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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 27, 2019 8:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. our headlines today: at least 60 people, including children have survived a plane crash in kazakhstan — it came down shortly after take off — 15 people though have been killed. free hospital parking in england for some patients and visitors from april but questions over how it will be funded. tributes are paid to a father and his two children who drowned in a hotel swimming pool in spain on christmas eve. we've had the big christmas binge, now comes the big clean up. we have produced 30% more weight this week than we normally would have so i am at a recycling plant in manchester this morning to see all the stuff we have thrown in our bins.
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good morning. liverpool go 13 points in the premier league, but their manager says they're not thinking about the title. it's after they beat leicester 4—0. the parents separated from their premature babies and the hospital app that's helping them. and in the weather it might be a great day across the country, the wettest is scotland and northern ireland, but over the next few days, it is set to get a good deal milder. all the details on bbc breakfast. it's friday the 27th of december. our top story... around 60 people, including children, have survived a plane crash in kazakhstan. at least 15 people died when the bek air plane went down during take—off from almaty, the country's largest city. it was bound for the capital, nur—sultan, carrying 93 passengers and five crew. the cause of the crash is not yet known. earlier we spoke to our moscow correspondent sarah rainsford. we've seen a list of 60 passengers that has been published by the airport.
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they say these are the 60 that have, so far, been identified as surviving the crash. many of them are now in hospital. we understand some are in serious but many appear to have made it out alive from the devastated wreck of this plane, which we understand crashed soon after take—off. 0ne eyewitness has described the plane isjust getting off the ground before getting into trouble. rescuers getting into trouble. were quick to the scene and began rescuers were quick to the scene and began pulling people out of the rubble. there was no fire which made their task easier but the plane wreckage is terrible, of course. it is extraordinary that so many people appear to have come out of this crash alive.
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plans to offer free hospital parking to some nhs staff and patients in england will be rolled out in april, the government has announced. most visitors to hospitals in scotland, wales and northern ireland are already exempt from charges. 0ur health correspondent, dominic hughes, has the details. paying for parking at hospitals has been a long—running source of complaint for many nhs patients and their visitors. during the election campaign the conservative manifesto promised free hospital parking for specific groups. so from april, 206 hospital trusts in england will be expected to provide free parking for those described as in the grated sneyd. this will be blue badge holders, frequent visitors to patient out patient clinics and staff working night shifts. but there have been concerns from nhs managers who fear trusts may lose out financially. we have been looking for assurances that costs of these measures will be fully
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covered, because otherwise there is a risk that funding intended to run front line services could be diverted into running car parks. hospitals make a lot of money out of parking fees. the conservative ma nifesto parking fees. the conservative manifesto promised £78 million to help trusts make the changes. the department of health and social care say the plans will be fully funded but the exact cost has yet to be funded. you're watching bbc breakfast. we're on the news channel until 9:00 but it's time now for us to say goodbye to viewers on bbc one. you're watching bbc breakfast on the news channel. firefighters in australia are bracing themselves for another heat wave as they continue to tackle raging bushfires. 0ur reporter phil
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mercer is in the blue mountains. bring us up today, these fires have been going on for so long in difficult conditions? for weeks and weeks and many of the firefighters who have been on the front line have been at these blazes. fatigue is a big issue, but there is a dedication and determination to see this job through. the problem the authorities haveis through. the problem the authorities have is they don't know how long this crisis will go for. fires have been burning in recent days, in three states, in south australia where temperatures reached 41 degrees in the city of adelaide. active fires in victoria, and here in new south wales, there are more than 70 fires burning. this is echo point in the blue mountains, people come here from all over the world to
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see the three sisters this is a very famous rock formation. we were here a few hours ago and you could barely see them because of the thick smoke. there has been a strong wind, so much of the smoke has been blown away but you will see in the distance, smoke billowing from active fires that have been burning here for weeks and weeks. if you look into the valley floor, you can see vast areas of charge bushland. this is a crisis that is continuing. in recent days, the conditions around eastern australia have been calm and a lot cooler to allow firefighters to get an upper hand on this crisis. but over the next few days, a heatwave is expected here in new south wales and that will bring very hot temperatures and warm, dry winds. dangerous days ahead, according to the authorities in new south wales, are likely to be monday and tuesday. as you say, we can see the smoke and the haze behind you.
