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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 5, 2020 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: dramatic scenes in washington overnight as president trump delivers his state of the union address, claiming a great american come back. the democrat speaker nancy pelosi ripped up a copy of his speech. the foreign office charters a final flight to bring home british nationals stranded in the chinese city at the centre of the coronavirus outbreak. the second biggest economy in the world is in near shutdown. i'll be looking at what the coronavirus epidemic means for businesses here, and around the world.
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should failing to pay for a tv licence be a criminal offence? the government starts a public consultation today. liverpool's young guns had fun in the fa cup. with the first team away, they beat shrewsbury to reach the fa cup fifth round. good morning. the weatherfor the next couple of days is fairly quiet. this morning there is some frost, some fog, but many of us will have a dry day. but by the weekend it's going to be quite stormy. i'll have more in about ten minutes. good morning. it's wednesday, february 5. our top story: president trump has spoken of what he considers his greatest achievements after three years in office, as he made his annual state of the union address to the us congress. referring to what he called "the great american comeback", the president said the united states was thriving and respected again. our correspondent ben wright was watching the speech in washington. hejoins us now.
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and they were pretty dramatic scenes, won't there? yeah, this will be remembered. normally a state of the union address is a solemn event. this felt my lot —— far more likely donald trump rally. even before he began republican lawmakers in the house of representatives standing up dancing "four more years" because of course this is an election year, president trump is up on the ballot in november. and i think a lot of republicans in washington are pretty confident they can win this. in contrast, democrats throughout the speech sat there looking very glum, not getting off their seats, not clapping, the contrast was dark, the polarisation clear. more drama even before president trump spoke when the house speaker, democratic nancy pelosi, offered a hand to president trump to shake it and he refused to. took the folder which contained the speech from her, didn't shake her hand, an extraordinary snub, don't think that has happened before. and then at the end of the speech, quite
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remarkably, nancy pelosi, just as donald trump was winding up, stood up donald trump was winding up, stood up and ripped the speech into shreds, showing her disgust at what she clearly thought was a far too political party pitch by the president. and then shortly after that mike pompeo, the secretary of state, tweeted a picture of lisa simpson from the simpsons sobbing over a torn up that paper. i mean, as an example of the better polarisation in washington, this was quite an example and shows how divided the republicans and democrats are in this of course happened within the context of an impeachment trial that will wrap up inafew impeachment trial that will wrap up in a few hours people's time, when, zverev expect, the senate will vote to clear donald trump of abusing his power and obstructing congress. it was april remarkable hour and a half upon capitol hill. what an extraordinary note. thank you very much. incredible stuff. a second and final flight is being chartered to help any remaining british citizens wishing to leave wuhan,
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the chinese city at the centre of the new coronavirus outbreak. 94 uk nationals and family members have already been evacuated from the city. overnight, the number of deaths in china has risen to 490. let's go to shanghai and get the latest from our correspondent, robin brant. it really is a developing story. we will be speaking to the health secretary, matt hancock, later in the programme. what is the latest news you can bring us from shanghai? welcome i think this morning we wake up welcome i think this morning we wake up to the news that matt hancock is pa rt up to the news that matt hancock is part of a government that is now telling all of its citizens to get out of china if they can do so. a remarkable scenario, really. that advice changed yesterday because the foreign office believes further travel restrictions within china are you combine that with a rapid fall in the number of flights available to get out of china, plus the fact that the foreign office is cutting back on some stuff here evacuating them out, it makes for a scenario that the foreign office is worried about, and that's why the advice
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changed yesterday to all britons if you are able to leave you should do so. you are able to leave you should do so. there is going to be a second charter flight so. there is going to be a second charterflight due so. there is going to be a second charter flight due to depart wuhan on sunday morning, we are told. 108 returns according to the government have expressed an interest to be on the plane. there was a modelling computer last time around about who could go, if you are married to a chinese national could they go? if your partner or children were from a third country what could happen there? it led to a lot of confusion. ina 0&a there? it led to a lot of confusion. in a 0&a note sent out by the embassy, they make it clear, the chinese authorities say, chinese nationals married two brutes, chinese children whose parents are british, they will be allowed to go. if you are from a third country you need to have the appropriate punt —— paperwork to leave. if it goes on sunday and they are living, that is when they will be very sure about returning to the uk. robin brant, thank you for that. all sorts of questions about what happens to those people, where they will go,
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how do you bring 30,000 people back? do they all go into quarantine? we will speak to the home secretary this morning. should you be prosecuted if you fail to pay the tv licence fee? the government is launching a public consultation on the issue this morning. at the moment, you are breaking the law if you watch television, stream a live programme, or use the bbc iplayer without paying the fee. let's get more on this from our reporterjohn mcmanus, who's outside broadcasting house in central london this morning. what are people going to be asked, exactly? this was launched today by the culture secretary, nicky morgan, at its heart, should people watching live tv or live streaming programmes onatv live tv or live streaming programmes on a tv set be prosecuted if they don't have a tv licence on the bbc? if the process is decriminalised, it could mean a big dent in the bbc‘s finances and its ability to pay for its programmes, including this one. at the moment the license fee is scheduled to rise by £3 in april to £157 by 50 p. that rise already
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agreed by the bbc and london some time ago. most people who watch live tv or have a tv set pay for the license fee. 2018 people were prosecuted for not paying for it. and england and wales only five people ended up going to prison. the government says the consultation will carry on through spring and then nicky morgan will make a final decision in the summer. that's something the bbc will probably be very concerned about. the culture secretary suit says she wants the bbc to adapt to new technology. she gives the example of what happened to block austin connelly video rental chain that went bust when video streaming went live across the uk and around the world —— blockbuster. more than a0 people have been arrested during a crackdown on courierfraud. it's where people are tricked into withdrawing large sums of money to then hand it over to someone posing as a courier or police officer. city of london police say there have been 3,000 victims over the last two
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years, many of them elderly people. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw reports. early morning in central london, police are out in force for a raid on a flat in kings cross. it's part of an operation targeting criminal gangs involved in courierfraud. a sniffer dog is brought in to find items that may be hidden like mobile phones, sim cards, and memory sticks. carol norton was a victim of courierfraud. she was tricked into handing over £4,000 in cash after being phoned by a man who said he was a detective and needed her help on an undercover investigation. i believed every word he said. he really sounded... he was concerned about me. he did say he was concerned about my husband and he just seemed a genuine police officer. when you learned that it was
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a scam, how did you feel? what was your reaction? i just cried, it was awful. i really felt upset because i let my husband down. police believe courier fraud is a growing problem across england and wales. in the past two years, there've been over 3,100 victims and £12 million have been stolen with some people losing hundreds of thousands in pensions and savings. in police raids since november, 44 people have been arrested, including two men at the flat in london. they've since been released while investigations continue. 1a others have been charged as police continue to tackle what they say is a despicable crime. danny shaw, bbc news. it is no minutes past six. you are watching breakfast. so, liverpool turned up. you know what, that is all you need to know this morning. louise had the best line. liverpool turned up. it doesn't matter that they were the younger starting side
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in history, youngest age of about 19. liverpool turned up. james milner also didn't go off to the sunshine. he stayed at home, trained with the under—23 ‘s, and was there last night and gave them a little p9p last night and gave them a little pep talk at half—time. he is a top rope. —— pro. it was liverpool's youngest starting line—up, but they beat shrewsbury town in their fa cup replay. the under—23s stood in forjurgen klopp and the first team, who're away on their winter break, and they reached the fifth round, thanks to a really unfortunate own goal. the premier league's new chief executive richard masters says var does need improving, but he insists it won't be scrapped. and england looked really flat in their first one—day international since lifting the world cup last summer — and they were thrashed by south africa in cape town. we had such high hopes. i've stayed up we had such high hopes. i've stayed up too late last night thinking oxford united would be newcastle as well. it was exciting. i thought
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there would be a penalty shoot—out. it was so late. the ten o'clock news was delayed as well. sat furiously at my desk. i go to bed before ten o'clock. good for you! must be more professional, sort yourself out. let us professional, sort yourself out. let us catch up on the weather, how is it going? i'm not sure what you said then, because they cannot actually hear. they will crack on with the weather. for the next couple of days it will be fairly settled, dry for many of us, and we will see our old fringe the sunshine. as we headed through the sunshine. as we headed through the weekend, particularly so saturday night into sunday, looks like we can have stormy conditions come oui’ like we can have stormy conditions come our way. today high pressure is firmly in charge. so this morning we do have some fog around, we have some frost as well. and out towards the west we are pulling on a bit more moisture, there will be more cloud across northern ireland are parts of scotland throughout the course of the day. thick enough for some showers across the north and
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west of scotland. the fog that we currently have will slowly lift, somejust currently have will slowly lift, some just lifting into low cloud through the day. you can see a lot of dry weather. hazy sunshine and temperatures between seven and about eight or nine degrees. so more or less where they should be at this stage in february. as we had on through the evening and overnight, we still do have high pressure in charge of our weather. and what you will find is the cloud will be thick enough or drizzle across the north and west of scotland, possibly some of that getting into northern ireland as well. a greater chance of seeing fog form this coming night than the one that has just gone. wherever you see blue on the charts thatis wherever you see blue on the charts that is indicating that we have temperatures around freezing or below. we could see as low as —3 tonight. as well as the fog there will be frost around and some of that could be freezing fog, something to bear in mind. through thursday the high pressure is still with us, but it's pushing further east. it will be breezy out towards the west. this is where we have got
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a bit more cloud around. once again we will see drizzle coming out of that loud around north—west scotland, but we can also see some more holes because of the breeze ralph king —— breaking up the cloud. the fog we have in the morning, again, will be slow to lift, some lifting into low cloud which will suppress the temperatures. for most it will be a dry day with some hazy sunshine. temperatures 6—9d. as we go through thursday into friday there goes our high pressure, pushing off towards eastern europe. then we have an array of weather fronts coming our way, the first one isa fronts coming our way, the first one is a weak one, it will produce some showers. there is a chance we could see a little bit of frost first thing, maybe the odd spot of fog as well. dry weather around. thing, maybe the odd spot of fog as well. dry weatheraround. from thing, maybe the odd spot of fog as well. dry weather around. from the west we start to see showers coming oui’ west we start to see showers coming our way. and later a more substantial weather front bringing in heavy rain and strengthening winds. so i'm going to showers you a fast moving chart next. it goes through the weekend, so we have an array of weather fronts, watch the isobars as well as women from
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saturday into sunday. a whole clutch of them come our way. again, isobars tightly packed, indicating the strength of the wind. as well as that there will be heavy rain around. for this weekend we are looking at gail's and some heavy rain and disruption is quite possible. even as we head into the new working week it will remain windy and potentially at this stage it could even be stormy once again next wednesday. and don't worry, we can hear you evenif and don't worry, we can hear you even if you do not hear us. let's take a look at today's papers. the front page of the daily mail suggests former prime minister david cameron's bodyguard sparked a security scare on a transatlantic flight, by leaving his gun in the toilet. the paper says a terrified passenger found the weapon and handed it to british airways flight attendants. there is also a picture of mp tracy brabin who received criticism
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on social media for wearing an off—the—shoulder dress in parliament. she will be with us at 810 a.m. this morning. the guardian leads on news that all 30,000 british nationals in china have been warned by the uk government to "get out if you can" following the coronavirus outbreak. the paper also carries a picture of monika luftner who was stabbed in the streatham terror attack at the weekend. the times reports that more than 11,000 women, who were treated by rogue surgeon ian paterson, will be called in for checks as an independent inquiry calls for an urgent review of private healthcare. the online edition of the huffington post shows democrat house speaker nancy pelosi ripping up her printed copy of us president donald trump's speech at the conclusion of his state of the union address. if you have not seen those pictures, you will see them here. it was pretty dramatic. he would not shake her hand, she tore up her speech.
