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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 19, 2019 6:30am-8:31am GMT

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‘ delays ‘delays in the good there are minor delays in the dlr. good service elsewhere on the tubes this morning. on the trains, south western strike action continues today, with a reduced service and some replacement buses. delays and cancellations on southeastern trains on the ladywell and hayes line following problems at the depot. in westminster, abingdon street, old palace yard and st margaret street are closed between millbank and parliament square for the state opening of parliament today. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. plenty of heavy rain around last night, so it's rather wet underfoot to start the morning. some large puddles on the roads on the pavements, and towards southern and western areas of the capital, there is a met office weather warning and forced to cater for further heavy downpours, and that warning is valid until midday
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on friday. so more rain at times everywhere today. also lots of dry weather, it's mild, and it's rather windy as well. so i'll start to the morning, the initial rain is pushing its way northwards. lots of cloud, but lots of dry weather as well, particularly through the mid—to—late morning into the first part of the afternoon, before further pulses of rain just afternoon, before further pulses of rainjust put in afternoon, before further pulses of rain just put in from the south. but turning dry again towards the end of the day, probably, top temperatures of 12 or 13 celsius. so feeling mild but also some strong gusts of wind around at times as well. for the first half of the night it's looking dry, then it's going to be wet again through the early hours and into the start of the day tomorrow. but a mild night to come stop temperatures dropping to between seven and nine celsius. it's a wet start to the day tomorrow, but it should brighten up into the afternoon. some further showers on saturday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now though it's back to charllie and naga. bye for now. a nyway hello — this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news
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and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. it's a time to eat drink and be merry, but for those recovering from addiction, christmas can be a time of temptation. we'll have some tips on how you can have a sober festive period, and still have a great time. the force is still strong, but it's the end of an era for the star wars series. the rise of skywalker premiered in london last night, and we'll have a real storm trooper in the studio. gruffalo author julia donaldson‘s creations are becoming a fixture of the christmas tv schedules. she'll be here to tell us about this year's adaptation of the snail and the whale. good morning — here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. donald trump has become only the third president in american history to be impeached.the house of representatives, controlled by the opposition democrats, voted to send mr trump for trial by the senate on charges that he abused his power
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for personal gain, and obstructed efforts to investigate him. at a rally in michigan president trump claimed the democrats were trying to nullify his election win and predicted the move would backfire. the do nothing democrats and they are do nothing, what that's what you wa nt to are do nothing, what that's what you want to focus on that, they are declaring their depatriot and disdain for the american voter. this lawless artisan impeachment is a political suicide march for the democrat party. have you seen my poles in the last four weeks? the nhs will be at the centre of the queen's speech today, as the conservative government sets out its legislative agenda for the year ahead. the flagship policy will be to write into law an increase of 39 billion pounds for the health service in england. there will also be proposals for longer jail sentences for serious criminals, a cut to business rates, and the bill to deliver brexit. the ceremony will be more low key than the one in october,
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with cars used instead of carriages and the monarch wearing a hat instead of a crown. the first minister of scotland, nicola sturgeon, will outline her case for another scottish independence referendum later this morning. the snp leader believes her party's success in last week's election gives her a strong mandate for another vote. the government's says it will not support ms sturgeon‘s plan. a state of emergency has been declared in parts of australia as more than 100 bushfires continue to burn and temperatures hit a record high. forecasters are predicting highs of nearly 50 degrees celsius by the end of the week. it's feared the soaring heat will make it difficult for the thousands of firefighters trying to bring the blazes under control. have you ever heard of a snow squall? it's a relatively new term to describe a short but intense burst of heavy snow and strong winds. well, a snow squall hit new york overnight,
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and a camera at the top of the world trade centre captured this time lapse footage of it moving across manhattan. the storm lasted just half an hour, but in that time central park was left under almost half an inch of snow. really dramatic pictures. half—an—hour, half an inch of snow. extraordinary. the european premiere of the ninth and final star wars film — the rise of skywalker — has been held in london. the director” abrams joined stars including daisy ridley and john boyega at the event in leicester square. the movie concludes the star wars saga started by george lucas more than a0 years ago. i think all of us take this on and understand the responsibility and only want to tell a story that is meaningfulfor people only want to tell a story that is meaningful for people and like anything like this, going in, it would be a divisive thing. it could
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be somebody else's nightmare no matter what you do and you do the best you can. you realise the scale of the responsibility. those who love the film will be the most critical. people have grown up with it. there is the whole drama about when the middle three were released. as if you should touch the first three. which are actually four, five and six. i'm a big star wars fan. we have a storm trooperjoining us in the studio. that will be exciting, won't it? it will be. do you like star wars? i always tell myself i'm going to go and watch the films but whenever a new one cotties going to go and watch the films but whenever a new one comes out, i never do. let's say over christmas, there will be a bit of it and you end up watching ten minutes. have
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you never watched a full one. end up watching ten minutes. have you never watched a full onelj could you never watched a full one.” could say i could piece the film together but never have i sat...” you are going to do a star wars marathon with me. all nine? charlie will dress as a storm trooper, he will dress as a storm trooper, he will stand in the background and you andi will stand in the background and you and i can sit down on the sofa, popcorn, liverpool, almost being crowned the best side in football. is it competition rated? when you are there, you don't have to win many matches but you've just got to get there in the first place. it's the six confederations in fifa in world football. they are winners of their respective club tournaments. liverpool have got there by winning the champions league. flamenco, they
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play in the final, with a south american champions. does that make sense? liverpool are making a habit out of scoring late winners, roberto firmino this time as they reached the final of the club world cup beating mexican side monteray in doha. craig templeton was watching. two matches in less than 2a hours for liverpool, one in birmingham, the other 3,000 miles away in doha. the reason — being able to call yourselves world champions. but to get to saturday's final, they needed to first beat the concacaf champions league winners, monterrey of mexico, a task that looked easier after mo salah found naby keita, who found the opening goal. if that was supposed to break the mexican spirit, it didn't. they responded in a matter of minutes — rogelio funes mori, the twin brother of former everton player ramiro, with the equaliser. the twin brother of former
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everton player ramiro, with the equaliser. and, if it wasn't for a string of saves from alisson, monterrey would have taken the lead. liverpool were still creating more chances of their own, but marcelo's opposite number was in fine form. there was nothing they could do about this. trent alexander—arnold weaved a pass to roberto firmino, who couldn't miss. commentator: and liverpool are in the final of the club world cup! and in that final, they will face flamengo of brazil for the chance to call themselves the world's best. welljurgen klopp didn't have it all his own way out in qatar. the liverpool boss had a bit of a comedy row with his opposite number — monterrey‘s antonio mohamed. so they are having a little bit of common words between them and they are stepping out of the areas. he is still smiling. even though he's getting a yellow card. what happens if they get a yellow card?m getting a yellow card. what happens if they get a yellow card? if you get another, you adopt they are sent
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off. but otherwise? they're that's it, it's a warning. kind of pointless ? it, it's a warning. kind of pointless? don't do it again. there's going to be a manchester derby in the semi—finals of the league cup. that's after manchester city beat oxford united 3—1. they didn't have it all their own way though. the league one side had a real go, and had 18 shots on goal against he premier league champions. united meanwhile beat the league two side colchester united 3—0. elsewhere last night this stunning strike from leighton baines took everton to penalties against leicester city — much to the delight of caretaker boss duncan ferguson. hisjoy was short—lived though, as jamie vardy scored the decisive penalty to send leicester into a semi—final against aston villa. celtic are five points clear at the top
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of the scottish premiership. that's after a 2—0 win over struggling hearts — ryan christie scored the opener, with olivier ntcham also getting a goal before the break to move celtic further ahead of rangers, who have a game in hand. it's hearts' sixth game without a win. cristiano ronaldo may be 3a years old — a veteran in the world of football — but he continues to do things that defy logic, and gravity. how tall is he? he is six foot? they've done scientific studies on his ability to leap into the air, have they? he is such an athletic player and isn't such brilliant shape for a 34—year—old. i guess it isa shape for a 34—year—old. i guess it is a demonstration of a talented athlete. he hasjumped up, what, five feet in the air? he is able to sort of contort even when he is up
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in the air. that is a lot of athleticism for a man who is six foot two. how tall are you? i'm about 64. do you think you could jump about 64. do you think you could jump that high air? no chance. how high could you jump? probably a few centimetres, if that. i don't know. a metre? i don't know. our high could you jump? a metre? i don't know. our high could youjump? let's a metre? i don't know. our high could you jump? let's do it on social media later. we will have a jump social media later. we will have a jump off. you can measure it. john, thank you very much. carol is going to bring us all the weather from windsor. more than a quarter of a million people in england face spending christmas on the streets or in a hostel, as homelessness figures continue to rise.to tackle the problem some cities are following the lead of scotland
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where a scheme called housing first provides secure accommodation and support to those most in need. it's being hailed as a real success story, so breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin went to glasgow to meet mick, who says his life has been turned around. how far away from where you were is this moment right now?” how far away from where you were is this moment right now? 1 million miles away, definitely. and how do you feel? -- overwhelming, happy, normal. baby freddie was born just seven days ago, and arrival which would have been unimaginable 18 months ago when his dad mick was homeless. i was actually working for a homeless unit myself. i had a bad time, iwas a homeless unit myself. i had a bad time, i was really depressed, i started drinking and stuff, lost my
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job, lost my tenancy. for three days, mickjoined job, lost my tenancy. for three days, mick joined rough job, lost my tenancy. for three days, mickjoined rough sleepers on the streets of glasgow before being given a place in a hospital —— hostel, the traditional approach to theissue hostel, the traditional approach to the issue of homelessness. did you feel safer in the hostel compared to the streets? no, no. it was hell. alcoholics, attic, all sorts of different guys, people in that room with all different problems. fantastic. and the tree is up. the tree is up. that was up weeks ago, by the way. was it? but today, mick is in his new home with a new tree and his new family. awesome, amazing. and the most important addition is... is freddie. he was given the keys to the splat on a scheme which is turning traditional support on its head. the housing first programme does exactly what it says on the tin, offering a stable home first and then helping to stay