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tributes are being paid to a british man and his two children who drowned in a hotel swimming pool in spain. gabriel diya, who was 52, died along with his nine—year—old daughter comfort and 16—year—old son emmanuel on christmas eve. emily unia is at the church in charlton, in south—east london, where mr diya was a pastor. many tributes being paid to the family? yes, when you hear what neighbours have to say about this family, you can hear the loss the impact will have. they have described gabriel diya and his family is very religious, very friendly and very humble. his nine—year—old daughter comfort humble. his nine—year—old daughter co mfo rt we nt humble. his nine—year—old daughter comfort went to a local primary school and it will be a very sad start to the time for all the children at the school. the church where gabriel diya is a christian pastor has put a statement on its facebook page paying tribute to the family. it says, with heavy hearts
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we extend our condolences to the family, parish and associates of gabriel diya who passed away along with two of his children in a tragic incident on a family holiday in spain. there are hundreds of comments written below this post, people wanting to pay tribute to the family they were clearly very fond of. spanish police said they have investigated the pool where this happened and they have looked at the pump and filtration systems and did not find anything wrong. they did find comfort‘s swimming hat in the pump but they cannot see any explanation as to how this happened. they cannot confirm whether the family could swim on. the company that runs the result say they are cooperating fully with the spanish authorities. emily, for the moment, thank you. bad weather, black friday deals and online sales are being blamed for a fall in the number of boxing day shoppers. analysts said the number of people braving the high streets and shopping centres was just over ten—per—cent lower than the same day last year.
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it's been a good year for migrant butterflies, moths and dragonflies in the uk, according to a review by the national trust. the charity says extreme weather this year has caused an influx of migrant wildlife — such as these painted lady butterflies. but the report also found mixed fortunes for some of our native species, such as water voles and sea birds. astronomers are warning that thousands of satellites due to be blasted into space next year could impede their research. the aim is to create internet access for every corner of the globe but scientists say there 5 evidence for every corner of the globe already causing problems. blue badge holders and night—shift workers will be among those to benefit from free hospital parking in england from april. the policy was first outlined in the conservative pa rty‘s election manifesto. let's talk now to saffron cordery, from nhs providers. good morning, thank you forjoining
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us. good morning, thank you forjoining us. iam good morning, thank you forjoining us. i am sure lots of people who hear that it will be delighted, what is your view? i think it is absolutely critical to say first off, hospital trusts are really keen to provide the best possible access to provide the best possible access to patients as they can. however, what we have got to remember is it is very expensive to provide and maintain car parking spaces and we know this issue of car parking is, and charging for it is very controversial. first and foremost, hospitals are clear they want to provide the best possible access they can. are you saying they should continue? i think what we are saying is it is really important we balance out the charging for car parks, which covers the costs versus the access for patients. what we have to remember is, if hospital trusts are being asked to actually not charge
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for car parking spaces, then that may have an impact on the level of finances they invest in patient care. so it is quite a balancing act for many hospitals. the government has said, and this comes from the ma nifesto has said, and this comes from the manifesto doesn't it, that these measures will be supported with up to £78 million every year with new money and that will cover costs and capacity? we have to look at the detail of that. yes, it was in the ma nifesto detail of that. yes, it was in the manifesto and we have seen the announcements that have come out today around some of the detail. but we are not clear yet how this is going to work. it is great if the government can provide that subsidy for hospitals to provide more concessionary rates for blue badge holders, those undertaking chemotherapy, for example. we know hospital trusts do that already. but what we have got to make sure it is, this doesn't impact on the level of finances being invested into patient care. first and foremost, that is at
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the front of trusts' mine. scotland, wales and northern ireland don't charge for parking. they do operate a different scheme, but it has been the case in england that hospital car parking charges have been in place for a substantial number of yea rs. place for a substantial number of years. hospitalfinances place for a substantial number of years. hospital finances are operated on the basis of trusts charging for car parking. it is worth remaining that —— remembering that maintaining car parking spaces is expensive. but it is making sure trusts can invest in patient care across the board and it is critical the amount of money the government puts forward is adequate to meet the costs of maintaining car parks. critical that happens. some people watching, and i know people feel strongly about it and you alluded to that, are thinking are we funding
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patient care from the amount we are paying in parking charges?” patient care from the amount we are paying in parking charges? i think it is important to remember that car parking itself is a complex issue. it feels like a simple issue but what we are talking about is keeping and maintaining an area of land so people can park their car and access services. but there are other factors at play. if a hospital car parkis factors at play. if a hospital car park is in a city centre and it offers free car parking, we have got to remember that could be used for other purposes and not for hospital patients. so there are a number of more complex factors at play, than simply how we offer that car parking. so we have got to think through what this actually means. it is absolutely the case that trusts are committed to providing the best possible access to patients for their care and so many already do provide concessionary, orfree parking for blue badge holders,