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bad tempered. it shows you the state of american politics. the financial times this morning, indeed all of the financial sections of the papers, reported on the global impact of coronavirus. this is a picture turned into a makeshift hospital, but it is reporting that ion day for example is shutting its factories. —— hyundai. also a business struggling because electronic components are not arriving. ikea's first closure in the uk. this one in coventry. 350 jobs at risk. ikea have said it is because of the layout of the store, but interestingly, some consumer a nalysts but interestingly, some consumer analysts are saying because of the
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way we shop have changed. we used to go there for the day, have your meat balls, and then pick up bits and pieces. the fact they do not have foot for makes a difference. it was like a family tradition. the gravy on it. and the other funny stuff. it is the only reason i went. i said we would mention newcastle, i want to say they scored in the dying moments to give you united a win in the fa cup. much more into the fa cup coming up because the liverpool game was not on television but we will show some of it later this morning. you're going to like this story. it
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is golf related. golfers are hitting the ball too far, slowing the game down, compromising some of the greatest golf courses in the world and they are now considering making changes to the gospel to make it heavier and harder to hit so far. —— golf ball. that's fine but it has to be the same for amateurs as well. if you start giving professionals one bowl, and amateurs have to play with a different one, beauty is that you play in the same courses as professionals. wouldn't that get better with the evolution of the new
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boss? all of the technology is going to be looked. —— golf ball. boss? all of the technology is going to be looked. -- golf ball. my driving distance has only gone up one yard per year. how do you even know that! i don't know but it's there. what should be saved for the future? 50 different things including fish and chips, the bbc, glastonbury, red postboxes, politeness and bees stop that is what the nation want to keep. as well as pubs. politeness would be nice. and parks. green space. can i ask you ladies about what you feel about this story. she called politically incorrect debates but i
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comment. tracy brabin. .. politically incorrect debates but i comment. tracy brabin... first question, was it a daring address or a wardrobe malfunction? we need to ask her that. essentially she received all sorts of comments about this which she addressed on twitter. we have had to take out some of the words she referred to on twitter. she said... there are regulations about what you can wear. the parliamentary guide to rules and procedures, mps should dress in businesslike attire.|j rules and procedures, mps should dress in businesslike attire. i got shouted for wearing jeans in the
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house of commons media area. you cannot wearjeans. it is a strength. i would say, as a woman, you never wa nt i would say, as a woman, you never want to have anything distract from what saying and the knowing thing for her is now distracting from her message. i once got thrown out of harrods for wearing an inappropriate top. many, many years ago. got escorted out. women, doing this job we have to think more about what we have to do wear. and who needs rules anyway. i was very little crop t—shirt. i was just anyway. i was very little crop t—shirt. i wasjust coming in after a holiday. madam, you have to leave. i was mortified. did you walk out
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with your head down, i am so sorry. tracy brabin will be speaking to us at 8:10am and you can ask that question about the wardrobe malfunction. in dramatic scenes in the us congress overnight, president trump has set out his case for another four years in office. republicans chanted in support at the annual state of the union address. but his political rival, the democratic speaker nancy pelosi was seen ripping up her copy of the speech. niall stanage is the white house correspondent for the hill newspaper in washington and joins us now. really good to talk to you today. what a fascinating speech. about 90 minutes in length, the speech and real drama throughout. i suppose the things we will talk about particularly but nancy pelosi did at the end? that was pretty spectacular. i do not think anyone has seen anything like that at a state of the union address. we did not bookend speech that had begun
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when nancy pelosi appeared to try to shake hands with donald trump and he snubbed her and shake hands with donald trump and he snubbed herand in vienna shake hands with donald trump and he snubbed her and in vienna she ripped up snubbed her and in vienna she ripped up the speech. a remarkable vision ofa up the speech. a remarkable vision of a wonder typifies how politics is polarised here right now. a lot of what president trump was saying, he mentioned the word jobs dozens and dozens mentioned the word jobs dozens and d oze ns of mentioned the word jobs dozens and dozens of times. it was looking at this date of the economy. —— the state of the economy. we have to look at this as an election speech delivered amid pomp and circumstance of the state of the union. the trump thinks the economy his strongest card. with this state of the union speech, particularly in the first half, it was all about this. that american decay was over and that it was he, donald trump, that had
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restored prosperity. that argument would be strongly contested by people who would say that the recovery started with barack obama. in the democratic response, a clear comment made about the impeachment process as well. a very busy time in american politics. it is although i think both parties are basically trying to get past impeachment. the president is virtually certain to be acquitted. impeachment is not really moved the needle that much either way in terms of opinion polls that everything is happening here, impeachment, the state of the union and the debacle that was the democratic iowa caucuses which i was attending. that was president trump abbas said state of the union address. do you think you will be making another one? —— president trump's. it is a toss of the kind
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whether he is successful. he is at about 50%job whether he is successful. he is at about 50% job approval, 49% in the gallup poll and that basically means it is really a jump ball, as we say here. and of course, who the democrats put up against him will play into that in a very, vital way. that would be a key issue because the results of the iowa votes are slowly coming in. 70% about now. how much difference and has that course? to the eventual debates we see and the long buildup to the election, how much damage has been because of the democratic caused by what happened in iowa? it was clearly a missed opportunity for the democrats. what should have happened someone would have been declared the winner and that person would have gone on prime time television victorious and made her or his case
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against donald trump stop instead you have this shambolic process where we are still waiting for final results. pete buttigieg has a narrow lead but he could still be overtaken by bernie sanders. the whole episode really has an air of incompetence. that does not mean the democrat nominee is a doomed come november but it is a very serious opportunity by the democratic party. thank you for your assessment of the state of the union made overnight by donald trump. the shunt handshake. tearing up trump. the shunt handshake. tearing up the trump. the shunt handshake. tearing he paper. trump. the shunt handshake. tearing up the paper. and they all know it is on telly. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, from bbc london. i'm tarah welsh. the boyfriend of a tv presenter killed on her e—scooter in battersea says he believes the poor condition of the road contributed to her death.
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emily hartridge was involved in the uk's first fatal e—scooter crash. jake hazell says he has suffered from panic attacks and is continuing to campaign for mental health issues. he also wants more regulation brought in for escooters. wandsworth council, who maintain the road, say it would be inappropriate to comment ahead of the inquest. the road was in horrendous conditions when i spoke to the police on the day they said that was a fact. one week after emily's death they fixed the road and that for me was gut wrenching. for someone to pass away for them to put a rate in usable conditions. it should be done right the first time. drivers in hertforshire who sneak in to bus lanes could soon face automatic fines. the council is considering plans for a network of camera and automatic fines. at the moment there aren't any in the county, but officials are condiering the action to stop the mis—use of bus lanes.
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work to demolish the army and navy flyover in chelmsford is set to begin next monday. it was closed permanently in september when defects were found in its concrete foundations. most of the work will take place overnight and some sundays with the expected completion date in april. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the all tubes lines this morning. the overground is part suspended between south tottenham and barking. this is due to repairs to five miles of damaged track. a look at the roads now. it's busy northbound towards the blackwall tunnel. in west london, kingsley road is closed near to hounslow east tube station that's following that stabbing yesterday evening. and in mayfair, stjames square is closed because of a demonstration. now for the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. a chilly start this morning. some patchy frost for
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central london and also to the west of london and the backs of bucks and the home counties are mist and fog patches as well. elsewhere dry. if you have the mist and fog, could linger through much of the morning but it will gradually start to lift. the went a lot lighter than yesterday. temperatures reaching nine celsius. high pressure in charge overnight so clear skies and temperatures dropping. more widespread mist and fog as we head through wednesday morning. the minimum temperature down to zero so we might get patchy fog first thing. very quite and settled first thing on thursday. it will lift into low cloud and if you are stuck underneath that it will feel cold. friday, and the weekend, things start to change. stormy weather on the way for saturday. a yellow with a warning for sunday. —— weather warning.
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i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello. good morning. this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning we'll talk to labour mp tracey brabin, as she hits back at the online abuse she received for wearing this off—the—shoulder dress in parliament. he's donated more blood in the uk than any other dog — we'll meet stumpy the labrador and hear why more donorsjust like him are desperately needed. and it's the show where plastic surgery is performed live. presenter vogue williams joins us after nine to tell us why she hopes it will help young people make safer decisions. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news.
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amidst chants of "four more years" from his supporters, president trump has delivered his final state of the union address before november's presidential election. he said years of economic decay were over. not everyone in the chamber was impressed though — democratic speaker nancy pelosi was seen ripping up her copy of the speech at the end of the 90 minute address in which the president spoke of a "great american comeback". jobs are booming. incomes are soaring. poverty is plummeting. crime is falling. confidence is surging. and our country is thriving and highly respected again. british citizens are once again being urged to leave wuhan — the chinese city at the centre of the new coronavirus outbreak. the foreign secretary says a second and final flight is being chartered to help them leave. 94 uk nationals and family members
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have already been evacuated. overnight the number of deaths in china has risen to 490. a consultation is to be launched on whether failing to pay the tv licence fee should no longer be a criminal offence. the fee covers tv and bbc streaming services and you're breaking the law if you don't pay it. the culture secretary, lady morgan, said it was time to think about keeping the fee "relevant" in a "changing media landscape". the bbc said a 2015 review found the current system to be the fairest. an investigation's under way after david cameron's bodyguard reportedly left his gun in the toilet of a plane. as a former prime minister, mr cameron is entitled to life—time protection. the weapon was found by a passenger on a transatlantic flight, who handed it to flight attendants. scotland yard has confirmed that an officer has been taken off operational duties.