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in the home. i bet you feel like you won the lottery. definitely. one of the most important things about housing first is the support goes with the tenant to the get permanent tenancy and that ends their homelessness and from the base, they can build and live a normal life. homelessness —— homelessness can become a cycle but this new scheme has a 90% tenancy retention rate here where it's part funded by the scottish government. on this summer, it's been piloted in ten areas in england and wales. there is a success story here in scott lind with homelessness applications down almost 40% in the last ten years. numbers though might be creeping ever so numbers though might be creeping ever so slightly back up again and the people behind this project believe this is the way to keep pushing these numbers down. house first, lots of wraparound support. it's great having your own house because you feel safe, you can lock your own door. how much help did you
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get? 24—7 and they are still there for me, on the phone every day. i'd like to thank all the people that saw me when i was at my worst point and they saved me. i've met an amazing woman, we've had an amazing wee boy in the sky is the limit. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. bye for now. it will be a very special christmas for that family, won't it? 18 months he was homeless and now mick and his family are in a completely different situation. it is a scheme that is working. brilliant to see a positive story and someone's life changed around for the better. good morning to you. thank you forjoining us. time for the weather now, and carol is at windsor castle this morning. the queen isn't in residence, so you
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have taken up residence, have you? you will hear no complaints from me, it is gorgeous here at windsor castle, and we are in the crimson drawing—room this morning. you can see the choir, we will be talking to them later on. first of all, let me tell you a little bit about this room. this is one of the state rooms, where her majesty the queen, as head of state, would hold some of her official duty meetings, but also some private events as well. and when queen victoria was when queen victoria some private events as well. and when queen victoria was early in her rain, this is where her guests would gather before going in for dinner. it is nice and warm in here. it is also mild outside, because we have southerly winds. it has been a wet and also a windy night. and that is how we are starting today. the forecast has got some heavy rain in it, still blustery winds, but some of us will see some sunny skies. they will be fairly fleeting, i must say, for most. what is happening is is driving our weather. we have a clutch of france moving northwards through the night, they will
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continue to do so through the course of the day as well. but look at the direction of the isobars going round that low pressure, coming up from the south, hence the mild conditions. so this morning we start off with some rain across wales, parts of the midlands, northern england. that is pushing northwards before clearing later on this morning. we will then have a dry interlude before more rain sweeps in from the south—west, spread across southern counties, moves into wales in the midlands, getting into northern ireland and southern scotla nd northern ireland and southern scotland by the time we to the evening. but temperature—wise, most of us in double figures. we could hit 14 degrees somewhere, today, for example around the london area. it will be windy across the western and northern isles, as it is now. the wind is picking up across the south—west through the course of the day. through the evening and overnight the band of rain continues to push north across scotland, but you can see that girl across western scotla nd you can see that girl across western scotland and northern ireland, and then later it swings back in across east anglia, the south—east and the midlands. as a result, it is not going to be a cold night, temperatures only falling between about seven and nine. so we start tomorrow with that rain. especially
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so tomorrow with that rain. especially so in the eastern parts of england and the midlands. that moves away and the midlands. that moves away and then we see something drier and brighter, still a fair bit of cloud at times, but we also have some showers coming in across the west. temperature—wise, we are down just a notch or two on what we are looking at today. for saturday, it is a dry and brighter day. are still some showers, particularly so in western areas. but it is later on in the day that we see some more rain coming in across southern counties. and this is likely to be heavy and persistent, and it is something we are keeping a close eye on, because of course the ground is already pretty saturated, and our rivers are pretty saturated, and our rivers are pretty full. but you will notice that the temperatures are starting to slide injust that the temperatures are starting to slide in just a bit, that the temperatures are starting to slide injust a bit, as that the temperatures are starting to slide in just a bit, as they will do as we head into the weekend. sunday it is going to be blustery and there will also be just a few showers. now, it's my pleasure to introduce you once again to the sing healthy choir, who are going to perform the first noel. # they look
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up perform the first noel. # they look up and saw a star, shining on the east, beyond them far. # and to the earth, it gave great light, and so it continued both day and night. # noel it continued both day and night. # noel, noel, noel. noel. born is the king of israel. it always feels like a bit ofa king of israel. it always feels like a bit of a shame to interrupt, but thatis a bit of a shame to interrupt, but that is the sing healthy choir. they will be with us all morning and that
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magnificent setting. they did it very nicely this morning, beautifully. it has begun. are you prepared? kind of, yes. you didn't come here to talk about christmas. know, something quite different, actually. travel. if you are heading away for the christmas period, you might want to listen to this. this is an annual survey of passengers by the consumer group which? it asked over 10,000 airline passengers for their views, and got more than 6,500 responses. they were asked to rate a whole range of things, like experiences of boarding, seat comfort, food and drink, state of the cabin, customer service, and value for money. they looked at long— and short—haul. the airline that came out worst overall was british airways. part of the reason for that might be the timing of this survey. here is the independent‘s travel
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editor simon calder. he summed up why this is particular bad for ba. lots of people have been crossed with british airways. perhaps a couple of years ago because they did away with free food and drink in economy class on shorthaulflights, or and drink in economy class on shorthaul flights, or maybe and drink in economy class on shorthaulflights, or maybe it and drink in economy class on shorthaul flights, or maybe it has more to do with the fact that this survey more to do with the fact that this survey was more to do with the fact that this survey was conducted in september, when ba pilots went on strike. hundreds of thousands of passengers we re hundreds of thousands of passengers were affected, and a lot of them we re were affected, and a lot of them were quite cross because they didn't think that ba handled it very well. it has been a tough 12 months for the airline even since that survey was done. a first pilots' strike in its history in september, that led to about 2,000 cancellations.
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22—hour delays after an it glitch in november. they say that that was fixed pretty quickly, but nonetheless very difficult for them. add to that the low—cost carriers increasingly competing with ba on its long—haul routes. are used to be called the no—frills ones, but they are now trying to be nicer but kinder, and eating into that territory which ba once dominated, but it seems no longer. any other airlines getting a mention, ben? no points for guessing that ryanair came out badly. but this is one of the ones you said is trying to be nicer. they are in a category for improving their service, they say it is about offering you more clarity in what you are paying for and what you should reasonably expect to get back in return. in terms of top performers, the long—haul carrier singapore airlines got top scores in most categories, and when it comes to short—haul, travellers continued to praisejet2
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for its budget prices and premium service. again, notjust again, not just the again, notjust the cheapest again, not just the cheapest sort again, notjust the cheapest sort of basic service, they are offering extra stuff, sojet2 doing well out of this as well. it won't make for welcome reading for british airways. it is interesting how important the flight it is interesting how important the flight is when it comes to your holiday. sometimes you think of it as getting the flight over and done with and getting on with your holiday. and you can suffer a pretty basic service for a couple of hours, but also 11 or 12... and qantas launching its non—stop flight to sydney, you are going to want some
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decent service on that, 22 hours of long haul. the force was strong in leicester square last night with the european premiere of the latest star wars movie, the rise of skywalker. i actually enjoyed it. to be honest i went i actually enjoyed it. to be honest iwent in i actually enjoyed it. to be honest i went in with quite low expectations. i heard loads of spoilers and negativity, but i enjoyed it. ithought spoilers and negativity, but i enjoyed it. i thought it was good. it is such a huge franchise, there will be a range of people who believe the story should go one way compared to another. every generation has their own star was now. i had the originals, my little brother had the prequel trilogy, and my niece now has the new trilogy, ray as her hero. my jaw dropped to the floor about four, five times. i didn't shed tears, but i was close to. i thought the film was
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brilliant, i enjoyed every second of it. i would go back and watch it again if it wasn't this time of the morning. if you are a filmmaker, someone saying my jaw dropped to the floor, for a good reason, that is what you wa nt to hear. well, perhaps you have seen it already, perhaps you are planning to see it this weekend. tell us about it, get in touch. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm geeta pendse. cases of dementia in london have doubled in the past five years, according to nhs data. experts say the rise is due to an increase in diagnosis rates and an ageing population. nhs england said the priority is finding out as early as possible whether you have the condition to get the right treatment. more than two years after it originally started, the south western railway strike looks set to continue in 2020. the rmt union is now balloting members for a sixth time to secure
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a mandate for more strikes. the latest isn't due to end until 2 january. south western railway isn't backing down from plans to change the role of guards on its trains. 600,000 passengerjourneys are being disrupted on the network daily. alison bunce commutes each day from frimley. i don't think i am coping. we are now into week three. i am exhausted, iam now into week three. i am exhausted, i am stressed out, i am making m ista kes i am stressed out, i am making mistakes at work, who are being amazing, i have to say. i have barely seen my husband. i have had to cancel christmas drinks because i can't get home. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there are minor delays on the dlr from tower gateway to beckton. that is due to a faulty train. good service on the rest of tubes. delays and cancellations on south eastern trains on the ladywell and hayes line following problems at the depot.
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in westminster, abingdon street, old palace yard and st margaret street are closed between millbank and parliament square for the state openieng of parliament today. —— opening of parliament today. and in edmonton, the a406 north circular is down to one lane westbound, just after the fore st tunnel, for emergency repairs. there are tailbacks of two miles to chingford. and traffic is building on the a13 from dagenham into barking. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. plenty of heavy rain around last night, so it's rather wet underfoot to start the morning. some large puddles on the roads and the pavements, and towards southern and western areas of the capital, there's a met office weather warning in force to cater for further heavy downpours, and that warning is valid until midday on friday. so more rain around at times everywhere today, also lots of dry weather. it's mild, and it's
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rather windy too. so a mild start to the morning. the initial rain is pushing its way northwards. lots of cloud, but lots of dry weather too, particularly through the mid—to—late morning, into the first part of the afternoon, before further pulses of rain just push in from the south, but turning dry again towards the end of the day probably. top temperatures of 12 or 13 degrees celsius, so feeling mild, but also some strong gusts of wind around at times too. for the first half of the night, it's looking dry, then it's going to be wet again through the early hours and into the start of the day tomorrow. but a mild night to come, temperatures dropping to between seven and nine degrees celsius. it's a wet start to the day tomorrow, but it should brighten up into the afternoon. some further showers on saturday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now.
