Skip to main content

tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  December 19, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

2:00 pm
today at 5pm, we‘re live at westminster, where the queen has hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy at westminster. opened a new session of parliament, today at 2: after last week‘s general election. the state opening of parliament — the queen sets out the government's the queen, accompanied plans for the future with brexit by the prince of wales, processed into the house of lords, centre stage — there's also to deliver a speech extra money for the nhs. with brexit at its heart. my government‘s priority is to deliver the united kingdom‘s departure from the european union my my government's priority is to on the 31st of january. deliver the united kingdom's departure from the european union on the 31st of january. the tensions between prime minister and leader of the opposition promises of safer streets were clear as they prepared with the recuitment of more police to debate the new government‘s officers and tougher action programme of legislation. on the most dangerous criminals. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, sets out her plans for another independence referendum after the dither, after the delay, after the deadlock, — and warns borisjohnson after the paralysis not to oppose it. and the platitudes, the time has more dismalfigures for the nhs — this time in wales — come for change and the time where hospitals recorded the worst has come for action. ever performance at accident this government, that and emergency units last month. conservative party, does not stand
2:01 pm
coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with katie shanahan. it is understood the mikael arteta has said his goodbye to staff at manchester city ahead of expectations that he will be revealed tomorrow as the new man in charge of arsenal. thanks, katie. and chris fawkes has all the weather. it has been a wet start to december gci’oss it has been a wet start to december across parts of southern england and we have two batches of heavy rain on the wane. we could see localised flooding not just across the wane. we could see localised flooding notjust across the south but elsewhere as well. a full forecast coming up later on. thanks. also coming up, after stepping out of the ring — a dramatic change of career for the olympic boxer nicola adams. i started getting into acting when i was younger. i had to turn down a few opportunities boxing so i am looking forward to now taking up all the opportunities that i had miss.
2:02 pm
hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. the queen has outlined the government's agenda for the next year following the conservatives‘ decisive election victory last week. addressing both houses at the state opening of parliament, her majesty said her government would embark on an ‘ambitious programme of domestic reform that delivers on the people‘s priorities‘. legislation to take the uk out of the european union on 31st ofjanuary is among over 30 bills announced. other measures include guarantees on extra health service funding in england — and more cash for schools. there are also proposals for new sentencing laws for serious violent offenders, including terrorists. and the government says it wants to ensure the whole of the uk can prosper — with plans for more infrastructure spending.
2:03 pm
our political correspondent nick eardley reports on today‘s events. got a sense of deja vu? it‘s less than ten weeks since we last had a queen‘s speech. this one is a bit different though. scaled back, no golden carriage. no ceremonial dress for the queen. the biggest changes here in the house of commons. black rod! mr speaker, the queen commands this honourable house. summoned to the lords to hear the government‘s plan for the next year, led by a victorious prime minister, a small and weakened opposition. look at the tension between them. boris johnson can now make his promises reality and that means ina few weeks‘ time, the uk will leave the eu. my government‘s priority is to deliver the united kingdom‘s departure from the eu on the 31st of january. my ministers will bring forward
2:04 pm
legislation to ensure the uk‘s exit on that date. and to make the most of the opportunities this brings for all the people of the uk. but he wants to persuade you there‘s more to his government, a detailed agenda beyond brexit. the top domestic priority is the health service, enshrining in law the promise to spend 3a billion extra a year. my government will embark on an ambitious programme of domestic reform that delivers on the people‘s priorities. for the first time, the national health service‘s multi—year funding settlement agreed earlier this year will be enshrined in law. there will be legislation to change the uk‘s immigration system and improve broadband connectivity. and a pledge to change sentencing for serious crimes. new sentencing laws will ensure the most serious violent offenders, including terrorists,
2:05 pm
serve longer in custody. new laws will require schools, police, councils and health authorities to work together to prevent serious crime. ministers say the programme shows they mean business. this five—year ambitious plan, the 34 billion additional investment, is exactly what the nhs meets. this is a people's queen's speech. opposition parties are still sceptical. we are deeply concerned about the headlines differentiating from the reality of people's lives and that divide has got greater and greater over the last few years under this government. we are going to carry on being the real opposition as we‘ve been over the last number of years and we will be focusing on protecting the nhs, focusing on ensuring the social security system is fair and actually catches people. the election may be over but the debate goes on. borisjohnson promised during the campaign
2:06 pm
that a majority government would get the country moving again. his challenge now is to make that happen, notjust to deliver brexit but to fulfil those other key campaign pledges too, not least those made to people in the north who voted tory for the first time. a day of tradition in westminster but with a new government comes change and much of what happens around here will feel very different. our chief political correspondent vicki young is inside the houses of parliament for us. a new political era, here we go. what is interesting is those inside downing street are very keen that brexit doesn‘t continue to dominate the political landscape. it will up toa the political landscape. it will up to a point because the uk will be leaving the eu at the end of january, that 80 seat majority for borisjohnson january, that 80 seat majority for boris johnson guarantees january, that 80 seat majority for borisjohnson guarantees that, but thatis borisjohnson guarantees that, but that is only the first part of all
2:07 pm
of this, that is the ritual agreement and the agreement bill which will be brought before the house of commons again on friday but the next stage is those trade negotiations. can they get a trade deal in place within 12 months? that is the big unknown, lots of opposition mps saying it is com pletely opposition mps saying it is completely impossible but that will be important. people in downing street think people will not be following every twist and turn of that. it will be quite technical at times, they are very keen to move on to talk about other things, things like the nhs. it is slightly strange that a government with a majority of 80 has to put into law something that it intends to do anyway, but this is all about signalling to people that this government is moving on, it is changing things, priority is the nhs and with it comes that money. some would see this as theresa may‘s legacy, something she got put down and got sorted out before she left as prime
2:08 pm
minister. looking at any potential flash points, the issue of the union is going to be rearing its head and we heard from nicola sturgeon already today. that is going to be one of the major issues facing the prime minister. we know that the two have spoken, borisjohnson made it clear he doesn‘t feel there is a need for another independence referendum in scotland. he says look at the time, it was said a generational issue, they will have that vote, that would be the end of it. that is not how nicola sturgeon sees it. the resurgence of the snp in scotland, all those extra seats here are going to mean that call continues but it is notjust scotland. one of the other big issues here is going to be the relationship with northern ireland. they have tried to get stormont up and running. a couple of irish mps say they are optimistic about that because the dup and sinn fein didn‘t do as well, they feel that was a
2:09 pm
real signalfor the do as well, they feel that was a real signal for the people of northern ireland that they were fed up northern ireland that they were fed up and want to get that back up and running. the problem for boris johnson is he is about to put through this place a withdrawal agreement bill which is very much opposed by a lot of people in northern ireland and that could end up northern ireland and that could end up causing a lot of friction in the months and years to come. quick word about what we can expect in the next hour or so about what we can expect in the next hourorso in about what we can expect in the next hour or so in terms of what is happening in the commons chamber. they are still doing some swearing m, they are still doing some swearing in, every mp has to swear an oath, thatis in, every mp has to swear an oath, that is continuing. at 2:30pm we have the humble address, to government backbenchers will make speeches. they are supposed to be funny and amusing. all eyes will be on tracey crouch, the former sports minister and eddie hughes. they have got that honour and the debate sta rts got that honour and the debate starts with borisjohnson laying out why he thinks the house should support his queen‘s speech. our health editor hugh pym is here.
2:10 pm
a lot of people will think it strange that they have been enshrined into law money that had already been promised for the nhs. that is right. it is an innovation to say as the government, we have promised you a sum of money but in the campaign you may have heard billions of pounds being talked about, we‘re going to put it in legislation. we are going to legislate to commit us to spend £33.9 billion a year more in cash terms on the nhs in england by 2023. the political intention here is to try and reassure voters that this government really means business, it really will deliver this money, but as you suggested, it has been committed, was committed by theresa may. it is hardly conceivable that it would have been cut back by this government and if you look at the real terms increases each year, 3.4%, certainly more than what we have had but still short of the
2:11 pm
historic average. many health commentators are saying, yes, it is welcome but is onlyjust enough to keep up with rising patient demand. it is all about the message and intent. yes, it was important to have the nhs high up in the queen‘s speech as the government‘s priority and nobody is criticising the commitment, but what does it add up to? this commitment to money, there is talk of the 50,000 more nurses that were mentioned in the campaign, more gps but no indication in the legislation how that will be delivered. it remains a work to do andi delivered. it remains a work to do and i don‘t think we have learned anything new about how they‘re going to recruit those extra stuff. we have seen new figures from the nhs in wales, more dire figures, but it is devolved, it is labour responsible for it in wales. yes and we had the worst ever figures in england only last friday, the day after polling day, even worse than november. every part the uk is
2:12 pm
facing pressures on a&e, on the nhs. scotland‘s figures have remained above those in england and wales, northern ireland are even worse. it is not something that anyone can say, look, actually it is your problem not ours. it is a big problem not ours. it is a big problem for the nhs across the uk. immigration, something that was also addressed and the idea of new visas, particularly for nurses and doctors who might want to come and work here. cutting the price of a visa for a health care worker coming here, that sounds good and welcome if you want to recruit more overseas staff given the rotor gaps. but actually, the cost of paying for your health care if you are from outside the eu, the surcharge that has been paid has gone up. you gain in one sense but you lose in another so in one sense but you lose in another so it is sceptical whether that will make a difference at all. thank you. rachel wolf is a partner
2:13 pm
in public first, a business management consultancy in london. but she also co—wrote the conservative manifesto. shejoins me now. and a big smile which says it all. there is nothing there you haven‘t heard before. it is incredibly exciting because with a majority government, it is very clear that they are now going to implement everything that was in the ma nifesto. everything that was in the manifesto. we had a whole slew of announcements which were promised in the campaign. they are obviously getting on with delivering to prove to voters they meant what they said and having gone through several yea rs of and having gone through several years of total paralysis and very little movement on anything domestically, it is exciting to see this government does mean to deliver. that said, the public have got very tired of hearing politicians promising and re—promising something they have heard before, we seem to be doing that with the nhs. what new is there? that is exactly why some of there? that is exactly why some of the announcement is just now are
2:14 pm
very interesting because as well as the new money, what they are clearly doing is dealing with some of the areas in the nhs that are putting burdens on a&e. far more nurses but many more gp appointments which put burdens on a&e. what the public are going to test though, you are right, it is not these announcements, the question is in five years can people get a question is in five years can people geta gp question is in five years can people get a gp appointment more easily than they can today? the government knows this because they would have to say in five years that to the electorate, that they have delivered. you do trust us on the nhs, you trusted us on schools, to create a new immigration system, and we did. when that manifesto was being written, was that target audience if you like, those who had never voted tory in their lives, was there any thought that actually this swing would be quite as dramatic as it was because you know there was a huge focus on those voters because
2:15 pm
it was very clear that they felt they had been portrayed by our inability to leave the eu. but a lot of the things talked about like the nhs like the immigration system, like how we asked people to contribute and that sense of fairness and public services like what our towns look like, there were a lot of pronouncements on things like business rates, where monumental frustrations and give the conservatives could demonstrate they could deal with those, there was a real opportunity to win voters. could deal with those, there was a real opportunity to win votersm was a conservative government before, we have had one for years and people will say, you are coming in here, behaving as if it is a brand—new feel, it is the same old faces. if that is what people felt they would not have voted for the conservatives last week. they voted because they thought this was going to be something new, a breakfrom the paralysis that has been plaguing parliament and government for a long time. and then we‘ll be deliver on the priorities. the second part is
2:16 pm
dealing with the things they really ca re dealing with the things they really care about, that is what today was about, dealing with public services, changing immigration, sorting out people‘s towns around the country. again the public hearing phrases like get brexit done, this doesn‘t get brexit done, it gets brexit under way but that is not a message that would have played so well. as well as leaving the eu next year, what the government has managed to do very fast start to deal with some of the things that caused people to vote for leaving the eu in the first place. having a points—based system that people can control and vote on that people can control and vote on that says, we really want doctors and nurses to come into this country and nurses to come into this country and make it as easy as possible but we expect people to be highly skilled, to have a real contribution to the economy, that is a massive deal and it is only possible because we are leaving the eu. what about theissue we are leaving the eu. what about the issue of the union? it is all very well for boris johnson
2:17 pm
the issue of the union? it is all very well for borisjohnson to say he will not discuss it in the next five years but many people agree with nicola sturgeon that she has an unarguable case for another referendum given her mandate. this is going to be a much bigger political challenge for the government over the next few years than probably the labour party will be. i think they will resist it, a referendum, simply because they are very much a unionist party and unionism remains a big part of how the conservatives talked about themselves in the campaign. just looking at you, it is a long time since i have anybody smile so much. there is a sense this is a new era. it is very exciting for those of us who do feel that voters across the country, people have been let down over the last few years. the reason i wanted to get involved in the ma nifesto i wanted to get involved in the manifesto was because we need to address these people‘s priorities
2:18 pm
and it is wonderful to think that in five years people might say, that vote was worth it and my life is now better. it is hard to not feel excited by dad. who are the targets here? is it the wealthy, the poor? is there such a difference now? sometimes in westminster we make this strange distinction as though the only people in this country are either rich or pull when the vast majority are getting by, they are just about managing, but there are lots of things from public services to tax to how their high streets look which make a very big difference to their lives and only the state can address. it is that huge majority of the country, this is what one nation means now, that huge majority of the country that will be the focus. very good of you to come in. nice to see you. scotland‘s first minister says the mandate for a new independence referendum is now "unarguable". after the snp won 48
2:19 pm
of the 59 seats in scotland at the general election. nicola sturgeon has now published a document laying out what she says is a detailed case for another referendum. borisjohnson has repeatedly made clear his opposition to such a move. our scotland correspondent lorna gordon is at holyrood. this issue will be raised and raised a lot. yeah, again and again and againi a lot. yeah, again and again and again i suspect over the coming months and possibly even years. a few key things happening today. first we have nicola sturgeon setting out the arguments that she seesitin setting out the arguments that she sees it in favour of scotland‘s right to choose its own constitutional future. it is quite a slim document, just 38 pages but it deals with some weighty concepts. nicola sturgeon in her statement talked about the right to self—determination, she talked about a material change in circumstances, by that she is referring to the fact that the uk is leaving the european
2:20 pm
union but that a majority of people who voted here in scotland voted to remain as part of the eu and she also talked about a democratic mandate, a mandate which she says was reinforced with those big gains the snp made in the general election. added to that the second thing that has happened today is it has been confirmed that nicola sturgeon has written a letter to the prime minister asking for what is known as a section 30. that is the technical term for legislation allowing the parliament here at holyrood to legislate in areas that are normally devolved to westminster but here is the challenge for nicola sturgeon. she wants a referendum, the uk government says no to that. they think it is divisive and unnecessary but nicola sturgeon has got —— believes that is not a position that can hold long term.
