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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  January 21, 2020 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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you're watching afternoon live. today: backing an initiative to plant a trillion tree, president trump attacks activists. it is a time for optimism and action but to embrace the possibilities of tomorrow, we must reject the prophets of doom and their predictions of the apocalypse. we're not telling you to offset your emissions byjust not telling you to offset your emissions by just paying not telling you to offset your emissions byjust paying someone else to plant trees in places like africa, while at the same time forests like the amazon are being slaughtered at a higher rate.
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planting trees is good of course, but it is nowhere near enough. planting trees is good of course, but it is nowhere near enoughm washington donald trump will tonight become only the third us president to be tried in the senate, accused of abusing his powers. after the november terror attacks, plans to introduce lie detector tests. £4 billion, the legal bill the nhs in england faces after negligence claims. and coming up, all the sport with sarah. hello, iwill have claims. and coming up, all the sport with sarah. hello, i will have all the news from the australian open, that was not a great one for british hopes. konta and edmonds out. more from you later. now the weather with matt. good afternoon, it is blue or grey skies for the next few days.
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most places staying dry. i wish i could say the same for spain and france. i will show you what is happening there. also coming up, the duke of sussex arrives in canada to be reunited with his wife and questions remain about what the future holds. raise we're asking you to act as if you love your children more than anything else, the words of greta thunberg as she challenged world leaders in davos. their inaction is fuelling climate change she said. but president trump rejected what he called the prophets of doom. it is a time for optimism, he said. our
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correspondent sent this report. getting away from it all... donald trump has flown over 4000 miles from washington to the alpine heights of davos, hoping to look more like a president on the world stage, less like a defendant back home. he's treading carefully on all the ice and snow. any fall here would look terrible. but will this gathering of the world economic forum, 5,000 feet up in switzerland, give an embattled president the high ground he craves? even without impeachment, he's way out of step with the main goal of this meeting — to do much more to tackle global temperature rise. this is a time for optimism. fear and doubt is not a good thought process, because this is a time for a tremendous hope and joy and optimism and action. but to embrace the possibilities of tomorrow, we must reject
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the perennial prophets of doom and their predictions of the apocalypse. they are the heirs of yesterday's foolish fortune tellers and i have them, you have them, we all have them, and they want to see us do badly but we don't let that happen. being here today in switzerland and not in washington, the president may feel he is among friends, surrounded by more than 100 fellow billionaires. but in truth, he's in a much more vulnerable and uncomfortable position than any of them. one of his fiercest critics, greta thunberg, the swedish teenage climate activist, was condemning not just the united states but governments around the world. she accuses them of making empty promises to hide inaction. you say, "children shouldn't worry." you say, "just leave this to us, we will fix this, we promise, we won't let you down. don't be so pessimistic."
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and then... nothing. silence. or something worse than silence — empty words and promises, which give the impression that sufficient action is being taken. president trump will be using the rest of his time in davos to focus on one—to—one meetings with other world leaders. he will be discussing everything from trade disputes to the huge tensions of the middle east. but the long shadow of events in washington seems to reach here to switzerland. james robbins, bbc news, davos. backin back in washington he is not there, but donald trump will tonight become only the third american president to go on trial in the senate. he is accused of abusing his powers. but with the republican party in the majority in the upper house, it is unlikely the president will be
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removed from office. will all senators now stand or remain standing and raise their right hand? do you solemnly swear that in all things appertaining to the trial of the impeachment of donald john trump. . 7 yes, these are 100 members of the united states senate, but for the next few weeks, they will also be jurors and judges. they get to fix the rules of the trial and decide on guilt. well, we'll be sitting there in our chairs probably in the order of six hours a day, starting at 1pm eastern time, and then six days a week. so this is going to be, i think, kind of a gruelling exercise but also one that will be public. pthe resident faces two charges. the resident faces two charges. the first is that he abused his power by pressuring the president of ukraine to investigate one of his main democratic rivals, former vice presidentjoe biden. the second is that he obstructed congress by trying to stop
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officials giving evidence and withholding documents. there are almost no rules for a trial like this and democrats and republicans are completely at odds over whether to call witnesses at all. that all means this trial could last anything from two to six weeks. democrats want to hear from the former national security adviserjohn bolton, who reportedly likened the pressure being put on ukraine to a drug deal. but republicans are threatening to retaliate by insisting joe biden or his son appear too. in the coming days, senate republicans are going to face a choice — will they take their cues from the white house, as leader mcconnell clearly stated, and engage in a cover—up for president donald trump?
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the president continues to dismiss his impeachment as a hoax, instead focusing on his achievements here at a farmers' rally in texas. and what do i get out of it? tell me. i get impeached, that's what i get out of it. by these radical left lunatics, i get impeached. but that's ok. the farmers are sticking with trump. it would take a two—thirds majority in the senate to convict the president and remove him from office. that is extremely unlikely. nevertheless, these coming weeks will resonate for years to come. here, borisjohnson here, boris johnson has here, borisjohnson has vowed to invite african leaders to the uk regularly. he made the pledge in this meeting with the kenyan president. the kenyan president said the congress was great and said it was the first in a long time we have had this kind of exchange with the
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uk. new laws to end automatic early release fr prison are being introduced. the measures could involve the use of lie detectors test to assess how much monitoring a released terrorist needs. daniel sa ndford released terrorist needs. daniel sandford reports. the man who carried out the fishmongers hall attack had come out of prison just one year earlier. he had been serving 16 years for preparing terrorist acting, but was released half way through that sentence, prompting criticism of the criminal justice system. the father ofjack merrett, the young man killed here in london said his son would not have wa nted in london said his son would not have wanted his death to be used to justify tougher sentencing for terrorism, but today the government is doing exactly that. watching
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elite police firearms officers training, the home secretary priti patel announced that by march there will be a new counter terrorism bill before parliament, ending the automatic early release of most serious terrorist prisoners and raising the minimum sentencejudges can pass. we will ensure that we increase sentences to 14 years for the offenders involved in planning terrorist offences and also involved in training for terrorist offences w that, we are clear that we are going to be reviewing licensing conditions so to be reviewing licensing conditions so people do not have early release. ministers say they will introduce lie detector tests to help monitor people recently released from prison. something jack merrett‘s father described as a cynical
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gimmick. there will be more psychologists and immams involved in reradicalised prisoners. but the mother of one terrorism victim said... it is good to invest in staff, but what is important to is to prevent things happening, which is martin's law, which is putting money into prevent. once someone has been radicalised, no one says there isa been radicalised, no one says there is a hundred per cent they can be deradicalised. police warned their workload has gone up by a third in three years and agree that more needs to be done on diverting people away from extremism. we can talk to professor david cantor. it is a
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headline—grabber, the idea of lie detector tests for something like this and you don't have to look far, thejeremy this and you don't have to look far, the jeremy kyle this and you don't have to look far, thejeremy kyle show, to see it will be controversial. yes it has been around for about a hundred years, the problem is it is not a lie detector, it is something that measures what you might loosely call emotional response, whether your palms get sweaty, whether your breathing changes and the idea is that when you are telling an untruth, it increases the stress, it is something that is a challenge to think through and therefore it is likely to have some influence on your emissional o' o'—— emotional reactions, but excitement, fear, all sorts of things will generate the same responses. so it is disentangling these to determine
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whether somebody is lying, which is such a challenge. i'm hoping that requires an element of skill and it depends on what the questions are, how they're asked and what the person asking them is look for. how they're asked and what the person asking them is look fonm is more than that. it depends on having an established procedure that has been found to work. one of the problems with this measures of fizz logical response is that there is no actually standard procedure for using them. and they are based around an interview. they are how do people react to the questions asked of them. so that those questions can va ry of them. so that those questions can vary in all sorts of ways. and finding the appropriate questions that will be useful is very important indeed and as i say, not something that has been very firmly established. so beyond that, there is the need to train people in the process that is known to be effective and that is not easy.
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there are all sorts of aspects of it. for instance, if you wire somebody up to one of these pieces of kit, they will quickly adapt to the sensation and the mood of it. the early response that a person has maybe very misleading, compared with responses when they have been wired up responses when they have been wired upfor it responses when they have been wired up for it for 10 or 15 minutes. there is a lot of subtleties involved in how you use the kit and that needs a lot of training. involved in how you use the kit and that needs a lot of traininglj wonder why it is in operation already, seven forces in england and wales use these things with existing sex offenders. why is that deemed to be acceptable, when we're quibbling over other offenders. all they're using them for is to see whether people may have broken the rules of their parole and whether there is some aspect of what they're doing that they shouldn't be doing. isn't
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that they shouldn't be doing. isn't that exactly what they're talk about, asking someone convict offend about, asking someone convict offend a terrorist offence, are you still in touch with those who radicalised you, have you had thoughts of attacking the country, it is things like that isn't it snt it? yes it is getting the background of what the person is part of. but particularly, if you're a terrorist and you have thought your quaye through into the whole process, those are questions you will be asked all the time and not something you will have a physical reaction to. what percentage success would you give a lie detector? the research that i know about suggests that in order to tell whether or not somebody is being truthful, they possibly work in above chance level of 60 or 70% of the time. but they're not nearly
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so of the time. but they're not nearly so effective in telling whether somebody is lying. that is, people can avoid being detected and lying and they're can avoid being detected and lying and they‘ re often can avoid being detected and lying and they're often only a chance level for that. the key to their use is that people believe in them. with sex offenders, i have been told by people who have studied this, if the offender believes that their truth will come out, they may confess to something before they're even wired up something before they're even wired up to the equipment. thank you very much. you're watching afternoon live. our headlines: president trump launches a stinging attack on environmentalists. in washington donald trump will today become only the the third us president to be tried in the senate. after the november terror attacks, plans to
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introduce lie detectors tests. on a day of british exits at the australian open qualifier and world number 173 harriet dart was the only one of 5 to come through their opening round matches... opening round matches. she showed superb fight to win a final set tie break against japan's misaki doi. well british number one johanna konta believes her season will still come good after exiting in the first round. she was beaten in straight sets by tunisia's ons jabeur. and leicester tigers have confirmed the news that steve borthwich is to leave england at the end of the season to become their new head coach. i will be back with more after half past. see you then. let's return to the impeachment of donald trump. proceedings start in the senate tonight. let's talk to oui’ the senate tonight. let's talk to our correspondent gary o'donoghue on capitol hill. they‘ re
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our correspondent gary o'donoghue on capitol hill. they're still deciding how the trial will be conducted, what can we expect later? what you're going to get is a couple of hours of debate and discussion over a sort of resolution that the republican, who are in the majority in the senate, have put forward. that specifies and stipulates thousand trial will be conducted. in specific terms, it says that the democrats have two days and 24 hours to put their case. two days over 24 hour, that is 12 hours a day, beginning tomorrow afternoon and they will be going into the early hours of following morning. the white house will have something system and then there will be questions. only then will there be a vote on whether or not no call more witnesses, that is of course what the democrats want, because they believe that there are key witnesses in this affair involving ukraine that they haven't heard from yet,
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because they were blocked from talking to the investigation before christmas. is there any chance that donald trump himself might have to give evidence? yeah, i have heard this floated. i think that is very unlikely. he has a huge legal team. including people like kenneth starr, who was the independent counsel under bill clinton, who investigated bill clinton over the monica lewin ski affairand bill clinton over the monica lewin ski affair and another part of that sort of team that defended oj simpson in the nineties. i think it is unlikely that donald trump will appear in his own defence. he threatened a lot of times to speak to the mueller inquiry and be interviewed by them and that never happened. i would would be amazed if the president appeared to answer questions. i'm seeing on the wires
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reporting that the... impeachment managers have demanded disclosure from trump's lawyer, how significant could that be, he could be a material witness. that would be tricky, he is the white house counsel, the lead lawyer on their side. there is a lot of argument going on at the moment about evidence and to what extent evidence will be included in the record. it is quite technical, but effectively everything that was heard before christmas, the documentation, everything, has to be voted into the record and the republicans may not allow that. the whole weight of evidence is not automatically going to go in there. we will see what happens, but what you're going to get this time around, unlike with the bill clinton impeachment, where the bill clinton impeachment, where the senate voted 100 to one on the rules, they agreed how it should
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proceed, this time around, 20 years on, 20 more years of partisanship, you will get straight down the line party votes. particularly at this stage of the process on how it should be conducted. stage of the process on how it should be conductedlj stage of the process on how it should be conducted. i know you're not a betting man, if you were, would you go with the republican wish that this is going to be short and in their words sweet, or could it and in their words sweet, or could hdmg and in their words sweet, or could it drag on for a long time? oh, my goodness! well, look... it is very difficult. there are a handful of republicans that could upset this apple cart. there are a handful who have hinted publicly, privately, that they might be prepared to support the idea of witnesses being called. it only needs four of them, just four, to swap sides for that to change the maths in the senate in terms of rules. if they start calling witnesses, that could turn this into a very long process. not least and this is a key point, because if they start calling
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witnesses that the president doesn't wa nt to witnesses that the president doesn't want to hear from, witnesses that the president doesn't want to hearfrom, likejohn bolton, he will block that through executive privilege and then it has to go to the he supreme court. i didn't a nswer the he supreme court. i didn't answer your question did i?|j the he supreme court. i didn't answer your question did i? i don't think i have ever seen you stumped foran think i have ever seen you stumped for an answer — that is the first time! thank you very much. more from you later on. here the nhs in england owes more than £4 billion in legal fees to settle claims of clinical negligence, accorded to figures received by the beep. —— bbc. brother, son, and nephew. this is hayden. soon after, though, he was rushed to hospital, and died there.