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air good morning — welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. impeached — donald trump is charged with abuse of power and obstructing congress. he'll face trial in the senate next month. a defiant president said the the democrats arguments were "atrocious lies". they're the ones who should be impeached, every one of them. (naga tx 00v) extra funding for the nhs in england and longer sentences for violent criminals are among the government bills to be announced in today's queen's speech. turbulent times for british airways, the uk's flag carrier is voted one of the country's worst airlines — again. i'll look at what went wrong.
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one win away from being named the best club side in the world. roberto firmino's late winner for liverpool sends them into saturday's final at the club world cup in doha. my jaw myjaw dropped to the floor about four or five times. and we'll find out if the force is strong with the final installment of the star wars' skywalker saga. good morning from st george's hall in windsor castle. the weather outside is rather wet. we'll see a dry interlude before more rain arrives later on and it's going to be another blustery day. i'll be back with the choir throughout the programme. it's thursday 19th december. our top story. donald trump has been impeached over
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allegations that he abused his power for personal gain. it means he will now face trial in the senate, where he could — potentially — be removed from office. he's just the third president in history to be impeached as our north america correspondent peter bowes reports article one is adopted. and with that, donald trump and the history books as the third us president to be impeached. a decisive vote by the house of representatives controlled by the democrats sealed the president's fate. it followed a day of high drama of the kind rarely seen in the us congress, which is bitterly divided. at the precise time of his impeachment, the president was being lauded by his fans at a rally in michigan, the kind of made—for—television choreography that donald trump rebels in. the do—nothing democrats, and they really are do—nothing, all they want to focus is on this. what they are doing is declaring is their depatriot and disdain for the american voter.
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this lawless partisan impeachment is a political suicide march for the democrat party. have you seen my polls in the last four weeks? the president is accused of withholding military aid to ukraine to try to get the country to investigate his political rival, joe biden. that, say the democrats, is an abuse of power and the reason for the first article of impeachment. the second, obstruction of congress, came when it was claimed the president tried to block the inquiry into his discussions with ukraine. article two is adopted. the passing of two articles of impeachment, the charges, means that president trump will now face a trial in the senate where the republicans
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are in the majority. mr trump is almost certain to be acquitted but more high drama is guaranteed. peter bowes, bbc news. the nhs will be at the centre of the queen's speech today, as the conservative government sets out its legislative agenda. her majesty will address mps and outline what the government wants to achieve over the next five years, including an extra £39 billion per yearfor the nhs in england, plans to abolish hospital car parking charges for "those in greatest need" and an additional £1 billion per yearfor social care. more money will be promised per pupil for schools in england. the government says secondary schools will receive a minimum of £5,000 per pupil and primaries will get a minimum of £4,000 per pupil. legislation on the uk's future relationship with the eu will also be outlined as well as plans for a withdrawal agreement to be in place by the end of december next year. the ceremony itself will be more low key than previous ones, with cars used instead of carriages and the monarch wearing a hat instead of a crown. our political correspondent nick eardley is in westminster this morning. nick, what does this speech tell us about this new government's
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intentions for the next five years? it's going to be a strange sense of deja vu because it was only nine weeks since we were last year. the big is going to be scaled back on borisjohnson this time has a big majority so instead of a wish list, this really is a programme for the legislation he's going to try to get through parliament over the next year or so. through parliament over the next year or so. but the themes are going to feel very similar. a lot of what we saw nine weeks ago will be back in the queen's speech. two big election issues which are going to dominate. we know that it's boris johnson's number one priority but also the thing that labour sought to attack the tories most on during the election, the nhs. borisjohnson is going to come out of pledges today. the biggest is the one you
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mentioned. that £34 billion extra per year for the health service mentioned. that £34 billion extra per yearfor the health service by 23- per yearfor the health service by 23 - 24. other per yearfor the health service by 23 — 24. other things in there as well. a fast track visa system to make sure doctors and nurses can come to the uk easily. it's all part of borisjohnson saying we will get to the eu. there is a lot to do on the domestic front as well. and we have plans. nick, thank you very much. at 7.30 we'll speak to rishi sunak, chief secretary to the treasury, about what's on the government agenda for the next 12 months. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon will outline her case for a second referendum on scottish independence later this morning. the snp leader is also expected to call on the uk government to transfer powers to holyrood that would ensure any vote on leaving the union was legal. our correspondent lorna gordon is in edinburgh for us this morning.
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good morning. this is something that nicola sturgeon is simply not giving up nicola sturgeon is simply not giving up on. no, she's not. she is determined. today, she will make a speech on this alongside publishing a document where she will set out what she calls the detailed democratic case for a transfer of powers to the parliament to enable it to call a second referendum. the case for the referendum, the right to scotland to choose its own constitutional future is unarguable following last week's general election result. remember this is a general election in which the snp won 80% of the seats here in scotland. that is 48 out of the 59 available. one of the challenges for ms sturgeon is that she has said she will seek what is called a section 30 order by the end of this year to enable this referendum to take place. she has to get that from
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westminster and the uk government has said there will be no section 30 order, they will be no second referendum. a state of emergency has been declared in parts of australia as more than 100 bushfires continue to burn and temperatures hit a record high. forecasters are predicting highs of nearly 50 degrees celsius by the end of the week. it's feared the soaring heat will make it difficult for the thousands of firefighters trying to bring the blazes under control. we're just hours away from the official state opening of parliament, and the new speaker of the house, sir lindsay hoyle, says he wants to be the first in almost 30 years to wear no the european premiere of the new star wars film — no the new star wars film - the rise of skywalker — has been held in london. the movie, starring daisy ridley and john boyega,
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concludes the star wars saga started by george lucas more than 40 years ago. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba was there. i think all of us take this on and understand the responsibility and only want to tell a story that is meaningfulfor people and like anything like this, going in, it would be a divisive thing. it could be somebody else's nightmare no matter what you do and you just do the best you can, that's all. this story is following a times investigation. you will be familiar of those stories we get from the bank of england of the governor, giving press conferences. it follows any announcements about inks like interest rates and quarterly inflation and the governor gives his view on what will happen to the uk economy or unemployment or inflation over the coming months. what transpires is this thing broadcast over the television to everybody at the same time, put out live but there is also a backup audio only version of that in case the pictures
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bail, people will be able to listen in on this sound only. the way technology works, sound moves more quickly than video. since transpired that the company was charged with providing this audio backup, was only ever supposed to be used in emergencies was selling this on to third parties. the video feed on the audio feed. it means they get that information momentarily. and they can made a trade. survey get a bit ofan can made a trade. survey get a bit of an early advantage. what about the foreign exchange markets, the currencies? so the sterling is the one that would immediate the react and it is so fluid that the sec. matter. if you change money from euros to dollars in those few seconds, you stand to make a lot of money and the technology is such that they can make those trades and
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every millisecond does count. what we had in the last few minutes is a statement from the bank of england and they've been clear. it was done without the bank's knowledge or consent and it's now being investigated further. with insider trading, these people had an unfair advantage of a market moving information, unbeknownst to the bank of england and unbeknownst to eve ryo ne of england and unbeknownst to everyone else, they getting that extra advantage and this will be quite interesting to see how this investigation proceeds, the bank of england clear that that provider is now cut out, they've been blocked from that access but nonetheless, absolutely fascinating how a few seconds can make a real difference. do we know how much money they have made? that is what the investigation will look it. shadow foreign secretary emily thornberry has become the first mp to officially enter the race to replacejeremy corbyn as labour leader. she says she can win
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because she "comes from the heart of the party". however, former prime minister tony blair has accused labour of "letting the country down" and says the leadership went into the election with a "strategy for defeat." emily thornberryjoins us now from central london. it's a simple question to kick us off. why you? i suppose it's a mixture of things. what we need now but unfortunately we are heading to five years of opposition, we need somebody who can take borisjohnson on at the despatch box. i did that for two years when he was foreign secretary and i believe i got the better of him on a number of occasions, but we also need to have somebody who has a strategic mind was able to think through where it is that we are going and what it is we are doing so that we are able to stick together and we have a clear plan as to how it is we get ourselves elected in five years' time. i don't fundamentally believe
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that the manifesto we put forward was wrong, i can't look at anything in the manifesto and say we shouldn't have had that. i think the criticism is there was so much in it and that we didn't really prioritise what it was, the four or five things you wanted to put for the public. i think people felt a bit overwhelmed by that. i think it was a strategic catastrophe to agree to a general election. it allowed borisjohnson to wrap themselves up in the lie that he get brexit done by the of january. he simply can't. and allow him to have a single issue election for christmas which then gives him five years being in charge of our country and gives him free range and a whole load of other things. the general election should have been general. we shouldn't have had a single issue election. we should have a confirmatory referendum. if his deal is so great, why didn't he
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simply put that back to the people, we could have then sorted brexit and we could have then sorted brexit and we could have had a general election. part of the problem here is that you were right in the middle of all this. you talk about a catastrophe. if you were to use a phrase for your party leader,, was hea phrase for your party leader,, was he a catastrophe in terms of winning elections? part of our problem, speaking from the heart, but triangulating on brexit, it undermined his credibility. what we should have done is have a clear view on brexit and we should have been pushing absolutely for a referendum. we were three votes off getting enough mps to be able to add a referendum. you're looking
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backwards in terms of all this. jeremy corbyn is surrounded by a group of people and you tell us, surrounded by a group of people who protected him from the outside world, ina protected him from the outside world, in a way, what the general public might think and that's the way the general election vote turned out. do you accept that there is a problem right at the heart of the party? so what i have said is that i believe thatjeremy was let down by the advisers that he had. who are still there. who are still there. so will you get rid of them? so what we have seen is that they have been a
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number of letters have gone out to staff throughout southside, to people in the leader's office, indeed, to people who advise the shadow cabinet, including my own staff, who have been told that they may be made redundant. but those that made the decisions, the strategic decisions before and during the general election, it looks like theirjobs are not on the line, and that seems to me to be wrong. so let me be clear about this. what i am hearing from you is that, if you become labour leader, you would still be surrounded by the same people who many people think we re same people who many people think were at the heart of the problem in this general election campaign. they are still going to be there, and you can't do anything about it. no, i'm not saying that at all. i'm saying the opposite of that. i'm sorry if i have not made myself sufficiently clear. i think what you need to have as you need to have a leader who has advisers around them who advise, who understand that that is what their job is, that it is the elected politicians who make the decisions, you don't countermand what elected politicians do. you don't, for example, sit in a meeting for