2:21 pm
the more a tory government seeks to block the will of the scottish people, the more they show complete and utter contempt for scottish democracy, the more support for independence will rise. so, their short—term strategy, in my view, sows the seeds of their longer term defeat. it is self—defeating, but it will not hold because it is not a democratic position. i think we see the tectonic plates of this shifting already in the days since the election. so, i'm going to stand my ground. i fully expect today we'll get the flat "no" of tory westminster opposition, but that's not an end of the matter and borisjohnson should not be under any illusion that it is. nicola sturgeon thinks she has a reinforced mandate following last week‘s‘s election. she also thinks she has momentum on her side. i think that the hips is key for this entire argument going forward. she
2:22 pm
wa nts to entire argument going forward. she wants to persuade voters that another referendum is a good idea and further down the line persuade them of independence as well. but for now, neither side is budging. nicola sturgeon playing a long game i think but don‘t expect this constitutional stand—off to end anytime soon. donald trump has become only the third us president to be impeached. the democrat—controlled house of representatives last night approved two charges, setting up a trial next month in the senate, but it‘s dominated by republicans so the president is almost certain to remain in office. mr trump denies abusing his power and obstructing congress, and says the process is a witch hunt. peter bowes reports from washington. article one is adopted. and with that, donald trump entered the history books as the third us president to be impeached. a decisive vote by the house of representatives, controlled by the democrats,
2:23 pm
sealed the president‘s fate. it followed a day of high drama of the kind rarely seen in the us congress, which is bitterly divided. at the precise time of his impeachment, the president was being lauded by his fans at a rally in michigan, the kind of made—for—television choreography that donald trump revels in. the do—nothing democrats, and they are do—nothing, all they want to focus is on this. what they could be doing... what they are doing is declaring is their depatriot and disdain for the american voter. this lawless, partisan impeachment is a political suicide march for the democrat party. have you seen my polls in the last four weeks? the president is accused of withholding military aid to ukraine to try to get the country to investigate his political rival, joe biden. that, say the democrats, is an abuse of power and the reason for the first article of impeachment.
2:24 pm
the second, obstruction of congress, came when it was claimed the president tried to block the inquiry into his discussions with ukraine. article two is adopted. the passing of two articles of impeachment, the charges, means that president trump will now face a trial in the senate, where the republicans are in the majority. mr trump is almost certain to be acquitted but more high drama is guaranteed. peter bowes, bbc news. police have confirmed they‘ve found the remains of a missing father of one — in woodlands in buckinghamshire. mohammed shah subhani, also known as shah khan, had failed to return home to west london in early may. police later found the 27—year—old‘s car with ballistic damage and a murder investigation was launched. the record breaking heatwave in australia shows no sign of letting up. the average temperature nationally has reached 41.9 degrees celsius — that‘s 107.4 fahrenheit.
2:25 pm
a week—long state of emergency has been declared in new south wales, where more than a hundred bushfires continue to burn out of control. two firefighters have been seriously hurt after their fire engine was reportedly engulfed by flames. phil mercer reports from the blue mountains north of sydney. choking smoke, intense heat and raging bush fires. it‘s been another brutal day in australia. the battle to protect life and property seems never—ending, but despite a mammoth firefighting effort more houses have been lost. a seven—day state of emergency in new south wales is giving fire authorities additional powers to cope with dozens of blazes, many of which are burning out of control. the biggest concern for us over the next few days is the unpredictability, with extreme wind conditions, extreme hot temperatures. we have a good idea, a good sense of where the most concerning areas are, but again, when you‘ve got those turbulent wind conditions,
2:26 pm
embers and spot fires can occur very unpredictably. military helicopters have joined a huge emergency effort that‘s being stretched to the limit. on the front line, crews, many of them volunteers, have confronted the sheer ferocity of the flames. three firefighters were injured, two of them seriously, when theirfire engine was engulfed by flames. the bushfires are again spreading a toxic haze across sydney and other parts of new south wales. a heatwave has made a dangerous situation even worse. the heat and the smoke are almost unbearable. the streets here in sydney‘s outer western suburbs are almost deserted. air quality is at a hazardous level. it is so bad my eyes are stinging, my throat is dry, and my lungs feel sore from all of the smoke blown in from the bushfires.
2:27 pm
as the fires continue to rage, so does the debate about whether the conservative prime minister scott morrison is taking the threat of climate change seriously. don‘t get me started on the government! that‘s just — yeah, he should be doing so much more. the bushfires i think are just a normal part of australia, a little bit worse this year, but ten years ago was the same, and i'm not so sure that climate change is responsible for what we're experiencing here. we are currently experiencing very hazardous air quality... the record for australia‘s hottest day has been broken for a second time this week. maximum temperatures across the country reached an average of 41.9 degrees. officials fear that conditions on saturday could be even worse. phil mercer, bbc news, sydney.
2:28 pm
remarkable images there. let‘s find out what is happening closer to home. one thing to think about with the australian thing is that only one month into their summer season, so this story has a long time to run, it will be a long hot summer with their dangerous bushfires. for us that it‘s a different story. we have too much water which has caused localised flooding issues across the banks of the river thames. two areas of rain bearing clouds, one lurking at the moment and one that will bring in another dollop of heavy rain overnight. rain at times sums up rain overnight. rain at times sums up the weather, but because the rain will come down quite heavily and the ground is already saturated, it increases the risk of seeing some impacts from this heavy rain as it pushes northwards into northern ireland and scotland, with more rain following for the second part of the
2:29 pm
night. again across england and wales. it will be a mild night but thatis wales. it will be a mild night but that is not really the issue, the issueis that is not really the issue, the issue is all this rain. we could see localise flooding problems building up, could have some disruption on roads and one or two railway lines given the intensity of the rain on the way and given that the ground is already saturated. into friday, little change. more rain around as we start the day and that will be pushing northwards reaching eastern scotland. some uncertainty as to how far it will spread into scotland but the east coast looking pretty wet. rain around dundee, edinburgh as well. further south across the midlands and east anglia, the rain uses 01’ midlands and east anglia, the rain uses or fear as well. across western parts it gets cooler. for the weekend, another area of low pressure working into the english channel. another one pushing and for the second part of the weekend. some rain on the way again for the weekend, mainly focused across the south but that is one area where we
2:30 pm
have seen a lot of rain already this december. further northwards, quite a bit of cloud and a scattering of showers pushing northwards across northern england into scotland and northern ireland. temperatures six and seven is across northern areas, reaching ten or 11 degrees further south. sunday, the dregs of that weather system will clear across east anglia, south—east england. what will follow are slightly brighter concessions. further showers around as well, some heavy. temperatures are run 7—10d. heavy rain over the next 24 hours bringing the risk of localised flooding.
2:31 pm
this is bbc news. our latest headlines. the state opening of parliament. the queen sets out the government‘s plans for the future with brexit centre stage. there‘s also extra money for the nhs. promises of safer streets with the recuitment of more police officers and tougher action on the most dangerous criminals. scotland‘s first minister, nicola sturgeon, sets out her plans for another independence referendum, and warns boris johnson not to oppose it. more dismal figures for the nhs. this time in wales, where hospitals recorded the worst ever performance at accident and emergency units last month. welcome back to westminster.
2:32 pm
let‘s go to vicky young who is inside the houses of parliament for us, and what we expected? the speaker is making a statement about procedure, normally have the queen speech debate that goes on for five oi’ speech debate that goes on for five or six days but that is not going to happen, they will come back to it in the new year. first of all, today, we start with the humble address. this is to backbench mps getting up and thanking the queen for her speech and making what i supposed to be humorous speeches. we are going to have headache use for walsall, and then tracey crouch the former sports minister. expectation is high that they are going to come up with some good jokes. that is what everybody wants. and just before christmas as well, to lighten the mood before they move into the debate about the queen‘s speech which started jeremy corbyn, the labour leader, and then boris
2:33 pm
johnson, the prime minister will reply laying out why he thinks the house should support all the measures he has put into the queen‘s speech today, mainly being delivering on brexit and that legislation and shining extra spending for the nhs. that is what happens this afternoon in the house of commons. it‘s probably quite a nerve—racking experience the some of these mps, tracey crouch is pretty experience, she‘s been a sports minister, lots of people predict she might one day come back into high office. for eddie hughes, who hasn‘t been an mp for that long, they get to talk about their constituency, thatis to talk about their constituency, that is part of the theme, to talk about their predecessors and talk about their predecessors and talk about why they think the queen‘s speech is a good thing for the people in their area. what we're seeing now the first motion. this is the appointment of a temporary deputy speakers. just a bit of housekeeping to be going on with.
2:34 pm
this always happens at the beginning ofa this always happens at the beginning of a parliament. what is strange todayis of a parliament. what is strange today is we were all here ten weeks ago doing it but knowing this date the conservative party was in, the government was then, borisjohnson booted out those mps, he wouldn‘t have got very much through the house of commons on that occasion. it‘s all change with the election, that a majority of 80 something we haven‘t seen majority of 80 something we haven‘t seen for a long time. many people walking around, including ourselves, wondering how different it will be reporting on a majority government without those late—night votes on a knife edge. all of us. i think this is still procedure. is jacob rees—mogg, he is calling for a change of appointments for friday. let‘sjoin change of appointments for friday. let‘s join the proceedings now.
2:35 pm
the bill will be published and it will be scrutinised by her majesty‘s opposition so that we look at it in the best interest of the united kingdom of great britain and northern ireland, and on that basis we support the motion. mr speaker... old habits die hard, mr speaker! could i also say this is an unusual statement of affairs. you have been generous to the government in order for this debate to go ahead tomorrow. this is what it has been all about for the last three weeks, ensuring they get their disastrous, dismal but exit. scotland opposed it in 2016 and opposed it last week and we will vote against it tomorrow.
2:36 pm
notwithstanding the standing order and the practice of the house at this day city may discuss the european withdrawal bill and this house will sit on the 20th of december 2019. are those of that opinion say i. to the contrary, no. i think the ayes have it. just to say for the record, i did negotiate to ensure we weren‘t coming back after friday. i wanted the house to be in the right place. that is part of my duty. we now come to presentations of bail. the european union with the role bail. second reading tomorrow. i have to acquaint
2:37 pm
the house that the house has they tended to her majesty in their majesty was pleased to make the most gracious speech to both houses of parliament to which they have obtained a copy for greater accuracy. i shall direct the terms of the speech be printed in the votes a nd of the speech be printed in the votes and proceedings, copies are available. i have the greatest of pleasure to ask tracey crouch and then eddie hughes to second that. i beg to move the humble address be presented to her majesty as follows. most gracious sovereign, we're majesty is most dutiful and loyal subjects, the comments of the united kingdom of great britain in parliament assembled by glee to offer our humble thanks to your
2:38 pm
majesty for the gracious speech which majesty has addressed both houses of parliament. mr speaker, despite the fact it is possibly the most terrifying thing i have ever done, it is a great honour as they are re—elected and plywood member for chatham and aylesford. —— re—elected a member. the chief, a man well known for his elegance, charm and wit has clearly clocked his panto season is asking me to do this is the equivalent of shouting, your career this is the equivalent of shouting, your career is behind you! oh, no, it isn't! mr speaker, it isn't! mrspeaker, i it isn't! mr speaker, i think we can do a bit better than that. i feel a bit more reassured if the prime minister could join in. if i may,
2:39 pm
reassured if the prime minister couldjoin in. if i may, their chief, a man, well known for his charm and wit has clearly clocked it is panto season for asking me to do this is the equivalent of shouting, your career this is the equivalent of shouting, your career is behind you. oh, no, it isn't! instead of... instead of cinderella or puss in boots, less raise the literary tone and note that today is the anniversary of a christmas carol being published in 1843. charles dickens was a son of chatham and so this old has—been speech clearly makes me feel like the ghost of christmas past. the member for walsall north will play the ghost of christmas future. the prime minister
2:40 pm
is oven ready for the role of christmas present. scrooge would have been brilliantly played by the former chancellor, philip hammond. sadly, he was pipped to the part by the last to speak of the house who are dish and powerfully for this role in many a bleak year. old mali, sits on the front bench opposite, chained and regretful and that's about arsenal's re ce nt regretful and that's about arsenal's recent performance. smile, jeremy, it won't kill you. hill, mr speaker, who is our tiny term? so hill, mr speaker, who is our tiny term ? so valiant hill, mr speaker, who is our tiny term? so valiant and small, the
2:41 pm
object of pity. it can be none other than the right honourable member for westmorland for whom we welcome back to the house and wonder if he'll have another go at his party's leadership. i have thought of continuing the love actually election theme by delivering the speech with carols being sung in the background. but we are not allowed to bring props into the chamber, too, hugh grant has suffered enough! three, it would be simply impossible to fit all the names of the new conservative intake... i know that their last cairns conservative intake... i know that theirlast cairns mp conservative intake... i know that their last cairns mp to give the address who started his speech that
2:42 pm
by saying he had been returned in four successive elections and the conservative vote had been higher than the time before. thanks to this prime minister i now know how he feels. this legislative programme the macro it was the green speed in 1994 that the legislation for high—speed one was tabled. high—speed one take goes through my constituency and kent. thanks to that built on five years ago there are parts of kent that has seen mainly —— major regeneration. there is still even more potential to unlock. i'm privileged to be the memberfor unlock. i'm privileged to be the member for chatham and aylesford, a device constituency with a strong naval history. a friend, mentor of mine, mention to me earlier this week he is the only cairns mp to have been serving while the chatham
2:43 pm
dockyard were still operational. rumour has it is the only cairns mp to be when the last mp said the queen speech in 1937. alas, the dockyard has always been of critical significance to the town, it ceased operations in 1984. however, it's regeneration has been remarkable paying tribute to its heritage through housing and tourism. another female member of the 2010 intake is my right honourable friend for portsmouth north. a constituency is built firmly on the foundations of the royal navy and she famously lifted her speeches with bets of the male anatomy as a dare. i thought i would seek her advice given i know i would seek her advice given i know i would feel sick to the car and shake
2:44 pm
with fear whereas she herself has great calmness and tranquillity during tough times. she looked at me, she took my hand and she said, tracey, you will be fine, don't cock it up. i note the last humble address to take place after a december election was proposed by mr reginald mitchell bangs from swindon, answered no he delivered his speech on court dress, tradition lam his speech on court dress, tradition i am grateful no longer exists. hansard wishes to note i am dressing in high street chic. he spoke of the importance of training with our friends abroad and the bonds of commerce friends abroad and the bonds of commerce and enterprise between the united kingdom of those countries both near and far have only strengthened since. the famous watling street, trading route used by ancient britons runs through chatham and it was on that road the famous battles were fought against
2:45 pm
roman invaders. i'm delighted to say things have changed and it is on that road today along with the m20 that road today along with the m20 that goods come and go from the port of dover which is the foreign secretary knows is a trading —— important trading point. it is in that spirit that are opened to the world. we have proposed legislation that is by delivering a brexit creates new and exciting training opportunities and it starts in this house tomorrow with the withdrawal agreement. this bill will unlock and unleash britain's potential with the rest of the world alongside other pieces of brexit legislation announced this morning, we stand ready to build new relationship with our friends in the eu based on free trade and cooperation. thanks to the legislative programme for today we can raise our own standards in areas
2:46 pm
like agriculture and animal welfare and the environment. the reintroduction of the environment bill will protect and restore our natural environment for generations to come, it is an achievable programme to tackle pollution. for those with densely populated polluted constituencies, with the la st polluted constituencies, with the last pockets of green space and the threats from inappropriate and strategically ill thought planning proposals, demonstrating these fears not only provide a haven for wildlife but a breathing space in urban areas are to enhance health and well— being of urban areas are to enhance health and well—being of our residents is our last remaining hope. as hope. as well as other extremely important focus of legislation, i noted from my campaigning, constituents with warmly welcome plans of investing in the nhs, greater access to gps, warmly welcome plans of investing in the nhs, greateraccess to gps, mole police officers and tougher sentences. but more police officers.