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awkward. it hasjust gone at 6:30am. sally is here to look at the sport. is it all var again? it is that thing again, var. how much are about of the season? the time. the premier league finally has a new chief executive after lots of chopping and changing. if you candidates. did you go for it? next time. love it or hate it, var is here to stay, according to the premier league's new chief executive. richard masters admits that it does need improving but he denies it's been damaging to the game. he's been speaking to our sports editor dan roan. obviously there are issues. there are issues with consistency of decision—making. there are issues with delay, which people don't like. should we just scrap the whole system? just do away with it? no, i don't think that's an option. what we have to do is try and make var better. and we are going to have a debate in april with the clubs about what sort of var they would like next season.
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we have tried to improve the communication and stadium by using different methodology steve minnikin with fans was going on. we will have a debate in april with the clubs about what sort of var they want next season. isn't it interesting we're talking about var. through three could have been 1—0 up but for var. and grab —— shrewsbury. liverpool fielded the youngest side in the club's history last night — and they made it through to the fifth round of the fa cup, beating shrewsbury1—0. and it was a really unfortunate own—goal that decided it, ro—shaun williams under pressure and fluffing his clearance. with their first team and manager away on the winter break, the under—23s were on the field — although jurgen klopp was in constant contact. some words of advice and some support, which was fantastic. and, again, a little bit at half—time and at the end as well. i think he is delighted with the performance and delighted with the performance and
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delighted with the result. and now we have, you know, that was a little bit of a message to the players before the game, chelsea could be an opportunity for one or two more of you to play in a game like that. wayne rooney helped set up a meeting with his old side manchester united, scoring the last goal in derby county's 11—2 win over northampton town. they'll be at home to united, the 12—time fa cup winners in round five. also through are newcastle, birmingham, and reading. england cricket captain said they were "way off the mark" after they were thrashed by south africa in their first one day international since they won the world cup. there was a familiar collapse as they struggled to 258—8. quinton de kock then hit a century in his first match as south africa's odi captain. and temba bavuma added 98, as south africa safely took victory by seven wickets. let's talk golf now, and ask the question, how far is too far? those running the sport believe measures are needed to prevent players hitting the ball farther and farther, and making golf unsustainable. this is how it's changed over
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the last quarter of a century. in 1995, the world's top 20 were driving the ball, on average, 278 yards off the tee. but throw that forward to last year, and it's up to a massive 310 yards. where is hitting distance going and where is it likely to go in the future? and there was a concern about the need to keep expanding golf courses and the balance between skill and technology. and those two issues laid at the heart of the report. he's not even made his debut yet but super league clubs are considering legal action over catalan dragons' decision to sign israel folau. the former union star was sacked by rugby australia for his homophobic comments and hull kr have led the revolt — their owner has written to dragons to warn them that he'll take proceedings if they suffer financial losses as a result of the signing,
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such as sponsorship withdrawal or lack of investment. more on this throughout the programme this morning. double paralympic champion georgie hermitage says it's "heartbreaking" to have to retire from athletics at the age of 30. hermitage took gold in the 100 metres and 400 metres at the rio olympics and also won four world titles. but after series of recurring injuries she said she's just not able to train or compete to highest level any more. really disappointed. what a shame. disappointing for her. i'm interested to see what you think of that. i love golf. it hasn't changed massively. what was this start? the average driving distance has gone up one yard every year from about 2013. it obviously technology since the 19905 has changed immeasurably and
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clubs are now incredibly expensive and a lot of money is spent on designing them and all the technology behind them as well. and balls are going further. and lots of amateurs are enjoying that side of it, especially people who, as you get a bit older, can't hit the ball as far. think there needs to be 1—0 for pros and amateurs. everybody playing these the same access. with the prose is it not the fact that they are now incredibly strong and fit and that plays into it as well? they are very athletic. make the balgo 70% of the distance but everybody uses the balls that do that. there is your answer. i might be wrong though! thank you, see you later. we're going to introduce you now to a remarkable man. his name is tony collins. he's a second world war veteran who went on to be the first black—heritage manager in the football league. tony's been taking part in a special project to mark 75 years since the end of the conflict. it sees former footballers and veterans meet up with some
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of the game's fresh new talent to talk about everything from racism to the design of football boots. i went along. good to see you. come in and meet tony, boys. tony, thank you so much for having us today. do you still have very strong memories about that time, about living through the war asa time, about living through the war as a young boy? 0h time, about living through the war as a young boy? oh yeah. it was very difficult. the sirens would go and we would be making haste for the shelters. what was it like for you to be called up to serve in world war ii? tell us a little bit about that. oh, my dad went mad when i got calling up papers at 18. he didn't wa nt calling up papers at 18. he didn't want me to go to war. it seemed to spoil all his thoughts about me being a player. so football has a lwa ys being a player. so football has always been a big part of your life? 0h always been a big part of your life?
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oh yeah. what's the difference between football now and then? 0h, we've got better players. better players. you'd expect him to say that. what would your advice be to me, young this generation? concentration. practice went you can. every chance you get you've got to play. how were the football boots back then? they were heavy. and the boots now, it's like playing in slippers! beautiful. tony, when you are scouting, what did you used to look for in a player? ability. boys who had the wits to get the ball and ta ke who had the wits to get the ball and take it to people. when you are scouting, or any time, you are looking at a match, you are always, in no time, you pick up boys you think he could be a player. and when
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people watch match of the day these days they will see a fellow called alan scheer on there, and he was one of those, you try to get him to sign for manchester united, you try to get united to sign this young man?|j saw get united to sign this young man?” saw alan shearer play at southhampton in a reserve team. and i thought he looks something special. i'm going to come over and show you a video that he made for you, if that's all right. ok? it was on much of the day at the weekend and i'd told him i would see you and he has given me this to play for you. tony, alan shearer here. my hope you're well. i've got a little less hair than when you try to get me to manchester united. i know you have loved working in football for 60 years, sojust have loved working in football for 60 years, so just wanted to say thank you, congratulations, and well done, and sorry i can't be there today. all the best you, thanks. you could always tell aloe —— alan shearer had a big heart as well as
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being a good player. how do you feel about being the first black manager? i never thought about it. they wa nted i never thought about it. they wanted to be a player! when you see that you are going past people and you say, yeah, a good enough. a lot of black people get stick for the colour of their skin. it is good to hear what tony just colour of their skin. it is good to hear what tonyjust said about feeling he had the ability to play. i think having self—confidence is important and tony has reassured us that we have got to be confident in our self that we have got to be confident in ourself in that we have got to be confident in our self in order to reach elite standard. so, yeah. you are asking tony about being the first black manager, is racism something you have experience favourable yourself? yeah, i have. it's not a good feeling for me to get stick for the colour of my skin. nothing they can do about it. i'm just trying to play football. it draws the game of
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football. it draws the game of football. is that from people you are playing with people on the sidelines? that was people i was playing with, playing against. it does give you a little bit of a knock. and when you hear tony talk about attitude being the most important thing, does that make a difference to you? if you think you experience racism again would you think about it differently? yeah, think about it differently? yeah, think hearing from tony gives a boost of confidence. if they do feel that again i'lljust carry on playing and show them what i've got. that if i've got ability nothing will stop me from playing football. we are all playing football for the love of the game. that's right. so i don't think that's acceptable. we've got to sort of unite as a team and stand against it as one. what do you lads feel you've learned from meeting tony and listening to some of the things he's and went through? the sacrifices he made, not many people can say they've done that. so i think it's good to listen to his
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story. thank you very much, tony, it's been lovely to see you. thanks, lads. it was a lovely morning matt. and to hear those two lads, talking about his experiences, genuinely interested in what he went through, even from the boots he wore, what it was like taking part in the war, and his expansive racism and then talk about what they had experience playing football now. one of the strange things, we get people now with huge age rangers that were talking about something with —— that feel so relevant. good. nice to hear from them as well. carol will look at the weather. it sounds like there might be called on the way. there is quite a bit of frost around. the weather family settled as the high—pressure is in charge. the winnable pickup on saturday with stormy conditions. today,
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high—pressure firmly in charge, widespread frost and fog as well. around this area of high pressure, the wind moving in a clockwise direction. ireland and scotland with not as cold start. west london, for example most of the fog will lift. some lifting into low cloud. a lot of dry weather. some sunshine. showers across the north and west of scotland. temperatures more or less where they should be at this stage in february. through this evening and overnight, we are more likely to see more fog issues, especially across england and wales than the nightjust gone. mcleod coming in across the west. whether cloud remains broken, it will be a cold night frost and potential for some freezing fog so some hazards to watch out for first thing in the morning. the breeze will pick up on
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the western flank and where you have the western flank and where you have the cloud coming in from the atlantic, that will break it up in places. more sunny spells. cloud still thick enough across the north and west of scotland for some drizzle. a lot of england and wales are looking at a fine day. hazy sunshine around with temperatures between six and nine degrees. by the time we mean from thursday into friday, the high—pressure is off to the new continent, opening the doors to more weather fronts and stronger winds coming away. two weather fronts. possibly a bit of frost around first thing likely but a lot of dry weather. you will notice the breeze will be more prevalent during the course of friday. the first front comes in bringing some showers, some of them will be wintry in the hills. later in the day, another one will bring a band of rain and strengthening winds. the
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next sequence will move through the next sequence will move through the next few days quite quickly. it is a pressure chart. the front bringing in the ranks during the course of those are into friday and behind it, look at the array of fronts coming in over the weekend. later on saturday into sunday, we are expecting heavy rain and the wind will really pick up. as we go through the weekend, especially later on saturday and into sunday, the risk of gales, heavy rain and also disruptions so stay tuned to the weather forecast. look at that, we're going to have to watch out. carol has got some great teachers from the weather watchers. how should the bbc be funded? at the moment, tv services are covered by the licence fee and if you don't pay, you could be fined or even sent to prison. but this morning, the government is looking at whether that should change. breakfast'sjohn maguire has been out and about in bristol to see what you think. this is, believe it or not, a
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typical weekday at the bowl club. many here are over 75 and from june will have to pay the tv licence fee and, as for the much hyped change in viewing lens and, well, there is little appetite for the digital revolution. we hate the love ireland type nonsense, i am sorry to say. we only watch the preview so we do like bbc programmes but, i must admit, we go all over the place, drama, talking pictures, everything, really. sue's has been spent most of his spare time playing bowls but when, on the rare occasion he swaps the green for the tv screen, he is happy to pay for it. i think it is good value, £3 a week. i think the latest one is £3 overall, over a year which is nothing. the old tv
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detector va ns year which is nothing. the old tv detector vans have now followed black—and—white sets into the skip and now the government says it wants to make sure the licence fee remains releva nt to make sure the licence fee remains relevant in this modern digital age. today, launching its consultation on whether or not to decriminalise non—payment. whether or not to decriminalise non-payment. three, two, one, you may see... these journalism students in the west of england trying to forge a career in that chosen industry. it is what they appreciate. it is transforming before their eyes. we chat on a mini version of the breakfast so far. the majority of stuff i watch is not live tv. i subscribe to netflix and i watch most of the things on there. usually i watch netflix, mainly,
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obviously, but i also watch bbc iplayer. i feel like that is my main to go place because all my documentaries are there, david attenborough is on there, so probably that is the main one. what do they think of the mandatory licensee fee? no, i do not think there should be a licence fee. there are amazing shows on the bbc and i think it is part of the british heritage in a way so it will be sad to get rid of that but as a student, there is just no trance. i to get rid of that but as a student, there isjust no trance. i could not afford it. it is a tough one but i feel if people do not really watch television, they do not have to pay for it. it is and if they decide they want to watch previously should pay for it. one thing they agree on, the natural history programmes presented by sir david attenborough are sacrosanct. life ofjust would not be the same without them.