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elected politicians to make a decision and then go off and briefed something slightly different. you don't undermine the leadership. you know what your job is, don't undermine the leadership. you know what yourjob is, and yourjob is not there to be making decisions or to be trying to push labour's agenda on. you are there to give assistance to the elected politicians. so have you got a list of people that you are going to get rid of? i don't understand why that is funny, because a lot of people think that that is what has to happen. if you want to make some kind of clean break from the past, and i'm not even sure if you are saying that, you need to get rid of people. so do you have a list? what happens is that when a new leader is elected it will be up to her to decide who is in the leader's office and who it is that we'll be advising her. so whoever gets elected, it will be up to them to decide who their advisors are, that is how it works. so expect sackings if emily thornbury becomes leader of the labour party, it is as simple as that. is that right? expect us to continue to be the party that we are, to continue to have the values that we do, but expect to be led by
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somebody who will make timely decisions and strong decisions, who will take boris johnson on decisions and strong decisions, who will take borisjohnson on at the dispatch box, and who will think through in a logical way where it is that we are going and what we're trying to do. for example, you know, you have seen the democrats taking on president trump and getting as far as they have done in terms of impeachment. that is because they have had a clear strategy and they have had a clear strategy and they have worked together. it is that sort of thing you need to do in opposition. i am sort of thing you need to do in opposition. iam not sort of thing you need to do in opposition. i am not saying we impeach boris johnson, before opposition. i am not saying we impeach borisjohnson, before you say that, but we need to be able to ta ke say that, but we need to be able to take boris johnson on say that, but we need to be able to take borisjohnson on and be clear about how we hold him to account and where it is that we are going as a party. many observers are saying that the potential candidate, not declared as you are at this stage, rebecca long bailey, who a lot of people see as closest to jeremy corbyn in terms of politics and the way they see the party, that she is the front runner. do you think it would be a mistake for the party to stick with someone who has the principles thatjeremy corbett stood on closest to them. would that be a
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mistake? —— jeremy corbyn.” on closest to them. would that be a mistake? -- jeremy corbyn. i think in the end when you look at principles in politics, let's look at the manifesto. the truth of the matter is that the manifesto was a unifying document. when it comes to the politics, we all agree. it is a question of how do we make sure that we get ourselves into power in order to be able to implement that. i believe that i am a bridge from where we are to actually getting us into power. you don't agree with everything in the manifesto. do you think it was right to offer free broadband to everyone? listen, i have no problem with everyone getting free broadband, it is just a question of where our priorities are. just a lot of people thought it wasn't realistic. so you got to the point, possibly in desperation, where you were just promising the earth, and people saw that. and if you are still sitting here now, hoping to be the labor party leader, and still saying you got all of that right, people might think that's not
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looking good. but i think if people are listening to me, they will know thatis are listening to me, they will know that is not what i am saying. what i am saying is that there is nothing wrong on any of the individual promises in the manifesto. nobody can say... i don't think anybody from the labor party can say that there was anything in the manifesto that was wrong. but what we needed to do was we needed to have clear priorities, and we needed to say that this is a problem. we needed to make sure that we were out there discussing what the problem was, showing that it was a problem, and then, once we have laid the ground for that, to say but you know what? the labor party has got an answer to that. it is that sort of thing that we need to do, and that is the sort of strategy that we have been lacking. that is what i am saying. thank you very much, emily thornbury, good to speak to you, shadow foreign secretary. nice talking to you. it is time to play a game. we are going to hunt for carol. she is hiding. where are you? good morning, naga and charlie, i have just lost my sound, but
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hopefully you can. we are currently in windsor castle, and what a spectacular sight. we are in one of the state dining rooms, one of the smaller ones, and you can see this grand service on the table. it is enormous, it comprises 4000 pieces, it was commissioned by george iv, and because it is so big, none of it has ever been replaced. there are 140 dishes, 288 dinner plates, and 107 candelabra. and it is notjust used here at windsor castle, it is also used at buckingham palace. now, queen victoria may well have had her christmas lunches in here, and if she did, things on the menu in those days could have included things like total soup, roast swan, four, pork, sausages, and for desert, things like meringues with chantilly cream and arm and pastries —— boar. now, this footage was taken from a recent event here, and you can see more of the grand service —— almond pastries. look how precise the setting is, everything is measured
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so setting is, everything is measured so that my setting is exactly next to the person on my left and also on my right. that level of precision is what happens here at windsor castle, and of course, the other royal residences as well. it is nice and warm in here this morning. outside, it is it warm in here this morning. outside, it isa warm in here this morning. outside, it is a mild start to the day. the forecast is a fairly mixed one, though. we have got rain, we have got gusty winds, with some stronger than that, and we have a little bit of sunshine, but not a lot. low pressure is driving our weather today, with its attendant fronts. they will be moving northwards, taking rain with them through the course of the night, and windy conditions. but the wind is coming from a southerly direction, so it is
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going to be a mild day. now, first thing this morning we got rain across wales, the midlands, heading northwards. and that will clear as we go through the morning. we will have a transient dry period before the next band of rain swings in from the next band of rain swings in from the south—west, extends across southern counties of england, moves north through the rest of england and wales, getting into northern ireland and southern scotland by the time we get to late afternoon, early evening. temperature—wise, much milder than yesterday. most of us in double figures, top temperature around about 40 degrees, but windy and the western isles, western highlands, and winds picking up on the south—west of england, especially along the coast. through the evening, the rain continues to advance northwards. you can see that big swell of it in northern scotland, western scotland and northern ireland, and by the end of the night it has already come back and across east anglia, eastern england and the midlands. not a cold night with all of this going on, our overnight lows between seven and nine. so we start tomorrow with all that rain in eastern parts of england and the midlands. it will clear off into the north sea through the course of the day, leaving a mostly dry day. quite a bright day, but at times there will be a lot of cloud, and in the west once again we
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are looking at still a few showers. but temperature is just sliding by a couple of degrees. as we head into saturday, again we start off on a mostly dry note. cloudy with the bright spells developing, some showers in the west, but later on in the day we will see more persistent rain coming across southern areas. we have already got saturated ground, the rivers are quite full, so ground, the rivers are quite full, so that is something we are keeping a very close eye on. there is the risk of risk a very close eye on. there is the risk of some localised flooding. but that will clear overnight and on sunday it is a mixture of bright spells, sunshine and showers. so, naga and charlie, there is something for everyone in this forecast. we will see carole later, and hopefully she will get her sound back as well. it looks absolutely stunning, doesn't it? christmas can be a tough time of year for anyone who struggles with alcohol problems. earlier this week, a tweet by the actor stephen mcgann sparked a huge online debate when he said if someone turns down a drink, you shouldn't insist they accept, because you've no idea why they're declining. our next guests know what it's like to battle addiction at christmas, and are now trying to help others with their award—winning
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podcast hooked. good morning to you both. tell us about hooked. you recorded every week, yes? yes, so hooked, the unexpected addicts, we were the first winners of a podcast award, and it is a podcast to challenge the existing narrative of addiction and to challenge the stereotype. telus a bit about your yes, so i am an alcoholic in recovery, and basically i was kind of brought to my knees by alcohol, if you will, and i ended up very quickly chemically dependent.” was using alcohol as a crutch to mental health and then very quickly it went from being a coping strategy toa it went from being a coping strategy to a dependency. and right now, in the week before christmas, there are certain triggers and things that people possibly don't think about that are real issues for you. yes,
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our christmas special was released yesterday and we really wanted to do that because christmas can be a very triggering time, notjust in recovery, but emotionally. and yes, it can kind of feel quite isolated, and especially for me, who identifies as an alcoholic itjust feels at this moment and the last few christmases, christmas just seems to be centred around alcohol and how it is advertised and marketed. it can be really tough and quite isolating when itjust feels like the whole of the uk is, have a drink, it is christmas. and as stephen mcgann said, just don't
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insist if someone says no. tell us your story, how you are involved and how perhaps you will be viewing this christmas in terms of saying no, perhaps, to something that may not suit you. for me, i think... perhaps, to something that may not suit you. for me, ithink... know is a full sentence, so if somebody... i have been the person that encourages other people to have those drinks. asi other people to have those drinks. as i mentioned on the podcast, all it would take was someone to say no to me and i would go out and buy a
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tray of drinks and take people with me, because my view was it is christmas, and to have fun you have to drink, that is howl christmas, and to have fun you have to drink, that is how i viewed it. whereas i think, notjust for people in recovery, like the tweet says, there can be a whole number of reasons people are turning down drinks. mental health reasons, medication. it increases domestic problems... so talk us through kind ofa problems... so talk us through kind of a scenario. so you are out, maybe somebody doesn't know your story, and there is that moment. who wants and there is that moment. who wants a drink? does that play out awkwardly sometimes, and how do you address it? it can do sometimes. i am quite comfortable within myself at this point in my recovery to say no thank you, i am in recovery. however, there has been times early in recovery when i struggled with that. and what i would say is, if you are supporting somebody that's in recovery or you are in recovery yourself, is not necessarily the event itself. it can be a couple of days afterwards. for my own experience, i have been two events and things and felt quite comfortable to say no, i don't want to drink, and felt 0k being in that
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situation, and a couple of days later, i situation, and a couple of days later, lam situation, and a couple of days later, i am in addicts and i overthink everything, and i have found myself being caught up in that cycle of addiction of saying i wish i had had a drink —— i am an addict. you think you wish you have had had a drink? at times, afterl have been to an event as well. if you are supporting someone in recovery, it is not necessarily the actual event that can be the trigger. it can be a couple of days after. people can still find it hard and think... and i suppose the response you must have from listeners to the podcast — generally very supportive? very supportive, yes. i imagine they are listening to it either out of interest, which is why you would listen to a podcast, but also because many will have had similar experiences or thinking about their own attitudes to drugs and alcohol. and as you said, people are just generally genuinely interested, or in terms of what is available at the minute in the uk, out there for addict in the mainstream, there is very little, and very little that is representative of what addiction and recovery and visible recovery really look like. so the overall response has been so positive, and it has also been positive from friends of addicts. so to garner respect from all of those has been really humbling. i am sure people hearing you talking openly and honestly, out
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loud, as it were, on the podcast, will make a big difference to people. lovely seeing you this morning. have a great christmas. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm geeta pendse. cases of dementia in london have doubled in the past five years, according to nhs data. experts say the rise is due to an increase in diagnosis rates and an ageing population. nhs england said the priority is finding out as early as possible whether you have the condition, to get the right treatment. more than two years after it originally started, the south western railway strike looks set to continue in 2020. the rmt union is now balloting members for a sixth time to secure a mandate for more strikes. the latest isn't due to end until 2 january. south western railway isn't backing down from plans to change the role of guards on its trains. 600,000 passengerjourneys are being disrupted on the network each day. alison bunce commutes daily from frimley.
