sydney? i was
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and melbourne about to heat up as well. sydney? iwas going and melbourne about to heat up as well. sydney? i was going to say syd ney well. sydney? i was going to say sydney but you are not going to get any of it, i'm afraid. and we are going to have half an hour on what adelaide is doing because, frankly, iam losing adelaide is doing because, frankly, i am losing the will. the heat is pushing eastward to canberra, melbourne and sydney. and new south wales, the wildfires won't help things. it won't be until the weekend when things tactical down. shall we move on to what is happening here? can you move on? shall we move on to what is happening here? can you move 0mm is getting warmer here but not quite as one. it has been quite a cold week so far. 0h, as one. it has been quite a cold week so far. oh, there we go! nothing to see here. push a button again, see what happens. australia temperatures getting higher, there we go. right, uk. just forget this last two minutes. sunny but cold to the north and east. this is cornwall just a short while ago. it has been rather grey, wet and windy. it is
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changing now. lots of cloud, wind and rain coming in with this set of weather fronts. to the east, fog lingering through today, it is starting to lift as the breeze picks up. here was the rain as we head towards the evening rush hour. it slowly moves northward and eastward. heaviest rain around wales and south—west england, lots of surface water around. look at the temperatures, down in single figures. compared to the nines and tens to the west. 30 nights, we will see strong winds through the evening rush hour, may be touching 60 to 70 mph, that will lead to budget restrictions and problems on the roads, add to that surface water. we could see snow for a time in scotland, giving aid covering to the higher roots before rain eases. rain unlawful night between parts of england in particular. note these temperatures. mostly single figures today, tonight will actually be
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warmer than day. into tomorrow, that one coming all the way from the mid—atlantic, spain and portugal, across the whole of the country. it will feel completely different. strong wings to begin with, that could touch 60 to 70 mph. 0ne strong wings to begin with, that could touch 60 to 70 mph. one or two showers and it will feel quite pleasant. the best of a nation trying to the north and west, overall a cloudy day, patchy rain and drizzle across the south in the morning, heavier bursts into the afternoon but all of us, with the exception potentially of shetland, in double figures. we have not seen that for a fairfew in double figures. we have not seen that for a fair few days. brighter, further spells of rain working northwards. some will be heavy. mild as we go through into friday morning. then it is a case of watching what happens in this weather system. this will bring more rain on already saturated ground, particularly in central and eastern areas. ? about how quickly that will clear. turning dry to the west later on, a little bit brighter too but
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temperatures drop late in the day out in the west which will push us into a fresher weekend. that is how it is looking. applause more coming up, in a smoother afternoon i've, next with simon mccoy. this is bbc news. our latest headlines. the families of four british soldiers killed more than 35 years ago in the hyde park bombing win their case in the high court against suspectjohn downey. the house of representatives in washington has started the process of impeaching president trump. a police constable is among 16 men charged as part of an investigation into allegations of historic
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child sexual exploitation. sport now on afternoon live with katie sha na han. liverpool are right in the middle of an extremely busy 24 hours, tell us more. liverpool have to play two games in less tha n liverpool have to play two games in less than a day. jurgen klopp says that theyjust "have to deal with it." he's spoken in recent weeks about his frustations over the fixture congestion his side are facing. liverpool could still win five trophies and will have played 31 games before the new year. so, last night, their youngest ever side lost 5—0 to aston villa knocking them out of the league cup, as liverpool's first team are out in doha getting ready for their club world cup game against monterrey, which kicks off less than two hours from now. and we can cross live to doha and join our reporter, 0lly foster. a couple of hours to go. the gates
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are open here at the stadium. it has stopped raining, that is another plus. december the 18th, a very significant date. it is the national day, they have had parades and flybys all day. december 18 in exactly three years time, they are going to be holding the world cup final here. this is a mini dress rehearsal for that. let's bring final here. this is a mini dress rehearsalfor that. let's bring in stephen warnock who played in the last clu b stephen warnock who played in the last club world cup which liverpool we re last club world cup which liverpool were runners up in. last club world cup which liverpool were runners up in. you to sao paulo. you are on bbc two this evening. they have got to get on with it, haven't they? they will be set in the favourites to win this, you would think. they will. you can see howjuergen you would think. they will. you can see how juergen klopp you would think. they will. you can see howjuergen klopp has taken this competition seriously. the team that they put out last night against aston villa, he could have left certain players behind and not involve them in the world club cup. he is taking this competition seriously. you will want to be the first liverpool manager to win the competition for the big night for