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he was just six days old. it is every parent's worst nightmare. we just had to there and watch as our son slowly die in front of our eyes, literally. and then he died, in front of our eyes. it has been four years of trauma after trauma. in the face of official silence, they felt they had no choice but to sue. "parental concerns not listened to." i haven't really thought about it as suing the nhs. i've thought about it as kind of fighting for a voice for hayden, and fighting for, you know, acknowledgement of his life and his rights. i don't think we had a choice. you can't bring that person back, nothing is going to bring them back, and the only thing that helps is to have acknowledgement that they existed, that they mattered, and answers as to why, how this happened.
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the hospital did eventually admit liability, years later. that picture is being repeated across england. payments for clinical negligence have doubled since 2015. last year, the nhs paid out £2.3 billion, but the total cost of outstanding claims now stands at a staggering £83 billion, and we've learnt legal fees make up £4.3 billion of that. doctors fear costs are spiralling out of control, but lawyers for patients claim safety failings is still the biggest issue. the nhs in england says 70% of claims are now resolved without going to court, and it is committed to learn from incidents in order to improve patient safety. but hayden's death is evidence of a system that failed, one his parents believe is in urgent
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need of reform. the money should be paid on training doctors and nurses. there's a death, and you pay, there's a death, you pay, there's an injury, you pay. and they're not actually fixing the source of the problem, so it'sjust going to be repeated. angus crawford, bbc news. some breaking news from frankfurt, we are hearing the japanese car maker mitsubishi is being investigated for devices installed in its diesel engines. officials investigating a number of members of staff at the car maker for fraud, as well as a car dealership company and two suppliers as part of probe. they're cars equipped with 1.6 litre
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diesel engines are being investigated and premises has been searched in germany. according to prosecutors. mitsubishi not unfamiliar with probes into the use of defeat devices. their president in fact stepped down after their admission to cheating fuel efficiency tests in 2016. but a prosecutor in germany looking into a new allegation of using defeat devices in their software. we will find out more on that and bring it to you. one of britain's biggest unions will announce today who it is backing in the labour leadership contest. the union announces its decision in what will be a boost for which ever candidate wins their backing. let's talk our political
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correspondent ian watson. how important is this vote this afternoon and who mightjust be looking at leaving this contest? well that's right, it is hugely important, largely because of the way the labour party rules work. if you're to avoid going around the country trying to get the support of more than 30 local parties, you need the backing of two big trade unions. keir starmer has already done that and the decision by the gmb is crucial for lisa nandy. and the decision by the gmb is crucialfor lisa nandy. if and the decision by the gmb is crucial for lisa nandy. if nay back her she has a good chance of being on the ballot. if not she will struggle. but it is the person who did not turn up for today's meeting thatis did not turn up for today's meeting that is the most interesting, because jess phillips that is the most interesting, becausejess phillips who, said she was a different type of leader and was a different type of leader and was a different type of leader and was a critic ofjeremy corbyn's, she was a critic ofjeremy corbyn's, she was due to put her case to members of the gmb today and chose not to
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attend and the expectation is she will be withdrawing from this contest in the very near future. there will be a meeting with people who supported her in parliament, she will be talking through the state of campaign. but it all points in one direction for a number of reasons. first of all, she didn't have any trade union support at all. secondly that different way of getting on to the leadership ballot, getting support from constituency parties, well she hasn't been nominated by them either. also she said in an article for a newspaper that she thought the hustings at the weekend, where members can talk to the candidates and question them, they had gone badly for her and she didn't like the format and thought either keir starmer or rebecca long bailey would win. when she makes this statement on the future of her campaign, it is going to be a statement which suggests this field will narrow from five to four
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candidates today and certainly if the gmb were to back keir starmer, we could see the field narrow further. jess phillips was expecting to get the nomination from the shop workers union, that went to keir starmer. is there a sense that keir starmer. is there a sense that keir starmer could go this alone and they may let him have a clear field?” don't think that will happen. first, i think those on the left of the party don't quite trust keir starmer to carry the torch of corbynism any further, although he has been stressing his left—wing credentials. they want a left—wing candidate and thatis they want a left—wing candidate and that is rebecca long bailey. another trade union mads a decision on friday. the unite leader said he is not making a recommendation, but it is expected rebecca long bailey
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would get their backing. lisa nandy has the backing of the num. if she gets support today, she will be on the ballot. so you're looking at a three—horse race, rather than one person galloping over the finishing line. he has had the early moment and the fact keir starmer had that early momentum, people field he has squeezed the potential for support and he wasn'tjust picking up some support on the left, but hoovering up support on the left, but hoovering up the support of those who wanted the party to change direction and that was a space she wanted to occupy. we will leave it there. i saw you almost break into a gallop and then started to hoover. there will be more mixed metaphors to come! thank you.
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mike taylor is here. from hoovering to mopping up? that is barcelona, not what you would expect to see. now, winter breaks in spain have been like this. so stormy that the low pressure system, the cloud has been lasting since the weekend, it has been given a name, storm gloria, it has produced all sorts of problems. apparently the mac deaths. it has been ripping up some pretty rough seas in the mediterranean. this is the viewjust along the coast from alica nte this is the viewjust along the coast from alicante through yesterday, dc has been coming onshore, the winds pushing that c right onto the promenade. justin lined in valencia, they had as much
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rain and have days days 9 birmingham has in an entire 6 months. justin lined, some snow. british holiday—makers don't expect to see scenes like this, 76 centimetres of snow expected around there. notjust spain, france too. we could have seen the highest wave height recorded in the mediterranean, 80 metres high waves just off the shore from valencia. it has been an incredible sound system, not finished yet either. what else is occurring? we could see that continuing, could see 70 centimetres of snow around the pyrenees over the next few days. it is all because of what we have here, high pressure in charge, nothing is moving as far as the atmosphere is concerned, low pressure they are, more stormy seas to comment. are we going to get
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that? now, we have high pressure, it will stay dry. it will become a little less cold, we will see a bit more cloud, not as frosty by night. some sunshine today, just here in west yorkshire. i don't know if you can spot that, just over the hill, the grey skies in lancashire are being kept at bay by the pennines. cloud towards the pennines, 3 south and east of the uk, sunshine to see the day out. it will potentially quickly, i wouldn't be surprised if some of you seal the foster turn, overall, the cloud from the north and west will topple a little bit further south was eastward overnight. there will be gaps, some associative frost in the morning, a few mist and fog patches, the fog is
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extensive tomorrow because we will see slightly less cold ar topple around our high—pressure system, just lifting the temperature a little bit over the next couple of days. there will be a big difference across southern areas. still a little cloud around tomorrow, there will be breaks here and there, particularly not bring out eastern areas. light winds through tomorrow, no staying dry, cloud thick enough and at the far north and west for the spot of rain. temperatures widely into double figures into wednesday afternoon. thursday and friday, high—pressure still in charge, the odd mist and fog patch. the main difference will be the greater chance of some rain and it northern half of scotland, overall, it is dry and a fairly cloudy pitch for thursday and friday. a fair amount of hard for saturday, more of amount of hard for saturday, more of a wind building in for the site of the weekend, no greater chance of a few showers in the west initially. then something later in the north—west of scotland, the best of
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saturday placing on the east on high ground. sunday will clear away some of the cloud, the greater chance of helen, some sunshine, heavy showers developing to the north and west later. some turning wintry of higher ground. into this weekend, as well as things turning windier, things will gradually turn that bit chillier again, temperatures returning back to normal after what has will be a slightly milder spell over the next few days. beyond that, we are into that more changeable pattern. at the moment, it is back to low pressure, spells of wind and rain, typically in the north and west. crewe?
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you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. the headlines: backing an initiative to plant 1000 trees to offset climate change, president trump launches a stinging attack on planned activities as he says it is time for optimism. this isa time says it is time for optimism. this is a time for tremendous hope and i°y is a time for tremendous hope and joy and optimism and action. but to embrace the possibilities of tomorrow, we must reject the perennial prophets of doom and other predictions of the apocalypse. we are not telling you to offset your emissions byjust are not telling you to offset your emissions by just paying are not telling you to offset your emissions byjust paying someone else to plant trees in places like
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africa, while at the same time, for a slightly armours are being slaughtered at an infinitely higher rate. planting trees is good, of course, but is nowhere near enough. in washington, down from over, the third us president to be tried in the senate evening, accused of abusing his powers. after the terror attack tax, plans to introduce a lie detector test to improve her probation officers handle release terrors. £4 billion — an astonishing bill the nhs in england faces at the negligence claims. sport now on afternoon live. plenty of british interest at australian open, how have they been getting on? five brits in action today, four are out. the only success coming from harriet dart.
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the british number three failed to win a single game in the first round last year, but came through a dramatic final set to beat japan's misaki doi. a tough task awaits in round two though, the current wimbledon champion, simona halep. meanwhile, two former semifinalists are both out in kyle edmund and 12th seed johanna konta. she has been struggling with a knee injury. might need going into the match, i was going to may be not feel my best, not see the ball the best, just have that kind of match tightness that we love to have as competitors. it definitely did not discourage me from doing the best i could out there today, it definitely wasn't enough. we still have dan
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eva ns, wasn't enough. we still have dan evans, who will be in a second round action heather watson was due to play her opening match, that has been rescheduled for midnight tonight because of the slow progress on matches here on day two. how have the main contenders been getting on? maria sharapova was beaten and at the first round. she was unsure about her future afterwards and her post—match press conference, she said she didn't know if she would be here next year. however, no such problems for the men's world number one, rafael nadal. safely into round two after a straight sets victory over bolivia's hugo dellien. the world number one and winner in 2009 lostjust five games on the way to a fairly comprehensive victory in melbourne. nadal is looking to win his 20th grand slam and at the same time equal roger federer‘s total.