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i don't think i am coping. we're now into week three. i'm exhausted, i'm stressed out, i'm making mistakes at work, who are being amazing, i have to say. i've barely seen my husband. i've had to cancel christmas drinks because i can't get home. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there is good service on the tubes this morning. on the trains, southern, thameslink and the gatwick express are running reduced services from london to gatwick airport. delays and cancellations on south eastern trains on the ladywell and hayes line following problems at the depot. on the blackwall tunnel southern approach, there is queuing from the woolwich road flyover following an earlier breakdown in the tunnel. and in edmonton, the a406 north circular is down to one lane westbound just after the fore st tunnel. there are tailbacks of two
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miles to chingford. and traffic is building on the a13 from dagenham into barking. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. plenty of heavy rain around last night, so it's rather wet underfoot to start the morning. some large puddles on the roads and the pavements, and towards southern and western areas of the capital, there's a met office weather warning in force to cater for further heavy downpours, and that warning is valid until midday on friday. so more rain around at times everywhere today, also lots of dry weather. it's mild, and it's rather windy too. so a mild start to the morning. the initial rain is pushing its way northwards. lots of cloud, but lots of dry weather too, particularly through the mid—to—late morning, into the first part of the afternoon, before further pulses of rain just push in from the south, but turning dry again towards the end of the day probably. top temperatures of 12 or 13 degrees celsius, so feeling mild, but also some strong gusts of wind around
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at times too. for the first half of the night, it's looking dry, then it's going to be wet again through the early hours and into the start of the day tomorrow. but a mild night to come, temperatures dropping to between seven and nine degrees celsius. it's a wet start to the day tomorrow, but it should brighten up into the afternoon. some further showers on saturday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello — this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. donald trump has become only the third president in american history to be impeached.the house of representatives, controlled by the opposition democrats, voted to send mr trump for trial by the senate on charges
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that he abused his power for personal gain, and obstructed efforts to investigate him. at a rally in michigan president trump claimed the democrats were trying to nullify his election win and predicted the move would backfire. the nhs will be at the heart of today's queen's speech, that's according to the prime minister borisjohnson. as the government sets out its legislative agenda for this parliament, mrjohnson said the spotlight would be on healthcare and brexit. we're joined now from westminster by rishi sunak, chief secretary to the treasury. justin, chief secretary to the treasury, the manifesto was put out, the election was one. can you pay for everything? absolutely. the ma nifesto for everything? absolutely. the manifesto set out everything but the crucial part of that, the heart of the queen's speech will be our record funding settlement. £34 billion over the next five years. the prime minister said he wanted to be the people ‘s government. in all
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the other priorities we talked about. let's break this down into bite—size chunks. so page £34 billion as you just said, but actually, if you look at it when it's adjusted for inflation, it comes down, your own figures, £20.5 billion. is that enough? £34 billion as the cash, that is how we think. when people are told about their pensions, they are told to think it in their own terms. sorry to talk of you, people are told about things in real terms, savings in the future in real terms, savings in the future in real terms. that is why this figure is important. the same figure, £34 billion in cash and you put out out the real number. this is the number that was in the five year plan that was agreed last year are with the head of the nhs, and at the time,
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this was the plan that the nhs is said, they can deliver all their plans. we've actually added to that in the campaign, in the manifesto which means we can add 50,000 more nurses, 50 million more gp appointments and invest in the infrastructure. new hospitals, upgraded hospitals. because it's not just about the money, it's making sure the money reaches the frontline and makes a difference to people's day—to—day experience of the nhs which is why we are so focused on delivering with more nurses and gp of ointments because it's all very well sitting here and putting money into things, want to make sure it makes a difference on the ground and that's what we are focused on delivering. you are recruiting another 31,000 nurses, retaining 19,000. which adds up to 50,000 more nurses in the nhs. it's not, but i've had this argument so many times across so many i've had this argument so many times across so many broadcasters, we will just move on. when you said you spoke to simon stephens, he said to
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you, i don't need any more than £20.5 billion in real terms by 2024 ordid he say... £20.5 billion in real terms by 2024 or did he say... you can go and look at the exact words but the time the plan was outlined together with simon stephens and the exact language, and that's the plan that has been set up and published. we've added to that plan by making sure we can have 50,000 nurses, and all these new and upgraded hospitals. but this is a record funding settlement. it is the largest in the nhs's history. and that's why we're putting it at the heart of the queen's speech. let'sjust putting it at the heart of the queen's speech. let's just the first pa rt queen's speech. let's just the first part of what we're doing. we also focused on making sure our communities are safe more police and tougher sentencing. with investments in infrastructure and education so taken together, it's an exciting and
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inclusive agenda but also focuses on these other priorities. in the first 100 days in office, borisjohnson says he is going to guarantee that no—one needing care is to sell their own home to pay for that. what we've said with regard to social care, which is a long—term complex challenge. we got a 3— point plan. to stabilise the system. secondly, we will work urgently defined across cross— party we will work urgently defined across cross—party consensus we will work urgently defined across cross—pa rty consensus on we will work urgently defined across cross—party consensus on this issue, the same way we have a consensus on the same way we have a consensus on the nhs. and our belief that no—one needs to sell their home for care. it's right there is a cross—party consensus on this. this is a long—term challenge. unless there is a cross—party long—term challenge. unless there is
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a cross—pa rty consensus, long—term challenge. unless there is a cross—party consensus, we won't have the certainty. and you will get that done in 100 days? we will solve that done in 100 days? we will solve that work urgently. the billion pounds of extra funding is already in place for the forthcoming year and what we said is that will continue for years thereafter. will you solve the social care crisis in the first 100 days in office?” you solve the social care crisis in the first 100 days in office? i said what we will do is put the process in place to find that cross—party consensus urgently. in the short—term, £1 billion per year has been committed. rishi sunak, chief secretary to the treasury, thank you for your time. liverpool are now one win away from being able to call themselves the best tea m being able to call themselves the best team in world war, the best clu b best team in world war, the best club side in world football. you have a gathering of, in theory, the best clu b have a gathering of, in theory, the best club sides. absolutely, they have all met in doha. is it the
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trophy? liverpool are prioritising it. they took the first team to doha to play. it is important and it doesn't come around all that often. having won the champions league, this is the cherry on top, shall we say? but they left it late. they left it late to beat mexican side monterrey, 2—1. the european champions looked to be heading to extra time before roberto firmino came off the bench to score a dramatic winner for the right to play brazilian side flamengo in saturday's final in doha. and it's not often you see a manager getting a yellow card, but how about both managers? liverpool bossjurgen klopp on the receiving end after a disagreement with his opposite number over
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the severity of a challenge from liverpool'sjoe gomez. it's a passionate game! if you to ask me who would shoot, who would score, i would say yes, that would be a good idea. wonderful goal, great play, really super game, atmosphere like this. i can do that, to be honest. there'll be plenty of passion in the semi finals of the league cup, we've got a manchester derby. city beat oxford united 3—1. it doesn't tell the whole story, the league one side had 18 shots on goal against the premier league champions. while united beat league two colchester 3—0 to set up that big tie in the last four.
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everton will be gutted not to be joining them there after this screamer from leighton baines which took their match with leicester to penalties much to the delight of caretaker boss duncan ferguson. but hisjoy was short—lived as jamie vardy scored the decisive penalty to send leicester into a semi—final against aston villa. celtic are five points clear at the top of the scottish premiership after a 2—0 win over struggling hearts — ryan christie and olivier ntcham with the goals. second placed rangers have the chance to trim the gap again when they play tomorrow night. this goal may not be as good as the one we showed you earlier, but it has to be admired for its athleticism. cue cristiano ronaldo. here he is scoring forjuventus, defying the laws of logic and gravity, hanging in the air like a bastketball player.