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those who are undertaking long—term chemotherapy, have long term conditions. you know, those staying overnight. many already offer what is being put forward today. thank you. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. how was christmas? it has not been bad, charlie. been here most of the timea bad, charlie. been here most of the time a very enjoyable and looking forward to a few days. weather has been mixed, not a white one but this morning clear skies in congleton and cheshire. 0ne morning clear skies in congleton and cheshire. one of the exceptions, rather than the rule today. lots of cloud around and for some it is going to be a wet day, particularly the northern half of the country. it is raining heavily in western scotla nd is raining heavily in western scotland and across northern ireland. there is something dry heading into northern ireland but rain will never be far away. the heavy rain extends into a line of light drizzle through wales and the
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south—west. that will take away some of the morning sunshine in north—west england and north west midlands at the moment. it will push eastwards through the day as well. if you get the sunshine you are doing well. the best of which is around shetland which will finish the day with heavy rain and strong winds across northern and western areas. the wind is coming from a southerly direction lifting temperatures in the west to around 12 degrees. cooler in the east where the winds are light is. gales around northern and western scotland to finish friday. a windy few days to come here. the wind is still coming in from come here. the wind is still coming infrom a come here. the wind is still coming in from a south—westerly direction keeping things mild and bringing rain across scotland and northern ireland. and for a time across the north of england. most will finish the night on a reasonably dry now, cloud around at that. temperatures from dropping too much. lowest of all, some breaks in the cloud towards eastern pa rt all, some breaks in the cloud towards eastern part of scotland and eastern england. this is the big picture in that will stop temperatures from dropping too much. lowest of all, some breaks in the cloud towards eastern part of scotla nd cloud towards eastern part of scotland and eastern england. this
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is the big picture in the weekend. high pressure having more of an influence across england and wales. a longer spell of dry weather will be with the others. on the fringes, scotla nd be with the others. on the fringes, scotland and northern ireland, on saturday more rain in the west. some rain at times and northern ireland. the further south and east, the drier your day will be. eastern scotla nd drier your day will be. eastern scotland will see hazy sunshine now and again. north wales has the better chance of sunshine through saturday afternoon. temperatures into double figures and they are rising as we go into sunday. dragging the airup rising as we go into sunday. dragging the air up from northern africa, a mild day for the time of year on sunday and more sunshine to go with it, especially for england and wales. claddagh times in scotla nd and wales. claddagh times in scotland and northern ireland. 0ne 01’ scotland and northern ireland. 0ne or two showers and with the breeze coming in from the south—west, we could see temperatures peaking around 1a or 15 celsius. temperatures widely into double figures as we finish sunday afternoon. they will drop as we go into the start of next week but as we head towards new year's eve, it
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is looking dry and it is looking fine for most with just like winds. if you have been missing a little bit of winter snowfall, look at what happened in california on christmas day. big, severe winter storm push through dropping lots of snow on the mountains. even the reports of a tornado and heavy rain around other parts of california. none of that this year, much milder. back to both. if you havejust this year, much milder. back to both. if you have just turned this year, much milder. back to both. if you havejust turned on your tv, that is california. we can bring you more on that plane crash in kazakhstan now. at least 1a people have died after an aircraft with 98 people on board crashed during take—off. the bek air flight was heading towards the capital, nur—sultan, when it went down. the airline describes itself as the country's first low—cost airline. we can get some more details now from the independent‘s travel editor, simon calder. good morning, simon. the first thing to say is people see these images for the first time this morning. 15 people confirmed dead, but many have
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survived, which is extraordinary in itself? the aircraft didn't get very high, it was in the airfor less than one minute, according to the analysis i have seen. and as you have been reporting, struck a wall and a building and it is miraculous that people have survived and tragic of course that some have lost their lives in yet another accident in the former soviet union. aviation is increasingly safe, but it does seem to be the case that when accidents do occur, there is a high chance they will be in one of these countries. so from what we understand the reports locally as you describe it, it came down very close to the airport. we see the front of the aeroplane actually going into a building we understand which isjust on going into a building we understand which is just on the perimeter of that airport, which i understand,
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you know that place? yes, one of the major airports, it was the destination for the soviet version of the concorde. it is a big, modern airport and has all the usual safety equipment. i think investigators will be looking at a number of things, starting with the weather, the time of the crash, although the wind was calm, pleasant enough day. the temperature was well below freezing, so they will be looking at the possibility there was a build—up of ice on the wings. also will be looking at the possibility of mechanicalfailure looking at the possibility of mechanical failure and of course, pilot error will not be at this stage ruled out. simon, looking at bek air itself, tell us about the background? they are one of the many airlines that started up in the
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19905 after the collapse of the soviet union. they have been in business for 20 years, they have a fleet of eight of these aircrafts, the fokker 100, this one is said to be three years old. they flew in kazakhstan, no international flights. they were in competition with the national flag flights. they were in competition with the nationalflag carrier. although most kazakhstan airlines we re although most kazakhstan airlines were taken from the european blacklist of airlines which were not allowed to fly in the eu three years ago, the american state department still will not allow its diplomats to fly on any airlines in kazakhstan, apart from the flag carrier, and that will include bek air. they are concerned about the degree of safety oversight by the civil aviation authority in
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kazakhstan. simon, the aircraft itself, this fokker 100, the same aircraft is used by other airlines? yes, you see them rarely in the uk and the rest of europe these days, because they were built in the 20th century. but they are perfectly good aircraft and of course, there is no reason why age should be a problem. these are small jets, reason why age should be a problem. these are smalljets, a couple of rolls—royce engines which are rear mounted and they were a familiar site about 20 years or so ago. now they are mostly flying in the developing world. even though this aircraft was 23 years old, there is aircraft was 23 years old, there is aircraft much older than that flying elsewhere, as long as they are well maintained and flown well, there is no reason why maintained and flown well, there is no reason why age maintained and flown well, there is no reason why age should be a factor in this tragedy. simon, thank you very much. just to confirm, 15 people so far have been confirmed