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the players to try and progress to that final. what would it mean for liverpool to win this? there has been a little bit of a backlash about the fact that it was such a younger squad, the youngest in the youngest inevitable cosmic history against aston villa, but only manchester united have ever won this tournament. as british clubs go. when you look at the squad last night that he puts out at aston villa, the stipulation with uefa is to bring the full squad across at a certain time before the competition starts, before liverpool enter at the semifinal stage. that was taken out of its hands. it strengthens livable's position is to go on and win this competition as well. flamingo waiting in the final, it is monterey, the mexican champions. what you make of them? have they got half a chance? they say it is a once—in—a—lifetime opportunity. half a chance? they say it is a once—in—a—lifetime opportunitym is. it is the first chance to reach a final, they have never did before. they have an attacking manager who likes to play a high pressing game likes to play a high pressing game like liverpool. he has said, though,
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the competition he'll be a lot tougher than what they have faced in the mexican league. he understands it will be a challenge and they may have to change their tactics. many thanks. we will see how liverpool go and it's a bit later. just under two hours until kick—off. liverpool's semifinal against monterey in the clu b world semifinal against monterey in the club world cup. thank you very much. 0llie foster reporting there. you can watch the match live on bbc two this evening and on iplayer from 5:15pm. how come he got to go tojohar? from 5:15pm. how come he got to go to johar? i know, he got the good gig- to johar? i know, he got the good gig. let's talk about darts. rather good news. this is a really special moment for darts as fallon sherrock has become the first woman to win a match at the pdc world championship. she's now calling for female darts players to be given more "opportunities" in the future. she was only the fifth woman to ever play in the event and one of only two women to qualify for this year's competition. here she is after a memorable night at ally pally, for all the punters too, as she came from behind
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to beat ted evetts 3—2. and sherrock admits she's proud to put women's darts on the map after a dramatic victory in london. iamso i am so proud of myself to help put women's dance especially on the map. there was always criticism that women couldn't compete against men, we weren't good enough, so the fact that i have proved it wrong. in any sport, i think women can prove themselves, we can beat the men, we just need more opportunities. there are more women who can play to my level, if not better. we just need the opportunity to do it. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. thank you very much. some breaking news. we are just getting news that 19—year old ayoub majdouline has been sentenced to life for the gang murder of 14—year—old jaden moodie in leyton in east london at the beginning of this year.
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with a witha minimum with a minimum of 22 years. they we re with a minimum of 22 years. they were told the 14—year—old suffered a violent and frenzied attack. he was knocked off in the pit and stabbed in january. the jury at knocked off in the pit and stabbed injanuary. the jury at his trial we re injanuary. the jury at his trial were told his dna was found on yellow washing—up gloves and a knife. they covered their faces. two more yellow river rubber gloves to avoid being identified. jayden moody, the youngest murder victim in london this year. the man responsible for his death has been sentenced to life with a minimum term of 21 years for what was described as barbaric gang murder.
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the relatives of four british soldiers who died in the 1982 hyde park bombing have been speaking of their relief and vindication at winning a civil case against the convicted ira member, john downey. a criminal case against him collapsed when he was found to have a letter from the government which said he couldn't be prosecuted. the ruling paves the way for a damages claim to be made against downey. speaking outside the royal courts ofjustice, the relatives of the british soldiers made this statement. sarahjane young was made a victim three times over. the first time by the ira and john downey when they detonated the bomb that killed her father. the second when a catastrophic failure by the british government led to downey being issued and on the run letter. the third when downey‘s criminal trial collapsed as a result. sarahjane and the families here today were told that they would never get justice, that they should put the past behind them and move on.
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they and thousands whose lives were devastated by the ira are the forgotten victims. yesterday, many responsible for the most awful acts of terrorism on british soil were living out their days in peaceful retirement, believing they would never be held to account for their crimes. butjustice has prevailed. today, after 37 years, john downey has been found responsible for the death of lance corporaljeffrey young, trooper simon tipper, corporal major roy bright and lieutenant anthony daly. today, john downey, extradited from ireland to the uk, is now awaiting trial on charges relating to further terrorist murders. today, the forgotten victims are finally remembered. sarahjane and the brave families gathered here wish to tell them that no matter how many years have passed, justice can and will and must be done,
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and they invite the british government to meet with them to ensure it never fails them or other victims and veterans again. thank you very much. alice is here with the business news injusta alice is here with the business news injust a moment. first alice is here with the business news in just a moment. first the headlines. the families of four british soldiers killed more than 35 years ago in the hyde park bombing win their case in the high court against suspectjohn downey. the house of representatives in washington has started the process of impeaching president trump... a police constable is among 16 men charged as part of an investigation into allegations of historic child sexual exploitation. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. the boss and co—founder of online gambling firmbet365 denise coates has received a £320 million payday, confirming her position as the uk's best paid executive.