2:47 pm
they'll be delighted to hear more commitment to supporting those with poor mental health. members of this house have spoken powerfully about their own pressures with various mental health conditions. it is right we help them with a stigma around mental health by talking about it but it is action not words that matter and it is paramount we ensure our constituents whose voice may not be as light as our own receive the treatment they need by guaranteeing we teach mental health with the same urgency as physical health. i was proud i will manifest commitments to improve the overall well— being of the commitments to improve the overall well—being of the nation. while there may not be in the legislative programme outlined today, measures like investing in grassroots sports, enhancing physical education in schools, reform of the gambling legislation, the prime minister should know there is a white support for improvements to begin the laborious whitehall process and i hope they will do so soon. i made my
2:48 pm
maiden speech on poverty. part of my constituency suffers from deprivation and i work alongside many organisations to support those who find themselves not able to cope. charles dickens chronicled vicar —— the poverty of victorian britain. mercy and altruism has to remain our mission. i have worked with many mps from other parties and this has on various issues and i welcome and congratulate my new colleagues on these benches but there are officer to i will miss enormously. although we've not cove red enormously. although we've not covered ourselves in glory for these past few years, new mps will discover this place is at its best when we work together and relationships and friendships will be formed over issues that need cross—party be formed over issues that need cross— party consensus. chatham's heroes dickens may have been a great
2:49 pm
social reformer that he also observed there is nothing in this well so irresistible as laughter and good humour. perhaps it would be no bad thing for us as we repair this house of commons in the coming months. let laughter and good humour, like friendships thrive in letters respect our differences but not let them divide us. and of course, let tottenham finish above arsenal in the league! that's a given! asi arsenal in the league! that's a given! as i finish my humble offering to her majesty, may i take this opportunity to wish colleagues and all the hard—working house staff are merry christmas, happy hanukkah and the peaceful holiday season and in the words of tiny term at the end ofa in the words of tiny term at the end of a christmas carol, god blesses everyone. i call the member for walsall everyone. i call the memberfor walsall north, eddie hughes.
2:50 pm
mr speaker, eddie hughes. mrspeaker, i eddie hughes. mr speaker, i hope you will forgive me if! mr speaker, i hope you will forgive me if i look slightly bewildered being called to address a full house of commons chamber. i have never had this experience previously. over the previous two and half years i've got used to being called at the end of a debate to address a house of commons chamber that is almost empty and then being given two minutes to make a ten minute speech. mr speaker, if you like what you hear over the next few minutes... i would like to think you will call me early in debates. unlike your much loved predecessor. for the moment, mr speaker, unlike your much loved predecessor. forthe moment, mr speaker, i unlike your much loved predecessor. forthe moment, mr speaker, lam going to relish at this amazing opportunity to talk. to talk to all of these people. it is an incredible
2:51 pm
privilege to be seconding the gracious speech but it is an incredible privilege to follow on from a dear and good friend of the honourable member for chatham. ifi remember correctly, she won her seat in 2010 from a labour member. if my maths is right, we've got 50 new conservative mps in this chamber that have won this seat from labour members as well. from right across the country, from ynys mon... you had to ruin the flow, didn't you! you are meant to me nice. you were meant to be nice to me, i meant. back to it, from ynys mon, to ipswich, tech kensington, to blyth valley. anybody has got a political bone and thereby they should take a
2:52 pm
minute to remember how they felt when that blyth valley result came in. mrspeaker, i when that blyth valley result came in. mr speaker, i won when that blyth valley result came in. mr speaker, iwon my when that blyth valley result came in. mr speaker, i won my own seat in 2017. it was 19 76 when the conservatives last won that seat and they only managed to win it at that time because john stonehouse, the labourmp, faked his time because john stonehouse, the labour mp, faked his own death. while on a business trip to miami he left a pile of clothes on the beat, pretending he had gone for a swim, never to be seen again supposedly. he was a damn fine swimmer! five weeks later he turned up 10,000 miles away in melbourne, australia. he was arrested and he tried to apply to a couple of countries for asylu m apply to a couple of countries for asylum but that didn't happen. he was deported back to the uk and
2:53 pm
incredibly, while out on bail, he continued to serve as a labour mp. i'm not sure but i don't think the right honourable member for with them, the home secretary, would allow such leniency these days. i did find it amusing when i reckon a line on wikipedia that said, the labour party were unhappy with the situation but chose not to expel him. that seems like a familiar theme. anyway, for those of us who are 2017 mps, this has felt like a precarious endings, like we are never five weeks away from a general election. i was getting a bit concerned because my predecessors who is now baron hodgson, he managed to serve 910 days as the mp for
2:54 pm
walsall north. when parliament was dissolved on the 5th of november, i had served 881 days. i know, thank you for playing up part! i knew i had to win that election, i had to beat the baron. anyway, the good omen for me and for this incredible conservative victory should have been apparent to me on the 27th of april this year because we just a few days to go into the local elections i was visited by a man who was, at that time, a humble backbencher, the right honourable memberfor backbencher, the right honourable member for uxbridge and south ruislip. he wasn't the prime minister then. the blonde bombshell was unleashed on the unsuspecting people of bloxwich and the result was truly magnificent to behold. everybody who asked for a selfie was
2:55 pm
greeted with a beaming smile and an occasional tussle of those famous blonde locks. when i tour reached its inevitable destination, the future prime minister obviously pulled a pint of such as gold. i know what you are thinking, you are thinking, so what? what was the consequence of this great visit? the consequence of this great visit? the consequence was for me, in those local elections we won two more council wards against the national trend and for the first time ever the conservatives took control, first time in 25 years, of walsall council as now, i shouldn't have beena council as now, i shouldn't have been a surprise because over the past three years we have had a blue—collar revolution. the working people, the working class of britain have sent two shock results to
2:56 pm
westminster. and who will lead both of those campaigns? one man who completely understands that actually what the public want is a government that will stay out of their way but will ensure they have safe streets, good standard of education for their children and a great national health service when they need it. we now have a government under prime minister that understands that and will deliver. people enters their vote in the selection, we cannot let them down, we must not let them down, we will not let them down. mr speaker, i think you know the answer to this question, what is the first priority for this country? you are supposed to say, you get breaks it down. indeed, mr speaker, supposed to say, you get breaks it down. indeed, mrspeaker, in supposed to say, you get breaks it down. indeed, mr speaker, in an interview immediately after the election result, i think i heard the right honourable member, the shadow
2:57 pm
chancellor, said he understood the public wanted to get breaks it down but the labour hadn't been listening. —— brexit dun. 74% of people who voted in that referendum voted to leave. that was the interesting thing for me during the general election. when i was telephone canvassing and spoke to lifelong lib dem voters who had voted to remain in the referendum but were now voting conservative because they said they were real democrats. they knew how important it was for this country to deliver on the results of that referendum. mr speaker, walsall north is like many of the constituencies we have just won. it is among the most deprived constituencies in the country. now we have a prime
2:58 pm
minister who completely understands that although ability is equally distributed across the country, opportunity is not. that is why we are going to transform further education system by investing in a huge new rebuild programme worth {1.8 billion. but investment in infrastructure is also incredibly important, there are towns like my where the manufacturing base has been decreased over recent years. i was delighted to work with the mayor of the west midlands to secure the money for a new train station because that train station will be a lifeline for that town, to allow the people of will nel to travel to birmingham or wolverhampton more easily forjob birmingham or wolverhampton more easily for job opportunities birmingham or wolverhampton more easily forjob opportunities for education opportunities. it will allow people to travel in to willem nel. if we can continue to remediate
2:59 pm
those old industrial sites, we automatically free up new opportunities and i'm imagining a time where we have a robotic factory making goods that will otherwise be brought over from the other side of the world, therefore also reducing our carbon footprint. mr speaker, i know what you are thinking, you are thinking... sit down! that is not what you were speaking, mr speaker. you were thinking, what about the nhs? is it safe in this conservative government's pounds? let me tell you, it is in walsall north because i get money for a new casual to make departments which will increase capacity as well as improving conditions for staff and patients alike. what about the rest of the country? i don't know where to
3:00 pm
begin. 50,000 extra nurses. 50 million extra gp practice appointments per year and 40 new hospitals. what about the future of our great nation? i'm delighted to read that this conservative government by the end of this parliament will be investing a stonking {3.2 billion a year in research and development. although i completely agree with the member for harborough who says we can't continue to have half of that money spent injust continue to have half of that money spent in just three continue to have half of that money spent injust three cities, london, oxford and cambridge. from my personal point of view is certainly looks like the country? future, the future of the whole united kingdom is incredibly bright with this conservative government.