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deadin people so far have been confirmed dead ina people so far have been confirmed dead in a crash. many more, 60, we understand are confirmed to have escaped that crash in kazakhstan. we've had the big christmas binge, now comes the big clean up. those boxes to clean up, cardboard and all of it. sean, what happens when it gets to the depot where you are? it creates a bit of a stink. it is not as bad as i thought, that must niss of an old, empty dustbin. there isa niss of an old, empty dustbin. there is a lot of waste going on, they get through about 180 articulated lorries of waste here around this time of year, just in this plant. if we look at some of the figures about what we are doing nationally at the moment. lots of glass being separated and that will have to go somewhere else to get the plastic out of it. but cardboard boxes, we
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throw away 260,000 times the coverage of big ben. you could cover big ben 260,000 times with the boxes we throw away. we are supposed to be improving, we have a target to reduce waste by 50% next year. it is looking like we will probably be a little shy of that. so what do you deal with the rubbish? let's chat to michelle, whojoins us deal with the rubbish? let's chat to michelle, who joins us this deal with the rubbish? let's chat to michelle, whojoins us this morning. michelle, whojoins us this morning. michelle, good morning. you are in charge of greater manchester's, you know, trying to get people to change their habits of what they do with their habits of what they do with their waste, what are the main things that make life easier for you with this? things like, when you re cycle your with this? things like, when you recycle your cardboard boxes, empty them and take out the polystyrene
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and bubble wrap because we cannot re cycle and bubble wrap because we cannot recycle that. things like wrapping paper, glitter is a big problem this time of year. no glitter on the wrapping paper on christmas cards, put them in your general waste bin. the main thing is, if you are not sure, then don't put it in your recycling bin. people might think, why can't you guys, i know you are in charge of one combined authority, but make it easier for us all? don't put it in your general waste if you are not sure, that doesn't seem like the best thing to do for our sustainability ambitions?m doesn't, but we want to recycle as much as possible and we cannot do that if you put things like dirty nappies, for example, a kitchen paper, tissues, baby wipes and things like that in your paper and ca rd things like that in your paper and card then, it causes a problem. once it is in it is difficult to get it out and it affects the quality of the paperand card out and it affects the quality of the paper and card we sent on for
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recycling. it is better not to put it in in the first place. check the calendar from your council and check the label. but if you're not sure, don't put it in. we will chat to somebody about what happens next, michelle thank you very much. margaret, closed with the wrapping paper, very impressive. good morning. we werejust paper, very impressive. good morning. we were just talking about wrapping paper, what is the test about what can go in the recycling box or not? the scrunch test, if you scrunch it up and it springs back like that, you cannot recycle it. throw it in your bin. what is the plan, from the university of northampton, you look into the sustainability stuff, why are we trying to get more into the right bins and they end up in packages like this, sold around the world? this can be sent off, cleaned up and turned into all sorts of things like fleeces, it can be turned into garden furniture. we are increasingly looking at turning things back into what they were, so
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plastic bottles going back into plastic bottles going back into plastic bottles. it is useful when you buy stuff, not only check when it can be recycled, but see if it has a high recycled content as well, so has a high recycled content as well, so that is even better. in terms of our trends and whether we are getting any better, it is the kind of things we talk about most christmases, are we getting better at doing this stuff? there are some good signs that people are getting better. they are thinking more about it. more of us have reusable water bottles than before and some of the manufacturers bottles than before and some of the manufacture rs are bottles than before and some of the manufacturers are changing their practices so changing from coloured plastic to clear plastic, so we are going the right way but we all have a lot to do. margaret, thank you very much. we have a lot to do so get your bins out. lemon squash, you might have noticed in the last year, no longer in a lemon tinted plastic case, it is now transparent and it can be put into factories like this,
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that have been splitting it up and making it easier to recycle at stuff. it does make a difference to what we are putting in our bins.|j will be going home to do the scrunch test. sean has yellow tinted goggles as well. nicely done. having to leave a child in hospital is tough for any parent, particularly at this time of year. to ease the strain, a third of neo—natal units in the uk have if signed up to a new mobile phone app which allows nurses to provide family members with regular updates, throughout the day and night. katherine da costa reports. hey, mr! it's hard being a new mother. you've got all the hormones, but then having them in this unit as well, it is even more difficult. victoria's triplets were born nine weeks early at the princess anne hospital in southampton. while eli and leo were able to go home five weeks later,
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little oscar spent an extra month in the neonatal unit. the first time i met them they were all in incubators, obviously covered in tubes and wires and they were so tiny and looked so fragile. it's hard. everybody else gets to take their babies home, and ours have to stay here and you have to leave them every day, and that's really difficult. the unit is one of more than 60 in the country using a trusted nhs app, allowing staff to capture precious moments and sending regular updates to parents. we've always felt that that moment, where the family have to leave us for whatever reason — and there are lots of reasons that might happen — that that's a wrench for families. we do what we can to prepare them for that, but to soften the blow by sending them videos, sending them photos and little messages, it's really lovely for us to do. i remember getting the first photo and i was up at 3:00 in the morning expressing. you are awake all the time and you are looking at your phone