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john maguire, bbc news. very interesting to hear all their thoughts. we were talking a lot about the coronavirus and we will be speaking to the health secretary at 7:30am. but also the effect on business is important. one of the biggest economies in the world is being devastated by what is happening. this is a horrible time for people who are poorly, for people who have passed away, dreadful for them but there is a big impact on the economy. china is a second—biggest economy in the world. british airways have stop flights in and out of beijing and shanghai for and out of beijing and shanghai for a month. virgin atlantic and lufthansa also. for 120,000 chinese students based in the uk, it is a lot trickier. almost 200,000
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tourists tripped from china to the eu have been cancelled so big financial implications from that. looking at the global operations, they are playing it safe. google has closed offices in china, hong kong, taiwan. starbucks have closed have their offices. people going out less at night. juggler lentil over also struggling stop —— jaguar land rover. around £44 billion worth of goods and around half of manufacturers have found tools at the moment and it has big implications for companies who make things out of chinese parts, like tracy, who makes electronics. we always plan for the chinese new year but we were surprised last week that
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it had been extended. even more surprised to hear one of the factories that supplies materials to us factories that supplies materials to us is in the affected province and is on lockdown. we have been able to find alternative sources for the materials but because we need them quickly now, then there are price implications and some of that has been as much as three times the original cost. if this continues, we will have to have conversations with our customers because in the long—term we would not be able to absorb those sort of cost increases. you were mentioning consumption of oil as well? reports saying china uses 20% less oil and raw materials and that has meant a cheapening in the price of oil. the petrol is coming down but volatility is not
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good for the global economy. the big thing to say is that these extreme measures of stopping manufacturing and quarantining tens of millions of people all comes from a good place, to reduce the number of fatalities but the truth is we did not know how long this will go on and it has implications for every economy. not just from the health point of view but economically and globally, the effects it is having. the tension with the us and the trade war, we will be filling it for a while. how many steps have you done in your new smoke? we just have to have a look. i will have a lap soon. other watches are available. coronavirus will be one of the things we will be
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speaking to about to the health secretary. we also looked at ian paterson and we will be speaking to two of his victims. one who had cancer when he didn't, another one who had impacts after a botched operation. we will also be talking about step parenting. in books, for example, they are still vilified. evil stepmothers have been part of storybooks over the years so we will talk about that later. the are calls for a change. what do you think of that at home? lots of people now with blended families. i am sure you have opinions on that as well. we will also be talking about the mp at the centre of this from yesterday. tracy brabin, an mp in the house of commons yesterday, and she received all sorts of comments and grim
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insults as well after what you referred to as a wardrobe malfunction. some people say it is a daring dress, a wardrobe malfunction? you can take a picture that does not tell the true story. but what is the case definitely is that she got a huge amount of abuse. for example, if a bloke had warned not something like that but something similarfrom a male point of view, would they be as many insults. all this to discuss with the. she responded on twitter and repeated some of the abuse. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, from bbc london. i'm tarah welsh. the boyfriend of a tv presenter killed on her e—scooter in battersea says he believes the poor condition of the road contributed to her death. emily hartridge
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was involved in the uk's first fatal e—scooter crash. jake hazell says he has suffered from panic attacks and is continuing to campaign for mental health issues. he also wants more regulation brought in for escooters. wandsworth council, who maintain the road, say it would be inappropriate to comment ahead of the inquest. the road was in horrendous conditions. when i spoke to the police on the day, they said that was the factor. one week after emily's death, they fixed the road and that for me was gut wrenching. for someone to pass away for them to put a road in usable condition. it should be done — it should always be done, it should be done right the first time. drivers in hertforshire who sneak in to bus lanes could soon face automatic fines. the council is considering plans for a network of camera and automatic fines. at the moment there aren't any in the county, but officials are condiering the action to stop the mis—use of bus lanes. work to demolish the army and navy flyover in chelmsford is set to begin next monday. it was closed permanently in september when defects were found
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in its concrete foundations. most of the work will take place overnight and some sundays with the expected completion date in april. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. the overground is part suspended between south tottenham and barking. this is due to repairs to five miles of damaged track. a look at the roads now. it isa it is a slow on the m25, approaching junction 25 because of roadworks. in west london, kingsley road is closed near to hounslow east tube station that's following that stabbing yesterday evening. and in mayfair, stjames square is closed because of a demonstration. now for the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a chilly start this morning. a little bit of patchy frost away from central london,
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and also to the west of london, out towards parts of buckinghamshire and the home counties, some mist and fog patches as well. elsewhere dry with some sunny spells. now the mist and fog, if you have it, could linger into much of the morning but it will gradually start to lift. some sunshine. the wind a lot lighter than yesterday. temperatures reaching nine celsius. now, high pressure in charge overnight as well, so clear skies, temperatures dropping. more chance of widespread mist and fog as we head through to thursday morning. the minimum temperature down to zero so, again, we mightjust get patchy fog first thing. so a chilly start to thursday. very quite and settled but that mist and fog stubborn. it could actually last well into the afternoon and lift into low cloud. if you are stuck underneath it, it's going to feel chilly, but elsewhere, you'll get some bright and sunny spells. similar conditions for friday. it's the weekend where things start to change. overnight saturday, stormy weather on the way. very windy for sunday. and the met office has issued a yellow weather warning. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address.
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bye for now.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: dramatic scenes in washington overnight as president trump delivers his state of the union address, claiming a great american come back. the democratic speaker nancy pelosi ripped up a copy of his speech. the foreign office charters a final flight to bring home british nationals stranded in the chinese city at the centre of the coronavirus outbreak. the second biggest economy in the world is in near shutdown. i'll be looking at what the coronavirus epidemic means for businesses here, and around the world. should failing to pay for a tv licence be a criminal offence? the government starts a public consultation today. liverpool's young guns had fun in the fa cup. with the first team away in the sun, they beat shrewsbury to reach the fa cup fifth round.
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good morning. the weatherfor the next couple of days remains fairly settled. there is frost and fog this morning but most will be dry with hazy sunshine. by the weekend we will be in for some wild weather. they will have more later. and we meet stumpy the labrador who has helped save up to 120 other dogs by donating blood more than 30 times. good morning. it's wednesday, 5th february. our top story: in dramatic scenes in the us congress overnight, president trump has set out his case for another four years in office. republicans chanted in support at the annual state of the union address. but his political rival, the democratic speaker nancy pelosi was seen ripping up her copy of the speech. our correspondent ben wright was watching the speech in washington. the stately procession from white house to congress —— even before president trump spoke this felt more like a republican
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party rally than a state of the union address. four more years, chartered republican lawmakers, while democrats looked angry and glum. ina while democrats looked angry and glum. in a striking snub of the most senior democrat in the chamber, president trump refused to shake nancy pelosi's hand. someone who pushed hard for his impeachment. donald trump then fired out lines that will form the crux of his re—election campaign. that will form the crux of his re-election campaign. jobs are booming. incomes are soaring. poverty is plummeting. crime is falling. confidence is surging. and our country is thriving and highly respected again. applause . his speech was bombastic, boastful, and partisan. my fellow americans, the best is yet to come. thank you. and then, at the end, this. nancy pelosi ripping up the
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president's speech in disgust. washington has rarely looked so bitter. in the partisan divide will only deepen later on today when, as everybody expects, the republican led senate clears president trump of abusing his power and obstructing congress. in this election year, the next nine months will be fiercely fought and this may not be president trump's last state of the union address. ben wright, bbc news, washington. should you be prosecuted if you fail to pay the tv licence fee? the government is launching a public consultation on the issue this morning. at the moment, you are breaking the law if you watch television, stream a live programme or use the bbc iplayer without paying the fee. let's get more on this from our reporterjohn mcmanus, who's outside broadcasting house in central london this morning. good morning to you, john. i'm sure you're getting plenty of comments about this this morning, as we are today. it is an interesting issue at
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the moment, particularly. extremely. this consultation announced by nicky morgan, the culture secretary, will check whether the public thinks are those who watch live tv or live strea m those who watch live tv or live stream television programmes but don't have a bbc licence should be pursued through the courts, which is what happens now, or whether there should be a different type of enforcement situation. at the moment they are pursued through the courts and the government says it wants to look again at why that is happening. now, at the moment the bbc licence fee scheduled to rise by £3 at the beginning of april to £157, an amount already agreed between the corporation and the bbc. and although most people who should have although most people who should have atv although most people who should have a tv licence should have one, in 2018, hundred and 21,000 people were pursued, the prosecuted for not having one. although england and wales only five people ever went to prison because of this. the government says that the consultation will carry on through the spring. they'll make a decision in the summer. the bbc says this issue was looked at five years ago
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in 2015 and at that point the government review decided that nonpayment of the licence fee should remain criminalised otherwise the bbc could stand to lose hundreds of millions of pounds. thank you for that this morning. british citizen isa again that this morning. british citizen is a again encouraged to leave china. a second and final flight is being chartered to help any remaining british citizens wishing to leave wuhan — the chinese city at the centre of the new coronavirus outbreak. 94 uk nationals and family members have already been evacuated from the city. overnight, the number of deaths in china has risen to 490. more than 40 people have been arrested during a crackdown on courierfraud. it's where people are tricked into withdrawing large sums of money to then hand it over to someone posing as a courier or police officer. city of london police say there have been 3—thousand victims over the last two years, many of them elderly people. our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw reports. early morning in central london,
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police are out in force for a raid on a flat in kings cross. shouting. it's part of an operation targeting criminal gangs involved in courierfraud. a sniffer dog is brought in to find items that may be hidden like mobile phones, sim cards, and memory sticks. carol norton was a victim of courierfraud. she was tricked into handing over £4,000 in cash after being phoned by a man who said he was a detective and needed her help on an undercover investigation. i believed every word he said. he really sounded... he was concerned about me. he did say he was concerned about my husband and he just seemed a genuine police officer. when you learned that it was a scam, how did you feel? what was your reaction? i just cried, it was awful. i really felt upset because i'd let my husband down. police believe courier fraud is a growing problem across england and wales. in the past two years, there've been over 3,100 victims
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and £12 million have been stolen, with some people losing hundreds of thousands in pensions and savings. in police raids since november, 44 people have been arrested, including two men at the flat in london. they've since been released while investigations continue. 14 others have been charged as police continue to tackle what they say is a despicable crime. danny shaw, bbc news. those are some of the main stories around this morning. it is eight minutes past seven. just a reminder, we will be speaking to matt hancock, the health secretary, getting the very latest on government advice for coronavirus, what we should be doing in the uk, and the plans we heard yesterday about getting 30,000 britons in china back to the uk. and there is a final flight coming from wuhan with just over 100 people on
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board, that is returning at the weekend. lots to talk about with regard to that. and let us find out with what's going on with this morning's weather. that looks lovely. it is one of our weather watchers pictures. if you are out and about for most of us it will be dry, there will be hazy sunshine, and less windy than it has been. we're starting off on a cold note, widespread frost. got some fog patches across parts of the midlands, west london, any home counties, for example. through the early hours we've got cloud building towards the west. especially towards northern ireland and northern and western scotland. here we will see a few showers as we go through the course of the day. the fog lifting slowly. some will lift into low cloud. if that happens to you it will suppress the temperature. temperature is more or less bang on today for this stage in february. and with lighter winds than we have had of late it won't feel quite as cold. so this afternoon to the north—east of scotland seeing brightness, sunny spells coming through. in the west we hang onto