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fiat chrysler and rival psa group, owner of peugeot and vauxhall, have confirmed a £30.8 billion merger deal. the deal will create the world's fourth—largest car—maker. the uk's inflation rate held steady at 1.5% in november — that's according to the office for national statistics. it's the same rate of inflation as in october. £320 million, that is not a bad paycheque. £320 million. according to the accounts, in the year to the end of march, her salary increased from 220 million which she received in the same period last year. it is a privately held companyjointly owned by miss coates, her brother, he is the ceo, her father is the
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chairman. herfather he is the ceo, her father is the chairman. her father in the original high street betting shop that she joined after university. she went to sheffield, she read econometrics. sheffield, she read econometrics. she got a first degree. she saw the rise of online gambling and she really drove this high—street gambling shop into that online domain. but the rise for her comes asa domain. but the rise for her comes as a whole industry have been facing mounting criticism over how it operates. yes, and particularly in regards to the issue of underage gamblers, children gambling. there was an interesting piece of research backin was an interesting piece of research back in october that suggested two fifth of 11 to 16 years had gambled in the last year. it is illegal to gamble under of the age of 18. let's go back to that enormous paycheque. we have luke on the line. this brings us to the thorny issue of
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executive pay, is she worth that amount of money? let's put the figures into perspective. if you invested £320 million into public services or used it to fund the pay rise for lower middle income earners, it would make a tremendous difference to tens of thousands of people's lives. in that context, it doesn't look terribly sensible or efficient for it to be accruing entirely to one person. to some extent, it is a zero—sum game like that. billionaire money comes from the profits of the companies they own and their post—tax wealth. if we wa nt own and their post—tax wealth. if we want to have better public services, if you want to have better pay throughout the economy, we do have to think a bit more about how much, how much more efficiently, can we redistribute the commonwealth of the super—rich, the redistribute the commonwealth of the super— rich, the alternative redistribute the commonwealth of the super—rich, the alternative is lower pay for everybody else and pour public services and or higher taxes
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on lower middle earners. this is a privately held company, there is no denying that denise coates is directly responsible and involved in the success of the company, so in a way, arguments about money that should be spent on public services, is that relevant in this case? it is perhaps more of an issue looking at the difference between her pay and that of other workers lower than the food chain within the company. that totally is the case then we shouldn't personalise this too much. nobody is trying to say that she has not done well not been successful and that she should just be the paid of delinquent the same as anybody else. we should reward success but it isa else. we should reward success but it is a case of what is proportionate. to give you perspective, the top 1% of earners in the uk make about £120,000 or more so in the uk make about £120,000 or more so she is being paid 3000 times more so she is being paid 3000 times more than the top 1%. she could
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live... people earning 300 million in the year could have a lifestyle of fabulous opulence on a 5% of that. something that would be more than enough to reward business success. if we got a bit more of that into the lower paid workers in the company before the wealth gets to desert the top or off them in taxes after it gets to those at the top, then everybody else would have a bit more, public services will be better funded and the very rich people would actually still be very rich. i don't see what there is not to like about that. in practice, what can really be done? she is certainly not alone in terms of executives earning a lot. ryanair boss, he sparked a revolt with his paycheque. elon musk made headlines, and did martin sorrell. what can actually be done in real terms to change the culture, if you like, of
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executive pay? i think corporate reform is important. giving elected representative seats on boards. when it is said that they are going to give 300 million, the representative could say hang on, what about a pay rise for those in the middle and bottom? we rise for those in the middle and bottom ? we could rise for those in the middle and bottom? we could do more tax on earned wealth, wealth from investments and what have you, the same as wealth and from work. people with an income... people out there working every day with an income in the tens of thousands, they are paying less tax on that —— more tax on that. there is a lot that could be done. the uk has probably the biggest gap between those at the top and everybody else in europe so if
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we look at our international comparators, there is definitely evidence that suggests, yes, taking a little bit more from those at the top to make lives better for everyone else is totally viable and we can do that without causing economic damage. many thanks. really interesting to talk to you. director of the high pay centre. i will be back in the next hour to talk about how markets have done.” just asked you and you went like that. not a huge fluctuation. we will talk about those in the next hour. see you later. now you're about to meet dennis. he's a therapeutic shetland pony and he's taking on a very important job this christmas. as part of a project set up by the charity mencap, he's visiting people with learning
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disabilities over the festive season to help combat loneliness. fiona lamdin has been to find out more. 28—year—old dennis getting ready for the biggest day of his year. he's a miniature shetland pony and at this christmas party, he is the star of the show. he doesn't want to play ball, does he not? laughs. the charity mencap say people with learning disabilities are seven times more likely to be lonely over christmas. i have felt a bit lonely but not too oft. ed's 49 and has cerebral palsy and needs round—the—clock care. hello, you. this year, ed'll be hosting his friends so they're not alone on christmas day. i don't think anybody should be alone at christmas. that horrifies me because, you know, they haven't got no friends. no family, some of them. 0r no—one to talk to. nothing to do.