3:01 pm
so as we look to 2020 with a new—found spirit of optimism and ambition, it is my privilege on behalf of the great people of the black country to commend this gracious speech to the house. the question is that the humble address be presented to her majesty as follows. lord gracious sovereign, where your registry? most dutiful and loyal subjects in parliament assembled beg leave to offer our humble thanks to your majesty for the gracious speech which your majesty has address to both houses of parliament. i now call the right honourable jeremy corbyn. thank you, mr speaker. it is the tradition at the beginning of each session of parliament to commemorate former members of the house who have died and it has only been two months
3:02 pm
since the last eight opening but in that time sadly we have lost our great friend frank dobson, former mp for holborn and st pancras. frank was a very committed health secretary from 19 97—99 he began the rebuilding of our nhs. he was always an incredibly friendly face, always full of anecdotes and jokes that i can‘t repeat here and he will be greatly mist by all of us on this side of the house and i suspect many others who knew him as a thoroughly decent member of parliament who was very committed to his constituents and to the cause of good housing across the country. we have also lost david lambie, the magnificent age of 94. dover was the labour mp from 1970 to 1992 and i knew him very well as a very committed peace
3:03 pm
campaigner. on tuesday the prime minister and i both remembered saskia jones and jack merritt. the wonderful young friends who died in the appalling terror attack in the fishmonger ‘s hall and it is right that again we pay tribute to them today for the way in which they lost their lives in the message they left behind. i would like to take this opportunity to welcome all new members to the house on both sides of the house because being a member of the house because being a member of parliament is a massive achievement. it is a massive honour andi achievement. it is a massive honour and i would have thought in witnessing our opening proceedings today, many will think, what on earth have i have taken on? the pantomime season has come early this year. look behind you! if i may continue, mr speaker. and i would also like to pay tribute to those members who lost their seats in the general election because to serve in
3:04 pm
parliament and fight an election and then not be returned is an amazingly traumatic experience when they have put such huge amount of work into the campaign and the work they have done and the trauma they must all feel is something that i think eve ryo ne feel is something that i think everyone in this house should just think on for a moment, on the human side of what it is like to go through that experience. i thank them all. i will not mention all the names but one i want to draw particular... if i could just commemorate and thank the amazing work and presence that dennis skinner has been in this parliament through all the years he was an mp. and i would like to congratulate the proposer of the loyal address, the memberfor chatham proposer of the loyal address, the member for chatham and elmsford showed passion and integrity and thatis showed passion and integrity and that is what she became known for since her very principled resignation from the government over its failure to restrict fixed odds betting is terminals. and i thank herfor betting is terminals. and i thank her for that but betting is terminals. and i thank herfor that but i‘m betting is terminals. and i thank her for that but i‘m afraid that is
3:05 pm
where we part ways. for if anything can drive a wedge between two people even more than a brexit vote in this place it is the north london rivalry between spurs and arsenal. these things may seem trivial but some is the great bill shankly once said, put it this way, some people say football is matter a of life and death. i am very disappointed in that attitude. it is much more important than that. to put it another way, it will help the member, arsenal won 13 league titles, tottenham too. but we take our victory is where we can find them. —— tottenham two. but i do wa nt them. —— tottenham two. but i do want also to compliment her particularly on the last part of her speech dealing with the national wild and the environment, it was incredibly important and well put. cani incredibly important and well put. can i also congratulate today‘s
3:06 pm
second of the loyal address, the memberfor walsall north second of the loyal address, the member for walsall north and the spirit in which he gave that speech. i got the sense of also recently at the college recently. members opposite are renowned for their membership of various clubs, the reformed club and so on, but i was absolutely overjoyed in researching the member to find that he is a member of one of the greatest and most prestigious clubs of them all, the honourable gentleman is a trustee of the walsall wood allotment charity. which is a fantastic honour. i‘m sure everyone will agree. you will understand more than most the ecstatic pleasure that we allotment holders also the prozac gets from our allotments and the produce we get from them so i hope this will provide an opportunity for
3:07 pm
a genuine bipartisan working relationship over the onions and carrots. it is just two months ago that the prime minister made the queen come here as part of a pre—election stunt. since then he has made many promises to many different parts of the country, he has promised to address problems that are result of his own party‘s actions in government and the political choice to impose austerity cuts on this country. there can no longer be any doubt that austerity has caused unnecessary suffering to millions of people all across this country. the communities to whom the prime minister made his promise will nowjudge him on whether he keeps them. in this queen‘s speech the government has tried to mimic some of the priority and interestingly much of the language of labour policies, but without the substance. on austerity, on investment, or in regional inequality, the national
3:08 pm
herd this —— the national health service. they say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, even if it isa sincerest form of flattery, even if it is a pale imitation but i fear those who were swayed by the prime minister‘s promises will be sorely disappointed. as this speech shows, what the government is actually proposing is woefully inadequate for the scale of the problem is that this country faces. our nhs, the country‘s most precious institution, is on its knees due to this tory government. the government now talks about enshrining funding settlement in law. enough of the gimmicks, just funded properly. i don‘t remember the last labour government having to pass a law to force itself to invest in the nhs. yet an increased nhs funding bya in the nhs. yet an increased nhs funding by a rate of 6% per year. this government is proposing little
3:09 pm
more than half that, unless in fact than the historical average. the gap between the government? rhetoric on the nhs and the reality is enormous. last week for the first time ever, every single major accident and emergency unit in england failed to hit its four our waiting time target. every major unit failed to meet the target. every single one under this government. the number of people in england waiting for operations is the highest since records began, 4.4 million and the number of unfilled staff vacancies has ballooned. the prime minister‘s promise of 50,000 extra nurses was quickly revealed as a sham, 19,000 of them already work for the nhs. and his promise of 14 new hospitals turned out to be a reconfiguration of just turned out to be a reconfiguration ofjust six. mr turned out to be a reconfiguration of just six. mr speaker,
3:10 pm
turned out to be a reconfiguration ofjust six. mr speaker, the public will remember this. they will not look kindly on promises that are not kept. this government says it will ta ke kept. this government says it will take action on hospital car parking fees following our lead, but where we propose to abolish them, only a p pa re ntly we propose to abolish them, only apparently some people will be entitled to free parking under their plans. it was the disastrous health and social care act brought in by the conservatives and the liberal democrats when they were in coalition which flung open the door to privatisation which is the cause of so many problems in our nhs. yet the queen‘s speech says nothing whatsoever about the health and social care act and the privatisation that it has brought. not so long ago, the prime minister stood on the steps of downing street and announced he had a plan to solve the social care crisis so where is it? it wasn‘t in his party‘s ma nifesto it? it wasn‘t in his party‘s manifesto and all we have today are
3:11 pm
empty words about bringing forward proposals. perhaps we shouldn‘t be surprised. all we had in the last green‘s speech were empty words about bringing forward proposals and in the queen‘s speech before that, what did we get from the conservatives? empty words about bringing forward proposals. at least they have continuity. cuts to adult social care are expected to reach almost 8 billion by the end of 2019-20. but the almost 8 billion by the end of 2019—20. but the government is only putting 1 billion back in. it is like taking £8 from someone and expecting them to be grateful when you give them back £1. so when it comes to young people, mr speaker, the government seems to have given up the government seems to have given up altogether. this is yet another queen‘s speech that is miserably wea k queen‘s speech that is miserably weak on education, nothing for early yea rs, weak on education, nothing for early years, nothing for colleges, nothing
3:12 pm
for universities. the government clearly has not heard the anxious cry clearly has not heard the anxious cry of parents and teachers about school funding overcrowded and unqualified teachers. the funding promised to schools will still leave them hundreds of millions of pounds worse off in real terms than they we re worse off in real terms than they were in 2010. mr speaker, when it comes to brexit, the election result demonstrated a strong determination from many people across our country to end the mess and paralysis of the last three years. we understand that people are desperate to move on. that does not mean... that does not mean we willjust accept the prime minister‘s reckless approach on how it is done. he is now deliberately resurrected the threat of no deal at the end of next year which would decimate industry and destroy
3:13 pm
people‘s jobs. that threat is now written into the withdrawal agreement bill. the prime minister has shown time and time again his priority is a toxic deal with donald trump that will sell out our nhs... risk the safety of our food, our environmental protections and workplace rights. we do not want our nhs given over to us corporations. and we don‘t want expensive medicines with extended patents. and we don‘t want food like chlorinated chicken on our dinner tables either. we know that the prime minister‘s deal won‘t put brexit to bed, it will just be deal won‘t put brexit to bed, it willjust be the beginning of years of more drawn out negotiations. mr speaker, it has been reported that the government wants to scrap the department for international development, a proud achievement of
3:14 pm
labour in government. for the prime minister confirm that this government will not close it and will he ensure that no .7% of the uk spending continues to be used to help and global poverty and destitution. i note the commitment to develop a sanctions regime to directly address human rights abuses, that sounds like good news for saudi arabia showed the saudi regime be worried? although the government continue to ignore their human rights abuses and their war crimes in the yemen that have resulted in a famine and humanitarian disaster. according to the unhcr, the refugee commission, there are almost 71 million forcibly displaced people around the world. where is the government‘s commitment to do anything for those desperate people fleeing war, violence and famine? around the world britain
3:15 pm
should stand up for human rights and democratic rights. including the right of workers facing exploitation and abuse. it is very worrying that here at home the conservative government is planning an assault on workers‘ rights to withdraw their labour beginning with the transport workers. no worker, mr speaker, goes on strike likely that we will oppose any attempt to curtail that rights. we have already seen some of the most draconian anti—worker laws and now the government seeks to take us even further back in time again in breach of the conventions of the international labour organisation. international labour organisation. ina international labour organisation. in a country where pay is too low, work to insecure and bad employers to common, attacking the right of the working people to stand up for themselves is a completely
3:16 pm
wrong—headed approach. and on the subject of transport, with planned transport investment in the north less tha n transport investment in the north less than half that in london, what assurances can be prime minister give that the commitments on investment in the queen‘s speech are not just another failed gimmick like the northern powerhouse was. we should take it as a form of flattery that an investment, the words of the queen ‘s speech echo what labour have argued, that investment is desperately needed in every part of our country but the scale of investment planned by the government falls woefully short of what is required. speaking of falling woefully short, this queen‘s speech contains nothing of substance to deal with the colossal challenge of climate and environmental emergency. net zero carbon emissions by 2050,
3:17 pm
which is the government‘s target, is too late and in any case, at the current rate of progress, we won‘t reach net zero until 2099. any target date will be fanciful if action doesn‘t start now. what are the prime minister‘s plans on climate for this year and for each year after that? it is clear that clu b 25 year after that? it is clear that club 25 this year was a failure. next year britain has the honour of hosting and it will be embarrassing to host such a vital conference if we are not doing enough to reduce our own carbon emissions and show we have made some real progress towards bringing forward the target date. the government needs to get serious and put young people‘s futures before those of the big polluters, many of whom fund the party opposite. mr speaker, this
3:18 pm
christmas, thousands of people will be sleeping rough on the streets thanks to this government and its housing policy. rough sleeping has doubled under the watch of the conservative party in government. everyone who sees people huddled in doorways in the cold, in the fifth richest country on earth knows it is morally wrong. shelter says that 280,000 people will be homeless on christmas day in england alone, either rough sleeping or living in temporary housing or hostels. can the minister explain why there is no mention of homelessness in the queen‘s speech and why there is so little to address the housing crisis? could it be that he doesn‘t wa nt to crisis? could it be that he doesn‘t want to upset the billionaire landlords to his party? the prime minister has used labour‘s idea of offering discounted homes to first—time buyers will stop it is
3:19 pm
0k, it is first—time buyers will stop it is ok, it is more flattery but lets see the substance of it. what reassurance can he provide that this will not go the same way as the failed starter homes programme? remember when we were promised 200,000 starter homes in 2015 but as yet we have seen absolutely zero. the fire at grenfell tower exposed a housing system that is fundamentally broken. yet two years later, two yea rs broken. yet two years later, two years later, 319 of the 446 buildings covered in aluminium composite cladding have not had it removed. imagine living in one of those buildings and feeling at risk, probably not something many members of this house go through but an experience that thousands of people go through every day, living with the fear of a burning inferno which is their home. for the prime minister now set a hard deadline for all landlords to replace dangerous
3:20 pm
cladding and will he fund the installation of sprinkler is in high rise social housing blocks and reverse budget cuts to the fire service? mr speaker, we will look at the findings of the government‘s royal commission on the criminal justice process but i simply say this, any changes it in sentencing must be done in consultation with anti—terror experts and not as a knee jerk reaction to make political capital. this queen‘s speech is notable for what is not in it. it does nothing for students who have been lumbered with huge debts, does nothing for older people unable to pay their heating bills this winter, does nothing to address the levels of poverty in our country and this year the united nations, yes the united nations itself had to take our government to task over the shocking fact that 14 million people are living in poverty in this, the fifth richest country in the world.
3:21 pm
shouldn‘t that be a source of shame to this government? shouldn‘t there queen‘s speech contain something to address this? why is there not even address this? why is there not even a mention of universal credit, the cool policy that has ruined so many lives? why is there no commitment to immediately raise the minimum wage to £10 an hour so that people can no longer had to work their fingers to the bone and still remain in poverty? these things are not in the queen‘s speech because this government, that conservative party, does not stand for the people at the receiving end of their policies. despite all their promises, that is exactly what this queen‘s speech shows. the central aim of my party, the labour party, is to stand up for working people, for every pa!’t the labour party, is to stand up for working people, for every part of this country, for the many, not the few, to deliver socialjustice, prosperity and a society that works for all. as this government ploughs
3:22 pm
ahead with its programme of gimmicks and false promises, we will be holding them to account every step of the way and campaigning inside and outside parliament and across this country for the real change that this government certainly will not deliver but that our country so desperately needs. i now call the prime minister. thank you, mr speaker. this is the moment to repay the trust of those who sent us here. by delivering on the people‘s priorities with the most radical queen‘s speech for a generation and if there was one resounding lesson of this election campaign, one message i had in every corner of these islands, it is not just that the british people want
3:23 pm
their government to get brexit done, though they do, they want to move politics on and move the country on. building hospitals, renewing our schools, modernising our infrastructure, making our streets safer, our environment cleaner, our union stronger. and this queen‘s speech of this people‘s government sets in motion a vast interlocking programme to your night and level up across the whole united kingdom and unleash the potential of all our people. this one nation government will enshrine in law record funding for our nhs, take back control of our borders with a wholly new immigration system, tough in our criminal justice system immigration system, tough in our criminaljustice system with longer sentences for the most dangerous offenders, double investment in basic science research and protect our environment with a bill so ambitious and so fast that there is
3:24 pm
no environmentally friendly way of printing it off. and this is not a programme for one year or one parliament, it is a blueprint for the future of britain. just imagine where this country could be in ten yea rs where this country could be in ten years time, trade deals across the world, creating jobs across the uk. 40 new hospitals, great schools and the biggest transformation of our infrastructure since the victorian age. british scientists using a new gene therapies to cure the incurable and leading the dawn of a new age of electric vehicles, notjust cars but planes, pioneering solutions to the challenge of climate change and i do not think, i do not think it implausible to say that a new golden age for this united kingdom is now in reach and in spite of the
3:25 pm
negativity, in spite of the scepticism that you will hear from the other side, we will work flat out to deliver it! mr speaker, her majesty‘s gracious speech was expertly proposed by a beacon of our one nation conservatism. my honourable friend the member for chatham and elford who is not only a football coach of great distinction, who has done much to champion the female game which will be a key part of this country‘s bid for the 2030 world cup, but she is so personally skilled at the game with what has been described by her adversaries as a take no prisoners style, that according to the daily telegraph and if you can‘t believe the daily telegraph, what can you believe? she was once barred from playing against
3:26 pm
men to protect their egos and even use this dispatch box for an impromptu game of kick up. my honourable friend has also done a pioneering work on tackling loneliness, improving dementia care and curbing the harms as we have hurt inflicted by gambling and alcohol and is so dedicated to her job she has brought her son freddie into the lobby, so reducing the voting age to six months and chatham‘s great parliamentary sketch writer will confirm that her speech was in the very finest traditions of this house. she was followed with great style by my honourable friend the memberfor walsall great style by my honourable friend the member for walsall north. great style by my honourable friend the memberfor walsall north. when he addressed this house for the first time in 2017, he said, the
3:27 pm
good people of warsaw north have had to wait 41 years to hear a maiden speech from their mp. you can imagine how disappointed they will be. he was being characteristically modest but i cannot help noticing how the good people of warsaw north have taken drastic steps to avoid another maiden speech. they not only re—elected him but they improved his majority just to re—elected him but they improved his majorityjust to be sure. as the honourable member is pointed out, you wait years for a queen ‘s speech and then along come to in short order, something my honourable friend will appreciate as one of the growing number of bus driver children on conservative benches. he was elected as a blue—collar conservative. from a traditionally
3:28 pm