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that quest has begun for rafael nadal. manchester united have been charged by the football association for failing to ensure their players conducted themselves in an orderly fashion. the charge relates to players confronting referee, craig pawson, during the 2—0 defeat to liverpool, after he had initially allowed a goal by roberto firmino. sunday's loss has since prompted former player gary neville to heavily criticise executive vice chairman ed woodward and the club's recruitment policy. manager ole gunnar solskjaer, though, is only focusing on tomorrow's game against burnley. we have lost to liverpool, a team that you all say are fantastic, and we we re that you all say are fantastic, and we were in the game until the last kick of the ball. for me, that is is the right forwards. of course, we are disappointed at losing the game, we don't want to be behind them in the league. but there are signs that
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we are on the right track, definitely. for me, now is not the time to start talking about the recruitment. for me now, i think we are looking towards the next game against burnley. we are always looking to improve the squad and the club, but in my mind, now is not the time to start discussion, gary. one of the world's best footballers kylian mbappe has told the bbc that he's not considering a move to the premier league not until the end of the season at least. the french world cup winner is currently at paris saint germain and on course to win a third straight league title. despite being linked with moves to real madrid and liverpool he feels he owes some loyalty to the french giants. you know, it's not the moment. you know, we are injanuary. it's the main time in the season.
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imagine i say something, everyone will talk about it and it's not good for psg. i think about the club. the club helped me, because i came here at 18 years, i was a talent but i was not a superstar, but now i'm superstar thanks to paris st—germain and the french national team. so i have to stay calm and focused on p56 100%. at the end of the season, we will see, but now i'm focused on my game. superstar indeed, only 21! more on at the impeachment of donald trump, with the republican party and the majority in the upper house, it is highly unlikely he will be removed from office. less up to white house correspondent from bloomberg. just orchestrate what we will see, nobody is really sure how long this thing will last. —— just talk was for you. under way today,
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one pn talk was for you. under way today, one pm in washington so six pn talk was for you. under way today, one pm in washington so six pm in london. a big debate over how this trial should proceed. mitch mcconnell will introduce...” trial should proceed. mitch mcconnell will introduce... i will try to return to jordan mcconnell will introduce... i will try to return tojordan a little later on, it looks like he is broadcasting from a cupboard in the white house. we will come back later on. in the meantime, let's move on to prince harry. he has arrived in vancouver, in canada, to rejoin his wife, meghan, and theirson, archie. he left london last night after attending a uk—africa investment summit. it's not clear when the couple will return to the uk. sophie long sent us this update from vancouver island. we think that harry has now been reunited with his wife, meghan, and their young son, archie, and one can only imagine that might have been a rather emotional reunion. the couple have been separated by thousands of miles and an eight hour time difference, in what can only be described as an extremely turbulent time — both for the royal couple themselves and the wider royal family. now, we know that harry would have boarded that flight
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in london with a heavy heart. he's talked very candidly about his great sadness at having to take such a major step back. he said he wanted to continue to serve the queen, the commonwealth and his military associations, but that following those negotiations with the queen and senior members of the royal family, that had not been possible. so, while he will have come here with great sadness, that will also have been coupled, one would imagine, with excitement at seeing his wife, meghan, and their young son, archie. it's hoped now — both hope expressed by the queen and harry himself — that they will now be able to move through that transition as we have reported, the number of those killed by the new corona wireless in china has risen to ten. the authorities are taking more elastic measures to try and the disease which causes pneumonia, the world health organisation is also one that diseases like it was pretty
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other cities and countries. cbs correspondent sent us this report from wuhan were at the outbreak began. officials here in wuhan have designated nine hospitals as emergency treatment centres, including the one behind me, on top of 61 is fever clinics and our expert medical team. chinese scientists say that they have figured out the dna sequence of this virus, that possibly opens up new treatments and potentially a vaccine. that is as hundreds of millions chinese residents migrate across the country to ring in the lunar new year, confirmation of the wider could be spread between humans, raising the possibility can be transmitted more quickly and more broadly, that poses an even greater challenge for china and nearby nations to will contain this outbreak. travellers with mass, quarantine stations and temperature checkpoints are becoming common points at transport hubs across asia. the number of new infections
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has risen sharply since yesterday, topping 300 cases in china alone. 15 hospital workers in wuhan here have been diagnosed with the virus. the who has said it will assemble an emergency committee of experts, meeting on wednesday to decide whether this outbreak constitutes a global crisis, and how best to do with it. representatives of australia's tourism industry say about the recent bushfires has cost them almost $700 million, with that number likely to increase further in coming months, many international visitors are expected to stay away even though most of the fight and our out or under control. tourism is estimated to account more than 3% of the show your‘s economic output, i won in13 of the show your‘s economic output, i won in 13 of itsjobs. tourism has been badly affected by the bushfire crisis. this is kangaroo valley, with its famous bridge, about two hours to the south of sydney. now this is a place that this time
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of the year that should be full of visitors, but it's not because people are staying away because of the fires. and this is the story that's been repeated in many other parts of the country. everyone's devastated, you know. their livelihoods are at risk at the moment and people are being laid off and, you know, people are closing their businesses. we have heard of one today that's had to close because they can't afford to pay their rent. yeah, so it's pretty devastating and we are trying to scramble to get help from the government, welfare, and whatever we can, but that's proving very difficult and a long process and frustrating for people. you know, people coming in in tears and it's been devastating. the trade minister simon birmingham says the bushfires have inflicted enormous damage on australia's international tourism reputation. the government is to spend millions
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of dollars trying to rehabilitate australia's image both overseas and also with travellers from australia. many visitors are deciding not to come. this is a country that has paid an enormous price during this bushfire crisis. vast areas of bushland have been scorched, many properties have been destroyed, and lives and livelihoods have been lost. phil mercer, bbc news, in kangaroo valley. then has all the business news. first, a look at the headlines: the promises climate activists are alarmist. in washington this evening, there are come on at the third president to be tried in the senate for abusing his powers. after the november terror attack, plans to introduce lie detector test to help how probation officers handle
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territories. these are your business headlines: a record number of women in full—time work has pushed the uk's employment rate to a new high of 76.3%. the record figure could reduce the chance that the bank of england will cut interest rates when it meets next week. facebook will create a comic 1000 newjobs in london this year, including heart tonic hiring more people to tackle online content. it will take their uk workforce to more than 4000. pressure has been going on the social media firms to remove posts that promote self—harm or political extremism network rail has been issued a formal warning for its positive surface in a north—west and central regions of england, including train operating companies, catlike northern and trans—pennine express. the regulator is investigating if network rail is in
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all it can to improve services. now, disney has set a date to launch a streaming service in at the uk, a market that is already very crowded? yes, it is, you can't move... as a service hurriedly launch and the us, it is coming to the uk and europe at the end of march, march the 24. you're right, such a crowded market, dominated by the likes of netflix and amazon prime, dtb plays. so many others getting in on the act, all asking for subscriptions, rather than thing for one big subscription toa than thing for one big subscription to a satellite or cable provider, they're asking for individual ones. that is a danger that we will be spread, adding up to a lot more. this is no mickey mouse outfit?m is not. there is no recently merged with fox, they have a big back catalogue. they have taken fox out
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of the nine? yes, that was confirmed last week. no confirmation what fox content will be on. they have lounge pixar, because films, of course, a star wars bar pixar, because films, of course, a starwars barend. pixar, because films, of course, a star wars bar end. marvel, superhero films, national geographic having they have a big bit of content that they have a big bit of content that they think will appeal to a lot people. it is a really crowded market to stop in a moment, it will speak to one of the media analyst. first, let her to new york to michelle at the new york stock exchange. michelle, we talked about how it is a crowded market in the us, is even more crowded in this industry? there is net lights, apple, amazon, of course, disney plus. comcast, which owns nbc. the one thing executives i don't want to call this as a streaming war, in
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other words, this big pile on. they wa nt to other words, this big pile on. they want to to see this as a battle for ecosystem dominance. think of the case of disney, you mentioned star wars, they have a big tv show launching on this new service, a spin off. the idea is that they are using video to try and help grow the more profitable bits of their business, whether that be the parks, the cruisers, merchandise, the halo effect around the brand, that is what you're seeing. the same thing with anderson, their prime customers, trying to retain them and get more subscribers. for viewers, this means right now there is this rush to put out good quality content. so, for viewers, rush to put out good quality content. so, forviewers, it rush to put out good quality content. so, for viewers, it is potentially a good thing, of course, we are all having to shell out a bit more, and to that idea broadcast terrestrial television, or cable, is
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streaming. yes, we are all old school. thank you, michelle. let's speak to tom, a media analyst. michelle outlining how tough this market will be. there are so many players, all vying for that first mover advantage, they want to be the ones they get that money in our pocket. absolutely, they are quite getting that advantage, they are miles behind netflix. netflix spends a lot of money on content. these guys are a little bit late to the play, actually. they are not getting money from any one's pockets, they are giving stuff away for free. if you are a verizon subscriber in the us, you will get disney plus for free. if you're an hbo subscriber, you will get their streaming service for free. everyone is trying to build for the services out there so
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that the actual people watching them, the only way to do that is by offering a very low price, much to allude to be sustainable in the new term. 0r allude to be sustainable in the new term. orgiving it allude to be sustainable in the new term. 0r giving it away for free. you say is about scale, yes, disney may not be first but it has a lot of content, including things like lucasfilm, pixar movies, potentially all the folks back catalogue as well, it's a pretty big bees. they have an amazing content library, no doubt about that. year on year, they will be forgoing billions of dollars ina red will be forgoing billions of dollars in a red rate that they would have normally got from a licensing that stuff out. they see this as an accidental play, for then, viewing is moving from traditional models to streaming. —— an existential play. to be there, they need to have the content, the sooner they get those viewers watching it in that way, the
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better for them. emitted a crowded market commands you expect after everything has settled down, when they have worked out what they need to pay, we might see consolidation? that is inevitable, i think. all the services in that they will break even in five years, i will be surprised that most of them do that if ever. a few will survive. it's going to be a messy environment for the next few years. it might good to talk to you. this let me show you the markets, this is what they look like. dixon is carving a really interesting one put out a statement there should be a minus figure behind at the so it is down 2% not up behind at the so it is down 2% not up to percent. i think a bit of a typo of sorts. you would imagine that a tech firm look get this right, nonetheless, they had to
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correct and say that sales fell by 296. correct and say that sales fell by 2%. a good strong start to the day, but it fell back a bit, as investors work out this was nothing sinister, just a typo, the shares are back up again. easyjet have had a great start to the year, lots of uncertainty about travelling because a brexit concerns. they showed up, one of the bigger writers of the year because their focus for the year because their focus for the year is better. now, to the future. matched with the weather forecast. we started in a minus across parts of the country, but positive figures now. we have the sunshine, weather watchers proving that gray is not a lwa ys watchers proving that gray is not always dull, beautiful scene here in the highlands. a sheet of cloud in place, looking at the cloud from space, it is in place across much of
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the western half of scotland, north—west england and north wales. the base of the sunshine to the south. the cloud could be thinking up south. the cloud could be thinking up in western areas. temperatures in single figures away from the north. they will be... the cloud amount start to push their way southwards, temperatures will stay any frost into wednesday rush hour. perhaps the odd bit of fog, it should be a grave but the right start for the most. thing is turning colder though, the amount of colours pushing in from the atlantic as we start to allow those west to north westerly winds to push in. it means more clout in place tomorrow, there will still be some who see the sunshine, southern and eastern areas in particular. maybe some showers in the west. nothing much to move the cloud around tomorrow, when is
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fairly light away from the north west of scotland. but with that less chilly air, temperatures into double figures for most of us. when and thursday, i will surely pressure chart, not much changes for stop high pressure in the self, to see a bit more rain in scotland. thursday and friday, still fairly cloudy, still staying dry, continuing into the start of the weekend but learn things change. one of our breeze on saturday, some breaks here and there, critical across eastern areas, some showers expected on saturday towards the west. temperatures in a single figures. sunday, outbreaks of rain for scotla nd sunday, outbreaks of rain for scotland and northern ireland, pushing their way southwards and eastwards. a lot more sunshine but we will see some showers developing later on, critical across the western half of scotland and northern ireland. some cute on wednesday, the sign that things will turn killing as we head into the
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weekend. after a fairly quiet and dry week with light wins, a little bit of rain, still a lot of doubt whether, eventually turning colour from no no. that is how it is looking.