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the cloud and some showers. a bit more cloud across western parts of northern ireland, bright in the east and more cloud across north—west england, brate rennae north east. as we come further south, if you've got the fog, it will be chilly. there will be hazy sunshine around as well. into the evening and overnight period, once again, we are looking at fog forming, perhaps more expensively across england wales. a cold night, local frost expensively across england wales. a cold night, localfrost and local freezing fog patches as well. just a heads up, as we head into the weekend, if you have any travel plans it looks like we will see some gales, stormy conditions, and heavy rain which could lead to some disruption. i will have more on that in about half—an—hour. dan and louise. carole, thank you so much. the decision to make cannabis—based medicine available on the nhs was seen as "life changing" for thousands of children with severe epilepsy. butjust a few months later, campaigners are heading to parliament, demanding children
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are given access to different types we'll speak to two parents in a moment — but first, tim muffett explains the issues. alfie dingley has a rare form of epilepsy. he used to suffer more than 100 seizures a month. his family say medical cannabis, prescribed by the nhs in 2018, transformed him. he is now able to live a pretty much normal life. but otherfamilies live a pretty much normal life. but other families who want access to the same medical cannabis by the nhs for their epileptic children have been left frustrated and angry. some are having to pay thousands of pounds a month for it. that's because although medical cannabis has been legalised, critics say the guidelines issued by the national institute for health and care excellence are too confusing and to restrict give. the medical cannabis used by alfie as two key ingredients, cbd, which is known to
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reduce seizures, and thc, the psychoactive compound in cannabis which makes people high. some nhs specialists are worried about its effect on the brain. so the medical cannabis recently licensed by the nhs doesn't contain thc. some say it's less effective as a result. the nhs insists it will make a real difference, benefiting thousands of people with severe epilepsy. tim muffett, bbc news. let's speak to hannah deacon,her son alfie was one of several high profile cases that helped bring about the legalisation of medicinal cannabis. and joanne griffiths, who is paying thousands of pounds a month for a private prescription for her son, ben. good morning to you both. thank you for joining good morning to you both. thank you forjoining us. inu, hannah, we have talked to many before. let us hear joanne's son story. tell us about your son and how things are affecting him. well, it's very demanding looking after a child with
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additional needs. and he was having 100 seizures a day, on a good day. and we tried what they said we could have and it didn't work for him. he was having 300 seizures at that point. and so we asked can we have, can we have the other product, with a little bit of thc in, as hannah's son has on the nhs. and we were told no, we couldn't. so we then had to go to no, we couldn't. so we then had to gotoa no, we couldn't. so we then had to go to a private doctor, because ben was so poorly, he couldn't eat, he couldn't drink, he couldn't do anything. and they said yes. i mean, for us, they, you know, they saved my son's life. the doctor save my son's life stop and matt hancock
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stood in front of me in march and said it would be available in several months' time on the nhs. and that, you know, we could... you know... he understood. he said he understood. he said he knew that our children couldn't wait that long. and we are nearly 12 months on and we still don't have that prescription. we still don't have it. we're paying thousands of pounds every month and it's really hard. it's really hard. it is hard on so many levels but also the financial level? it is absolutely financially crippling to have to keep paying thousands of pounds every month. we are really blessed that we have been given this medicine outcast because if i was paying for it from the private hospital it would cost us over £3000
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a month. we will put your specific point to matt hancock, the health secretary when he comes in. the part of the cannabis plant that makes you high, people say more research has to be done with drugs that specific pa rt to be done with drugs that specific part to it. can you understand when they say they need to be more done so they can see exactly how that affects people? no, i do not understand it at all. there is huge amount that if you take these drugs it stops seizures. lots of anecdotes. data. israel's have been doing it for the last 30 years. they doing it for the last 30 years. they do not know what they are talking about, they have not consulted without any cannabis expert at all when they created this. we do not
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have any randomised controlled data, 78 drugs prescribed on the nhs with no randomised controlled data, it is all done on historical data so it is used, because they do not want to make it available. my son was having hundreds of seizures a week and pumped full of drugs and he is not like that. he is not cured, still suffers some day but mostly his quality of life has improved. hundreds of seizures a day does more damage than a tiny bit of thc. how much different does this make to him? he went two weeks with no seizures at all. every night, he could go periods without any seizures. he may have one or two a
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day and they are massively reduced in time length so they are seconds rather than minutes long. he is not losing hours of his day but maybe a minute. he can know now, he is learning at school, he is non—verbal but he has started to sayjuice at school and it makes a massive difference. really fascinating to listen to what the both of you are saying. when you hear the potential risk of the drug, do you balance that with the complete change in your sons live and say it is worth it? their son is vital to my son 's life because it could not live the way he was living the way he was before. it is the only drug to ever have reduced his seizures, to give him freedom and control. you are in a strange position because you are the person... very angry. i am lucky
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my son has an anna chase prescription. if you run a campaign you get something and if you don't you get something and if you don't you don't. i want to live in a fair and equal society as every viewer watching this programme doesn't but at the moment my son... the law has changed but that has not happened. we are calling on the government to fund these prescriptions. private prescriptions are funded by the nhs all the time. private services funded by the nhs all the time. they have to stop this suffering of these families. having a child with complex disability and complex epilepsy is horrendous enough without having to fund this drug. these families would not be doing
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this if it would not help. they have been doing it for the last year, spending thousands of pounds, doing fundraising, they should not have to do this. they must allow access urgently to help these families. we have spoken to the nhs and they say it is up to specialist doctors to prescribe the cannabis. when you hear that... prescribe the cannabis. when you hear that. .. that is such nonsense. all the families we work with, the doctors say we have been told by the hierarchy we cannot prescribe. who tells them that? their trust. they worried sick about prescribing something that is unlicensed. men compensate that doctors can prescribe but the doctors it is not fairon them prescribe but the doctors it is not fair on them because they have not been trained and are being bombarded by patients and they are terrified of their careers. they have to go
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through a lot of bureaucracies, go for the medical director and they are blocked all the way and what we wa nt are blocked all the way and what we want to see the government saying, 0k, there is a problem, let's sit down with stakeholders and find out what can happen. today is another frustrating day for you. it is very frustrating day for you. it is very frustrating but we want to say to matt hancock, please, do as promised and start funding this up—to—date for our children, immediately. —— start funding this today. we feel at the moment we are on a merry—go—round. sit down and break the access problem. we need him to find this today because we cannot carry on. it is not sustainable for anyfamily to carry on. it is not sustainable for any family to keep paying thousands of pounds every month. thank you very much. can ijust very quickly say, cannot look at a camera, i am
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personally appealing to the prime minister borisjohnson personally appealing to the prime minister boris johnson added to the secretary of state for health, please do the right thing for these families, you have it in your power to allow funding for the private prescriptions. show the public we live in a fair society. don'tjust allow my son to have this access. do the right thing. you can do that today, allow funding for these families and we can sit around the table and make access available to all. please, help them. thank you very much. some say it is up to the nhs to say treatment is available. thank you for making a point very powerfully this morning. british people are once again to leave the chinese city of wuhan. british
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tourist david abell is on board a cruise ship. the last 24 hours has changed quite considerably. when we arrived for five days we had to go through a quarantine procedure and since then, it has been really downhill with regard to what is happening to passengers on the ship. 6:30 a.m., japanese time, nine hours ago, we were informed by the captain that every passenger had to remain in the cabins. we cannot leave the cabin, walk along the corridor. food is being brought to us. and it has
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changed dramatically. we understand ten people on board have tested positive for coronavirus. are you worried? what are you feeling? those ten people are no longer on—board. we re ten people are no longer on—board. were ta ken off ten people are no longer on—board. were taken off the ship by the coastguard this morning. now they are ina coastguard this morning. now they are in a medical facility on land. so we do not know what the situation is with all of the other passengers. this is speculation what i am saying but i would imagine in the next five days every passenger is going to be tested again to see anyone is proving positive to the virus. until then, we are all confined to our cabins. frustrating, worrying, you're still smiling though! oh, what is the alternative? there is no point in being doom and gloom about this. we're to take it face on as i
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try to do that with everything in my life. we are one of the many fortunate folks that we have a cabin with a balcony so we can open the door, get fresh air and enjoy the view. the people i am feeling really bad about other passengers who have inside cabins. they have no natural light, no windows to look out of and all they have is the air—conditioning. for them it all they have is the air—conditioning. forthem it must be hell on earth. where are you meant to be going and any indication of when you might move on? ok, right now i am supposed to be in england. we had a flight booked with ba on tuesday morning. that has had to be cancelled. we have no idea when we will be allowed off the ship. all we have been informed is will be allowed off the ship. all we have been informed i514 days quarantine on the ship. that means no interaction with other passengers, food is brought to the room, it is really basic food,
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nothing like we have enjoyed in the cruise at all. it has changed so much. have you been able to be in touch with the british authorities? are they offering you support? no, i do not really know what they could do not really know what they could do for us because the japanese government have laid down the instructions of what we have to do. the captain of the ship is following those to the letter, i believe. i do not see what else the british government could do to help the situation. an important question, how are you feeling physically?” would say there is a wee bit of anxiety because what i do not want to hear is that another passenger has gone down with it, certainly not me all my wife. the ten passages that were infected, have they passed
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anything onto other people on board? we just don't know yet. i think there will be quite a bit of boredom coming up. if you were to talk to me and 14 days' time you might not see the same smile on me. david who is quarantine on that cruise ship in japan. very best of luck to you. thank you very much. dear me, some very interesting interviews on the programme. the health secretary will be here this morning. and also to tracy brabin we will be asking about the wardrobe malfunction, the dress of the shoulders in the house of commons. people getting in touch
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with us, are different end of the scales. something it is inappropriate and others saying how can you question what women way. we are going to meet stumpy the labrador and white more like him are desperately needed. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, from bbc london. i'm tarah welsh. the boyfriend of a tv presenter killed on her e—scooter in battersea says he believes the poor condition of the road contributed to her death. emily hartridge was involved in the uk's first fatal e—scooter crash. jake hazell says he has suffered from panic attacks and is continuing to campaign for mental health issues. he also wants more regulation brought in for escooters. wandsworth council, who maintain the road, say it would be inappropriate to comment ahead of the inquest. the road was in horrendous condition. when i spoke to the police on the day, they said
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that was the factor. one week after emily's death, they fixed the road and that for me was gut wrenching. for someone to pass away for them to put a road in usable condition. it should be done — it should always be done, it should be done right the first time. drivers in hertforshire who sneak in to bus lanes could soon face automatic fines. the council is considering plans for a network of camera and automatic fines. at the moment there aren't any in the county, but officials are condiering the action to stop the mis—use of bus lanes. work to demolish the army and navy flyover in chelmsford is set to begin next monday. it was closed permanently in september when defects were found in its concrete foundations. most of the work will take place overnight and some sundays with the expected completion date in april. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service
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on the all tubes lines this morning. the overground is part suspended between south tottenham and barking. this is due to repairs to five miles of damaged track. a look at the roads now. slow moving on the m25 anticlockwise because of roadworks. in west london, kingsley road is closed near to hounslow east tube station that's following that stabbing yesterday evening. and in mayfair, stjames square is closed because of a demonstration. now for the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a chilly start this morning. a little bit of patchy frost away from central london, and also to the west of london, out towards parts of buckinghamshire and the home counties, some mist and fog patches as well. elsewhere dry with some sunny spells. now the mist and fog, if you have it, could linger into much of the morning but it will gradually start to lift. some sunshine. the wind a lot lighter than yesterday. temperatures reaching nine celsius.