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and then an email comes through and you get this lovely picture and it usually has a message saying, you "hi, mummy, hi, daddy, having a lovely evening." you have to leave your babies and you feel so guilty leaving them. and to know that they're in such safe hands, and with people who care enough to take a picture and send it to you to make you feel good, is amazing. hospital charities fund the app, so it's free for parents to use. over the last two years, more than 5,000 families have benefited. vcreate is a really secure application for nurses. they can create videos very quickly and very easily, but be very confident that they're in control, that they're only going to be sending it to the right person. so there are lots of controls within the system that ensure that that happens. it's hoped the app will be available in nearly half of the uk's neonatal units by early next year, putting more parents like victoria
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and derek in the picture. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. let's get a summary of today's main news stories. around 60 people, including children, have survived a plane crash in kazakhstan. authorities in the city of almaty now say that 12 people died when the bek air plane went down just after seven o'clock, local time. it was bound for the capital, nur—sultan, carrying 93 passengers and five crew. the cause of the crash is not yet known. plans to offer free hospital parking to some nhs staff and patients in england will be rolled out in april, the government has announced. are people with disabilities, night—shift workers and parents of sick children will be among those
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exempt from charges. the government says it has fully costed the plan, but nhs chiefs have expressed concerns about funding. 0ur concern is that, if these measures are not fully funded, than funding intended to run front—line services could be diverted into running car parks. tributes have been paid to a british pastor who died, along with two of his children, in a hotel swimming pool in spain. gabriel diya, his daughter comfort and his son praise—emmanuel, died at a resort on the costa del sol on christmas eve. the church in london where mr diya was a pastor say their prayers are with their family. firefighters in australia are bracing themselves for another heatwave as they continue to tackle raging bush fires. temperatures of over a0 degrees centigrade are expected in several states. there are more than 100 fires still burning across new south wales, southern australia and victoria. bad weather, black friday deals and online sales are being blamed for a fall in the number of boxing day shoppers. analysts said the number of people
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braving the high streets and shopping centres was just over 10% lower than the same day last year. it's been a good year for migrant butterflies, moths and dragonflies in the uk, according to a review by the national trust. the charity says extreme weather this year has caused an influx of migrant wildlife — such as these painted lady butterflies. but the report also found mixed fortunes for some of our native species, such as water voles and sea birds. astronomers are warning that thousands of satellites due to be blasted into space next year could impede their research. the aim is to create internet access for every corner of the globe but scientists say there 5 evidence that crowded skies are already causing problems. there is live sport going on as we speak. you said you were enjoying seeing the sunshine in south africa.
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england have already bowled south africa eight. they can have a cup of tea. 0r something cooler. tea is good for cooling down. is that right? every day is a skill day. my answer to most things is a cup of tea. it took less than ten minutes for england to wrap up the south african first innings in centurion this morning. stuart broad got vernon philander caught behind to bowl south africa out for 284. england have just got their first innings under way. and very nearly got off to the worst possible start when rory burns was given out first ball. he reviewed it though and replays showed he hadn't hit it. a short time ago, england had moved
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onto six without loss. even though most of the country might be, liverpool managerjurgen klopp says they're not thinking or mentioning winning the premier league just yet. that despite going 13 points clear after thrashing second—placed leicester 4—0 last night. patrick gearey was watching. music, hype, light — this was leicester's big night. a chance to look liverpool in the eyes, to keep them on their side of the horizon. it's so difficult to watch them all. 0ne marauding red always escapes. here was roberto firmino. on saturday he scored the winner in the world cup club final. that experience of glory and what it takes to get there is now ingrained in this liverpool squad. they knew they needed a second. here was their chance. caglar soyuncu hand—ball, penalty. we can watch from james milner‘s point of view, but it's far harder to understand his calm. that kick could have settled the match and perhaps much more. from now on it was
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about showing off. firmino placed in the third and the fourth was fired home by a born—and—bred red, trent alexander—arnold from western derby, liverpool. part of a team that are european and club world cup champions, and have just taken a major step towards ruling england as well. everyone knows what a good season leicester is playing so far, how many problems they could cause. today we were really concentrated, we did a lot of things really good. especially then, scoring the goals, that is absolutely nice. yeah, very important day for us. important to say the least. manchester city play this evening and they caught the reds last season, but the nature of this win begs the question — was this the night liverpool moved out of sight? chelsea are fourth, but as close to the top of the table as they are to the bottom after losing at home to southampton. michael 0bafemi's well—taken first half strike set them on their way to a 2—0 win and made it two out of two over the festive period. mikel arteta's first game
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in charge of arsenal was very similar to many of the ones before he came in. no win, but they came from behind to draw at bournemouth. the new manager bounce worked at everton. carlo ancelotti's reign started with a 1—0 win over burnley. dominic calvert lewin with the only goal. and teenager mason greenwood scored again, decent hit it was too, as manchester united came from behind to beat newcastle. they're four points off the champions league spots now. will we get a different name on the scottish premiership trophy this season? celtic‘s monopoly on the silverware in scotland looks good for the time being. they're still five points clear of rangers in second after winning 2—1 at st mirren. the first goal came from callum mcgregor — who reacted fastest to the rebound. jamie forrest's14th of the season made it two. rangers can close the gap if they can beat celtic on sunday lunchtime. for the second successive year, clan des 0bo won the king george vi chase. not dissimilar to the premier league. a one horse race out front — winning by more than 20 lengths.