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you're watching afternoon live. the headlines at 3: jess phillips pulls out of race to be labour leader. she say the party needs a leader to unite all sides of the movement. backing an initiative to plant a billion trees, president trump attacks climate activists. this is a time for tremendous hope and joy this is a time for tremendous hope andjoy and this is a time for tremendous hope and joy and optimism and action. but to embrace the possibilities of tomorrow, we must reject the prophets of doom and their predictions of the apocalypse. we are not telling you to offset your emissions byjust we are not telling you to offset your emissions by just paying someone else to plant at leasts
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trees in africa while forests like the amazon are being slaughtered at a higher rate. planting trees is of course good, but it is no where near enough. in washington donald trump will tonight become only the third us president to be tried in the senate. four billion pounds — the legal bill the nhs in england faces for clinical negligence claims. and all the sport with sarah. . four british players are out of the australian open. more on that later. matt has the weather. it is looking settled. its at the moment, whether it is sunshine or grey skies, most
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places staying dry and we will have a look at what is happening in the mediterranean. also coming up, day one of their new life as the duke of sussex arrives in can canada, questions remain about what the future holds. hello. in the last few minute, the mpjess hello. in the last few minute, the mp jess phillips has hello. in the last few minute, the mpjess phillips has pulled out of labour leadership contest, she said, u nless we labour leadership contest, she said, unless we talk to the country on their term, that we won't be able their term, that we won't be able the make the gains we need to win an election and do what everyone in the labour movement wants to do and that is make people's lives better. she said:
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let's talk to your political correspondent ian watson. not a huge surprise, given she hasn't got the backing of any union? that's right, i'm here at the gmb union, they have been deciding who to nominate in the labour leadership contest, whoever they back will be crucial, butjess phillips didn't turn up for that meeting, the speculation grew that she was on the verge of standing down. she now has officially said she is withdrawing from the campaign. there was a meeting of her supporters and activists at westminster and there will be a video message released to her supporters too. you read out some of the things she said in that
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statement, saying she is not the person she believes to unite the different part of the labour movement. she had backing from fellow politicians, but her pitch was to try and bring people in from outside the labour party, in order to change it, to move away from the corbyn era and listening to the concern of people who turned away from the labour party at the last election. she said in her statement that she has brought in tens of thousands of people who weren't previously involved in politics, or had left the labour party and they had left the labour party and they had come back to support her. now, crucially in her statement, she is not endorsing any other candidate at this stage. but when the members come to make a decision, obviously some of people who may have been attracted to jess some of people who may have been attracted tojess phillips will have votes a nd attracted tojess phillips will have votes and the other candidates, keir starmer i think especially, but also lisa nandy, if she remains in the race, will be trying to pitch for
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those votes to say, we believe this was a serious defeat and we want the change direction. so jess was a serious defeat and we want the change direction. sojess phillips may have had an influence over the election. but she didn't gate union nomination and she was struggling to get nominations from local constituency parties, unlike keir starmer and there was a feeling that the keir starmer machine as they would see it, were sweeping up all the votes that may have gone to her and she has decided to pull out. what are we looking at? it still seems to be a two—horse race? it could be a three—horse race, because one of reasons i'm here at the gmb is simply this, very complex rules the labour party have for candidates to get on to the membership ballot, but they have got to get the support of either two trade unions, or more than 30 local constituency parties. the only person who has overcome
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that barrier so far is keir starmer. there is an expectation that rebecca long bailey will also overcome the barriers when the unite union meets. they're likely to support her. so as far as lisa nandy is concerned, this meeting is crucial. she already has the num on board. if the gmb back her, lisa nandy is likely to be on the ballot and be a fully fledged candidate. if nay don't support her and back keir starmer, he will be pushing ahead and then it could be a two—horse race. but the supporters of lisa nandy hope they will get confirmation she has done well enough to get that nomination. ian, thank you. ‘we're asking you to act
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as if you love your children more than anything else' the words of greta thunberg as she challenged global leaders at the world economic forum in davos. their inaction, she said, is fuelling the flames of climate change. farfrom being on the defensive president trump launched a stinging attack on environmentalists, rejecting those he called prophets of doom whose predictions had been wrong for decades. it's a time for optimism, he said, not pessimism. our diplomatic correspondent james robbins sent this report. getting away from it all... donald trump has flown over 4000 miles from washington to the alpine heights of davos, hoping to look more like a president on the world stage, less like a defendant back home. he's treading carefully on all the ice and snow. any fall here would look terrible. but will this gathering of the world economic forum, 5000 feet up in switzerland, give an embattled president the high ground he craves? even without impeachment,
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he's way out of step with the main goal of this meeting — to do much more to tackle global temperature rise. this is a time for optimism. fear and doubt is not a good thought process, because this is a time for a tremendous hope and joy and optimism and action. but to embrace the possibilities of tomorrow, we must reject the perennial prophets of doom and their predictions of the apocalypse. they are the heirs of yesterday's foolish fortune tellers and i have them, you have them, we all have them, and they want to see us do badly, but we don't let that happen. being here today in switzerland and not in washington, the president may feel he is among friends, surrounded by more than 100 fellow billionaires. but in truth, he's in a much more vulnerable and uncomfortable position than any of them.
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one of his fiercest critics, greta thunberg, the swedish teenage climate activist, was condemning not just the united states but governments around the world. she accuses them of making empty promises to hide inaction. you say, "children shouldn't worry." you say, "just leave this to us, we will fix this, we promise, we won't let you down. don't be so pessimistic." and then... nothing. silence. or something worse than silence — empty words and promises, which give the impression that sufficient action is being taken. president trump will be using the rest of his time in davos to focus on one—to—one meetings with other world leaders. he will be discussing everything from trade disputes to the huge tensions of the middle east. but the long shadow of events
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in washington seems to reach here to switzerland. james robbins, bbc news, davos. sally bundock is in davos for us. sally bundock is in davos for usm was what we were expecting in the sense that most of donald trump's speech was dedicated to how well the american economy is doing under his leadership, all the changes that he introduced when he became president and the impact they have had in boosting growth and creating millions of newjobs and therefore helping the american worker. and he was very good at congratulating himself on his leadership, especially when it comes to trade, referring to last week brokering two historic agreements s, one with china and also he said with mexico, canada and america, a new trade agreement that threw out the
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previous trade agreement that he argued was no good for anyone and specially not the american worker. most of his speech was dedicated to how well the american economy is doing and he said to global leaders in the room, follow our example and you too will see such prosperity. it is the best economic model, as it were. he said little about climate change. he talked about the fact that the us would get on board with the world economic forum's one trillion trees to commitment to plant a trillion trees. he didn't refer at all to what is happening in washington and the impeachment hearing that starts today and he didn't take any questions from the media, who were there, either. as soon as he finished his speech, he smiled, he waved and he received the applause, but then he was off and now he is in some meetings and some
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lunch meetings with business leaders who are gathered here. sally bundock in davos. reaction to the news of jess phillips withdrawing from the labour leadership race. emily thornberry said: that is emily thornberry, lisa nandy, the two other contenders against keir starmer and rebecca long bailey. we will bring you more reaction to that decision byjess phillips to pull out of race later. now to the united states. meanwhile back in washington he's not there but donald trump will this evening become only the third american president to go on trial in the us senate.
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he's accused by the house of representatives of abusing his powers. but with the republican party in the majority in the upper house it's highly unlikely the president will be removed from office. gary o'donoghue reports from washington. will all senators now stand or remain standing and raise their right hand? do you solemnly swear that in all things appertaining to the trial of the impeachment of donald john trump. . ? yes, these are 100 members of the united states senate, but for the next few weeks, they will also be jurors and judges. they get to fix the rules of the trial and decide on guilt. well, we'll be sitting there in our chairs probably in the order of six hours a day, starting at 1pm eastern time, and then six days a week. so this is going to be, i think, kind of a gruelling exercise but also one that will be public. the president faces two charges. the first is that he abused his power by pressuring the president of ukraine to investigate one
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of his main democratic rivals, former vice presidentjoe biden. the second is that he obstructed congress by trying to stop officials giving evidence and withholding documents. there are almost no rules for a trial like this and democrats and republicans are completely at odds over whether to call witnesses at all. that all means this trial could last anything from two to six weeks. democrats want to hear from the former national security adviserjohn bolton, who reportedly likened the pressure being put on ukraine to a drug deal. but republicans are threatening to retaliate by insisting joe biden or his son appear too. in the coming days, senate republicans are going to face a choice — will they take their cues from the white house, as leader mcconnell clearly stated, and engage in a cover—up for president donald trump? or will they, in this most sacred of undertakings prescribed by the constitution, vote for a fair trial with witnesses?
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the president continues to dismiss his impeachment as a hoax, instead focusing on his achievements here at a farmers' rally in texas. and what do i get out of it? tell me. i get impeached, that's what i get out of it. by these radical left lunatics, i get impeached. but that's ok. the farmers are sticking with trump. it would take a two—thirds majority in the senate to convict the president and remove him from office. that is extremely unlikely. nevertheless, these coming weeks will resonate for years to come. i spoke to gary o'donoghue and asked what we can expect. there will be debate over a resolution which the republicans have put forward. that
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specifies and stipulates s how the trial will be conducted. it says the democrats have two days and 24 hours to put their case. two days over 24 hour, that is 12 hours a day, beginning in the afternoon tomorrow and they will be going until the early hours. the white house will have something similar and then there will be questions. only then there will be questions. only then there would there be a question of voting, a simple vote, on whether to call more witnesses, which is what the democrats want, because they believe there are key witnesses in this affair involving ukraine that they haven't heard from yet, because they haven't heard from yet, because they were blocked from talking to they were blocked from talking to the investigation before christmas. is there any chance that donald trump will have to give evidence himself? yeah, i have heard this floated. i think that is very unlikely. he has a huge legal team.
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including people like kenneth starr, who was the independent counsel under bill clinton, who investigated bill clinton. and part of the team that defended oj simpson in the 90s. i think it is unlikely that donald trump will appear i think it is unlikely that donald trump willappear in i think it is unlikely that donald trump will appear in his own defence. he threatened a lot of times to speak to the mueller inquiry and to be interviewed by them and that never happened. i would be... absolutely amazed if the president appeared in the senate to a nswer president appeared in the senate to answer questions. i'm just seeing on the wires reporting that the impeachment managers have demanded disclosure from trump's lawyer, how significant could that be, he could bea significant could that be, he could be a material witness? that would be tricky, he is the white house counsel, he is the lead lawyer if you like on their side. there is a
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lot of argument going on at the moment about evidence and to what extent evidence will be included in the record. its quite technical, but as things stand, everything that was heard before christmas, the documentation, everything, has to be voted in the record. that will not stop democrats from putting stuff in the record when they make their case. but the weight of the evidence isn't automatically going to go in. what you're going to get this time, unlike with the bill clinton impeachment, where the senate voted 100 to one on the basic rules of trial, they agreed how it should proceed, this time around, 20 years on, 20 more years of partisanship, you're going to get straight down the line party votes, particularly at this stage of the trial process on how it should be conducted. gary donoghue. borisjohnson has vowed to invite african leaders to the uk "regularly" following the investment summit
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in london this week. the prime minister made the pledge in this meeting with kenyan president uhuru kenyatta at downing street. mr kenyatta said the conference had been great, adding: "that's the first time in a very long time we have had as africans this kind of exchange with the united kingdom." the headlines: jess phillips pulls out of race to be the labour leader. backing an initiative to plant a trillion trees, president trump launches a stinging attack on climate activists. in washington, the president will tonight become only the third to be tried in the senate accused of abusing his powers. in sport, on a day of british exits at the australian open. only one of fife british players came through, winning a final set tie—break. johanna konta
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believes her season will still come good after being beaten in straight sets. steve borthwick willjoin leicester tigers as head coach. geordan murphy has been appointed of by. geordan murphy has been appointed of rugby. more at half past. the nhs in england owes more than £4 billion in legal fees, to settle outstanding claims of clinical negligence, according to figures obtained by bbc news. each year the nhs receives more than 10,000 new claims for compensation, as angus crawford reports. brother, son, and nephew. this is hayden. soon after, though, he was rushed to hospital, and died there. a virus attacked his heart. he was just six days old.