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now, high pressure in charge overnight as well, so clear skies, temperatures dropping. more chance of widespread mist and fog as we head through to thursday morning. the minimum temperature down to zero so, again, we mightjust get patchy fog first thing. so a chilly start to thursday. very quite and settled but that mist and fog stubborn. it could actually last well into the afternoon and lift into low cloud. if you are stuck underneath it, it's going to feel chilly, but elsewhere, you'll get some bright and sunny spells. similar conditions for friday. it's the weekend where things start to change. overnight saturday, stormy weather on the way. very windy for sunday. and the met office has issued a yellow weather warning. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. it is 7:30am. it is wednesday morning. there's been two known cases of the deadly coronavirus in britain
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and more than a dozen uk nationals are in quarantine after being brought back from china. so how is the uk dealing with an outbreak that's been declared a global health emergency? let's speak now to the health secretary matt hancock. good morning to you, mr hancock. there are other issues we will get you as well, but seeing as this is your first tv interview since we have had this coronavirus crisis, there are quite a few things we would like to get clear as well, if that's possible. you want to 30,000 brits in china to come back to the uk. he was an idea, logistically, how would that happen? well, there are still commercial flights available. and the principal we are taking is that we want to take no chances with this virus. we want to ta ke chances with this virus. we want to take a science led approach. the approach that we have been taking has very much been driven by the advice of the chief medical officer. and this is a very serious virus and
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having a very serious impact in china. as you say, there are two cases only here in the uk, but we do expect more. and so we are taking no chances. how would you quarantine all those people if they came back, would that be the case? the advice is that if they have symptoms then they should stay—at—home, self isolated, as it's called, and call triple one. not go to the gp or the a&e because there is a risk of spreading the virus. and stay at home until they have spoken to a clinician. the more we discussed this problem, it is a china white problem now. you're talking about this commercial flights are still coming back, there are thousands of cases in china, thousands of lives arriving in the uk from beijing, shanghai, obviously wuhan is the centre of the virus at the moment, what about all those people coming into the uk at the moment, what is being done to monitor them? that is
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a very important question and we keep this under consideration all of the time. as you say, wuhan is the upper centre of this epidemic. —— epicentre. in those we brought back from wuhan, we putting them into quarantine. there are almost 100 people in a rope on the wirral. and i want to thank all the staff there who have done an amazing job in supporting those. but the current likelihood of getting a case of coronavirus in wuhan itself is much, much higher than in the rest of my novel top so because of that difference in risk we think that it is appropriate that if you are brought back by the government, because there's flights out of wuhan, then you need to go into quarantine, but we recommend that people come back from the rest of china and that they don't go to china and that they don't go to china unless it's absolutely essential, because... and then they
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should self isolated if they have symptoms and make sure, as i say, that anybody with a concern should dial 111. just for clarity, should you self isolated even if you don't have symptoms? no, we don't think that's necessary. in the key thing is however mildly symptoms, then you should self isolate and call 111. there are things everybody can do. we have a big public messaging campaign now to say that if you want to ta ke campaign now to say that if you want to take a precaution and do everything you can, then the most important thing to do is to wash your hands and if you have a cough ora your hands and if you have a cough or a sneeze, use a tissue. these things sound simple, they are exactly what you do to stop getting the flu. but they are the most important things to help stop the spread of this virus. i understand this is an issue that lots of governments around the world are dealing with, but what about those
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people who are carrying the virus but aren't you showing symptoms? because there are still thousands of those who might be coming into the uk. i understand the concern around that. the scientific advice is that the likelihood of them being able to pass on the virus is low. and also the tests don't really work on people who don't have symptoms. so the key is as soon as people do have symptoms, however mild, then that is the moment to call 111 and go home and stay home until you've spoken to and stay home until you've spoken to a clinician. so are you convinced that what you're doing at the moment, is that all you can do to best stop spread of coronavirus in the uk? i know you are trying your best to give the government advice, but there are a lot of ifs and buts and may see what you're telling us this morning. thereon. the advice is absolutely clear about what people should do. the analysis behind how
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you come to that advice and how you're taking decisions of course has to be based on the science. and that has to be based on what we know about this virus and that it does have uncertainties around it because of the nature of this being a brand—new virus. but as they say, the approach we are taking is to ta ke the approach we are taking is to take no chances, to base our decisions on the science, on the advice from the chief medical officer and the amazing scientist we have got in this country, we have some of the best urologists and epidemiologists in the world. over the last two days i have put an extra £40 million into the effort to find a global vaccine, because obviously this virus, it is new, there is no vaccine, but we are working round—the—clock to try to find one... can i ask a few extra questions to try to get facts for our viewers. they would appreciate if you could run through them as quickly as you can. there are some
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other things am desperate to talk to you this morning. the latest on the two chinese nationals with coronavirus being treated in newcastle. they remain in quarantine. and they are being treated. they don't want to give away any patient details, but that has gone, the process around that has gone, the process around that has gone, the process around that has gone well. they have been in isolation. and when they are being treated they are being treated by people who are themselves prevented from cutting the virus from them. so that has worked well. 11 who came back on the air france flight on sunday. there is one confirmed coronavirus case of someone on the flight with coronavirus case of someone on the flight with them, a belgian national, one of those 11 britons is awaiting results. have those results come back yet, what we know about that was yellow that result has come back and it is negative. so those 11 are now at our park on the wirral and they will be in quarantine for
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two weeks from when they came back —— arrow park. two weeks from when they came back -- arrow park. the person who fell ill on the flight back from china, i am pleased to say, has been tested and the test has been negative. but he will stay in quarantine until the two weeks is up, in case... because the test, as i say, doesn't work until the coronavirus symptoms become, you know, come through, until you get the cough and the cold, which is the early symptoms of this. and in some cases are the only symptoms that people get. so he will stay in quarantine, but the tests we have done have come back negative. some of our viewers are getting m essa g es some of our viewers are getting messages from their gps and are being told, someone text message, someone e—mail, if you think you have symptoms don't attend the hospital emergency department unless you are seriously unwell. how do you judge when you become seriously u nwell judge when you become seriously unwell and you have to take different steps other than ringing
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111 ? different steps other than ringing 111? call 111, that is absolutely the first thing that people should do if they think they have this. the whole 111 system has do if they think they have this. the whole111 system has been developed in the last few years. it is a superb system. there are gps on the other end of it. ms 24/7 people can turn up and get the advice they need -- it turn up and get the advice they need —— it means that. turn up and get the advice they need -- it means that. to other subjects, we will are going to talk to about the two, i don't know if you are watching the two parents we had on the sofa we had a few moments ago talk about their struggles to get drugs on the nhs for their children. i'll come to that in a moment. yesterday on the programme we were talking about ian paterson, the rogue surgeon can you assure our viewers what is being done to make sure that cannot happen again, what changes are you going to make and when will they be made? yes, this is an awful case. we published the report yesterday. it makes a series of recommendations about how we make sure that when you have a case like this the system that stops bad
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behaviour in medicine works properly, frankly, and it comes down... there are a whole series of recommendations by the central one is about information sharing. because the authorities that inspect different parts of the health system, the information wasn't being shared properly. that absolutely can be fixed. it will be fixed. and we will look at all of the recommendations that the report made and make sure we do what's necessary. and what about a timeframe on that? well, there's a whole series, they will change at different paces. but i think if we 90, different paces. but i think if we go, think it is reasonable to commit to giving an update sosoli in one ear‘s time that we should have made the changes necessary —— certainly end. i want to ask you questions that both hannah deacon and joanne griffiths, two mothers, joanne's son
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is ben, he has been having hundreds of seizures, they currently are paying £2000 a month for medication which they feel should be available on the nhs. can i play you what joanne griffiths said to us that she wa nted joanne griffiths said to us that she wanted to tell you this morning about 20 minute ago? capitalism stop matt hancock stood in front of me in march and said that it would be available in several months time on the nhs. and that, you know, we could, you know, he understood. he said he understood. he knew that our children couldn't wait that long. and we are nearly 12 months on and we still don't have the prescription. did you lie to her? no. i've met her and many other pa rents no. i've met her and many other parents whose children... because children benefit from these cannabis based drugs. i've changed the law to allow the cannabis based drugs to be used in this country. it was
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incredibly emotional meeting the pa rents incredibly emotional meeting the parents and i've met many more sense. and there was then a report from the national institute which decides what is paid for. it came out a few months after our meeting. in the costs that are being charged by the companies are too high. since then i've been working incredibly ha rd to then i've been working incredibly hard to get these drugs available on the nhs. can i explain the situation they say they have. they are being told they are available yet they are only prescribed by consultants and when they go to get the drugs they are told that they are not being prescribed because people are being told not to give them because there are fears about a lack of testing and they are being told by the trust they can't prescribe those drugs, so there are parents... we had joanne on this over this morning his life as being torn apart by the money she has got to spend, she has got to spend her life fundraising, trying