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his trainer said he could be considered for the cheltenham gold cup next. two welsh derbies in the pro 1a on boxing day. cardiff beat dragons but there was a massively one sided contest in the other as scarletts thrashed an injury—hit ospreys 411—0. steffan evans scored a couple of tries for the home side. osprey's are bottom of their pro 1a group and have lost their last ten matches. and after three days off, the darts is back at alexandra palace. world champions like michael van gerwen and gary anderson are in action this evening. but you suspect the biggest reception is going to be reserved for fallon sherrock. the only woman to ever win a match in the history of the event. she's now into the third round and will face chris dobey this afternoon. you suspect that is going to be the biggest cheer of the day when she walks out on stage. i am not crying! i have terrible sneezes. i was trying not to sneeze and that makes
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me cry. she loves the crowd and she makes it work to her advantage. me cry. she loves the crowd and she makes it work to her advantagem worked in the last round against an opponent who struggled with the fact that no one was rooting for him. are you ok? that no one was rooting for him. are you 0k? yes, thanks. i have the cold. i suspect a lot of people have it. with unusually high temperatures in winter and heavy downpours over the summer, it's been a year of varied and extreme weather in the uk. the national trust has been looking into how that's affected our wildlife over the past 12 months. fiona lamdin is at the ebworth estate in gloucestershire to tell us more. we can see you now. yes, the fog has lifted. i am on the edge of 600 acres of woodland. these
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are 400—year—old beech trees and they have seen a real mixed climate, a hot start to the year and in the middle of the year was really wet. there are winners and losers with this weather. i have been to cambridgeshire to see how they are dealing with the problem there. are they mallards? there is mallard, yes. wicken fen near cambridge is thought to be the oldest nature reserve in the uk. back in the day we would get 100 or 200 individuals, now upwards of 1,000. over the last two decades they have doubled the size of the reserve, which is now home to 9820 species. how have they done this? turn the valve on and let the water in. by flooding the fields. probably the most important is the fact that in re—wetting the peat, the soil, that locks
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the carbon away. it locks away the carbon that was already in the soil back into the soil and prevents it disappearing into the atmosphere. that's the biggest benefit. from turning farmlands to floodplains, they have reduced the greenhouse gas emissions here by 80%. we are as hands—on as possible. by introducing animals and by putting water back into the landscape, which has formally been drained, it allows mother nature to take its course and the wildlife comes back with it as well. what they are doing seems to be working. if you go to the left you can see a pair of gadwall, heads down, feeding. this year saw the first pair of breeding cranes in a century. this mosaic of wildlife landscapes is now one of the most prolific and diverse nature reserves in the country. iam i am with the lead ranger here.
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paint the bigger picture notjust to put across the uk, has the weather been playing havoc with different species? yes, it has been a weird year with wet periods and hot periods. the hottest day of the year injuly and periods. the hottest day of the year in july and some periods. the hottest day of the year injuly and some cold periods in scotland. they have had to adapt, species. those migrant species who have come across, some rare ones appearing on our shores. some which are more common like the painted lady butterfly which a lot of people seen fluttering. you have had a lot of those here. yes, but this year has been extremes of numbers. 0n the big butterfly count have a million we re big butterfly count have a million were counted on monday which is the largest numbers we have seen for ten yea rs. largest numbers we have seen for ten years. other migrants include
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dragonflies, we have had rare ones of those. those which are resident here, we have had some good numbers of seals across the country in west wales, in temperature, record numbers of seal pups, good numbers for those. adapting to the changes going on around them. not so well for the puffins. yes, and some of the other sea birds have suffered mainly down to events where certain ra i nfa lls, mainly down to events where certain rainfalls,100 mainly down to events where certain rainfalls, 100 millimetres in mainly down to events where certain rainfalls,100 millimetres in one day injune rainfalls,100 millimetres in one day in june when rainfalls,100 millimetres in one day injune when the czechs were at their most vulnerable, we had quite a high mortality rate for some of those species —— the chicks. a high mortality rate for some of those species -- the chicks. this goes the whole way to bristol to the river severn. you had huge flooding
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in 2007 but despite this you have managed to attract other animals. yes, the core project work was the idea of slowing the flow, reducing the quantity of high intensity rainfall events heading downstream but the knock—on effect on part of the benefit was by putting in these lea ky the benefit was by putting in these leaky dams with very high catchment such as we are at the top of the headwater it improves the water quality so we are getting more species better survival for things like crayfish and authors which are finding their way like crayfish and authors which are finding theirway up like crayfish and authors which are finding their way up these streams. —— and otters. finding their way up these streams. -- and otters. i am afraid it was too foggy to capture the owl that we saw. i love seeing owls.