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two metres is what, six foot four?” think isjust over six two metres is what, six foot four?” think is just over six foot. two metres is what, six foot four?” think isjust over six foot. six foot four isjust think isjust over six foot. six foot four is just under two metres. remember in the $6 million man, you don't remember that? he used to have a special noise, when the $6 million man did a special leap or rent very fast, there was noise. it's quite ha rd to fast, there was noise. it's quite hard to replicate. i can't. don't leave us hanging. that was it! wait a minute, wait a leave us hanging. that was it! wait a minute, waita minute. ch ch ch ch ch ch. that was a perfect rendition. when the $6 million man did something, he had the noise. it's like that. 0k. we'll put some sound
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effects on. are we going to do a jump effects on. are we going to do a jump off? charlie reckons it can win. there is the sound. with the jump? let's hear it. that was it? excuse me. ch ch ch ch ch ch. it's kind of a twanging noise. somebody somewhere will know what we're talking about. it's impressive, that is what we are saying. is that all the sport? that is all the sport. i just want to say, actually, england's women cricketers won their t20 series against pakistan. we have a sound effect that? raaaah! we're
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going to windsor castle. carol is there. we don't have sound effects, we've got acquire, though. that is a lwa ys we've got acquire, though. that is always carol, isn't it. look at me being nice to you. i need smelling salts delivered, i am in shock. good morning, everyone. it is such a treat to be here, in winds are castle this morning. we are actually in st george's hall, the largest state in quitting room in winds are castle. it was burnt down in the fire and rebuilt to its present glory back in 1992, and the queen and the duke of edinburgh, of course, spent many weekends here and a week during june for royal ascot and also for the day—to—day procession. talking of such things, this is the regalia that her majesty
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the queen wears on that particular day. and if we take a look at the ceiling, well, the ceiling is covered in all the arms for every single night of the gutter since the order was founded in 1348 —— night of the gutter. we will be hearing from our choir shortly, but first of all, let me tell you a little bit about what is happening with the weather. it has been a particularly wet and windy night. the forecast for the day has further heavy rain and also some strong winds. strongest winds will be across western scotland, the wind picking up western scotland, the wind picking up later on across the south now, low pressure is dominating our weather just now. you low pressure is dominating our weatherjust now. you can see all the fronts associated with it that have moved steadily northwards through the course of the morning, and will continue to do so through the rest of the day. but the direction of the wind is the salient thing as well, because we are looking at a southerly direction, so it is mild. some parts of southern england and south wales are already sitting 12 degrees. so we have a fresh batch of rain across northern
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england. that will clear into the north sea through the morning. then for many it will be dry, with just a few showers, but it won't be too long before the next batch of rain comes in from the south, and it will also spread in from southern counties, moving northwards, getting towards the borders in northern ireland by the time we get to tomorrow evening. temperatures up to 40 degrees, pretty good for this stage in december. through the evening and overnight, the rain continues to advance across scotland. it will remain also across scotla nd scotland. it will remain also across scotland and later it will take a swipe at eastern england and also the midlands. as a result of all of this, it is not going to be a cold night, temperatures only falling between seven and nine degrees. so we start off tomorrow with that rain. the rain pushing away as we go through the morning, leaving most of us through the morning, leaving most of us with a dry day, a bright day. yes, there will be areas of cloud, and a few showers are scattered, more especially in the west. still blustery or breezy, but not as windy as it has been. temperatures if anything just down a touch on what
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we are looking at today. then as we head on into saturday, are mostly dry start to the day, with some sunshine. variable amounts of cloud, a few showers in the west. it is later in the day we see some more persistent rain pushing across southern counties of england. this might be problematic, because of course the ground is already saturated, the rivers are already full, so something worth keeping an eye on. and temperature—wise, again down a touch. as for sunday, that rain will have cleared and it will bea rain will have cleared and it will be a blustery day with the brightness and some showers. once again it is my pleasure to introduce our lovely choir, who are going to sing we three sing we our lovely choir, who are going to sing we three kings. please take it away. # we three kings of orient are. bearing gifts, we travel afar. field and fountain, mail and mountain, following yonder staff. # star of wonder, start of night. # sta rt star of wonder, start of night. # start with royal beauty bright. #
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westwood leading, still proceeding, guide us to thy perfect light. # born a king in bethlehem lane. # king forever, ceasing never, over us all to rain. —— reign. # star of wonder, start of night. # start with royal beauty bright. # westwood leading, still proceeding, # guide us to thy perfect light. and the singing healthy choir will be joining and the singing healthy choir will bejoining us and the singing healthy choir will be joining us throughout the morning. that tree, that is a serious christmas tree. taken from windsor park. rather beautiful. who used to be called the favourite airline of the world? british
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airways. there was some question about who called it the world's favourite airline, whether it was british airways themselves. this is an annual survey of passengers by the consumer group which? it asked over 10,000 airline passengers for their views and got more than 6,500 responses. they were asked to rate a whole range of things, like experiences of boarding, seat comfort, food and drink, state of the cabin, customer service, and value for money. they looked at long— and short—haul. the airline that came out worst overall was british airways. part of the reason for that might be the timing of this survey. it was done in september, when a first pilots' strike in ba's history led to about 2,000 cancellations.
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the next month, we saw 22—hour delays after an it glitch. add to that the low—cost carriers increasingly competing with ba on its long—haul routes, it's being squeezed. there used to be a very distinct budget sector, low—cost, no—frills, and then the flag carriers, but the boundaries are emerging. here is the independent‘s travel editor, simon calder. all the evidence suggests that the main deciding factor is price. and fortu nately, main deciding factor is price. and fortunately, in the uk, we have the most competitive, the best value air market in the world. you have british airways, easyjet, ryanair, jet2, all of your business and mostly charging a pretty reasonable price. any other airlines
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getting a mention, ben? ryanair doing very badly in shorthaul, it is very different whether you are going 11 or 12 hours, orjust to europe, and ryanair say they are trying to be a bit more caring, a bit more sharing. looking at the top performers, this one doing really well. in terms of top performers the long haul carrier singapore airlines got top scores in most categories. and when it comes to short—haul, travellers continued to praisejet2 for its budget prices and premium service. so it really does vary according to where you are going, how long you are on the plane, what you value. but it does come down to price sometimes. when you look at this from a business point of view, even though the likes of ryanair coming right down that list, still doing well in terms of profitability. so
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therefore there is a real mismatch sometimes between knowing what we are getting and being prepared to pay a lower price for it. it doesn't a lwa ys pay a lower price for it. it doesn't always reflect well on studies like this. have you been making friends with a storm trooper? yes, it is very exciting. there is a storm trooper coming in. storm trooper in the building. the force was strong in leicester square last night with the european premiere of the latest star wars movie, the rise of skywalker. the film wraps up four decades of tales from a galaxy far, far away. but after the mixed reviews of the previous instalment, the lastjedi, how will this one go down with the fans? our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba was on the red carpet. the fans were out in force for the evening's premiere. for so many, star wars is more than simply a movie. this film and the other two in the latest trilogy have all won praise for the way they've seamlessly evolved from the original films, while also moving significantly forward when it comes to things like gender
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balance and diversity. c-3po: oh, they fly now! they fly now?! people have been fighting long and hard for characters like this, for women, and anyone sort of not in the traditionalfilm sense, to play. so i'm also thankful to all of the people who've been fighting for years and years and years for roles like this to be available. what has being part of this meant to you? it's meant being part of telling a 42—year piece of history. it's notjust been a movie, it's a cultural phenomenon. and again, to have contributed something to that is an incredible experience. there's a lot of responsibility. i feel like at the same time it's also shared responsibility, you know? i'm there, we have a whole crew, we have thousands of people that work on this movie. so it doesn't all fall on my shoulders, and i'm glad about that.
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as well as one or two news newcomers, it includes other characters from the previous trilogy, including carrie fisher's princess leia. how different was the experience of making this movie then when you made the movies in the 19805, when you made the movies in the 1980s, the empire strikes back and of course return of thejedi? 1980s, the empire strikes back and of course return of the jedi?m 1980s, the empire strikes back and of course return of the jedi? it is not that much different, it is working with some very fine people, and you have a good time. i mean, it is pretty much the same.” and you have a good time. i mean, it is pretty much the same. i am the new girl. i was a bit nervous, you never know whether you are going to fit in or not. but i think everyone on this set has been so committed to making it the best film we possibly can, and also, like, sticking together, but there wasn't a point where i felt like i was isolated or left out. people ask how does it feel to be part of something as big asa star feel to be part of something as big as a star wars. it was so big that i don't have a perspective on what i have done. i have been listening to the fans, and we are seeing it from
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this angle. they are seeing it from here —— star wars. disney bought lucasfilm and the rights to star wars for around $4 billion. the success of this new series now makes that look like a bit of a bargain. and it's all because of the passion star wars still enjoys from fans, 42 years after the saga first began. lizo mzimba, bbc news, leicester square. of course, anthony daniels was on the sofa with us a few weeks ago. we have decided to bring some security, he has just clumped have decided to bring some security, he hasjust clumped his have decided to bring some security, he has just clumped his way in have decided to bring some security, he hasjust clumped his way in here. iama big he hasjust clumped his way in here. i am a big star wars fan, and when the storm trooper walked in, my stomach properly flipped. we were not sure whether the storm trooper is going to speak or whether he was going to stand there looking vaguely menacing. glenn maxwell, he is guarding us, he is a security, and he is easing the load. we will leave the next bit to you.