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it is every parent's worst nightmare. we just had to there and watch as our son slowly die in front of our eyes, literally. and then he died, in front of our eyes. it's been four years so far of trauma after trauma. in the face of official silence, they felt they had no choice but to sue. "parental concerns not listened to." i haven't really thought about it as suing the nhs. i've thought about it as kind of fighting for a voice for hayden, and fighting for, you know, acknowledgement of his life and his rights. i don't think we would have gotten the answers that we had any other way. you can't bring that person back, nothing is going to bring them back, and the only thing that helps is to have acknowledgement that they existed, that they mattered, and answers as to why, how this happened. the hospital did eventually admit liability, years later. that picture is being
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repeated across england. payments for clinical negligence have doubled since 2015. last year, the nhs paid out £2.3 billion, but the total cost of outstanding claims now stands at a staggering £83 billion, and we've learnt legal fees make up £4.3 billion of that. doctors fear costs are spiralling out of control, but lawyers for patients claim safety failings is still the biggest issue. the nhs in england says 70% of claims are now resolved without going to court, and it is committed to learn from incidents in order to improve patient safety. but hayden's death is evidence of a system that failed, one his parents believe is in urgent need of reform.
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they could spend that money on training or doctors or nurses. there's a death, and you pay, there's a death, you pay, there's an injury, you pay. and they're not actually fixing the source of the problem, so it'sjust going to be repeated. angus crawford, bbc news. new laws to end automatic early release from prison and increase the minimum sentence for serious terrorism offences are being introduced. the measures could also involve the use of lie detector tests to assess how much monitoring a released terrorist needs. it comes in the wake of the fishmongers hall terror attack in november, where usman khan killed two people while out of prison on licence. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford reports. the man who carried out the fishmongers' hall attack in november, usman khan, came out of prison just one year earlier. he'd been serving 16 years for preparing terrorist acts, but had been released automatically halfway through the sentence, prompting widespread criticism
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of the criminaljustice system. the father of jack merritt, the young man killed here at fishmongers' hall, has said his son would not have wanted his death to be used to justify tougher sentencing for terrorism, but today the government is doing exactly that. watching elite police firearms officers as they trained to combat terrorism, the home secretary priti patel announced that by mid—march there will be a new counterterrorism bill before parliament, ending the automatic early release of the most serious terrorist prisoners and raising the minimum sentence judges can pass. we will ensure that we increase sentences to 14 years for the offenders that are involved in planning terrorist offences, but also involved in training for terrorist offences as well. with that, we are absolutely clear that we are going to be reviewing licensing conditions so that people
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do not have early release. ministers say they will introduce lie detector tests to help monitor people recently released from prison for terrorist offences, something jack merritt‘s father described as a cynical headline—grabbing gimmick. there will also be more psychologists and imams involved in deradicalising prisoners. but the mother of martyn hett, who died in the manchester attack, says preventing extremism is as important. it is great to look at prison sentences and punishment and all of that and investing money in more staff and all of that, but what is important is to prevent things from happening in the first place, which to me is martyn's law, which to me is putting money into prevent. once somebody has been radicalised, no one is saying there is a 100% guarantee someone can be de—radicalised, but if there is a chance, we ought to be funding that and committing to it. counterterrorism police warn that their workload has gone up by a third in three years,
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and agree that more needs to be done on diverting people away from extremism. daniel sandford, bbc news. now back the the news ofjess phillips withdrawing from the labour party leadership race. jessica parkeris party leadership race. jessica parker is in westminster. all this morning speculation was mounting as to whetherjess phillips who didn't go to to whetherjess phillips who didn't gotoa to whetherjess phillips who didn't go to a union hustings, whether she was pulling out of race and today she's put up a video on twitter confirming she won't be running in the leadership race, saying the candidate needs to be able to bring all parts of the party together and she has concluded that candidate can't be hear. —— her. joining me is a labour party mp who has been involved in jess a labour party mp who has been involved injess phillips‘ campaign. what went wrong? jess has had the
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guts to put herself forward, that is always a risk in a leadership contest, and just as jess always a risk in a leadership contest, and just asjess has been refreshingly honest, she is honest with herself and the truth is having gone through the mp nomination stage and concluding the union nomination, sh truth is she hasn't been able to build enough support to mean if she we re build enough support to mean if she were to become the leader she could pull the whole labour movement together in the way needed to face up together in the way needed to face up to the scale of the challenge and rather than go into the next stage, thatis rather than go into the next stage, that is constituency labour party meetings, and going direct to the members, ithink meetings, and going direct to the members, i think she hasjust decided it is better for members to have a reduced choice of candidates, who have that opportunity. but one thing i would say, whatjess has brought to this election in terms of catapulting the voice of the voters and the message of general election into the heart of debate, that has to remain, because the person who
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does emerge as the leader has a big challenge to face up to and i think what jess challenge to face up to and i think whatjess has tried challenge to face up to and i think what jess has tried to do as a candidate is to help the labour party to confront some of the issues, so we are in a position to win power again. you say it was clear she wouldn‘t get union backing. i don‘t think anyone expected her to get through from union backing and by her own admission in a an article she wrote over the weekend, she felt that the campaign was not necessarily going her way and she hadn‘t been able to be herself. do you think that is correct? yes, jess is, like i say, she is honest, you won't get spun lines from jess and i won't spin lines. she brought raw honesty to the debate. did she? because i think the debate. did she? because i think the expectation is she would light up the expectation is she would light up the leadership race and her ability to communicate, but a people
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who have been observing the campaign are saying that hasn‘t happened. who have been observing the campaign are saying that hasn't happened.” think her withdrawal is a result of two factor, one she has built the level of support and after the election there is one candidate who is emerging as the person who has been able to pull brought support and has emerged as the front runner and has emerged as the front runner and a lot of people who might otherwise have backed jess or might have backed lisa nandy are backing keir starmer. she has been squeezed out by keir starmer. i'm not knocking it, it is an election. quickly, as far as you‘re aware, is jess fill lils going to be en—— phillips going to be endorsing another candidate? not that i am aware of. you look at what she said about getting broad support. so far
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there are only two candidates that are showing support that is keir starmer and lena nandy who has been thoughtful and she has, a lot of people, she hasn't been in the shadow cabinet for five years and now she is back in the centre stage of the labour party and she is saying some powerful things that labour members are inspired by and she is confronting difficult choices. i think there will be a jess—shaped hole in the race, but looking at the remaining candidate, there is more than one person, there are people in the race capable of learning the difficult messages and the lessons from the general election and leading labour back to power. but it requires honesty and the membership to remember that our principles are no good unless we are in powerand i'm principles are no good unless we are in power and i'm confident the race will produce a good winner, but unfortunately it won't be jess and i'm gutted about that. thank you very much. so as we have been
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saying, jess phillips withdrawing from if race, leaving four candidates and we are waiting for the gmb to announce who they will be supporting. thank you. some breaking news, the duke and duchess of sussex have warned the media and saying photographs were published in some newspapers and on web—sites today and lawyers representing harry and meghan say the foe photos of her walking her dog and smiling, they say the the pictures were taken by photographers who were hiding in bushes and the duchess had not consented to be photographed. the legal team say there have been attem pts legal team say there have been atte m pts to legal team say there have been attempts to photograph inside their home and they‘re accusing the press of being camped outside the property. they accuse the photographers of harassment and want
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the situation —— warn the situation is untenable and they will take legal action. this on the first day of their new life. democrats involved in at the impeachment hearing against the president, a brief statement from adam schiff. alyssa joined in a brief statement from adam schiff. let‘sjoin them. in brief statement from adam schiff. let‘s join them. in which he wouldn‘t admit the relevant witnesses. are you going to use the full 24 hours? that will be a decision that the house should make, not at the centre should prescribe to go late into the evening. that is a wealth of evidence to present here. we should have the opportunity to present the case is the house chooses to stop not to go late into
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the evening when centre mcconnell evidently hopes the public will not be watching. we will make decisions about how long our case should go with the rules prescribed. i think the question is, what is the senator's, senator mcconnell, interest in structuring the trial this way? is it about hiding the evidence from the american people with late—night sessions? about trying to get it over with? that should not been shot be the thing here. the centre mcconnell has taken the same oath as every other senator in the chamber. not to skew the process in such a way that the house is not permitted to put its evidence before the american people. do you worry about all this focus on rails and process and what centre mcconnell is doing deletes in any way the message about what you are trying to put out about what
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president trump did? no, this is pa rt president trump did? no, this is part and parcel evidence of trying to cover—up the president's conduct. that is the whole object that is charging article two of the impeachment articles. if the senate and the senate leadership will not allow the house to present its case, not allow the calling of witnesses and presentation of documents. if senator mcconnell makes this the official impeachment trial in history without witnesses or documents, it not prove the senate, president and ascent, it will merely prove the senate guilty of working with the president to obstruct the truth from coming out. i do think that by structuring the trial this way, it furthers our case that what is going on here is really a cover—up of evidence from the american people. there are a number of key witnesses that, even at the
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outset of the trial, should be cold. people like john bolton, nick mawhinney, michael duffy and mr blair, and others. but if we are proceeding in a logical fashion, if we are interested in a fair trial, the first step should be the production of the documents— they will reveal precisely who the most important witnesses are, may be those of aw, may be others as well. let me give you one illustration of what has been hidden from the american people. we have text messages were high—level people in at the diplomatic corps are asking each other, are we really withholding mainly to the aid? —— mainly to the aid? as we talked about last night, i think it's crazy to withhold mainly to the aid to help with a political campaign. we
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have seen those documents because witnesses have provided. documents like that is being withheld from the public, that is the kind of behaviour and the president has been engaged in, they said it should not make it so party to that. we should review the documents, the house should have the right to cold witnesses, the president should have the right to cold witnesses, material witnesses, not just for the purpose of smearing opponents. that is what makes a fair trial. let me ask my colleagues who haven't had a chance to speak of the right to add anything. last question. to not be able to have the rate which witnesses and documents... it's as if you are onjury witnesses and documents... it's as if you are on jury duty and the judge were to come into the courtroom and say, i have talking to the defendant, and we have decided
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that i'm not going to let the prosecution cold any witnesses, not going to let them cold in any documents. i'm only going to let the prosecution read from the wreck out in the grandjury. that makes it impossible to have a fair trial, notjust difficult, that makes it impossible to have a fairtrial, notjust difficult, but impossible. i think for senators who ta ke impossible. i think for senators who take their oaths seriously, i hope and pray that they do, this is not a fair trial that the american people want, it is not the fertile the american people deserve. thank you. studio: so that is adam schiff, chair of the house intelligent committee. also one of the managers of the impeachment process, which gets under way in the next few hours. no fan of his is donald trump, he describes adam schiff as a pencil neck and a deranged human
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being. let‘s talk to the washington bureau chief at the chicago sun times. just to pick up on what was being said they are, what is at the chance at this whole hearing curve then very quickly, without any documents or witnesses, over in a flash? those are two separate questions, procedure, that is whether or not the republican leader of the senate, he is a leader because the republicans have the majority, mitch mcconnell, can he force timetable where the prosecutors, the house democrats, put their case out into marathon 12 hour sessions in order to get the 24 hours they are allotted. you may be wondering why it would be night—time that this hearing could proceed. that is because the chiefjustice of the united states, who is presiding justice roberts, he wants to do his
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isa drop justice roberts, he wants to do his is a drop in the morning — that is work at the supreme court. question two, once we have the trial going, what is the chance it will take place without documents and witnesses? that is at the threshold drama here. the attention is on four or five republicans, you drama here. the attention is on four orfive republicans, you need to form activate with the democrats, that demand witnesses. there is a possibility, not clear yet, that the democrats will get those four. that is the drama playing out. as hearing is the drama playing out. as hearing is concerned. as we hardly seen, there is plenty of drama going on outside, where the revelation seem to be coming? yes, this is what is interesting, the house voted impeachment more than a month ago. in the meantime, because nancy pelosi did not work over the paperwork which is necessary, more