labour seat. a path that many have just followed and since then, as he pointed out, he has secured funding for a new a&e department at his local hospital, a new railway station. i know he comes from a labourfamily. station. i know he comes from a labour family. i think station. i know he comes from a labourfamily. i think his brother isa labourfamily. i think his brother is a labour councillor and when he first declared himself a conservative, he felt like the black sheep of the family. all i can say isi sheep of the family. all i can say is i bet if they‘re watching today, they will feel nothing but pride. let me also welcome to his place the right honourable gentleman that the leader of the opposition, a stickler as we all know for watching the queen‘s speech at the right time. though i don‘t know what he has against coronation chicken, mr speaker. as our exchanges across these dispatch boxes come towards a
3:29 pm
close, alas, let me say that our personal relations have always been excellent and as for all our disagreements, i have never doubted that the right honourable gentleman‘s beliefs are deeply held. and his sincerity is to be admired. certain members of his shadow cabinet on the other hand are absolutely clear where the responsibility of the election result lights. the voters of the country have let his side down. they have forfeited the confidence of the opposition and the time has come for labour to take the only possible step, dissolve the electorate and replace it with a new one. at least i think that is what the lady for easington and finsbury said. for my own part, i feel a easington and finsbury said. for my own part, ifeel a colossal sense of obligation to the electorate that i
3:30 pm
am humbly serving. and to those people that lent us their votes however hesita ntly. this people that lent us their votes however hesitantly. this government will now engage flat—out on a programme of change for the better. tomorrow is the day when we finally peel back the plastic wrapping of that which you have had so much and present our other than ready deal and it will go into the microwave as the withdrawal agreement, it works in both devices this deal. taking back control of our money, our borders, our laws, ourtrade. clearing the way for an overarching programme of national renewal and above all, it is time to invest in that institution that gives the country its cohesion and even our national spirit. the simple and beautiful idea that whoever you are, the nhs is there for you when you fall sick. and as our nhs cares for us, so we will care for it,
3:31 pm
delivering the biggest cash boost in a generation and guarantees a new funding settlement in law and what will that pay for? the biggest hospital building programme in living memory with 14 new hospitals, 50,000 more nurses and their bursaries, 6000 more gps, 15 million more appointments and we will introduce an nhs visa to fast track talented staff from overseas. we will scrap those iniquitous hospital parking charges for all staff and vulnerable people and we will guarantee dignity and fairness for eve ryo ne guarantee dignity and fairness for everyone in their later years with a long—term and sustainable solution to social care and indeed our invite cross— party to social care and indeed our invite cross—party work on that solution in the spirit of cooperation that i think is supported by many members on both sides of this house. while many of these measures were foreshadowed in the last queen
3:32 pm
speech, fortified by our new mandate, we will go even further. we will give millions of tenants greater rights over their rented homes, abolishing no fault of actions, we will help millions of commuters whose lives are made miserable by strike action by imposing minimum service agreements. iam happy imposing minimum service agreements. i am happy to give away. if he is opposed to helping struggling commuters, i am delighted to hear from him. the people of scotland protected scottish government. if you really believe in people, the people of scotland should have their say ina people of scotland should have their say in a referendum. mr speaker, i think it was nicola sturgeon who self herself —— who said the referendum in 2014 was a once in a generation referendum. i feel the
3:33 pm
scottish nationalist party should concentrate more on delivering on the domestic priorities for the people of scotland and rather less on breaking up our united kingdom. we will abolish them i believe if i gave way to the honourable gentleman i would be forced to repeat the point i made. we will abolish the threat of no fault evictions, we will take forward our plans to rejuvenate and in some cases come in many cases to revolutionise the infrastructure of britain. including northern powerhouse rail, we will remedy the scandal that leeds is the biggest city in western europe without a light railway. we are investing nearly £30 billion in our road network including upgrading the
3:34 pm
a66 to the first continuous dual carriageway across the pennines since the 19705. above all, there is one nation government will strengthen our uber united kingdom of england, scotland, wales and northern ireland. the most successful union in history. a sacred inheritance that this parliament will never allow anyone to rip out or rent asunder. we will stand by one of the greatest international symbols of british courage international symbols of british courage and daring our armed forces. the men and women who sacrifice so much to safeguard their way of life, we will protect our protectors from unfair legal claims which undermine their morale and confidence. we will spend the effort in addressing the concerns of millions about the state of ourcriminal concerns of millions about the state of our criminaljustice system with the first royal commission for almost 30 years. action now to
3:35 pm
impose tougher sentences on the most serious offenders. if the owner believe the opposite actually wants to contest the need for tougher sentences for serious offenders i am happy to hear her view. i'd like to ask him in the queen's speech is mentioned a sentencing bill, with this include provision for increasing sentencing for death by dangerous driving to life imprisonment, if it won't, is the government is open to accepting an amendment? the honourable lady makes amendment? the honourable lady makes a valid point and i‘ve know that she reflect the concerns of her constituents and i will certainly be looking at what we can do to make sure the people who are guilty of dangerous driving to receive the penalties that they deserve. i know the home secretary will listen very carefully to what she has said. we will end the dangerous practice of early release of terrorists our reforms will only stand the test of time if our system of government
3:36 pm
here in westminster meets the challenge of a new era. the steady erosion of faith and politics has poisoned our public life and so we will establish a constitution democracy and rights commission to recommend proposes to restore trust in our institutions and our democracy. as a first step, we will repeal the fixed—term parliaments act. so that never, never again can we have the ludicrous spectacle of an opposition party trying to divide the whale of a majority of the house and run away from a general election. we will do everything in our powers to restore devolved government instalments in northern ireland is once again ruled by its own elected representatives. when it comes to standing by our friends
3:37 pm
at...i comes to standing by our friends at... i thank the prime minister for giving way and we all look forward toa giving way and we all look forward to a devolved government is being re—established in northern ireland fairly and equitably for all. other primaries to make good on its commitments for a golden age of all of the united kingdom by ensuring he makes good on the promises made for the first building in northern ireland and for infrastructure in northern ireland so we enjoy the golden age of infrastructure, and built the boris bridge not a boris boss. i am gratefulto built the boris bridge not a boris boss. i am grateful to the honourable gentleman and he can certainly be a shoe at my commitment to ensuring the beautiful forces continue to be built in ballymena andi continue to be built in ballymena and i will do everything we can to make sure that continues to be the case. as for his desire for a bridge to connect the two biggest aisles in the british isles, all i can say is, it is an interesting idea. i advised
3:38 pm
him to watch this space and indeed watch this space and watch that space between between those islands. what he has said, it hasn‘t fallen on deaf ears, mr speaker. when it comes to standing by our friends within in northern ireland or elsewhere one innovation that this queen‘s speech introduces is we will stop public bodies from taking upon themselves to boycott goods from other countries to develop their own pseudo— foreign policy against counties with nauseating frequency turns out to be israel. the scale of our programme is turns out to be israel. the scale of our programme is matched only by the sense of responsibility falls upon us now, upon all of us now who have
3:39 pm
been elected and i congratulate all new members, but a huge responsibility falls on us now to redeem and retain and trust the british people. i say to the people of this country, we owe you. we know it. we will deliver. we have the energy, the ideas, the mandate, the people and we will spare no effort to fulfil that mandate. as we engage full tilt in this mission of change iam full tilt in this mission of change i am filled with the invincible confidence in the ability of this nation, our united kingdom, i united kingdom of great britain and northern ireland to renew itself in this generation as we have done so many times in the past. after the dither and delay, after the deadlock and paralysis in the platitudes, the time has come for change and the time has come for change and the time has come for change and the time has come for action. it is action the british people will get from this most graces speech and i
3:40 pm
commend it to the house. thank you, mr speaker. we will try again. ian blackford. thank you, mr speaker. there is nothing in that address from the prime minister for the people of scotland. and for people who were listening back home, it was led by the announcement this is not for viewers and listeners in scotland. mr speaker, let me congratulate the memberfor mr speaker, let me congratulate the member for chatham and aylesford and fat walsall north for their
3:41 pm
addresses this afternoon. when i was listening to the stories about christmas carol, we didn't hear from a memberfrom christmas carol, we didn't hear from a member from the conservative who would be scrooge. i know the member for wa lsa ll would be scrooge. i know the member for walsall north is a great foot ball for walsall north is a great football fan, i thought he would mention aston villa, they are not having such a great time. mr speaker, this morning, scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon has written to the prime minister to demand a transfer of legal powers to the scottish government to hold a second independence referendum. under section 30 of the scotland act. mr speaker, is the first minister outlined, there has been a material change of circumstances since the independence referendum of
3:42 pm
2014. based on the prospect of scotland leaving the european union against its will. it is for the prime minister to explain to the people of scotland why he is denying scotland the right to choose our own future. why did democracy stop on the prime minister's world for the independence referendum in 2014? can i say to the prime minister, it is not a good look to see him playing with his phone rather than listening to the legitimate demands of the scottish national party. of course, the prime minister says something more interesting. this is about democracy, this is about the scottish national party that stood in the election when a manifesto about scotland has migrate to choose and it was about the conservatives that said, no, to indy ref two. what
3:43 pm
happened? the that said, no, to indy ref two. what happened ? the conservatives that said, no, to indy ref two. what happened? the conservatives lost more than half the members of parliament. prime minister, you got your answer from the people of scotland. the snp got 45% of the vote, a 20% difference to the government. we got 80% of the members of parliament that sat on these benches, some time, some day, these benches, some time, some day, the prime minister is going to have to respect democracy, the prime minister can't and will not continue to say no. the prime minister says looking at its phone is more interesting than hearing what scotland needs. doesn't that tell you everything about this prime ministerand you everything about this prime minister and his view of scotland. indeed, indeed it does. mr speaker,
3:44 pm
you know, that isn't really much that can be added to that because the image of the prime minister playing with his phone, not listening to the scottish national party says it all. mr speaker, the people of scotland did not vote for this prime minister. scotland did not vote for this conservative government. we certainly did not vote for this carbon of the tory plan set out today. —— come on. in december 1967 my old friend proclaimed the march of time can be days between elections so sometimes a government may have a majority in this house but a minority in the country. in scotland, but is the case. here in this place we are facing a tory government we have rejected, implementing a manifesto
3:45 pm
that scotland rejected. mr speaker, scotland has been held back by successive tory governments but we didn't vote for. mr speaker, snp mps have today set out an alternative queen speech to deliver for the people of scotland with the renewed and strengthened mandate i expanded snp team will focus on our priorities on scotland's priorities, on stopping brexit and protecting scotland's is a chat from any grabby trump trade deal. on dealing with the climate emergency once and for all putting to an end tory austerity. the government is's green speech sets out another tory government is the people of scotland rejected despite the fact that scotland voted to remain a member of the eu, we now face being dragged
3:46 pm
out against our will. we often hear about losers concerned but the fact of the matter here is scotland to stay in the european union, to maintain our rights as eu citizens. this conservative government does not have the consent of the people of scotland, does not have the consent of the scottish government to take scotland out of the eu. mr speaker, we ask the solemn light claimed by the people of scotland to determine the form of government is best suited to our needs must be exercised. this claim of right was accepted as a principle in this house on a motion moved by myself in july 2018. mr speaker, it is the scottish people who are sovereign. in this context, it is right for the house to respect our scottish
3:47 pm
parliament and to respect the election result from last week. but of course, in the last parliament of the tories ignored our interests and sidelined the will of the scottish government. intent on bringing forward a deal that will destroy our economy, riskjobs and livelihoods, mr speaker, as the former eu permanent representative to the eu set ivan rogers said, this pledge will create the biggest crisis of brexit to date. get brexit done is diplomatic amateurism the rest that domestically as bulbous and decisiveness. from sending off our nhs to sending out scotland's fishing communities, the prime minister will inflict hardship in our communities and the cost of delivering is damaging brexit. with the people of scotland silenced, their voice is silenced, the 80% of
3:48 pm
their voice is silenced, the 80% of the seats this has not listened to by tory government showing contempt. that is why we stand up for scotland. we stand up against these cruel punishing policies and narrow backward gazing politics and instead, mr speaker, we are determined that scotland has migrate to choose our own future will be delivered. not simply because we in the snp wanted, but because the people of scotland are demanding it. we stood on a monday to give scotland the right to choose its own future and i want to put the prime minister on notice. the snp members on these benches will not ever stop fighting this government for that case, for i will mandated be respected, a mandate for a fresh independence referendum. i see the honourable gentleman to seeking to
3:49 pm
intervene. will he accept democracy? the right scotland has to choose? where he accept democracy, 55% of scottish voters voted for parties who want to remain in the united kingdom. there is no mondays for a second referendum in scotland. they wanted to get on with the job. fix your own backyard first before you come in here demanding... absolute rubbish. what absolute harsh. you cannot get away from the fact that we won the election. we sit here standing up as a voice for scotland and he lost most of his colleagues, they were rejected at the ballot box, they have been reduced to a lab. the fact of the matter is, we have got 80% of
3:50 pm
the seats on our side, the government could only wish it had such a mandate, such a majority in the rest of the uk. no democrat can deny this, we won the election, we demand the right to have our referendum. mr speaker, the scottish government and the scottish parliament has a strong racket for bettering the lives of citizens across scotland. mr speaker, with more powers, with independence, we can and we will do so much more. today, the snp has published our alternative queen's speech. the people of scotland voted to lock borisjohnson out of people of scotland voted to lock boris johnson out of downing street and sk brexit. scotland chose a better future. our plan is to deliver that better future. we want to see a national health service
3:51 pm
protection bill to stop the nhs across the uk being at risk from a us trade deal. this will guarantee trade deals will not undermine the founding principle of the nhs that we cherish so much. we will continue to make the case and work to ensure scotland's voices heard and our nation has the right to choose its future. we were delivering scotland a bill to increase parental leave within additional 12 weeks to be ring fenced for the father in order to encourage take—up and increase statutory maternity and paternity p5y~ statutory maternity and paternity pay. the snp new green deal with built on the transition towards a greener sustainable future and we will continue to press the uk government to match scotland's net zero emissions targets by 2045 and putting oil and gas receipts into a net zero fund focused on measures to
3:52 pm
battle climate change. putting tackling the time —— climate emergency front and centre of our priorities. that is what a responsible government does. unlike the conservatives, our ambition is to end poverty not increase it by a failure to act, a failure to show leadership. poverty is not inevitable come to fight it we will work to end the disgraceful two child cap on tax credits and associated rate clause. we the united kingdom government immediately to end the benefits rise and halt the roll—out of universal credit. mr speaker, we will use every device open to us in this place to make the case we cannot allow our citizens to be dragged into diet hardship and despair by this nasty, careless tory government. we want to bring forward
3:53 pm
an equal living wage bill, living wage increases to at least the level of the real living wage and an end to age discrimination. scottish national party mps reject the wholly immoral replacement of nuclear weapons at a cost of over £200 billion. we call on other parties to follow us to say no to trident, to re move follow us to say no to trident, to remove these weapons of mass destruction from the clyde. mr speaker, we want to help our pensioners by ensuring the bbc licence fee remains free for those aged over 75. just like we have done in previous parliaments, we will not abandon those women born in the 1950s. abandon those women born in the 19505. by exposing and demanding this government delivers justice for the 3.8 billion women born in the
3:54 pm
1950s foster denied their pension by this conservative uk government. —— 3.8 million. we will be pressing for an nhs funding boost from the uk government not much is the current scottish level and for constitutional change and abolishing the house of lords. spending the franchise to include 16 and 17—year—olds. —— expending. this expanded snp group is determined and we are ready for the challenge. this government thinks it can do what it wants to scotland and get away with it, it will not happen our watch. the tories are risking our economy and reducing opportunities for citizens. the choice is clear. a noted —looking country with a vision of tolerance, inclusiveness and prosperity for all, in contrast to this offering of a union run by a tory party who don't care about
3:55 pm
scotland. the tory programme for government that will push child poverty to a 60 year high and devastate our economy, the hardest of tory brexit that risks up to 100,000 jobs being lost in scotland. the tory manifesto means in 2023—24, day—to—day spending on services outside health will still be almost 1596 outside health will still be almost 15% lower in real terms than it was at the start of the 20105. austerity has had the community is hard and it's not going away, it is more of the same from the tories. despite the same from the tories. despite the climate emergency, there is nothing in this queen's speech to make real progress on reducing emissions. the uk government has already failed to match the scottish government's net zero emission target of 2045. mr speaker, that is just the start of it. yes, the
3:56 pm
conservatives can say england and wales had its say that what about scotland? wales had its say that what about scotland ? we wales had its say that what about scotland? we had our say and scotland? we had our say and scotland rejected this prime minister, scotland rejected the tories. for those of us who represent the people and the will of scotland, we will use every avenue open to protecting our people against this government and its shoddy plan for government. mr speaker, before a close, i want to appeal to members across the house. in the last parliament, members conducted themselves in less than a cce pta ble conducted themselves in less than acce pta ble ways conducted themselves in less than acceptable ways on occasions. people across these islands have recognised it. they are fed up with it. let's start at this parliament with respect and let the strength of our argument when the case rather than dragging this place into the gutter. finally, mr speaker, in setting out the snp's clear opposition to the
3:57 pm
governments's queen's speech, and offering our alternative, i have set out to the people of scotland a tale of two governments, two parties, to futures. i started with the words of you and i will close it with the words of another parliamentarian. let me remind the house of the words of charles stewart parnell. no man has the right to fix the boundary to a match of a nation, no man has the right to say to his country, thus five shell vial to go and no further. now scotland must have the chance to choose its own future, one shackled to the brexit destruction imposed by westminster one with hope, with opportunity and ambition? an independent scotland in the european union. former prime minister, theresa may.