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learning to ride a bike is a skill which most of us pick up at a young age and then never forget. but that's not the case for everyone. we're joined now by two people, declan and joy, who thought they would never learn to ride. but they beat the odds and now they've received special awards from cycling uk. they're here now, along with declan's mum, siobhan, and jenny box from cycling uk. we will continue any minute, declan, but why have they been given these jumpers? we wanted to recognise the everyday heroes of cycling and we felt the yellow jersey which is usually seen with cycling excellence on the tour de france was the perfect keepsake and a way of saying thank you from us, a way to recognise the challenges they have ove rco m e recognise the challenges they have overcome and how they are inspiring others to cycle. when you were
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growing up did you think you were going to be able to ride a bike? no, because i have a dyspraxia which is affecting my balance. when you try to write about what would happen?” would normally just fall to write about what would happen?” would normallyjust fall off. to write about what would happen?” would normally just fall off. what changed? once i started to ride i got used to it and i accomplish that. this is you on the bike looking secure and everything is ok so how did you get to the point, mum, as declan described, feeling not confident and then being able to do it? the key thing was the one—to—one tuition he had with the charity that received funding from
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the big bike revival who came into declan's school in kidderminster. they were able to work with the pupils there. what was the thing for declan that they were able to do that gave you that confidence?” think it was adam that engaged with you, wasn't it? he took the pedals off of the bike so it was a balance bike to start with and then it was done over about three sessions so he had a session in school and one in the summer holidays and another one in school and in the third session he was pedalling independently so it was lovely and i was there to see it. you need to describe what that moment was like when you first on your own were feeling good on a bike. what did that feel like? awesome. i can go everywhere on my
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bike for freedom and i am not going to fall off. more riding around. this came to you later in life. much later. age 50. he had been wanting to learn. i could not find anyone to teach me so it took a lot of trial and error to find someone who could teach me and when i started learning getting that practice, getting a bike, holding on for dear life, trying to get up hills, but what really helped was doing a course because that gave me a lot of confidence, so cycling uk and begged birmingham bikes were instrumental in helping me do that. did it become, i hesitate to say, embarrassing? yes. people would ask
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you to go for a bike ride. it was embarrassing and people would think of course you can write. i went on a disastrous holiday where people said just get on the bike and i got on the bike and ifell off. i ended up wheeling it round instead of riding it and wheeling it round instead of riding itandi wheeling it round instead of riding it and i thought i have to learn. you have been very open about the whole thing and i bet you have lots of reaction. absolutely. everybody is really pleased but more importantly is really pleased but more im porta ntly lots of is really pleased but more importantly lots of people who felt they couldn't write before i've got lessons. you take out rides. does it involve ca ke ? lessons. you take out rides. does it involve cake? that is one of the main reasons i ride my bike. we have a cafe at the reservoir which is
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fantastic and usually it is a big brea kfast. fantastic and usually it is a big breakfast. what declan was saying about the joy, did you feel that? what was it like for you? absolutely, that sense of freedom, almost like flying, absolutely wonderful, and so peaceful being out in the fresh air. it can be a family thing as well. absolutely. did you cycle before? declan has inspired us to get the bikes out. we are going to get the bikes out. we are going to have a family holiday where we are going to cycle together. this was what you got for your birthday? yes. is it well used? yes. if you had a message for someone who maybe hadn't written for a long time or is
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lacking in confidence what would you say? get on the bike. get some lessons from people and you can do it. don't think about falling over. good advice. i love the yellow jerseys. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. do you cycle? not particularly but it is certainly better cycling weather, drier and milder across the country. we have seen a little bit of sunshine breaking through in cumbria but overall cloudy for many and it is going to be wet particularly for scotla nd going to be wet particularly for scotland and northern ireland. it has been raining quite heavily so far. across the western half of scotland. the rain easing from
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northern ireland and there will be some drier spells. this afternoon wet and windy, gales and if not severe gales around northern parts of scotland. a few breaks in the cloud across western parts of england and wales but overall cloudy with patchy light rain and drizzle coming and going but generally a drier scene for england and wales than the last few days. mildest on the west but the north and west of scotla nd the west but the north and west of scotland where some of the windiest weather will be particularly for shetland. the rain clears the way to night and overnight more rain returns. northern ireland pretty wet. much of england and wales will be dry through the bulk of the night and northern england will see some rainfor and northern england will see some rain for the first half and we will have partly clear skies with temperatures into single figures for some but generally mild for the