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time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm geeta pendse. cases of dementia in london have doubled in the past five years, according to nhs data. experts say the rise is due to an increase in diagnosis rates and an ageing population. nhs england said the priority is finding out as early as possible whether you have the condition, to get the right treatment. more than two years after it originally started, the south western railway strike looks set to continue in 2020. the rmt union is now balloting members for a sixth time to secure a mandate for more strikes. the latest isn't due to end until 2 january. south western railway isn't backing down from plans to change the role of guards on its trains. 600,000 passengerjourneys are being
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disrupted on the network each day. christmas is a time when people like to give back, and one little boy from south—east london is doing just that by giving out pyjamas to those in need. dominic, with the help of his school friends, has helped gather over 1,000 pairs of pyjamas and other essential items to give to children who will spend this festive period in domestic violence shelters. so i'm thinking of my christmas list, and then i realised that not all children have an amazing christmas. so i researched a bit about it, and it turns out that some people have a rubbish christmas. i wanted to help. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there is good service on the tubes this morning. on the trains, southern, thameslink and the gatwick express are running reduced services from london to gatwick airport. on the blackwall tunnel southern
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approach, there's traffic from the woolwich road flyover, with queues now back through blackheath. and traffic is building on the a13 from dagenham into barking. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. plenty of heavy rain around last night, so it's rather wet underfoot to start the morning. some large puddles on the roads and the pavements, and towards southern and western areas of the capital, there's a met office weather warning in force to cater for further heavy downpours, and that warning is valid until midday on friday. so more rain around at times everywhere today, also lots of dry weather. it's mild, and it's rather windy too. so a mild start to the morning. the initial rain is pushing its way northwards. lots of cloud, but lots of dry weather too, particularly through the mid—to—late morning, into the first part of the afternoon, before further pulses of rain just push in from the south, but turning dry again towards the end of the day probably. top temperatures of 12 or 13 degrees celsius, so feeling mild, but also some strong gusts of wind around at times too. for the first half of the night, it's looking dry, then it's going to be wet again
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through the early hours and into the start of the day tomorrow. but a mild night to come, temperatures dropping to between seven and nine degrees celsius. it's a wet start to the day tomorrow, but it should brighten up into the afternoon. some further showers on saturday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today... impeached — donald trump is charged with abuse of power and obstructing congress. he'll face trial in the senate next month. a defiant president said the the democrats' arguments were "atrocious lies". they're the ones who should be impeached, every one of them! extra funding for the nhs in england and longer sentences for violent criminals are among the government
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bills to be announced in today's queen's speech. trouble at the bank of england. an investigation has been launched after traders got early access to key press conferences. one win away from being named the best club side in the world. roberto firmino's late winner for liverpool sends them into saturday's final at the club world cup in doha. my my jaw dropped myjaw dropped to the floor are four or five myjaw dropped to the floor are four orfive times. and we'll find out if the force is strong with the final installment of the star wars skywalker saga. good morning, we are in st george's hole in windsor castle, we have a mild date ahead of us but there is some rain in the forecast and blustery winds. more details in 15
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minutes —— st george's hall. it's thursday, 19th december. our top story. donald trump has been impeached over allegations that he abused his power for personal gain. it means he will now face trial in the senate, where he could, potentially, be removed from office. donald trump denies all charges. he's just the third president in history to be impeached as our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. article one is adopted. and with that, donald trump entered the history books as the third us president to be impeached. a decisive vote by the house of representatives, controlled by the democrats, sealed the president's fate. it followed a day of high drama of the kind rarely seen in the us congress, which is bitterly divided. at the precise time of his impeachment, the president was being lauded by his fans at a rally in michigan, the kind of made—for—television choreography that donald trump revels in.
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the do—nothing democrats, and they are do—nothing, all they want to focus is on this. what they could be doing... what they are doing is declaring is their depatriot and disdain for the american voter. this lawless, partisan impeachment is a political suicide march for the democrat party. have you seen my polls in the last four weeks? the president is accused of withholding military aid to ukraine to try to get the country to investigate his political rival, joe biden. that, say the democrats, is an abuse of power and the reason for the first article of impeachment. the second, obstruction of congress, came when it was claimed the president tried to block the inquiry into his discussions with ukraine. article two is adopted. the passing of two articles of impeachment, the charges, means that president trump will now face a trial in the senate, where the republicans are in the majority. mr trump is almost certain to be
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acquitted but more high drama is guaranteed. peter bowes, bbc news. the nhs will be at the centre of the queen's speech today, as the conservative government sets out its legislative agenda. her majesty will address mps and outline what the government wants to achieve over the next five years, including an extra £39 billion per year for the nhs in england, plans to abolish hospital car parking charges for "those in greatest need" and an additional £1 billion per yearfor social care. more money will be promised per pupilfor schools in england. the government says secondary schools will receive a minimum of £5,000 per pupil and primaries will geta minimum of £4,000 per pupil. legislation on the uk's future relationship with the eu will also be outlined as well as plans for a withdrawal agreement to be in place by the end of december next year. the ceremony itself will be more low key than previous ones, with cars used instead of carriages and the monarch wearing a hat instead of a crown.
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our political correspondent nick eardley is in westminster this morning. we talked earlier and now is the time, they have made the promises and they want to start getting some of them through if they can. absolutely. there will be a strange sense of deja vu today because we had a queen's speech just over nine weeks ago and we are having another today. the big difference is last time it was a bit of a wish list for the government and this time, because they have a majority, there is an expectation that they will do it and there will be more pressure to deliver the promises they made in the election. unsurprisingly, the big priority for this government is brexit, getting it done them at meetings of the uk leaves the eu at the end of january. meetings of the uk leaves the eu at the end ofjanuary. we meetings of the uk leaves the eu at the end of january. we will hear a bit about that today although most of the focus will be on that tomorrow when the legislation is backin tomorrow when the legislation is back in parliament. what boris johnson is also trying to do is
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persuade us all today that he has a vision beyond brexit as well. that is why the nhs will beat such a big pa rt is why the nhs will beat such a big part of the queen's speech today. dash market will be. the legally binding commitment to increase the funding for the nhs by about £34 billion per year by 2023—24, a lot else for the nhs, a lot on tackling crime as well. it is all about the government saying that yes, get brexit done but a lot more to do as well. thank you. shadow foreign secretary emily thornberry has defended the labour manifesto, despite the party facing the biggest defeat since 1935. ms thornberry says she is the best candidate to become the next labour leader because she comes "from the heart of the party" and says the labour manifesto is a "unifying document" but it overwhelmed the public. i don't fundamentally believe that the manifesto that we put forward was wrong, i can't look at anything in the manifesto and say,
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we shouldn't have had that. i think the criticism is that there was so much in it and we didn't really prioritise what it was that our main four or five things that we wanted to put before the public. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, will outline her case for a second referendum on scottish independence later this morning. the snp leader is also expected to call on the uk government to transfer powers to holyrood that would ensure any vote on leaving the union was legal. our correspondent lorna gordon is in edinburgh for us this morning. potentially this is a significant day? yes, i think it is. potentially this is a significant day? yes, ithink it is. nicola sturgeon has always been very open that, as a leader of the snp, she wa nts that, as a leader of the snp, she wants independence for scotland. but she says the mandate for that call has been strengthened with the result in the general election. the snp won 80% of the seats here in
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scotland, 48 out of the 59 available and at the same time, the conservatives seats were more than halved in number. today we expect nicola sturgeon to make a statement and publish a document where she will set out what she called the detailed democratic case for the tra nsfer of detailed democratic case for the transfer of powers to the scottish parliament to enable it to hold a second referendum. we expect her to send a letter asking for what is called a section 30 order before the end of the eight what is a technical term for the transfer of powers from westminster to holyrood in areas that are normally reserved. she wa nts that are normally reserved. she wants that to happen so that any possible referendum is seen as legitimate by all sides. the problem for her is that the uk government says that is not going to happen but don't they say that people in scotla nd don't they say that people in scotland are fed up with constant division and uncertainty and westminster says the vote in 2014,
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the earlier independence referendum, was a once in a generation event. and at the moment, neither side are blinking to. for the moment, thank you. news just blinking to. for the moment, thank you. newsjust coming blinking to. for the moment, thank you. news just coming through... australia has just recorded it's highest december temperature on record. provisional data suggests it reached 49.9 degrees celsius today. the previous all—time high was 49.5. a state of emergency has been declared in parts of the country, as more than 100 bushfires continue to burn. you can't imagine it and it is escalating all the problems.
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the european premiere of the ninth and final star wars film, the rise of skywalker, has been held in london. the director, jj abrams, joined stars including daisy ridley and john boyega at the event in leicester square. the movie concludes the star wars saga started by george lucas more than 40 years ago. there is a lot of responsibility but at the same time it is a shared responsibility. i am there and we have a whole crew, thousands of people working on the movie so it doesn't all fall on my shoulders and i'm glad about that! because this is a machine! a lot of very happy people. midnight screenings, everybody dressing up. we have had a storm trooper in the studio. we will have the weather and the sport coming up a little later. more than a quarter of a million people in england face spending christmas on the streets or in a hostel, as homelessness figures continue to rise. to tackle the problem,
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some cities are following the lead of scotland where a scheme called housing first provides secure accommodation and support to those most in need. it's being hailed as a real success story, so breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin went to glasgow to meet mick, who says his life has been turned around. how far away from where you were is this moment right now? about a million miles away. definitely. and how do you feel? i'm over the moon, happy, normal. baby freddie was born just seven days ago, an arrival which would have been unimaginable 18 months ago when his dad mick was homeless. i was actually working for a homeless unit myself, had a bad time, i was really depressed. i started drinking and stuff. lost myjob. lost my tenancy.
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for three days, mickjoined rough sleepers on the streets of glasgow before being given a place in a hostel — the traditional approach to the issue of homelessness. did you feel safer in the hostel compared to the streets? no, no. it was hell. alcoholics, addicts, all sorts of different guys from different backgrounds and different problems. fantastic. and the tree is up. the tree is up! it looks brilliant. that was up weeks ago by the way! was it? but today mick is in his new home with a new tree and his new family. awesome, amazing. and the most important addition... is freddie. he was given the keys to this flat in a scheme which is turning traditional support on its head. the housing first programme does exactly what it says on the tin, offering a stable home first and then help to stay in that home. i bet you feel like
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you've won the lottery. god, definitely. one of the most important things about housing first is that the support goes with the tenant. so, they get a permanent tenancy and that ends their homelessness and from that base, they can build and live a normal life. homelessness can become a cycle but this new scheme has a 90% tenancy retention rate here where it is part funded by the scottish government. from this summer it has been piloted in ten areas in england and wales. there is a success story here in scotland, with homelessness applications down almost 40% in the last ten years. numbers, though, might be creeping ever so slightly back up again and the people behind this project believe this is the way to keep pushing these numbers down. house first, lots of wraparound support. it made all the difference, having your own house, because you felt safe. you could lock your door. how much help did you get? 24/7. was it?