3:58 pm
thank you, mr speaker. may i take this opportunity of congratulating you on your election as speaker. i know that he will reside in that chairand know that he will reside in that chair and uphold the best traditions of speaker of the house of commons. i also want to thank you for the work that you have done and i know he will continue to do ensuring a concern for the health and well—being, including the mental health, other members this house. we are going to pull away from the house. our chief political correspondent vicki young is inside the houses of parliament for us. the new golden age, according to borisjohnson. yes, after winning that majority. that has changed everything in the house of commons, the atmosphere com pletely house of commons, the atmosphere completely different to what it was before the election. all those arguments about brexit, the knife edge votes, those days seem to have gone. borisjohnson edge votes, those days seem to have gone. boris johnson clearly
3:59 pm
edge votes, those days seem to have gone. borisjohnson clearly not looking at is the next five years but the next ten years. what he is saying is he has not taken for granted the people who voted for the tardis, he granted the people who voted for the ta rdis, he understands granted the people who voted for the tardis, he understands the length of their vote to him and he will, he says, live up to that. jeremy corbyn says, live up to that. jeremy corbyn says the prime minister will be judged on what he delivers, not on what he says and not surprisingly some very, very glum faces on the labour side, really being hit by that big defeat. jeremy corbyn, for the first time, talking about the trauma for those who have lost their seats although he‘s come under a lot of criticism for not contacting the dozens of criticism for not contacting the d oze ns of of criticism for not contacting the dozens of labour mps that haven‘t been returned to this place. there was a tribute of sorts from boris johnson tojeremy corbyn, praising his sincerity, but it didn‘t last long. there were some very difficult scenes here earlier. they were seen walking towards the house of lords together, no chats between them. i
4:00 pm
have stood here for many of the state opening of parliament are normally the two leaders managed to have a bit of a discussion, there was none of that today. boris johnson saying, we have always got on, our relations have been cordial and boris johnson aboutjeremy corbyn, his beliefs are deeply held, his sincerity is to be commended but he did later enter the rest of the shadow cabinet. it is very, very difficult for the shadow cabinet to have a thing to set there, to listen to be marked in some of those earlier speeches and watching the conservatives, knowing they have this majority now to deliver up to a point what they want including the main thing in the queen‘s speech, that you will agreement a bill that will come before this house tomorrow. they were very keen, the government to show they were getting moving on there so the queen speech debate will continue in january moving on there so the queen speech debate will continue injanuary and
4:01 pm
that deadline, the uk leaving the eu at the end of january. the literal agreements bill has been published and that is in itself pretty interesting because of what is not in it. vicki young, thank you. hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy, live in westminster. today at 4: brexit and the nhs dominate the conservative government‘s agenda — set out in the queen‘s speech. do not think it then implausible i do not think it then glorious or implausible to say that a new golden age for this united kingdom is now in reach. on nhs, the country's most precious institution, it's on its knees thanks to this tory government. the eu withdrawal agreement bill is introduced to the commons, ahead of tomorrow‘s brexit deal debate and vote. there were also promises of safer streets, with the recuitment of more police officers and tougher action on the most
4:02 pm
dangerous criminals. scotland‘s first minister, nicola sturgeon, sets out her plans for another independence referendum, and warns boris johnson not to oppose it. more dismalfigures for the nhs — this time in wales, where hospitals recorded the worst ever performance at accident and emergency units last month. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with katie shanahan. yes, simon. it‘s understood that mikel arteta has said his goodbyes to staff at manchester city, following expectations that he will be revealed as the new man in charge of arsenal tomorrow. talk to you later, katie. and chris is looking at the weather for us. a number of flood warnings in force and with more heavy rain on the way tonight, we could see some further localised surface water flooding. i will have the fall forecast a little later on. thank you, chris. also coming up in the programme...
4:03 pm
australia endures another day of record—breaking temperatures, as a state of emergency is declared in new south wales to try to cope with the raging bushfires. hello everyone — this is afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy, live in westminster. the queen has outlined the government‘s agenda following the conservatives‘ decisive election victory last week. addressing both houses at the state opening of parliament, her majesty said her government would embark on an "ambitious programme of domestic reform that delivers on the people‘s priorities". legislation to take the uk out of the european union on 31st ofjanuary is among more than 30 bills announced. other measures include guarantees on extra health service funding in england, and more cash for schools. there are also proposals for new sentencing laws for serious violent offenders, including terrorists. and the government says it wants to ensure the whole
4:04 pm
of the uk can prosper, with plans for more infrastructure spending. front and centre of the government‘s plans is a pledge to take the uk out of the eu by the end ofjanuary, by bringing the withdrawal agreement back to parliament for approval. my government‘s priority is to deliver the united kingdom‘s departure from the european union on the 31st of january. my ministers will bring forward legislation to ensure the united kingdom‘s exit on that date, and to make the most of the opportunities that this brings to all the people of the united kingdom. thereafter, my ministers will seek a future relationship with the european union, based on a free trade agreement that benefits the whole of the united kingdom. they will also begin trade negotiations with other leading global economies. the integrity and prosperity of the united kingdom is of the utmost importance to my government. my ministers will work urgently
4:05 pm
to facilitate talks to restore devolved government in northern ireland. the prime minister says it‘s time to "repay the voters". this one nation government will enshrine in law record funding for our nhs, take back control of our borders with a wholly new immigration system, toughen our criminal justice system, with longer sentences for the most dangerous offenders. double — double investment in basic science, research, and protect our environment with a bill so ambitious and so vast that there is no environmentally friendly way of printing it off. and, mr speaker, this is not a programme for one year or one parliament — it is a blueprint for the future of britain. just imagine... cheering. just imagine where this country
4:06 pm
could be in ten years‘ time, trade deals across the world, creating jobs across the uk. 40 new hospitals, great schools in every community and the biggest transformation of our infrastructure since the victorian age. british scientists using new gene therapies to cure the incurable, the hiterto incurable, and leading the dawn of a new age of electric vehicles — notjust cars, but planes. pioneering solutions to the challenge of climate change. and i do not think, i do not think it then glorious or implausible to say that a new golden age for this united kingdom is now within reach. and in spite of the scoffing, in spite of the negativity, in spite of the scepticism that you will hear from the other side, we will work that out to deliver it! meanwhile, the labour leader jeremy corbyn lambasted the prime minister‘s promises, describing them as "woefully inadequate for the scale
4:07 pm
of the problems this country faces". enough of the gimmicks, just fund it properly. i don‘t remember the last labour government having to pass a law to force itself to invest in the nhs. yetan law to force itself to invest in the nhs. yet an increased nhs funding by 6% each year. this government is proposing little more than half that, less in fact than the historical average. the gap between the government‘s rhetoric on the nhs and the reality is enormous. last week, for the first time ever, every single major accident and emergency unit in england failed to hit its four our waiting time target. every major unit failed to meet the target. every single one under this government. the number of people in england waiting for an operation is the highest since records began, 4.4 million. and the number of unfilled
4:08 pm
staff vacancies has ballooned. the prime minister‘s promise of 50,000 extra nurses was quickly revealed as a sham. 19,000 of them already work that the nhs and his promise of 40 new hospitals turned out to be a reconfiguration of just new hospitals turned out to be a reconfiguration ofjust six. mr speaker, the public will remember this. they will not look kindly on promises that are not kept. we can speak now to frances o‘grady, tuc general secretary — whojoins me here. it's it‘s christmas, is there any benefit of doubt you could give the prime minister? a christmas miracle... the prime minister said he would work flat out to keep the blue—collar votes that he won but i think there isa votes that he won but i think there is a real likelihood that these promises on workers‘ rights will fall flat. in fact, they are weak, reheated, vague and he has already
4:09 pm
broken one of them, on the national minimum wage, saying any increases conditional on the economy prospering. so, ithink conditional on the economy prospering. so, i think we are already seeing him wriggle. what he could and should be doing is introducing a bold new agenda, to give all working people decent rights from day one. we can have dignified jobs and get rid of some of these zero—hours contracts that are holding all of us back. given that he could be in office for the next four or five years, are you prepared to accept that he has his priorities, brexit obviously is his key one. other issues like the nhs are up there but maybe, maybe some of what you have been calling for before the election could be delivered? well, the prime minister needs to honour promises he has made but already we are seeing those promises crumble, in terms of work
4:10 pm
as‘ rights. promises crumble, in terms of work as' rights. we have onlyjust had the queen‘s speech. as' rights. we have onlyjust had the queen's speech. exactly, he was briefing before the queen‘s speech was given that the national living wage increase we might have to whistle for. the only hard proposition we have seen is yet another attack on the very organisations that help working people stand up for their rights, trade unions. you must be pretty frustrated that the opposition, it is not there at the moment, is it?|j hope we will see an opposition focused on the dayjob as well as inevitably the leadership contest. i think it‘s important that this government is held to account but also that within their own ranks, the conservatives must realise they will not hold onto those votes they say have been loaned to them unless they start delivering the decent working lives that people deserve. how surprised where you buy the level of that conservative victory? i was surprised, i will be honest. it was obviously the closer you got,
4:11 pm
looking like a conservative majority but i was surprised by the scale of it. of course, a lot of those seats, a viewpoint either way could have made a difference, but we have the government that we‘ve got. as the tuc, we always engage with the government of the day but i think we need to see a little more than comedy and good jokes. for working people who don‘t forget, steal their wages are behind where they were in real times than before the financial crash. so, there is a lot of work to do to get wages rising again, to treat working people with respect, get rid of those zero—hours contract and get people day one rights and hopefully treat the organisations that represent them with respect. lot of those jokes were at the expense of an opposition, which some of its own members think have let the country down. does parliament
4:12 pm
blame labour? i think everybody is going to have to take a share of responsibility, from a labour perspective, in terms of what happened in that election and think ha rd happened in that election and think hard about how they regain the trust of working people who shifted their votes towards the conservatives. but i‘ve also got a dayjob to do and that‘s about standing up for working people‘ dignity and rights at work. of course, what we are seeing is potentially very difficult days ahead for the millions of workers on insecure contracts. the people who wa nt to insecure contracts. the people who want to see an increase in their pay packets because they have done without a real increase for so long. and, of course, families who are up against it. people want to be treated fairly. i think we all want to put our shoulders to the wheel but it‘s about time working people got a share of the rewards. good to see you, thank you for coming in.
4:13 pm
our chief political correspondent vicki young is inside the houses of parliament for us. the prime minister saying a new golden age, it is certainly a new era? it is, everything has changed regarding the make—up of the house of commons for after years of stalemate with mp5 constantly being mocked for voting against everything are not in favour of anything. i think that is about to change. a majority of 80 means up to appoint borisjohnson majority of 80 means up to appoint boris johnson can do majority of 80 means up to appoint borisjohnson can do what he wants. that queen‘s speech laying out very clearly what his priorities are. the most immediate one will be the withdrawal agreement bill coming before this house tomorrow for the first stages of that and then that date of january 31, the date when the uk will leave the european union. really, in a sign of how much things have changed, that constant arguing in parliament, as both sides of the debate try to make sure that parliament has a say over what‘s going on over brexit, well, that is going on over brexit, well, that is going to change because in the withdrawal agreement bill which has
4:14 pm
been published, there are certain elements that are missing. one of thoseis elements that are missing. one of those is parliament‘s right to have a say over whether that implementation period can be extended. remember, when we leave at the end of january, extended. remember, when we leave at the end ofjanuary, the plan is to go into an implementation or transition period when nothing much really changes while those discussions go on about a future trade deal, about our future relationship. there was an option in therefore extending that period, so it could go on for longer. that has been removed. so that is one sign i think of how much things are going to change with mp5 here just simply not having their say, the opposition mps, that they did before.|j not having their say, the opposition mps, that they did before. i want to touch on that. just watching it, it‘s difficult to gauge the mood perhaps. what does it feel like to be in that building where things have changed so dramatically?” think everyone is looking at the prospect of a majority government and wondering what it will be like. if you think about it, it‘s been so
4:15 pm
long since the government has had a large working majority. there were the coalition years between the conservatives and the lib dems but there was ongoing tension there, even though it was stable and lasted five years, there were lots of internal arguments, many of which didn‘t stay internal and we got to found out about. it is going to be different, of course, the labour mps looking on the backbenches, looking incredibly gloomy. they have to sit in the chamber of the house of commons, mocked by mps in the chamber of the house of commons, mocked by mp5 on the government side, mocked by the prime minister and they are sitting there wondering what on earth the next five years is going to hold for them. thejeremy corbyn as well, you could see it in his face, incredibly gloomy. he is not going just yet but he can‘t be relishing the idea of carrying out prime minister‘s questions for another three months. vicki young, thank you very much. also included in the queen‘s speech was a plan for an australian—style "points—based immigration system", allowing the uk
4:16 pm
to welcome skilled workers. let‘s get the thoughts of madeleine sumption from migration observatory which provides impartial data on migrants in the uk. thank you for coming in. so, particularly on the nhs, how it will work on the prime minister outlined this, doctors, nurses would effectively have more points, more likely to come in on a cheaper visa. is that a similar system ? cheaper visa. is that a similar system? yes. so what's been called the nhs visa isn‘t really its own visa. it‘s essentiallyjust slightly better, slightly faster processing and better service for doctors and nurses but doctors and nurses can already come into the nhs relatively easy. that‘s not an area where we would see a huge amount of change except eu citizens will have to go through that system is well, so we will have a single system for both eu and non—eu citizens. will have a single system for both eu and non-eu citizens. where would the major change be? the biggest change is ending free movement and
4:17 pm
bringing eu citizens into the same system that we have for non—eu citizens currently. it‘s been back to as an australian point style system. there are elements of that but we still don‘t have all the details are based on what has been an out so far, it looks quite like a uk an out so far, it looks quite like a u k style an out so far, it looks quite like a uk style points based system, something quite similar to what we had for non—eu citizens but also starting to apply to eu citizens who come here. is that something that can be chopped and changed at any point and depending on what the government sees as the priorities of the moment? well, it's not easy to change immigration policy very quickly because employers need to notice, they need to understand who is eligible and to not when planning ahead are making hiring decisions but there are elements of this... for example, things like what kind of salaries people would have to learn what occupations are eligible, how many numbers of agricultural workers that coming. those are the kinds of things that you tend to see twea ked kinds of things that you tend to see tweaked over time as the government evaluate how it‘s going.