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revelations have come out. some of these were included in the record that the democrats walked over, some things are still coming out. there isa things are still coming out. there is a development this morning in the us, where the president‘s chief counsel, summoned by the is now being pressured by the house democrats to disclose information about his role in the scandal, because he may indeed turn out to be a fa ct because he may indeed turn out to be a fact witness. at present, his role is to lead the president‘s defence. is there any possibility that the president himself might just is there any possibility that the president himself mightjust give evidence? i would say that back in the trump presidency, you never say never. trump is the reality show star that became president, this might be the big issue that he has
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executive produce. will he want a walk on role? in any legal setting, your lawyer would say no, don‘t do it. because of the unpredictability of donald trump, you have to leave the possibility open. it is fraught with legal peril if he goes, because once he one thoroughly goes to testify or be a witness, that would kind of crumble about some of the arguments about having other witnesses appear. just for the record, drilling tonic during the molar probe of russian interference in at the 2016 election, trump himself never talk to the prosecutor, he only submitted written answers to questions. this may sound a strange question, but how big a deal is is playing out across the country? is there something that only those in washington are obsessed by? or is this real consent outside of washington about this? well, every tv network will be covering this afternoon‘s proceedings live, as
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every cable. unless you‘re watching a sports channel, if your plan today was to watch cable tv, other than the movie channels and sports, you are going to see that this is what is dominating coverage. will people just go do something else? are people out working to stop and start watching this? probably not as much as somebody like me, i‘m actually going over to the senate in a short time to sit in the chambers. it doesn‘t necessarily mean is a disconnect, i think it more means that people have very busy lives, they have their own problems, the kind of want to know what is important to know in a summary, and not sit through at the moment by moment blouse that are going on. another reason some people may decide not to pay close attention is because, at the moment, we know the outcome of is nothing to suggest that two thirds of the senators,
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meaning you have republicans are joining democrats, are going to look to convicted and remove trump from office. that is why these procedural skirmishes have the drama, since we sort of know how this tie will end. i don‘t know if you‘re a betting lady, will be eventually see an impeachment blight? not what the presidents critics with light, the documents, the evidence, the people— what do you think will happen?” would put £25 on impeachment blight, may be a few documents in. i don‘t think it is everything the democrats want. i wouldn‘t rule out new aerial shot revelations up even in the past few days, some documents are passed over by a man under indictment, you might not not want to believe what he says in tv interviews, but his documents tell a story worth paying
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attention to. you know if more? there is still enough information floating out there that may surface like to change the minds of some of the republican senators and get some documents, at least, even if not witnesses, introduced to the trial. thank you very much for your time. on the house of lords, another government defeat on the eu were there all bill in the lords, the fourth defeat now. this is for protection or unaccompanied child refugees after brexit. 80 votes. this is the government was my critics led by labour? lord dubs, arguing the bill was watered down the facility of her children being reunited with families in the uk. ministers say that children will
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still be protected under the proposals. so, the house —— the bill is due to return to the house of commons with ministers are likely to try to overturn those four defeats already suffer in the lords. more on that later. the number of people killed by the new corona by race in china has risen to ten. the official number of people affected is almost 300. authorities are trying to limit the spread of the disease which causes pneumonia. the w h o is warning it is likely to spread to other cities and countries. we receive this report from wuhan where the outbreak began. officials here in the pot we have this of 99 hospitals as emergency treatment centres, including the one behind me. that includes 61 fever client and an expert medical team stopped chinese scientists have figured out
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the dna sequence of the spiders, possibly evident new treatments and a potential vaccine. that is as hundreds of millions of millions of chinese residents migrate across the country to celebrate the new year. recently possibility it could be transmitted more quickly and broadly. that poses an even greater challenge for china and nearby nations to contain this outbreak. travellers with mass, quarantine stations and temperature checkpoints are becoming common sites are airports and train hubs across asia. the number of known infections has risen sharply since yesterday, topping 300 cases in china alone. at least 15 hospital workers in wuhan here have been diagnosed with the virus. the world health organization says it will assemble in an emergency committee of experts, meeting on wednesday to decide whether this update constitutes a global crisis and how best to deal with it.
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in a moment ben is going to bring us the latest business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live: the duke and duchess of sussex issued a warning to the paparazzi, after photos were ta ken of issued a warning to the paparazzi, after photos were taken of meghan and baby archie without her consent. jess phillips pulls out of the race to beat labour later. she admits she is not the right person up for the job. backing an initiative 2.1 trillion trees to offset climate change, president trump launches a stinging attack on climate activist as he says it is time for optimism. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live: sainsbury says it is the catch up hundreds of management roles as it continues to merge sainsbury‘s with argos that it bought in 2016. the supermarket are trying to cut cost to better compete with our and lidl and aims to promote roles in its
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digital, technology and hr teams. a record number of women in full time work has pushed the uk‘s employment rate to a new high of 76.3%. the record figure could reduce the chance that the bank of england will cut interest rates next week. facebook will create a thousand newjobs in london this year, including hiring more people to tackle harmful online content. it will take facebook‘s uk workforce to more than 4,000. pressure has been growing on social media firms to remove posts promoting self harm and political extremism. drivers with mitzvah she made diesel ca rs drivers with mitzvah she made diesel cars and germany have been asked to contact authorities after they were accused of hitting cheap devices to make them appear less potent than they really are. prosecutors say they really are. prosecutors say they have ready ten businesses in germany. lots of people coming to the uk asked horace? yes, record year it seems at last year, spending
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more and staying for longer. taking advantage of the very low pound? yes, i think you‘re absolutely right. i‘m sure a few offers have been put in for stonehenge. record numbers in august last year, 4.1 million visits, up 7% on the year before. this meant a record £3.1 billion, up 13%. lots of money and lots of people, and i think it is a result of that exchange rate. we are bringing good news. shock horror that the business news is good for once. record figures, we should all be welcoming this? yes, i think we should. we are forecasting continued growth this year, an increase of 6% we are forecasting for this year.
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just shy of 40 million visits. largely driven by greed from america, our most valuable market with the most visitors, really strong growth from that. and from china, the new growth market of the future so it really strong truth great. is it because of the exchange rate, which makes it cheaperfor overseas visitors to stay and spend money here? of course that helps, but i note of caution, we will never be seen as a cheap destination. we find after the initial drop in exchange rate a couple of years ago, it had really fallen from the front of the minds of people, so not quite the driver you might expect. how about state occasions? are enough of us choosing to stay at home? are we choosing to stay on holiday here more? yes, we are seeing more visits
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here. a good year last year, particularly those short breaks, the second holidays. we have really focus on the younger market because we have noticed that it is the millennials who are going overseas rather than exploring more of their own country, and been really successful in driving that younger audience and encouraging them to stay at home. i don't put a damper on this, talk to me about a bit of uncertainty, does this continue but do people start looking elsewhere if there is uncertainty about travel plans, passports, all that stuff?” think we have lived through the uncertainty, i think we are now seeing a lot more certainty. in europe, we have been getting that message of reassurance. but for next year, that message also of welcome, that message to people that you are welcome here. i think that confidence is important to get over, but from other markets, we have seen
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new markets that can come and use the electronic gates, actually easier to get to britain. good stuff, nice to see you. you can‘t try pushing this disappointment unhappiness, it‘s all good news? employment doing pretty well, record numbers of people in work, record numbers of people in work, record numbers of people in work, record numbers of visitors. not such great news if you‘re working at sainsbury‘s. news if you‘re working at sainsbury's. let's have the markets. sainsbury's. let's have the markets. sainsbury shares are down, let‘s not talk about that if you do not want bad news. easyjet, good, this figure is much better than expected. dixons carphone, shows arising pretty strongly today even at low... someone has much of a press release?
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more than a press release, when you make a statement to the stock exchange, there is a reason, they put out a statement saying that sales went up 2%, actually, they fell 2%, its a one missed out the miners son in front so the sale tonic shares have been pretty volatile. is it one of those things or will there be a massive investigation? we are talking about a lot of money with those figures. critically over christmas, lots of people keep a close eye on retailers, the 2% growth was good so their sales went up. then at said, sorry, is actually down 2%. so a lot of volatility. investors are reassured it was a mock but something more sinister and a longer problem. and stonehenge is safe? it is not for sale! an attempt to set a
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world record in sri lanka for the largest gathering of twin seems to have failed because too many turned up. organisers wanted to break a record stretching back more than 20 yea rs record stretching back more than 20 years about the size of the crowd strict rules on registration could not be met. this report does contain some flash photography. if you happen to be visiting this sports stadium in colombo, you might be forgiven for thinking that you were seeing double. this was a venue full of twins, lots and lots of twins. thousands of them, in fact. recall had gone out, a record was there to be broken. when i heard the news, i thought, yes, this is at the moment that we asked when should go and participate, we personally have a responsibility to do that. because it being a twin is a blessing that can happen to anybody. but setting a new record is easier said than done. the sheer numbers are not led long
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queues. that meant registering the twins wasn‘t straightforward, so a new world record was very much in the balance, even if the organiser sounded fairly confident. translation: while the county own style going on, we have counted 12,492. by that, we have broken up the world record. we will submit the final count on the documentation back to the getting john mcguinness world record committee, and i am confident that we will be informed that we hold the record. among those turning up was sri lanka‘s prime minister, the brother, no not the twin, of the president. we should find out in a couple of weeks if a new record has been set. if not, they say that they will try all over again. we havejust been handed the script, warning, it contains funds.
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here is a brief history. £60,000, thatis here is a brief history. £60,000, that is how much of these bloomers have gone for at auction, more than a century after they were handed to a century after they were handed to a photographer. the actually worth a mention fetched £650 on their own. and other items as well. is that a... ?i and other items as well. is that a... ? i don‘t know what that is, is that a blouse? that‘s a dress. i don‘t know how many of these we have let‘s keep going. no, that‘s it, right. talk about someone else‘s bloomers for a change. let‘s have a look at the weather now. a lot more sunshine than expected, the pennines down yorkshire a favour. the mcleod just peeking over
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the peaks. favour. the mcleod just peeking over the pea ks. you favour. the mcleod just peeking over the peaks. you can see the line on a satellite imagery were the pennines were. better south and is worse, clearer skies around, turning out to be each evening, temperatures quickly dropping away, double figures across parts of scotland and northern ireland, slightly milder air. temperatures will dip away quite quickly tonight across southern and eastern areas, for us for a southern and eastern areas, for us fora time, southern and eastern areas, for us for a time, may be lasting till the morning. the general theme will be culled to mcleod increasing from the north and west. there could still be some frost and sunshine around the southern and eastern parts is that wednesday morning. progress into the middle part of the week showed slightly less cold air pushing in from the atlantic around the area of high pressure, temperatures will gradually lift up relative to the start of the week. cold start mid week, then some cloud producing rain and drizzle. like today, there will be some holes in that car,
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especially eastern high ground, may be better for especially eastern high ground, may be betterfor some in northern ireland. wind generally loud, breezy in scotland. temperatures could creep back to double figures across southern areas. enter thursday and friday, some weather fronts will skirt across the far north of scotland, bringing some winter conditions. overall, high pressure is in charge, keeping thursday and friday largely dry, fairly cloudy, patchy overnight mist and fog. saturday, more of a south—westerly breeze, that will break hard up across eastern areas, some sunshine. a you shop around in at the west, after a bit of a cold start, temperatures still around 9 to 11 celsius. into sunday, overweather front foot itself and eastwards, introducing more sunshine, dropping the temperature in scotland and northern ireland. a few showers and are comic longer spells of rain to finish the day in the fourth north—west. change this weekend, after some largely dry weather, the
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winds pick up, some rain and turning colder in the north again.