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to gather child at the same time, when she and many others feel they should have access to the drug through the nhs. of course. they totally understand. i have put research money into this to get the evidence on how well these drugs work, because they haven't been used in this country before, because they we re in this country before, because they were illegal before. i with sajid javid took the decision to make them level. so driving that through has been a huge effort. they totally understand the frustration of the pa rents. understand the frustration of the parents. we've got to make sure that we keep making progress on this. but it also comes down to the question about getting the drug companies to make them available in the right way. for instance, in the summer you might remember we had a case with drugs for cystic fibrosis, a drug where the company were trying to charge too much for it. we did eventually get it available on the
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nhs. i'm working very hard on this. there is a series of potential uses for these drugs that are based on cannabis that, in the past, have simply been illegal. and they do show, they show good hope. so why have been putting research money in, i've been trying to move this forward , i've been trying to move this forward, but it has moved more slowly tha n forward, but it has moved more slowly than i'd hoped for one year ago and we've got a shoulder to the wheel. that was joanne's point. why did you then stand in front of her and promised to those drugs would be available in 12 months down the line she is still waiting, her life is still in the same situation it was before? well, i've talked to her in march about this decision of the national institute for clinical excellence, the system we have in this country for deciding what drugs are affordable on the nhs. and i, at the time, was very much hoping they would decide that this should be available, prescribed, as you say, by occlusion. it is important that they are provide —— prescribed by
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clinicians and clinicians with an understanding of these drugs, they are very powerful. in that report came out and said there were problems on a value for money grounds. since then i've been working to try to make this available and i think that the companies that provide them need to come to the table as well and make sure we get good value for the nhs money, which is, by law, what we need to do, and quite right by all patients of the nhs. and i'm very happy to meet the parents again. by totally understand their anguish that they face. ok, i'm sure they will take you up on that. we have taken a lot of your time this morning. we appreciated. thank you, matt hancock. liverpool turned up, didn't they? and it was the baby read. they fielded the younger side in the
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history and made it through. it was an unfortunate own goal that decided it. fluffing the clearance. the under 23 is on the field last night although under 23 is on the field last night althouthurgen under 23 is on the field last night although jurgen klopp was under 23 is on the field last night althouthurgen klopp was apparently sending messages throughout the game. he is delighted with the performance and the result. chelsea away could be an opportunity for one or two of you to play in a game like that. hull kr are leading a revolt amongst rugby league clubs, against the signing of israel folau by catalan dragons. the former union star was sacked by rugby australia for his homophobic comments and hull kr have written to dragons, warning them that he'll take proceedings if they suffer financial losses as a result of the signing,
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such as sponsorship withdrawal or lack of investment. how's this for bad luck? barrow are top of the national league and they lost for the first time since october last night — but it gets worse. their team bus broke down and they needed to get home from dover! that's getting on for 400 miles, or seven hours. so they hitched lift back with their supporters. no! did they really? that is a fantastic support. it is a long, long journey. let's catch up with the weather. we have had lovely photographs. lovely weather watch photographs. we are looking at fairly quite conditions until the weekend when the weather turns a bit wilder. this morning, fog patches and widespread fog. into west london, east anglia
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that kind of area, the fog slowly lifting but some believed into low cloud and when that happens it will suppress the temperatures. west and northern scotland mcleod and also some showers but for the rest of the uk we are looking at some hazy sunshine through the day with temperatures ranging from eight — nine degrees. for this evening, more problematic fog possible. especially across parts of england and wales. the temperature is going to drop as well. some freezing fog so do bear that in mind if you are travelling. tomorrow moves further east, the high pressure so it will be breezy towards the west. with the breeze, in western areas we will see a few more brightness from scotland and
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northern ireland and some drizzle in the north—west from the thicker cloud. tomorrow the fog will be slow to clear and it may again into low cloud the temperatures. temperatures about 7—9d. as we move from thursday to friday, the high—pressure drifts towards the east of europe. a weak weather front coming away producing showers and then a more substantial weather front coming in with more substantial winds and rain. a lot of dry weather, sunshine and when the front comes in from the west, producing showers. the second one comes in later in the day with heavier rain and stronger winds and that would be a feature as we head into the weekend. the cold front moving across the uk during the course of friday into saturday. saturday night into sunday, look at all the front is coming our way. things will turn wet and very windy. in fact, so much so that disruption
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is possible. gail and heavy rain and quite stormy for some. you have been morning about that for a while. many of us give blood to help save lives, but have you ever thought about taking your pet to donate theirs? well, let's introduce you now to stumpy the labrador — he holds the record for the most donations by a dog in the uk - 30! it's thought that amount of blood could have saved up 120 other dogs. stumpyjoins us from coventry now with his owner, elly pittaway. good morning to you both and what a beautifully behaved dog. i think he was going to be a guide dog, wasn't he? yes, that's right. stumpy the labrador it was meant to be a guard dog but he has a deformity of the legs so they did not want to put him
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through all the training because of possible early arthritis. i took him on and being a vet i can look after him. a good opportunity to make the point and raise awareness about dogs being able to give blood? yes, absolutely. it is something people don't often think about until the debt needs a blood transfusion and it is obviously really important that people are aware that the blood for dogs comes from other dogs and so we rely on donors like stumpy to give blood regularlyjust like humans do. tell us about the procedure. how does he react through it? he loves it because he gets lots of treats and rewards. he sees the whole thing as a really positive experience and that is really
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important. they are careful that the only dogs that ever blood other ones are comfortable with that and do not mind doing it. obviously we have to put the welfare of the donor dog first. he is very still now so presumably he has to sit still when the blood is being taken? yes, they have to go through some tests and some examinations and make sure they are fit and healthy and for the actual donation process, they actually have to lie down, which is easy for a labrador because they like sleeping. some of them go to sleep and start snoring because they use a local anaesthetic cream so it does not hurt. it takes a few minutes to give the blood. goodbye. if anyone is watching this morning, and they did not know about this and they want to see if that pet could get involved, what is the procedure?
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what process do they have to go through? so basically, if you have a well—behaved larger dog, they have to be over 25 kg to give blood, because we use the standard human bags. the blood bank will keep a list. you can go to the website and get more information. ideally, they are looking for breeds that have a negative blood type because they can give blood to any dog. stumpy it is negative. the bread more likely to be and be more useful are your greyhounds, your boxes, lurches, dobermans, german shepherds, a whole list of breeds and people look at the website. a very good temperate is key. you do not get many
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labradors that have a negative blood thatis labradors that have a negative blood that is just like. any labradors that have a negative blood that isjust like. any bigger breeds, they are looking for. certain breeds are more likely to have a negative blood type. and now he has been retired because he is nine? his birthday is next week and after his ninth birthday, he will not be able to give blood because the welfare of the donor is always paramount. look, he is absolutely lovely. thank you for telling us about stumpy and how people can get involved. he is a gorgeous dog. we will go for a little while.” involved. he is a gorgeous dog. we will go for a little while. i love you when people contact you when you're doing a subject. a former
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footballer we nt you're doing a subject. a former footballer went on celebrity catch phrase to raise money for them. we will be speaking to the mp tracy brabin. this is a picture in lots of the papers. this picture shows a steel of the moment. the dress sort of fell off the shoulder she received all sorts of insults and comments about how she looked and how she was presenting herself and whether she was doing the right thing and whether it was inappropriate. it will be fascinating to see what she thinks. she will be talking to us about that at around eight to some of your views... megan says the attire was inappropriate and disrespectful for the house of commons. jonathan says this is an opportunity to debate clothing standard. mark says it is
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not the 1950s, this is the 21st century not the 1950s, this is the 21st ce ntu ry get not the 1950s, this is the 21st century get with it parliament stop by the way i am nearly 60 so this is not the opinion of a millennial. also coming up on the programme today... show where plastic surgery is performed live. presenter will join us and tell us why she hopes young people can make safer decisions. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, from bbc london. i'm tarah welsh. corporate witnesses in the grand phil taylor disaster —— grenfell
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that... the boyfriend of a tv presenter killed on her e—scooter in battersea says he believes the poor condition of the road contributed to her death. emily hartridge was involved in the uk's first fatal e—scooter crash. jake hazell says he has suffered from panic attacks and is continuing to campaign for mental health issues. he also wants more regulation brought in for escooters. wandsworth council, who maintain the road, say it would be inappropriate to comment ahead of the inquest. the road was in horrendous condition. when i spoke to the police on the day, they said that was the factor. one week after emily's death, they fixed the road and that for me was gut wrenching. for someone to pass away for them to put a road in usable condition. it should be done — it should always be done, it should be done right the first time. drivers in hertforshire who sneak in to bus lanes could soon face automatic fines. the council is considering plans for a network of camera and automatic fines. at the moment there aren't any
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in the county, but officials are condiering the action to stop the mis—use of bus lanes. work to demolish the army and navy flyover in chelmsford is set to begin next monday. it was closed permanently in september when defects were found in its concrete foundations. most of the work will take place overnight and some sundays with the expected completion date in april. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the all tubes lines this morning. the overground is part suspended between south tottenham and barking. this is due to repairs to five miles of damaged track. a look at the roads now. it's slow on the m25 anticlcockwise approaching junction 25 enfield because of roadworks. now for the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a chilly start this morning. a little bit of patchy frost away from central london, and also to the west of london, out towards parts of buckinghamshire and the home counties, some mist and fog patches as well. elsewhere dry with some sunny spells. now the mist and fog, if you have it, could linger into much of the morning but it will gradually start to lift. some sunshine.