4:18 pm
tweaked over time as the government evaluate how it's going. how does it work in legislative terms, what will the law laid down, the framework if you like of the system, how easy is that to bring in? well, actually, interesting foe immigration policy, most policies tend not to be down in primary legislation. there is a broad framework which allows the home office to introduce any policies and then almost all of the really big changes that we see in visa policy and the questions about which workers get to come to the country, for example, those tend to be just secondary legislation by the home office and adjusted reasonably often over time. we have seen the number coming in from often over time. we have seen the number coming infrom eu often over time. we have seen the number coming in from eu countries falling, particularly since the brexit vote. the argument is the figure outside the eu was going up and accounted for many more than perhaps some parties were suggesting. what would the impact be on outside eu people coming in? this
4:19 pm
is one of the big questions at the moment because essentially what we are seeing is a big restriction on the eu side but a little bit of a liberalisation for non—eu citizens. so the government has said for example that they won‘t require people to be in graduatejobs in order to get a skilled worker visa. they will allow people in like chefs, butchers and other skilled trades. so we would expect to see a bit ofan trades. so we would expect to see a bit of an increase on the numbers of people coming in on the non—eu side. exactly how much is really difficult to predict. it is still very plausible that the restrictions on the eu side would outweigh any increase you would see. so it is very plausible that we will still see lower overall immigration numbers as a result of the package of measures being brought in. thank you for coming in. scotland‘s first minister says the mandate for a new independence referendum is now "unarguable". the snp won 48 of the 59 seats in scotland at the general election —
4:20 pm
nicola sturgeon has now published a document laying out what she says is a detailed case for another referendum. borisjohnson has repeatedly made clear his opposition to such a move. our scotland correspondent lorna gordon is at holyrood and has been listening to nicola sturgeon‘s speech. first we have nicola sturgeon setting out, as you say, the arguments as she sees it, in favour of scotland‘s right to choose its own constitutional future. it‘s quite a slim document, just 38 pages, but it deals with some pretty weighty concepts. nicola sturgeon in her statement earlier talked about the right to self—determination. she talked about a material change in circumstances. by that, she‘s referring to the fact that the uk is leaving the european union but that a majority of people who voted here in scotland, voted to remain as part of the eu and she also talked about a democratic mandate. a mandate which she says was reinforced with those big gains the snp made in the general election.
4:21 pm
added to that, the second thing that‘s happened today is that it has been confirmed in the last few minutes that nicola sturgeon has written a letter to the prime minister, asking for what‘s known as a section 30. that is the technical term for legislation allowing the parliament here in holyrood to legislate in areas that are normally devolved to westminster, but here is the challenge for nicola sturgeon. she wants a referendum, the uk government says no to that. they think it‘s divisive and unnecessary, but nicola sturgeon, scotland‘s first minister, believes that‘s not a position that can hold long term. the more a tory government seeks to block the will of the scottish people, the more they show complete and utter contempt for scottish democracy, the more support for independence will rise. so their short—term strategy, in my view, sows the seeds of their longer term defeat.
4:22 pm
it is self—defeating, but it will not hold, because it is not a democratic position. i think we see the tectonic plates of this shifting already, in the days since the election, so i‘m going to stand my ground. i fully expect today we‘ll get the flat no of tory westminster opposition, but that‘s not an end of the matter and borisjohnson should not be under any illusion that it is. so, nicola sturgeon thinks she has a reinforced mandate following last week‘s election. i think she also thinks that she has momentum on her side. that, ithink, perhaps is key to this entire argument going forward. it‘s a battle, really, for hearts and minds. she wants to persuade voters that another referendum is a good idea and then, further down the line, persuade them of independence as well. but for now, neither side is budging. nicola sturgeon playing a long game, i think, but don‘t expect this constitutional stand—off to end
4:23 pm
any time soon. lorna gordon reporting there. reports from moscow say up to three people have been shot dead in the headquarters of the fsb security service. the shooting is said to have happened in the reception area. one of the victims is said to be a police officer. these pictures are live from the headquarters in moscow. russian media reports that a gunman opened fire with an automatic weapon in the entrance lobby of the fsb building. security forces have cordoned off the area and moved bystanders into nearby buildings. authorities say the gunman has now been neutralised. these pictures live from moscow, as the security operation continues following those reports of shootings. here, police have confirmed they‘ve found the remains of a missing father of one in woodlands in buckinghamshire. mohammed shah subhani,
4:24 pm
also known as shah khan, had failed to return home to west london in early may. police later found the 27—year—old‘s car with ballistic damage and a murder investigation was launched. the republican leader in the senate, mitch mcconnell, has described the impeachment of president trump as the most rushed, least thought through, and most unfair‘ in history. mr mcconnell has been speaking in the senate — after the democrat—dominated house voted to send mr trump to stand trial in the senate, for abusing his authority, and obstructing congress. over the last 12 weeks, as democrats have conducted the most rushed, least thorough and most unfair impeachment inquiry in modern history. now, their slapdash process has concluded in the first purely partisan presidential impeachment since the wake of the civil war. the opposition to impeachment was
4:25 pm
bipartisan. only one part of one faction wanted this outcome. the house‘s conduct risks deeply damaging the institutions of american government. this particular house of representatives has let its partisan rage at this particular president create a toxic new precedent that will echo well into the future. chuck schumer is the leader of the democrats in the senate and has urged those within congress to vote to remove donald trump from the presidency. together, these articles suggest the president committed a grave injury to ourgrand president committed a grave injury to our grand democracy. the conduct they describe is very much what the founders feared when they forged the impeachment powers of the congress.
4:26 pm
the founders in their wisdom gave the house the power to accuse the senate the power to judge. the house the power to accuse the senate the power tojudge. we the house the power to accuse the senate the power to judge. we are now asked to fulfil our constitutional role as a court of impeachment. now that the house of representatives has impeached president trump, the nation turns its eyes to the senate. our north america correspondent neda tawfik explained earlier how although president trump is entitled to give evidence, he isn‘t expected to... if he would like to, he has that ability but i think it‘s highly unlikely while the president has bashed the house processing it was legitimate, he does say he thinks he will get a fair trial in the senate. we will have to see how that proceeds but i think the president himself is hoping that republicans are the ones to kind of defend him and take this forward. he has said that he would like a longer trial,
4:27 pm
so that he can feel vindicated by his colleagues, the republicans, but everything we are hearing from the republicans themselves is that they wa nt republicans themselves is that they want this to be a very quick trial. they want to move on and look forward to elections in 2020. a teenager who harassed two women when they refused to kiss each other on a london bus has had his sentence increased from six months to eight months because a court found his actions were "homophobic". melania geymonat and her partner christine hannigan were pelted with coins and had a handbag stolen while on a bus in camden earlier this year. the 16—year—old and two others had already admitted to targeting the couple. a man who stabbed to death his three—week—old son and tried to murder the child‘s mother has been jailed for life and must serve a minimum of 23 years. denis beytula attacked andrei stefan with a kitchen knife as he lay in a moses basket, before turning on 21—year—old andreea stefan at their home in wallsend, in october.
4:28 pm
time for a look at the weather. the forecast now from chris fawkes. hello, we have two areas of heavy rain in quick succession pushing northwards across the uk. the first area of rain spreading northwards across england and wales at the moment will move into northern ireland, northern england and scotla nd ireland, northern england and scotland later in the night. quieter weather for a scotland later in the night. quieter weatherfor a time scotland later in the night. quieter weather for a time but then the next batch of heavy rain will begin to spread in later in the night. a relatively mild night. temperature 6-7 relatively mild night. temperature 6—7 quite widely but it is the rain falling on saturated ground that brings the risk of some localised surface water flooding. we could see some disruption locally to roads and perhaps one or two rail lines as well on account of the wet weather. on friday, more rain in the forecast. this area of rain slowly pushes northwards into eastern areas of scotland. some uncertainty how far west it will get in scotland that further south, across the midlands and east england, the rain relu cta nt to
4:29 pm
midlands and east england, the rain reluctant to ease away. northern ireland probably dry but a lot of cloud and generally turning cooler across western areas on friday. that is friday. that is your weather.
4:30 pm
this is bbc news — our latest headlines. brexit and the nhs dominate the conservative government‘s agenda — set out in the queen‘s speech. the eu withdrawal agreement bill is introduced to the commons — ahead of tomorrow‘s brexit deal debate and vote. there were also promises of safer streets with the recuitment of more police officers and tougher action on the most dangerous criminals. scotland‘s first minister, nicola sturgeon, sets out her plans for another independence referendum and warns boris johnson not to oppose it. more dismalfigures for the nhs, this time in wales — where hospitals recorded the worst ever performance at accident and emergency units last month.
4:31 pm
sport now on afternoon live with katy. mikel arteta, is he or isn‘t he going? what we are hearing is that mikel arteta gave an emotional speech at manchester city straining session this morning. he‘s been assistant coach under pep guardiola for the past three years. he said his goodbye‘s to players and staff at city 5 etihad campus, as he now switches his focus to north london. arsenal were meant to have their pre—match press conference ahead of everton on saturday, but that was postponed until tomorrow, where we are expecting arteta to be revealed as the new man in charge of arsenal. now this should have been a fairly straightforward move, but there‘s no disguising the anger from city as to how arsenal have handled this, using words like shambolic and disrespectful. arteta met three times with arsenal about the vacancy without either clubs making a formal approach. however, today we are hearing that arsenal‘s legal team have been in contact with city.
4:32 pm
but, there is still no agreement that would release arteta. arsenal face everton on saturday, and they have just announced that duncan ferguson will take charge of the match, not carlo ancellotti who‘s also expected to be appointed soon. and the scottish rugby legend is announcing his retirement? scotland captain, greig laidlaw, has announced his retirement from international rugby after nine years and 76 caps. he led the national team 39 times, more than anyone else. the 34—year—old scrum half made his last appearance for scotland in the rugby world cup defeat to japan in october. he ends his international career, second only to chris patterson on the all—time points list for scotland with 714, mostly from kicking. laidlaw will continue to play club rugby with clermont in france. now onto some sad news, as the leeds rhinos and england scrum half, rob burrow, has been diagnosed with motor
4:33 pm
neurone disease. the 37 year old won eight grand finals, three world club challenges and two challenge cups in 17 years with the super league side. burrow, who retired back in 2017, is now the head coach for the club‘s reserve team. when we were in the room and he told me he had it it was a bit of a shock, and there is not any sort of prep for being told there is something where you have got no cure, so really numb, but you know, it happened. and he can move on to be in it happened. and he can move on to beina it happened. and he can move on to be in a decent place. the double olympic boxing champion, nicola adams says she‘s now looking to turn her hand to acting. she announced her retirement from the sport last month, after fears that she may lose her sight, after she suffered a torn pupil in her last fight. but the 37—year—old is now looking to the future. it was tough at first, just to make
4:34 pm
the decision but now i‘m quite happy. i‘ve achieved a lot of great things. becoming a double olympic champion. becoming a world champion asa champion. becoming a world champion as a professional boxer as well, and i‘m happy with that. i‘m content. i‘ve come out of boxing at the top of my game. when i look back i will be like, you know what? i‘ve done really well. i can‘t complain. what matters she certainly has. now, to cricket. england‘s world cup winning captain, eoin morgan, has landed an ipl contract worth more than half a million pounds. he‘ll bejoining the kolkata knight riders. meanwhile, english batsman, alex hales helped his sydney thunder side beat melbourne renegades by six wickets in australia‘s big bash. hales scored 68 runs from 38 deliveries as thunder beat the reigning champions with two balls to spare. eventually he was caught in the deep, by kane richardson off the bowling of harry gurney in the 17th over. and we‘ll leave you with this.
4:35 pm
as if you fancy trying another sport, the best thing to do is go to an expert. well, serena williams is looking for a change from tennis and she fancied giving boxing a try. so here she is with the former world heavyweight champion mike tyson to get some training. you need a lot of stamina for boxing, and even serena williams gets tired after a short time! two giants of their respective sports. perhaps they‘ll swap and serena will give mike some tips for his forehand! that‘s all the sport. there‘s more on all of the stories on the bbc sport website. bye for now. how is mike tyson, did he recover from that? i don‘t know, we will have to ask him! welcome back to westminster. the queen has laid out the conservative government‘s agenda for the year, following last week‘s election win.