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you‘re watching afternoon live. today at 4: back an initiative to plant a trillion trees, donald trump attacks environment activists. it is a time for hope and joy and optimism and action, but to embrace the possibilities of tomorrow, we must reject the prophets of doom and their predictions of the apocalypse. we are not telling you to offset your emissions byjust we are not telling you to offset your emissions by just paying someone else to plant trees in places like africa, while at the same time forests like the amazon are being slaughtered at a higher
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rate. planting trees is good of course, but it is nowhere near enough. in washington, donald trump will tonight become only the third us president to be tried in the senate accused of abusing his powers. democrats say the proposed rules for the hear rgs a national disgrace. this is not a process for afair disgrace. this is not a process for a fair trial. this is the process for a rigged trial. this is the process if you do not want the american people to see the evidence. the duke and duchess of sussex threatening to take legal action over photographs ta ken threatening to take legal action over photographs taken in canada. jess phillips pulls out of the race to be labour party leader. and coming up, we have the sport with sarah. hello, yes, a day of british disappointment, harriet dart booked
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her first disappointment, harriet dart booked herfirst main draw disappointment, harriet dart booked her first main draw victory in australia. johanna went out today. and looking at the weather it is matt. it is grey skies or blue skies, most places dry, but some changes on the way for the weekend. all the details in the next half an hour. and on news nationwide, commemorations are being held for the football player emilio salah on the football player emilio salah on the first anniversary of the plane crash in which he and the pilot died. ‘we‘re asking you to act as if you love your children more than anything else‘ the words of greta thunberg as she challenged global leaders at the world economic forum in davos. their inaction, she said, is fuelling the flames of climate change.
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farfrom being on the defensive, president trump launched a stinging attack on environmentalists, rejecting those he called prophets of doom whose predictions had been wrong for decades. it‘s a time for optimism, he said, not pessimism. our diplomatic correspondent james robbins sent this report. getting away from it all... donald trump has flown over 4000 miles from washington to the alpine heights of davos, hoping to look more like a president on the world stage, less like a defendant back home. he‘s treading carefully on all the ice and snow. any fall here would look terrible. but will this gathering of the world economic forum, 5000 feet up in switzerland, give an embattled president the high ground he craves? even without impeachment, he‘s way out of step with the main goal of this meeting — to do much more to tackle global temperature rise. this is a time for optimism.
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fear and doubt is not a good thought process, because this is a time for a tremendous hope and joy and optimism and action. but to embrace the possibilities of tomorrow, we must reject the perennial prophets of doom and their predictions of the apocalypse. they are the heirs of yesterday‘s foolish fortune tellers and i have them, you have them, we all have them, and they want to see us do badly, but we don‘t let that happen. being here today in switzerland and not in washington, the president may feel he is among friends, surrounded by more than 100 fellow billionaires. but in truth, he‘s in a much more vulnerable and uncomfortable position than any of them. one of his fiercest critics, greta thunberg, the swedish teenage climate activist, was condemning not just the united states but governments around the world. she accuses them of making empty
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promises to hide inaction. you say, "children shouldn't worry." you say, "just leave this to us, we will fix this, we promise, we won't let you down. don't be so pessimistic." and then... nothing. silence. or something worse than silence — empty words and promises, which give the impression that sufficient action is being taken. president trump will be using the rest of his time in davos to focus on one—to—one meetings with other world leaders. he will be discussing everything from trade disputes to the huge tensions of the middle east. but the long shadow of events in washington seems to reach here to switzerland. james robbins, bbc news, davos. we are hours from the start of that
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impeachment procedure at the senate. let‘sjoin adam impeachment procedure at the senate. let‘s join adam schumer is who giving a press conference. leader mcconnell promised his trial rules, you‘ve heard this for weeks, let‘s enact the same rules as the clinton trial rules, he said we are going to get started in exactly the same way. it turns out the mcconnell rules are not even close to the clinton rules. and there are many places where that happens. unlike the clinton rules, the mcconnell resolution does not have the evidence into the record. he seems to want a trial with no evidence. you can understand why. it is because he‘s afraid of evidence.
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so is president trump. so are the president‘s men. a trial with no evidence is not a trial at all. it isa evidence is not a trial at all. it is a cover up. second, unlike the clinton rules the mcconnell resolution limits presentation by the parties to 24 hours per side over only two days. leader mcconnell wa nts to over only two days. leader mcconnell wants to force the managers to make important parts of their case in the dead of night. i‘ve read the brief. it is about 45 pages. i commend each of you, it is a powerful document. very ha rd to of you, it is a powerful document. very hard to rebut. in fact the president‘s brief doesn‘t even attempt to rebut it. next, the mcconnell resolution prohibits motions to subpoena witnesses or documents, until after the senator‘ question period and even then requires the senate to overcome an
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additional hurdle by voting to determine whether motions to subpoena witnesses in documents are in order. so we have had some senators say, well, i‘m going to vote for mcconnell‘s resolution, but later i might vote for witnesses and documents. mcconnell‘s resolution puts obstacles in the path of getting witnesses and documents i even later. so republican senators, don‘t fool us, don‘t say you want to make it easy to vote for witnesses and documents at the end of the trial if you vote for this resolution. it makes it a lot harder. and finally, unlike the clinton rules, the mcconnell resolution allows a motion to dismiss at any time. during the trial. now, we thought that the clinton rules shouldn‘t apply. they we re clinton rules shouldn‘t apply. they were unfair. mcconnell kept hugging
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the clinton rules as hi defence, but now we see he didn‘t mean it and what he wants to do is simply cover up what he wants to do is simply cover upfor what he wants to do is simply cover up for president trump. so, starting this afternoon, a immediately after mcconnell introduces his resolution, i will be offering amendments to fix its many flaws. the first will ask that the senate subpoena white house documents related to the charges against the president. those documents include the record of meetings and calls between president trump and the president of ukraine, as well as those records created or received by mr mulvaney, mr blair and other personnel about the decision to hold and release the military assistance to ukraine. it is very possible, even likely, that some of these communications may
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have been with president trump between him and these people. that is why they‘re so important. no one can argue that these documents are not directly related to the charges against the president and should be reviewed by the senate. the witnesses i‘ve requested have got a lot of attention and rightfully so. the documents are of equal importance. people should understand that the documents can shed as much light on why the aid was cut off, who did it and how it evolved as the witnesses. and we feel very strongly that we need documents and that is why it is our first call. i will then... i will then offer a series of amendments on the documents we asked, the witnesses we requested
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and amendments to fix the biggest departure from the clinton rules. there is no guarantee that leader mcconnell will allow these votes to ta ke mcconnell will allow these votes to take place later in the trial so, now, before any resolution passes, bemust do it. we feel this is an obligation we have to the constitution. to outline what a fair trial would be. to not go along with the cover up, with the sham trial. and we will do it. we will do it. right off the bat, republican senators will face a choice about getting the facts, orjoining leader mcconnell and president trump in trying to cover them up. this is a historic moment. the eyes of america are watching. republican senators
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must rise to the occasion. senator durban. that is the senate democrat leader saying they will ask the senate to subpoena documents relating to charges against the president, president trump. we learned senator mcconnell. let's go to capitol hill and our correspondent gary o‘donoghue. this was always going to be box office and we are only talking about the procedure at the moment? yeah, the democrats are furious, as you can tell, particularly at this resolution for the conduct of the trial. bear in mind in white house gave them nothing in terms of documentation, in terms of the inquiry before christmas. they literally handed over nothing at all. they blocked a lot of witnesses. although a lot of witnesses. although a lot of witnesses did testify off their own bat. but some key ones didn‘t. but
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they got no documentation whatsoever. even nixon handed over quite a lot of documents during the run up to his impeachment, which never actually happened in the end. so they‘re furious and calling it a cover up, a so they‘re furious and calling it a coverup, a sham so they‘re furious and calling it a cover up, a sham trial, national disgrace. what they‘re going to try and do this afternoon, or in a couple of hours, is amend this resolution, this trial resolution, and try and challenge some of those soft republicans, to see whether they can get some of them on side to get some of this documentation and testimony. and gary, talk us through what we can expect tonight in terms of that procedure? well, i mean the senate rules are a mystery to most people, including me, but what will happen is about 1 people, including me, but what will happen is about! o‘clock our time, so in happen is about! o‘clock our time, soina happen is about! o‘clock our time, so in a couple of hours‘ time, they
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will start discussing this resolution. the democrats can put down amendments to it. there will be debate on those. then it is a question of whether votes are called and how many votes are called. you could hear from chuck and how many votes are called. you could hearfrom chuck schumer and how many votes are called. you could hear from chuck schumer it is not just a could hear from chuck schumer it is notjust a question of could hear from chuck schumer it is not just a question of witnesses, they want documentation, because in a lot of the things they already have from the house investigation there are references to discussions and processes and none of the documentation that underlies that has been forthcoming and they find it extraordinary that the evidence that was gathered during the house investigation into the president that lead to the impeachment, none of that is automatically admitted into the record of the trial. it sounds very technical, i know, but it does mean those running the trial can‘t just produce
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it does mean those running the trial can‘tjust produce a piece of documentation from that process and say, as it says on page 300 and whatever of this, because the other side might challenge that documentation and there play have to bea documentation and there play have to be a vote on that. you can see the technical prop problems. —— problems. this why they‘re saying it is an attempted cover up. if you‘re a cynic, you could say this is pretrial spin by the democrats, they know they will lose and they can‘t get 67 vote and the president will be acquitted, so here is a way to spin it as it was happening, that it was always going to be a sham and a cover up and what did you expect from these monstrous republicans. gary, thank you. let‘s talk to dr jeffrey howard. gary‘s right, this
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is becoming facts versus cover up, prespin. that is the argument the democrats are putting forth, if republicans refuse to hear evidence from witnesses who could tell us more about the fact that donald trump dangled money over an ally. if they refuse to allow evidence, republicans will be accused of being pa rt republicans will be accused of being part of a cover up. one of the articles of impeachment that donald trump is charged with is obstructing congress, engaging in wrong doing and trying to stop congress finding out and republicans risk being complicit in that. you're assuming they care. yes and some are looking at the political winds and some republicans from very pro—trump states whose constituents were very much hoping that their senators do what the white house want them to do
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and they‘re less likely to support calling witnesses. but others from more moderate states are probably going to be more inclined to support witnesses. so are there enough? when chuck shumer says we are going to subpoena the white house, do the alarm belling ring? what is going on is something that goes back to the origin of the republic. there was a worry that the president was too powerful and he was like a monarch and would be like a king. the aim was to try to build a constitution that held the president accountable and one of the provisions was giving the house of representatives the power to charge the president with betraying the trust of the country. that has happened in in is case. then it goes to the senate who can decide whether to convict the president. the text is treason and bribery and the republicans have
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been saying what senators need to determine is an actual law has been broken. but i think it is useful to remind people this was not necessarily what the founders had in mind. alexander hamilton, one of the founding fathers, a lot of people have seen the musical, argued that it does not necessary an actual crime is committed, it is about a betrayal of the public trust, something a president has done that subverted their commit toment the constitution and that —— commitment to the constitution and that is not a question of has some narrow law been broken, it is a political and moraljudgment been broken, it is a political and moral judgment about whether the public trust has been betrayed. thank you. jess phillips has pulled out of the labour party leader ship
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she‘s issued a statement saying: . the gmb union have voted to back lisa nandy in the race. our correspondent is at the union head quarters. this livens the race up, doesn‘t it? quarters. this livens the race up, doesn't it? that's right. it has been significant in the race on two fronts. the basis of who turned up here and who didn‘t. this is where the gmb were hearing from all the potential labour leader and deciding who they would nominate. jess
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phillips didn‘t turn up and that started speculation she would withdraw. now she says she has brought ten of thousands of people into the labour party. so it may be she has some influence. she was the most corbyn sceptic of the candidates and wanted to see the party change direction. although she is pulling out because she couldn‘t get union backing, nonetheless if she has brought people into the party to take part in the race, it is probably likely, if that is the case that they will back a candidate other than rebecca long bailey, who is seen as closest to jeremy corbyn‘s politics and on the left of the party. also the gmb has backed lisa nandy. this was crucial for her, because keir starmer was so far the only candidate to go through the various hurdles that labour put in the way of the candidates and they have to get the backing of two
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unions or more than 30 local parties. he was the only one to have ove rco m e parties. he was the only one to have overcome the obstacles. lisa nandy had the backing of one small trade union and she needed the backing of a big union and she has done that and it is likely that rebecca long bailey will get the backing of unite union. today has been significant in term of defining the field and now the big task for the candidates is making sure to define their policies and make inroads with the members, because the next stage of this after the 14th february will be the members of the party themselves will decide how they‘re going to back for the remaining candidates. there is one sentence that screams out from tim roache, lisa nandy is a breath of fresh air. that sends out a message doesn‘t it? of fresh air. that sends out a message doesn't it? i think it does.