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and they are still there for me. on the phone every day. i would like to thank all the people that have helped me. i was at my lowest point and they saved me. i've met an amazing woman, we've had an amazing wee boy, and the sky's the limit. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. great to see a life turned around like that. josh littlejohn is the founder of social bite, which partly funds the housing first scheme in scotland. good morning. explain what the housing first scheme is, we saw the benefits but how does it work?m effectively turns the status quo of how we respond to homelessness as a society on its head. at the moment if you see somebody on the streets thatis if you see somebody on the streets that is homeless, ask them to prove themselves to be what is known as tenancy ready, saying to them as a
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society, you need to show us your on top of any mental health issues or addiction issues or you might be able to get a job, asking people to demonstrate they are up here but common sense would tell you that living on the street or being homeless will send you in a negative direction on all those fronts predict what housing first does it says the first point of intervention to homelessness should be the home and at the last point so we try to get the most vulnerable people, rough sleepers come into a mainstream one—bedroom flat and only from that a stable position of the home and we expect them to address anything. and that was perfectly illustrated with mick, the family situation now totally transformed. people will be asking where you get the flats from straightaway, where are they turned it from because it makes perfect sense but you still need the buildings on the properties. these have largely been pledged by large landlords, typically housing associations or city councils. they still own a rent
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from those properties, largely through housing benefit unless the individual get into the workplace. what they have done is simply pledged an amount of flats, the total pledges across five cities in scotla nd total pledges across five cities in scotland are 830 flats, one—bedroom flats, and people are moving in every month. what housing first does is it funds eight wraparound support for people so rather than just giving the keys and saying good luck and all the best, they might need a lot of support to help them sustain that and that is the missing link in the programme. and also what is important is it is all very well being put into a house or a flat but if you don't have a sense of community or friendship or anyone who understands you around you, you are still isolated. it's not as bad as being on the streets but you're still isolated and that also important? 10096. the first person that moved into the programme was someone we that moved into the programme was someone we met that moved into the programme was someone we met on that moved into the programme was someone we met on the streets he had been there for 20 years and never had a flat in himself and had severe
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challenges, as many as you could imagine. i got to know him personally and i want to see him in his new property and it was amazing to see him kind of really struggle at first but then grow to look after it and the thing that was important with the support was sometimes just somebody coming along for a few hours and watching tv with him playing cards or making sure his fridge stocked, basic things so it's not just, there the fridge stocked, basic things so it's notjust, there the keys and you are isolated. if that was the case, you would find the tenancies would often fail. you were explaining a moment ago about how you came into this work in the first place. you are running a cafe and somebody walks m, running a cafe and somebody walks in, just explain. it happened by accident, we opened a little cafe about seven and a half years ago in edinburgh with the original idea not having much to do with homelessness but we met a young guy who was selling the big issue who was called pete, outside the front door, and he came in and plucked up the courage and asked if he could have a job and
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we thought, why not, get started in the kitchen. it worked out well with him and we asked if he knew anybody else and he suggested his brother joe who was also selling the big issue so we got involved by accident to put it has grown and we have been... one of the things i'm most proud of in the programme is as been such a collaborative effort from so many people in scotland, the government have centrally engaged but often society is quite divided, and the business community in scotla nd and the business community in scotland have massively rallied by this and contributed the majority of the funding we have been able to put forward to. it has been a phenomenal collaboration across society. is that a prospect of eliminating homelessness in scotland ? that a prospect of eliminating homelessness in scotland? that is what we have certainly campaigned for and what we have certainly campaigned forandi what we have certainly campaigned for and i fundamentally believe that of course we can. in what timescale? we have 830 flats pledged and that isa we have 830 flats pledged and that is a significant stepping stone towards restructuring the system of how we respond to homelessness. i think there are a lot of bright lights in the world cup if you look
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at countries like finland which is often cited —— in the world, if you look at finland. over a ten or 15 year period they have almost eradicated homelessness and that is through strategic action and collaboration across society and i think if other countries can do it, of course the uk can drive those numbers down. thank you very much. it is clear a lot of lives are already being changed dramatically. and thank you for sleeping out for us, thank you to you guys. thank you. not sure it is a sleeping out weather tonight, it is cold! but something for everyone, apparently? carroll has a big tree and a lot of candles and some music. good morning, absolutely right, i am in the crimson drawing room in windsor castle and it is splendid. her majesty the queen would use this room to perform estate duties and also private events and in her early
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rain, queen victoria and prince albert loved music so they would have opera and music very much in the castle and in this very room they would also have small dancers punt we have some music here coming up punt we have some music here coming upjust after punt we have some music here coming up just after the weather. let's crack on with it. today it is a mild start and the forecast for us all is that at some stage you will get wet product we had rain and showers forecast, also blustery winds with the strongest in the northern and western isles and it will later pick up western isles and it will later pick up in the south—west. low pressure is dominating, fronts moving northwards across the uk and the direction of the isobar tells you it isa direction of the isobar tells you it is a southerly wind which is why it is a southerly wind which is why it is mild. starting with the rain in northern england and parts of northern ireland and that will clear this morning. most have a dry morning with a few showers before the next band of rain pulls in from the next band of rain pulls in from the south—west, spreading across southern counties of england and moving north, getting into northern
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ireland and the scottish borders by the evening. most of us in double figure temperatures today, some getting as high as 14 degrees in the south—east. this evening and overnight, a band of rain continues to advance northward through scotland, curling into western scotla nd scotland, curling into western scotland and northern ireland and by the end of the night it will be taking another swipe at eastern england and also the midlands. as a result of this, it will not be a cold night, temperatures down to 7-9d. cold night, temperatures down to 7—9d. tomorrow we start with the rain, you can see it in western scotland, northern ireland and eastern england and the midlands. that moves away leaving us with a mostly dry day, a fair bit of cloud around, the odd glimmer of sunshine and still some showers in the west. still blustery but not so much as today. temperatures are starting to slide a little bit, byte one or 2 degrees. on saturday, we will have had some rain coming into southern counties through the course of saturday and that will quickly clear
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overnight. for most it will be dry, a little bit of sunshine but still a few showers and temperatures once again just few showers and temperatures once againjust slipping a few showers and temperatures once again just slipping a little few showers and temperatures once againjust slipping a little bit few showers and temperatures once again just slipping a little bit so we can say goodbye to the 14s we are looking at today, for most we will be back into single digit numbers again. i promised you some music and on the way to look at the music have a look at the chandelier! that is a spectacular. music is by singh healthy wires and they're going to sing the first noel. —— sing healthy choirs. singing.
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christmas carols, one of those things, so traditional, just like a school nativity play, all part of the picture. does it take you back? a little bit. but how do you put on a show when you've only got seven pupils? how do you go about putting on a production at this time of year? you have to multitask. our correspondent tomos morgan was in the audience. with a population of less than a thousand, they are used to doing things small—scale in the picturesque village of abersoch in north wales. and, for the local primary
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on the llyn peninsula — the smallest in wales — performing the christmas panto can be a little tricky. merry christmas! i don't think they see it as a challenge because they just get on and do it. they have never ceased to amaze me before, never. when you actually see the children on that big stage in a big village hall, all seven of them, just doing their utmost best and really enjoying themselves, it does bring tears to the eyes. due to illness, only six children performed cardiau nadolig last night, the tale of a postman delivering cards with a message of remembering the reason behind christmas. i'm actually pretty nervous, yes.
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i was a little worried, i forgot a part and it was the most important part so i was very worried! their half—an—hour performance has 13 songs and was especially tailored by the only full—time teacher. we just get on with it, find a show and adapt to what we've got in talent in the children. i've got a store of 25 years of christmas shows so we just thought which show would be apt for these children here. they have reallyjust done it. this year's show had the fewest number of children involved. over the past three years, pupil figures at ysgol abersoch have halved and gwynedd council are consulting on the future of the school as it is well
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under its capacity of 34. with such a rousing performance, orchestrated by a former pupil who is now in charge, the local crowd will be hoping that next year will see the 96th christmas panto by the children of ysgol abersoch. tomos morgan, bbc news. i loved the little dad doing the dance routines in amongst it! if you are confused by the numbers, seven children at the school, one went off sick and was not able to perform in the show! as if it was not tight enough already! but the others just stepped up. brilliant. it gets you in the festive mood. one of those traditions. if you have eight nativity play going on with the kids involved, send us some pictures, it would be nice to see. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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hello, a very good morning to you. no real signs of a settled spell of weather for the rest of this week. and indeed come into the forthcoming weekend. and for that, we have to think, if that is the right word, areas of low pressure. one very much the dominant feature at the moment, a wet night across southern and eastern britain. the rain gradually driving through the eastern side of scotla nd driving through the eastern side of scotland into the north sea, then the next area of cloud and rain begins to show its hand across the south and west of england and. for scotland, in between the areas of rain, it is not a scotland, in between the areas of rain, it is nota bad scotland, in between the areas of rain, it is not a bad afternoon. one or two showers towards the west, quite a bit of dry weather around and for the most part, temperatures in double figures. after a dry morning, northern ireland sees one or two showers around lunchtime, this rain active during the evening and the rain initially through the south—west and quarter driving
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further towards the north. but for a time across southern england, south wales and the midlands, the rain really quite heavy, some localised flooding, already a lot of standing water. the rain completes its journey overnight and then another area of cloud and rain works its way into central and eastern parts of england. one pay off by day and by night at the moment is that it is on the mild side. but a lot of standing water again as you commute across the greater part of england. then once that rain moves away towards the north sea, friday turns out to be half decent day. a speckling of showers across the western side of scotla nd showers across the western side of scotland and temperature is still relatively mild for the time of year. no signs of relief as we worked our way towards the weekend. these fronts eventually bring rain into southern counties of england and wales for saturday. saturday and sunday, a mixture of sunny spells and blustery showers. take care, goodbye.
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this is worklife, from bbc news, with sally bundock and karin giannone. your data rights — versus the tech giants. a major privacy case reaches a key stage in europe's top court. live from london, that's our top story on thursday, 19th of december. campaigners want tougher rules on the transfer of personal data from europe to the tech titans. outside of the european union. we will talk you through what is at sta ke. also in the programme...

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