4:36 pm
there are around 30 bills — with the most prominent ones being delivering brexit by bringing the withdrawal agreement back to parliament. and an annual cash injection for the nhs is to be enshrined in law. we can speak now to the plaid cymru mp, jonathan edwards, and amelia womack, deputy leader of the green party. i want to get a sense of the mood in this place. your role has changed as a result of this huge win for the government. following the last election when there was a minority situation, every vote was on a knife edge, especially when the prime minister had lost hisju reti and got down to —40, by the time the election was called. —— mackie lost his majority. and the election by some parties was a huge strategic error because the prime minister was in office but not in power with three years to run that parliament, and the position was that he wanted to get a referendum and we could have forced him to offer that and instead we gave him an escape route
4:37 pm
via the election and he holds all the cards now. we know that we are sitting on the opposition benches and we will not win a vote for five yea rs and we will not win a vote for five years whereas before the election it was difficult for the government to win anything. and the big issue, brexit. big thing in the queen speech is the change any withdrawal agreement bill, with a prime minister deciding to put in another deadline. we know that it will have to be negotiated by the end of the transition phase, and ministers will not be able to mention the b word after february, and he has handed all the cards back to the eu with all the cards back to the eu with all of those time pressures, and a big decision the british government needs to make with these negotiations, will they go for close economic alignment with the eu, or will they go for a bare boned free trade agreement? both are very divergent parts with different
4:38 pm
consequences. there was nothing today in the queen‘s speech about the vision for the british government for this massive decision which has dominated the british government since the referendum in 2016. amelia, a bigger issue perhaps is climate change. was there anything you heard today that made you feel that this new government will address that more seriously? you feel that this new government will address that more seriously7m the queen speech they said we would be world leaders when it came to climate action but we are still looking at that 2050 target. you looking at that 2050 target. you look around the world and that is not leadership. we see other countries looking at 2045, 2030, 2035, and big economies, like california isn't a country but it has set 2045 as the target so that we have to make sure we don't over shoot with emissions and we are taking genuine action to tackle the climate emergency. the conservative
4:39 pm
former mp zac goldsmith will stay on as environment minister and will be made a life peer. you are smiling, what does that say to you about what borisjohnson has planned for environmental issues? it confirms to me that the london mail campaign that zac goldsmith ran that was he used racism and division, and it says something about our government about where they are standing, in enabling many of the toxic words and phrases across our country that has divided people in our communities, and to keep those kind of people on show is a reflection of what this government, what kind of government business. jonathan, the strength of this government given his majority, does that mean that the smaller parties are effectively no more than pressure groups at the moment. my parliamentary career, it has always been very tight numbers in the comments but that is not going to be the case. at the moment there is a
4:40 pm
dominant party. there will be opportunities. the prime minister will have to make a big decision about where he wants to go with the trade negotiations and it would be a huge divergence of views within the conservative party so potentially they could split one way or the other. that‘s an interesting question. that‘s why he was desperate to have the election this side of the withdrawal process stop he could have ran the bill through parliament. he had the numbers on the second reading no problem. he had enough labour support to get it through what he was desperate to have a bigger majority for this complex raise that follows next. brexit is only just complex raise that follows next. brexit is onlyjust beginning, and the little pages will be dominated by this topic for many years. the fa ct by this topic for many years. the fact that borisjohnson by this topic for many years. the fact that boris johnson said by this topic for many years. the fact that borisjohnson said let's get brexit done when the reality is he can only get it started is already very start. when you look at what that could mean, we could have a real battle on our hands to make sure that all of those aspects we have enjoyed from the eu, from
4:41 pm
workers' rights, and environmental protection, we will have a battle to make sure that we are holding the government to account or many of the promises that they will have made during this election campaign but also on the fact that we need to be ensuring that we match the ambition and what we achieve can in this country, that it is as strong as we had while we were in the european union and! had while we were in the european union and i don't think this government will see that as a top priority. one flash point that will have to be tackled sooner or later is the issue of the union, given what nicola sturgeon has said this morning. what do you think your party will try to achieve? is there a coat tail, that the scottish offer would offer you something? the tectonic plates are changing within the british state and the british constitution. events in scotland are far ahead of where we are in wales, but there seems to be agreement developing within the labour party and plaid cymru back in wales that
4:42 pm
the right for us to hold a potential independence referendum should be a matter for the people of wales to decide within our own institutions. we will see this government over the next few years, the british government, as they lose brexit, a new internal market for the territories of the british state they need that to hold up through devolution and if i was boris johnson i‘d be saying there are big challenges facing the uk constitution and we should create stronger intergovernmental partnerships within the constitution which would be a better way to save the union than going down the road of centralising power in westminster but this place only knows one way and that is to centralise power and there will be a huge backlash in scotland, in wales and we have seen in northern ireland that the unionist parties have lost the overall majority of mps in the house of commons and the next elections will the northern island assembly when it gets back on its feet will be very interesting. any other flash
4:43 pm
points that you can foresee in the coming months? what we have seen today with the undermining of union rights, with trying to stop railway workers going on strike at the moment isjust workers going on strike at the moment is just showing workers going on strike at the moment isjust showing that workers going on strike at the moment is just showing that we are attacking a lot of our human rights and workers' rights in this country and workers' rights in this country andl and workers' rights in this country and i feel like that could be a potential flash point to ensure that we are working across the country to ensure that this government doesn't continue to erode these rights and freedoms that we have one. we saw the right to protest being challenged during extinction rebellion when rules were introduced that basically ban protest and now we are seeing the right to strike being chipped away at, and i think that, people who believe in that right, who support that human rights, need to be working together to make sure that this government doesn't endanger that in the uk. thank you both very much. the
4:44 pm
government said it will enshrine the commitment to £33 billion a year to the nhs up until 2024. jeremy corbyn said the extra money for health is inadequate. siva anandaciva is a chief analyst at the kings fund — a think tank specialising in health care policy. it seems strange that the government is enshrining in law something they had already decided to do.” is enshrining in law something they had already decided to do. i think it is. it was something that was announced several years ago and we are at the beginning of this new five year funding deal. we have seen in the past the government announces plans for spending on the nhs but as pressures on costs plans for spending on the nhs but as pressures on costs rise you end up topping up those plans. it is hard topping up those plans. it is hard to see how this is anything other thana simple to see how this is anything other than a simple or a token to help the nhs plan for the coming years. was there anything in that queen‘s speech that you heard that was
4:45 pm
essentially new? nothing particularly new. you have mentioned the extra funding, which might make it easier to increase staff from overseas, and plans for changes to make it easier for different parts of the nhs to come together, so these are welcome but what was more interesting was what was not announced and the missing pieces of the jigsaw, the first, the workforce crisis gripping the nhs, and the second, the lack of any concrete proposals for how the government will make good or the prime minister's promised to fix the crisis in adult social care services once and for all. there was some new immigration policy, talk of special visas for nurses and doctors to address that issue of understaffing. there were, so this would be the proposal to make it easier for overseas staff to come and work in the nhs. the only thing to say there is, do we have a coherent package of
4:46 pm
policies that encourage people from overseas that we need to come and work in the nhs to do so? will they pay the immigration health care surcharge? pay the immigration health care surcharge ? when you pay the immigration health care surcharge? when you look at the numberof surcharge? when you look at the number of staff the government is trying to recruit, we at the king's fund think the government should be going further if the nhs is to get the numberof going further if the nhs is to get the number of staff it actually needs to meet the demands on services. good to see you, thank you for your time this afternoon. figures for last month show the worst ever performance at accident and emergency units in welsh hospitals. less than 75% of patients were seen within four hours in november. the target is 95%. our wales correspondent, hywel griffith is in cardiff with the latest. 20% down on what should be hit, 95% of patients being seen within four hours, here at the biggest and busiest hospital in wales, 75% being seen busiest hospital in wales, 75% being seen last month and that was one of
4:47 pm
the better hospitals. at a hospital in north wales only 57% of patients being seen within four hours, and even more worrying was the number of patients who waited 12 hours waiting to be seen, over 6000 in november. that is not the only part of the system under strain. ambulances have not been getting to a naff category red calls within the eight minute window. we have seen people not getting cancer treatment on time. the nhs in wales is under strain as it is across the rest of the uk. but it is across the rest of the uk. but it is across the rest of the uk. but it is worse here than in england, but it is better in scotland aren‘t much better than in northern ireland. the same problems, record demand, an elderly population that is living longer and living with chronic conditions that are exacerbated in winter when there are trips and slips. the welsh government say last month was particularly difficult because we saw outbreaks of flu and not a virus within the walls of some hospitals.
4:48 pm
they say they have got a winter plan but given that some senior co nsulta nts but given that some senior consultants working in eight amp e with wales, they are trying to work against us sooner —— against a tsunami by throwing sand bags at the problem. and real solutions will ta ke problem. and real solutions will take longer to deliver. in a moment we‘ll have all the business news for you, but first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the queen sets out the government‘s plans for the future at the state opening of parliament — with brexit taking centre stage. there‘s also extra money for the nhs. there are promises of safer streets with the recuitment of more police officers and tougher action on the most dangerous criminals. scotland‘s first minister, nicola sturgeon, sets out her plans for another independence referendum and warns boris johnson against opposing it. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live.
4:49 pm
an audio feed of the bank of england‘s press conferences was leaked to hedge funds before they were broadcast. that was the admission by the central bank. it meant traders had access to the governor mark carney‘s words between 5 and 8 seconds early. this leak gave an advantage to high—speed traders, such as currency speculators, who can make millions of pounds on tiny market moves. europe‘s top court has ruled that airbnb does not need an estate agent‘s licence to operate in france. the french tourism association had complained that the accomodation booking service didn‘t comply with the country‘s property laws. the ruling means the app‘s users avoid a threat of disruption to its service in the country. retail sales fell in november by 0.6%. that‘s according to the office for national statistics. it was the fourth month in a row without growth. shoppers kept a tight grip on spending amid brexit uncertainty and ahead of december‘s election. but november‘s data doesn‘t include sales from black friday.
4:50 pm
let‘s kick off looking at the top story, where traders could have had an eight second head start on the words spoken by mark carney and his officials. the announcement can contain lots of technical language but every word is scrutinised by financial markets and can cause a big movement in the value of the pound and government bonds. one trader explained to me how people can take advantage with only seconds of notice. the three cornerstones of trading is having a reliable, solid strategy, access to the markets and the speed of data and infrastructure that you can trade. that speed, if we take for example two different types of traders, that is four seconds which may sound small, but for some people, that four seconds is absolutely priceless. for some participants, it is absolutely
4:51 pm
useless. let's take that four seconds. the higher frequency traders in the market, they will be trading sub—10 microseconds, one microsecond being 1,000,000th of a second so a 4—7 second advantage, if thatis second so a 4—7 second advantage, if that is what the case is then that isa that is what the case is then that is a substantial heads up and a substantial edge to have as a trader. the vast majority of volume that transacts in the market is done by computers. these computers are actually trading on the market, taking that data, making those signals, but it is very important to understand that behind those computers, the programmes that define and dry the strategy, our people, so yes it is computers actually making the trades, at those millisecond and microsecond level and utilising that data, say, from the bank of england, but it is
4:52 pm
actually people that will be taking that data. that was malcolm baker. tom stevenson is investment director at fidelity international. good to see you. how serious is this? how can the fca crackdown potentially on what happened here?” think it is embarrassing for the bank of england above all. what has happened here, they have two fees, a video feed and an audio feed. they are provided by different companies. because audio is easier to compress and quicker to publish, that is what has created this 5—8 second gap. you could argue that the bank of england should have known about this difference and should have known that the company that was providing the earlier feed was indeed selling on that feed to people who could ta ke on that feed to people who could take advantage of it. —— that audio
4:53 pm
feed. in terms of repetition it is embarrassing for the bank of england especially as it is mark carney‘s penultimate month on the job so he could have done without this month before he gives up the governor. moving across the pond, us stocks continue to go up, despite what is going on in terms of the impeachment news coming out of washington and trade disputes. why have us stocks been so buoyant, in 2019? it has been so buoyant, in 2019? it has been a remarkable year, the s&p500 has risen 20% since the beginning of the year. it started from a low base. it had a poor fourth quarter of last year. but this year, we‘ve had two main events. the first has been a change of heart by the federal reserve. they started reducing interest rates and three interest rate reductions between july and september. that has been a
4:54 pm
massive factor in boosting the market. the second thing is the trade pension situation. in the last week, we‘ve had evidence that the us and china have struck at least a preliminary deal on trade, and that has boosted optimism in the markets as well. those two factors together have driven the market to its record highs that we are seeing at the moment. do you expect something to get traders even more excited in this dates? we are enjoying a santa rally at the limit. what we have seen rally at the limit. what we have seen this year has been a rise in optimism rather than an improvement in the fundamentals of the market. so company earnings have been a little bit disappointing this year. so what we are going to need to see next year is earnings driving higher, as well as this rise in optimism, this increase in the multiples of earnings that investors
4:55 pm
are prepared to pay. thank you very much indeed. thank you. 2019 was supposed to be the year 5g came to the uk but is it worth getting a new phone? 5g promises to revolutionise the way we communicate, connecting all sorts of things — cars, lampposts, maybe even products on a supermarket shelf — as well as people to the internet, at lightning speeds. our technology correspondent, rory cellan—jones has been putting 5g to the test in various spots in london. this was the year 5g arrived in the uk. offering streaming video wherever you go, and seamless connectivity in busy places like mainline railway stations. at least, that‘s the promise. i‘ve got three different 5g handsets from three different networks and we are going to test them and see whether it lives up to the promise. i‘vejust popped into a phone box, a handy place on oxford street, to do a quick test. and not great, ee, 83
4:56 pm
megabytes, not really 5g. vodafone claimed it was on 5g, andjust19, o2 27, neither of those count as 5g, in my book. what is 5g, and do you want it? i actually have no idea what 5g is. i‘m guessing it is an upgraded version of 4g. i guess 5g is faster than 46. do i want it? my4g my 46 doesn't even work, so i guess no, not really! i know! so, a busy station, waterloo. exactly the sort of place where you get congested on mobile networks. where, increasingly, they don‘t work properly. let‘s do a test, here. once again ee has come out as a good 5g score, well over 200. the other two, not so much. o2, pretty bad. i can‘t really see any reason why i‘d want it at the moment. i think right here, right now, there are definitely questions
4:57 pm
if you got a 5g phone today, but my view is, look beyond that. typically people keep their smartphones for at least three years in the uk now. if that‘s the case, you want to be buying a 5g phone, because you are buying a future proof device which is costing you hundreds and hundreds of pounds. we are in bermondsey, only one mile from london bridge, so still pretty central and i‘m getting 5g on none of the phones. 59 on ee still best, but none of them really giving me the service for which you would be paying. that ends the business news. now time for the weather with chris fawks. we have two areas of heavy rain pushing northwards across the uk with the first spreading quickly across england and wales at the moment, moving into northern ireland and scotland later in the night. brighter weather for
4:58 pm
and scotland later in the night. brighter weatherfor a and scotland later in the night. brighter weather for a time then the next batch of heavy rain spreads in later in the night. a relatively mild night, around six cell c is quite widely, but it is the rain falling on saturated ground that brings the risk of localised surface water flooding so we could see some disruption to roads and rail lines on account of this wet weather. friday, more rain and the forecast. this area of rain pushes its way northwards into eastern scotland. some uncertainty how far west that will get in scotland back to the south, you can see across the midlands and east of england, the rain reluctant to move away. northern ireland, drive with more cloud, and cooler across western areas on friday. that is your 02:58:48,158 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 weather. —— dry with more cloud.
4:59 pm
5:00 pm

24 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on