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she is very much portraying herself as the change candidate. in the past of course jeremy corbyn as the change candidate. in the past of coursejeremy corbyn was the change candidate and he came in to shake—up the labour party and she is the person who says she can move it ina new the person who says she can move it in a new direction now. she says that in a sense she looks and sounds different from keir starmer, who had been leading the race so far, the north london lawyer as she would had it. i'm north london lawyer as she would had it. i‘m told she got almost twice as many it. i‘m told she got almost twice as ma ny votes it. i‘m told she got almost twice as many votes as keir starmer, who was the only other person in the running. and given that is the case, it may be many of the members outside london liked somebody who is trying to win over the areas that labour lost and somebody with a northern accent from outside of london and she represents wigan and somebody who say k can say she looks different from previous labour leaders in terms of her youth and
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her gender. it was never likely they would back anyone other than her or keir starmer. in the past they backed owen smith. but now they have chosen to widen the race and bring lisa nandy in. she says the union represents half a million members. she is happy to get the endorsement and it means these rules that i will not even attempt to bore with you, but she is almost certain to be in the ballot. you were actually thinking of going through the rules? we will leave it there! thank you area shuch. the duke and duchess haveissued area shuch. the duke and duchess have issued a warning to the media. lawyers say the photographs of
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duchess walking her dogs were taken by photographers they claim were hiding in bushes and spying on her. they said the duchess had not consented to be photographed and the couple are alarmed by paparazzi action and accuse the photographers of harassment and say they will take legal action. joining me dan johnsing, what is going on. legal action. joining me dan johnsing, what is going onm soundses like the same old problem. harry hadn‘t even arrived and they have the same problem with photographs being taken that they say the duchess didn‘t know were being taken and she was being spied on by photographers who were hiding in the bushes waiting for her go for a walk with the dogs and her son and they could get a zoomed in photograph. that is the sort of pictures that we are deciding not to show. but the sort of pictures the
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royal couple say they‘re not going to tolerate. already they‘re talking of taking legal action in canada. it doesn‘t look like these move has been successful in terms of getting their greater privacy. within 24 hours of harry arriving, a warning shot for the media. maybe that is what it is, to say we are determined to start this new life and have new rules and perhaps the interest of the paparazzi will decline as they bed into their new lives. that is realistic? they will always be of interest and there will be money for these sort of pictures while people wa nt to these sort of pictures while people want to buy the sort of magazines and newspapers that will run the pictures. will they ever be free from this and get any greater protection in canada? are they even up protection in canada? are they even up to the standard of privacy law here? big questions. it is not a simple thing. there is a lot of
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protection in the uk because of things like the european convention on human rights. they don‘t have that in canada. so maybe that is what they are testing and trying to bring the media there to the same sort of court cases that they‘re threatening here. thank you very much. let‘s talk to mark stephens. so they have photographers in canada, who knew? yes, who knew! the challenge is about individual paparazzi, what‘s happened is we are not seeing the national newspapers in this country or other countries go to canada, what‘s happened is the free lances are there and recognise there are, or there is a market for long lens photographs orjumping out of bushes. the original paparazzi, a
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man who specialised in jumping out of bushes to jackie onassis eventually had an injunction agains him and! eventually had an injunction agains him and i think that is where we will get to in canada. the authorities will be keen not to allow harassment to become the order of the day on vancouver island. allow harassment to become the order of the day on vancouver islandm i‘m walking there awe park and i see you and you‘re smiling and walking your dog and you and you‘re smiling and walking yourdog andi you and you‘re smiling and walking your dog and i take a picture, if thatis your dog and i take a picture, if that is published in a newspaper, what is breached ? that is published in a newspaper, what is breached? your privacy has been breached. we have what we call a zone of privacy around individuals, in is in country, we kind of refer to it as the red carpet rule. if celebrities or royalty are doing official duty and
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are on the red carpet, then they‘re fairgame. if are on the red carpet, then they‘re fair game. if they‘re nipping to the shops, in nose circumstances they‘re —— those circumstances they‘re not. the best example was kate was shopping at a well known supermarket in angle sea and she was photographed by a member of the public in the car park and that photograph was regarded as an invasion of privacy. because that was part of her private time, that was part of her private time, that was part of her private space that everybody needs. so there are rules i think everybody needs. so there are rules ithink and everybody needs. so there are rules i think and the problem we have at the moment is that everybody seems to think that harry and meghan are fargame to think that harry and meghan are far game for pretty much everything. what we will see is a redress of balance and things will settle down andi balance and things will settle down and i think court orders will be brought into play to give them the protection they‘re seeking. brought into play to give them the protection they're seeking. the irony is they want to start their
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new life and to create that life they still need media interest and here we go. it begins. it does begin. i think this is part of it. soi begin. i think this is part of it. so i think what the photographers need to understand is that there is this private life and also the public life. and that they can only sell images from the public life and ultimately there is a problem and a challenge which is even if newspapers in this country and america choose to abide by the law, there are many other countries, where the law is very different. you think of australia, new zealand, south africa and of course asia, where these images would be lapped up where these images would be lapped up and of course while there is a market for them, whilst free lance photographers are being paid, they are going to sell them and it becomes a game of whack a mole for harry and meghan trying to stop
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people sending these images out and thatis people sending these images out and that is going to be almost an impossible challenge for them and they‘re better off putting up high walls around their estates and hoping the long lens as we saw with kate and the closer magazine, the topless images, doesn‘t come pointing their way. or you move back to your palace that is protected uk? that is one of reasons, i remember doing a debate in the oxford union about privacy and a celebrity said, i get my privacy because i‘ve got ten acres around me. you can‘t get a photograph in that. to some extent thatis photograph in that. to some extent that is truthful. mark, good to see you. thank you very much. now the weather forewast. — eforecast. you. thank you very much. now the weatherforewast. — eforecast. in the north and west we have some cloud and drizzle in the west of scotla nd cloud and drizzle in the west of scotland and northern ireland. burr
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here even though the winds are stronger, we have the milder air. turning colder in southern and eastern parts tonight. some frost around for a time in the south and east. lifting up the temperatures through the night with increased cloud. there will be some gaps and where the gaps are a touch of frost around. some mist and fog patches. wednesday, another day of largely dry conditions. some rain and drizzle in the west and far north. some sunshine. the best of those in the east and temperatures lifting up in the south after that chilly start up in the south after that chilly start up to 10 degrees. little changes over the next few days. most places seeing dry. if you see the sunshine, you will be on the lucky side.
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this is bbc news, our latest headlines: backing an initiative to plant a trillion trees to offset climate change, president trump launches a stinging attack on climate activities as he says it is time for optimism. this is a time for tremendous hope and joy and optimism and action. but to embrace the possibilities of tomorrow, we must reject the perennial prophets of doom and other predictions of the apocalypse. we are not telling you to offset your emissions byjust paying someone else to plant trees in places like africa, while at the same time, trees in the amazon are being slaughtered at an infinitely higher rate. planting trees is good, of course, but is nowhere near enough. in washington, donald trump is to be only the third us president to be tried in the senate this evening, accused of abusing his powers.
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lu accused of abusing his powers. democrats said tha a lu democrats said that they propose a rose for the hearings are a national disgrace. this is not the process for a fair trial, it is at the process for a wreck trial. this is the process if you do not want the american people to see the evidence. the duke and duchess of sussex relating to sue paparazzi over photos taken in canada. jess phillips was authorised to be party leader, she says she is not the right person for the job. meanwhile, lisa nandy has received the backing of the gmb union. the union says she isa of the gmb union. the union says she is a breath of fresh air and the debate over the parties future. sport now on afternoon live. a lot of optimism about the british players are lured, but that was before we started playing? five started four are now on the way home and it was
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qualifier harriet dart who bucked the trend of british disappointment to record her first main draw victory at melbourne park. she fought back brilliantly to beat japan‘s misaki doi. went all the way to a final set tie break. a tough task up next for her the current wimbledon champion, simona halep. dart though said afterwards that "it‘s a great opportunity for me to see where my level‘s at." not great news for the rest cameron norrie, katie boulter. and two former semi finalists are both out in kyle edmund and the 12th seed johanna konta all exited today. konta has been struggling with a knee injury, she was beaten by tunisia‘s ons jabeur. my knee going into the match, i was going to maybe not feel my best, not see the ball the best, notjust have that kind of match tightness that we love to have as competitors. it definitely did not discourage me from doing the best i could out there today,
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it definitely wasn‘t enough. well, heather watson was also due to play today but her match against czech kristyna pliskova, has been rescheduled for midnight tonight, because of the slow progress of matches on tuesday. she is still in it, that‘s good. what about the main contenders? interestingly, better day for the hosts — 9 of 12 australians through. nick kygrios was one of them, also through, the russian 4th seed, danil medvedev, as is dominic thiem. all eyes on world number one, rafa nadal, safely into round two after a straight sets victory over bolivia‘s hugo dellien. the champion here in 2009 lostjust five games on the way to a fairly comprehensive victory in melbourne. nadal is looking to win his 20th grand slam and at the same time equal roger federer‘s total. south africa captain faf du
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plessis has been left out of their squad for the one day series against england next month. wicket keeper batsman quinton de kock will lead an inexperienced squad for the three match series. a third of the 15 players are uncapped. england currently lead the test series between the sides 2—1, with one game left to play following victory in port elizabeth yesterday. one of the world‘s best footballers kylian mbappe has told the bbc that he‘s not considering a move to the premier league not until the end of the season at least. the french world cup winner is currently at paris saint germain and on course to win a third straight league title. despite being linked with moves to real madrid and liverpool he feels he owes some loyalty to the french giants. it is not the moment. everybody will talk about it, it is not good with psg. i
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think about the club, they help me. icame here think about the club, they help me. i came here at 18, i was a talent but i was not a superstar, now i am, thanks to p56 and the french national team. i have to do calm and focus on psg national team. i have to do calm and focus on p56 100%. after the season, we'll see, now lam i am focused on my game. algeria international nabil bentaleb has joined newcastle united on loan for the rest of the season. the midfielder, who spent four years in the premier league with spurs has signed from german side schalke. it is initially a temporary deal until may but with an option to make it permanent. steve borthwick is to become leicester tigers new head coach. he‘s currently working under eddiejones in the england setup and willjoin up with the premiership strugglers when his international commitments are over. he replaces geordan murphy at welford road who is moving to the director of rugby role. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour.
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the number of people killed by the new coronavirus in china has risen to at least six, and the the official number of people infected is almost 300. authorities are trying to limit the spread of a the disease, which causes pneumonia. the world health organisation has warned that the illness is likely to spread to other cities and countries. cbs correspondent ramy inocencio sent us this from wuhan, where the outbreak began. officials here in wuhan have designated nine hospitals as emergency treatment centres, including the one behind me, that‘s on top of 61 is fever clinics and an expert medical team. chinese scientists say that they‘ve figured out the dna sequence of this virus, that possibly opens up new treatments and potentially a vaccine.
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