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you know, they stay shut up in their own little world, if you like. and it's important that we bring people together at this time of year. and the charity believe inclusion is key. we need to work on changing everybody's attitude to people with learning disabilities. a lot of people are frightened, they're frightened of saying the wrong thing, they don't know how to approach people, and it'sjust a case of treating everybody the same. we've been told mince pies are dennis's favourite treats but he's only allowed one a year. ed, would you like to give it to him? go on, then. this is a first for me. go on then, nice flat hand, like this. is it nice having him come and visit you here? yes, dennis is very good because he's friends with us, dennis. very friendly. aren't you, dennis?
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what does he feel like? he feels nice and smooth. there's no doubt dennis has been a huge success today. are you enjoying that? if you let go of that and just hold your hand nice and flat, there we go, and he will lick your hand. i get quite emotional when i see people's faces change. it's just a lovely thing to do and a lovely thing to see. and he has his own story. sophie saved him five years ago from becoming horsemeat. when he's at home, he can be quite a handful but as soon as he gets to a setting like this, he completely settles, cool as a cucumber and just lets everybody fuss him and i'm sure he absolutely loves it. look, how about if i wear the antlers instead? go on, you put the antlers on then, ed. shall i put the antlers on? yeah, go on. neigh! fiona lamdin, bbc news.
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let's have a look at the weather. rain and much more to come. good afternoon. this is the view earlier off the coast in cornwall. you can see the white horses on the sea you can see the white horses on the sea behind, an indication of gales across you can see the white horses on the sea behind, an indication of the southwest. signs of a change from the cold conditions of late. cold for one or char two of you. this will sweep away some of the leftover mist and fog but introducing rain. raining heavily in south—west england and wales and pushing into north—west england and northern ireland. further east, it will be drier with clear skies for a while and still quite chilly. damage are still one or two to celsius in some spots. the mail the air comes
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with the rain and strong winds. we could see them touch 50 to 70 mph. that will have an impact on some of the transport infrastructure. the rain spreading, not reaching some parts of eastern england until the early pa rt parts of eastern england until the early part of the night. it will be on and off throughout. a spell of snow over the higher ground. the winds will continue to push mail the airforall winds will continue to push mail the airfor all and winds will continue to push mail the air for all and tonight will be warmer than today. can bejust air for all and tonight will be warmer than today. can be just for most around eight to 11 celsius as we start tomorrow morning. that is because the air is coming from the atlantic, spain and portugal, northwards towards us. it will be with us throughout thursday. it will feel pleasant in the sunshine, but heavy winds and showers in the hebrides to begin with. lots of cloud elsewhere across england and wales, outbreaks of rain in the morning, light and patchy, wales, outbreaks of rain in the morning, lightand patchy, heavier burst later on and they could be the odd rumble of thunder. temperatures anywhere between ten and 13 celsius.
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the rain in the south will push northwards quickly through thursday evening and there will be further pulses following it. it will be a wet and breezy night across many areas to take us into friday. questions about how far and how quickly the rain clears. this curl ofa quickly the rain clears. this curl of a weather front here is the big uncertainty of how intense it is and how much rain it will produce through the day. and how quickly things will turn drier. there will be sunshine at times in western areas, that is for sure. turning cooler and less windy through the day stop as we hit the weekend, temperatures will drop for all and it will be a mixture of sunshine and showers. see you later. 01:59:01,999 --> 2147483052:36:15,715 few years, and things have been 2147483052:36:15,715 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 heating up.
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