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weekend. moving across england and wales with these weather fronts skipping around the north—western edge which will bring persistent rainfor edge which will bring persistent rain for the highlands on saturday, some rain close to northern ireland. a few splashes of rain cannot be rotated in eastern scotland, but hazy sunshine could be possible. generally cloudy and mild with temperatures ten to 12 degrees and milder still for someone to sunday with airfrom milder still for someone to sunday with air from north—west africa. for more of you there will be sunshine to enjoy particularly for england and wales. 0ne to enjoy particularly for england and wales. one or two showers. even in the hebrides there should be drier moments. 1a or 15 celsius as possible, much higher than we would expect at this time of year. cooling down into the start of next week but
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the emphasis staying on largely dry conditions and if you are thinking about new year's eve there may be a bit of fog around but crucially it should be dry. are you in tomorrow?” should be dry. are you in tomorrow? i am not. i am having a few welcome christmas days off. if you're thinking of going for a post—christmas run today but struggling for motivation, here's one man who may well inspire you to get your trainers on. alex flynn is training to run four ultra—marathons — that's around 750 miles in total — across four of the world's biggest deserts. and that's despite being diagnosed with parkinson's disease over a decade ago. alex joins us now. we know that you are about to do extraordinary things and you already have. maybe the place to start is
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about your diagnosis and when you first knew you had parkinson's. this was 12 years ago. 12 years ago i got into work and picked up a cup of coffee and my little finger shook and honestly it was something that played on my mind for a couple of days and i went to see my doctor and i was diagnosed with parkinson's of unknown origin. i was 36. that is young, isn't it? no, the youngest diagnosis was such a two—year—old boy in 2016. parkinson's will affect one in 37 people watching this programme. it is about rigidity. the shaking you see at the moment is not my disease. it is my medication. and also i am a bit nervous! to be fair,
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thatis also i am a bit nervous! to be fair, that is absolutely allowed, but don't be, because everybody watching will have a huge amount of sympathy for you. tell us about the challenge you are taking on. what you are doing is immense. the challenge is five ultramarathons, not four, starting in the skeleton coast in africa and then going to mongolia where it is going to be called and wet and exceptionally mountainous so there will be desert and then carrying on to another desert in south america and finishing off, there are also mountains in between i forgot between mongolia and the desert, and then lastly there is the antarctic. can you explain for us
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how is the condition relative to what you are trying to do? how much is it hampering you awe—inspiring you or what? the condition inspires me to keep moving because to keep moving amelia rates my symptoms. my symptoms deteriorate when i don't exercise. the more you are pushing yourself the less the condition ma nifests yourself the less the condition manifests itself? absolutely, and i wa nt to manifests itself? absolutely, and i want to prove to people with neurological disease they can keep pushing the boundaries whatever their circumstance. if they have trouble getting across their room or getting up a flight of stairs, that is the everest. i got to the point where i need help to get a t—shirt on but i can run an ultramarathon. for me exercises pivotal. we are watching some of your training here
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and you are clearly extremely fit and you are clearly extremely fit and extremely strong. when you are doing something like an ultramarathon are there good days and days where there are bad days? parkinson's every day is unique and different. everybody has different symptoms from parkinson's. it is a designer disease. there are fantastic charities, parkinson's uk, working to bring treatment in years not decades because as people with parkinson's we don't have decades. i have years. i would like to put a shout out to any companies that might be watching who would like to put parkinson's on top of the world to get in touch because i need help to get in touch because i need help to get in touch because i need help to get these things done. you will be inspiring so many people. what is your motivation? my motivation is my kids. i want to prove to them they have a dad who didn't give up. i
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have a dad who didn't give up. i have a dad who didn't give up. i have a 20—year—old, an 18 year and an eight—year—old. have a 20—year—old, an 18 year and an eight-year-old. what they make of what you are to do? they think that is superman but i am not, i am just determined to keep going. did you think there will be a cure? what are you hoping for? i would like to think there are going to be treatments and there are incredible and advances. california is working on genetics and treatments there are looking towards preventing... in your brain there are neurons that die that effect dopamine production and if we can stop them getting affected, which is the main issue in
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parkinson's, then who knows? we have catches sitting still. sitting still. we will keep an eye on you and we hope it goes well. that's all from breakfast today — we're back tomorrow at 6am.
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this is bbc news i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 9.00: at least 15 people have been killed, after a plane crashed in kazakhstan — but there are at least 60 survivors, including children. tributes are paid to a father and his two children, who drowned in a hotel swimming pool in spain on christmas eve. free hospital parking in england for some patients and visitors from april — but questions over how it will be funded. the parents separated from their premature babies and the hospital app that's helping them. and in half an hour, i will be looking back at the best films of the year, films from around the world, from spectacular blockbusters to the hidden arthouse gems. that's all in review 2019: the year in film,

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