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the wind a lot lighter than yesterday. temperatures reaching nine celsius. now, high pressure in charge overnight as well, so clear skies, temperatures dropping. more chance of widespread mist and fog as we head through to thursday morning. the minimum temperature down to zero so, again, we mightjust get patchy fog first thing. we mightjust get patchy frost first thing. so a chilly start to thursday. very quite and settled but that mist and fog stubborn. it could actually last well into the afternoon and lift into low cloud. if you are stuck underneath it, it's going to feel chilly, but elsewhere, you'll get some bright and sunny spells. similar conditions for friday. it's the weekend where things start to change. overnight saturday, stormy weather on the way. very windy for sunday. and the met office has issued a yellow weather warning. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. and feed
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. it is 8am on wednesday morning. our headlines today. the health secretary tells breakfast that the government is taking "no chances" in dealing with the threat of a corovinus outbreak here in the uk. this virus, because it is new, there is no vaccine but we are working around the clock to try to find one. four more years! elsewhere, dramatic scenes
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in washington overnight as president trump delivers his state of the union address, claiming a great american comeback. the democratic speaker nancy pelosi ripped up a copy of his speech. shadow culture secretary tracy brabin hits back at online abuse over wearing this dress in the house of commons. she'lljoin us in the next few minutes. love it or hate it, var is here to stay in the premier league but the new boss says it does need to be improved after criticism from clubs and fans alike. good morning. the next couple of days, the weather is fairly settled. this morning, there is some frost and fog but most of us will be dry with hazy sunshine. but something still me coming our way this weekend. i will have more in ten minutes. —— something stormy. it's wednesday 5th february. good morning. our top story. the health secretary matt hancock has told breakfast that the government is "taking no chances" in dealing with the threat
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of a coronavirus outbreak in the uk. two cases have already been confirmed in england. a final flight to bring british nationals back from the chinese city at the centre of the coronavirus outbreak is planned for this weekend. more than 100 people have already been evacuated and are in quarantine at a hospital on the wirral. we will be playing you a bit more of that interview with matt hancock to see specifically what he said about the coronavirus in a few moments. let's go to shanghai and get the latest from our correspondence robin brant. there is no doubt this is escalating, isn't it? yes, the death toll and the numbers affected according to the official figures from the chinese government continues to go up at a steady rate, about 15—20% everyday, so 490 now dead and 24,000 now infected with this new type of coronavirus. but the lockdown, and it really is a
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lockdown in the physical sense, of wuhan, that city of usually 11 million people, that continues, very severe restrictions there and other places close by have similar restrictions in terms of people being able to get out and about and even where i am in shanghai, there are people putting themselves in quarantine, staying in, this is very quiet compared to what it should be like. a quick word on the charter flight like. a quick word on the charter flight set to leave on sunday, the second owner organised by the uk government and it will be the last. they talk about that in a press release yesterday, the last flight. we are told by the government 108 britons in wuhan want to be on that flight britons in wuhan want to be on that flight and want to get out. it is also clear now, there was a bit of confusion over chinese nationals who may be partners of british people, could they go, what about kids and families, some people were worried about splitting up their families. we are now told that chinese nationals will be able to go on the flight nationals will be able to go on the flight as well. anyone from a third country must have the relevant paperwork to get out. the government is hoping it has clarified the
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situation somewhat. give us an idea of how this is affecting daily life. well, it is different depending on where you are and you can kind of see these onion peel levels of restrictions. in wuhan, that is a city shut off from the rest of the world. you can't go anywhere, there, essentially. anecdotally, we are hearing people are still struggling to get the most basic level of medical provision. you come away to places like nanjing, along the yangtze river, further east, there are some areas of that city where people and compounds are being restricted in their ability to move around. where i am in shanghai, a massive city of 24 million people on the east coast, about 1000 kilometres from wuhan but it is nothing like you would expect at this time of year, it is very quiet on the streets, the most essential shops are open for food and the food delivery drivers are doing great business but apart from that, it is
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very quite. i'm getting my temperature read in the office. it is difficult to get basic things like disinfectant and masks here as well and it's a long way away. thank you forjoining us. as promised, if you arejust as promised, if you are just turning on your tv, we will bring you what the health secretary matt hancock is telling us. these are some of the main quotes and we asked him about what the government are doing to make sure they contain the spread of coronavirus in the uk. this is a very serious virus, having a very serious impact on china. as you say, there only two cases in the uk but we do expect more. so we are taking no chances. the advice is that if they have symptoms, then they should stay at home, self isolate, as it is called, and call 111, not go to theirgp or called, and call 111, not go to their gp or a&e because there is a risk of spreading the virus and instead stay at home until they have spoken to a clinician. the most important thing to do is to wash
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your hands and if you have a cough ora your hands and if you have a cough or a sneeze, use a tissue. these things sound simple and they are exactly what you do to stop getting the flu but they are the most important things to do to help stop the spread of this virus. matt hancock talking to us earlier. in dramatic scenes in the us congress overnight, president trump has set out his case for another four years in office. republicans chanted in support at the annual state of the union address. but his political rival, the democratic speaker nancy pelosi, was seen ripping up her copy of the speech. she was right behind the president at the time. our correspondent ben wright was watching in washington. even before president trump spoke, this felt more like a republican party rally than a solemn state of the union address. "four more years," chanted republican lawmakers, while democrats looked angry and glum. in a striking snub of the most senior democrat in the chamber,
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president trump refused to shake nancy pelosi's hand, someone who pushed hard for his impeachment. donald trump then fired out lines that will form the crux of his re—election campaign. jobs are booming. incomes are soaring. poverty is plummeting. crime is falling. confidence is surging. and our country is thriving and highly respected again. applause. the speech was bombastic, boastful, and partisan. my fellow americans, the best is yet to come. thank you. and then, at the end — this. nancy pelosi ripping up the president's speech in disgust. washington has rarely looked so bitter. and the partisan divide will only deepen later on today when, as everybody expects, the republican—led senate clears president trump of abusing his power and obstructing congress. in this election year,
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the next nine months will be fiercely fought and this may not be president trump's last state of the union address. ben wright, bbc news, washington. should you be prosecuted if you fail to pay the tv licence fee? the government is launching a public consultation on the issue this morning. at the moment, you are breaking the law if you watch television, stream a live programme or use the bbc iplayer without paying the fee. let's get more on this from our reporterjohn mcmanus, who's outside broadcasting house in central london this morning. iam sure, i am sure, as we i am sure, as we are i am sure, as we are getting plenty of correspondence through from our viewers this morning, it is a really interesting topic of debate, isn't it? yes, it is and also a realworry to the people in charge in the building behind me and also in the building behind me and also in the building where you are in salford. how should the bbc be funded? and if people are watching the bbc on tv or
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streaming services on iplayer or catch up, should they be criminalised if they are not paying for the bbc licence fee mark the culture secretary, nicky morgan, is going to launch this consultation this morning, asking people to come up this morning, asking people to come up with their opinions on what should happen and the bbc will be very wary about the answer, i think it is fairto very wary about the answer, i think it is fair to say. at the moment, the licence fee is set to rise by £3 at the beginning of april to £157.50, a rise that was previously agreed between the bbc and the government. despite most people buying a license if they need it, it is fairto buying a license if they need it, it is fair to say that some people do try and get off scot free and in 2018, more than 121,000 people were prosecuted for not having that licence. it is a real issue for the bbc, though, that it wants to get sorted very soon but it is wary about the answers. thank you for joining us. we can see the figures on the screen as well. thank you for your comments and messages about that this morning. it is something we will be talking about the next two weeks.
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it is nearly 8:10am. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning, a fine start for many people this morning, a beautiful weather watchers picture of the sun rise on the isle of man. through today, foremost, it will be dry with some hazy sunshine around. less windy than it was yesterday but we are starting off on a cold note with are starting off on a cold note with a widespread frost and also some fog. fog across much of the midlands, west london, heading up towards manchester as well. if you are out and about, bear that in mind. a lot of it will slowly lift. some of it will stick and remain as low cloud, suppressing the temperature. northern ireland and scotla nd temperature. northern ireland and scotland have a bit more cloud as well and it will have some showers here and there. but for the rest of the uk, we are looking at hazy sunshine with temperatures between eight and 10 degrees. with not much wind today, it will feel better than it did today. this afternoon, still afair bit it did today. this afternoon, still a fair bit of cloud, particularly in northern and eastern scotland, a few
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holes in the east. the east of northern ireland also seeing some holes but the west hanging onto the cloud. north—west england will see a bit more cloud today as well, but the north—east will see some holes in the cloud and as we come south, away from where the fog is likely to lift into low cloud, we will have some hazy sunshine. this evening and overnight, we are more likely to have more issues with fog than the nightjust gone, quite dense fog as well. in addition to that, it is going to be a cold night with some frost around. we could even have some freezing fog to watch out for as well. but let me take you ahead to the weekend, just in case you have got plans this weekend. saturday night into sunday, it looks like we could have some disruptive weather with gales and heavy rain, possibly even really quite stormy conditions with gusts of 70—80 mph with height and exposure but inland gusts even at 50—60 mph. the met office has a yellow weather warning out for this and i will keep you posted as we go to the next couple
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of days. we will definitely pay attention. i like an early warning. now, a story that's got lots of you talking this morning. tracy brabin started her week as an mp raising a passionate point of order in the house of commons about the treatment of journalists. madam deputy speaker, i know that all members of this house will agree that lobby journalists' access to government is vital for a functioning and healthy democracy, and this latest deterioration in relations between the government and the lobby is deeply concerning. it is an important point but it was not her words that caused a stir. it was actually her choice of clothing and it prompted a barrage of tweets. some people were questioning her professionalism, others delivering personal attacks and offensive and sexist comments. the batley and spen mp hit back with this response to some of those comments. we have had to blur some of the worst language because of the time of day. the debate has continued beyond social media and into the newspapers. this is this morning's daily mail, asking
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the question, "did mp's daring dress really deserve a commons motion? " we will ask because he joins us from london now. good morning. thank you for joining london now. good morning. thank you forjoining us. . i suppose that is the question but your answer on twitter has been quite clear, take us through what happened first of all. certainly coming back to the office and then seeing their messages underneath the picture of me at the dispatch box, i was startled by the vitriolic nature of them. but it is part of the territory as a politician and i am ina territory as a politician and i am in a privileged position that i can brush this off, but i feel that it is my responsibility to call it out for those women that don't have that amplification because there are women around the world that are putting up with this everyday, where they are being demeaned because of what they wear. i mean, it is another case of everyday sexism. so you decided to call it out and how
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did that go down? how did people react to that? well, i tried not to ta ke react to that? well, i tried not to take it too seriously and it seems to hit a nerve. the amount of supportive comments i have had absolutely overwhelmed the comments about my judgment about what absolutely overwhelmed the comments about myjudgment about what i'm wearing. and yet again, you know, i am here on the show talking about a shoulder when it is a really important time at the moment for the media, the urgent question was granted because it was urgent, about number ten deciding who can and can't have briefings. today, of course, we have nicky morgan announcing the decriminalisation of the tv licence inquiry so there's lots going on about the bbc and the future of the bbc and shoulders seemed to take precedence. where are we at when that is what is happening, do you think? well, i think it was ever thus. women are continuallyjudged by how they look. girl guiding uk did a survey a couple of years ago and interviewing
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young girls, about their confidence and so on, and one in six said they we re and so on, and one in six said they were ashamed about how they look. this is unacceptable, that we are raising our daughters to be looking inward rather than outward. and if you are navel—gazing, you can't take on the world, can you, if you are a lwa ys on the world, can you, if you are always worried about whether your hair is right or not. i would suggest this is part of a pushback for that and say, "listen to what we say, not what we were". do you think social media has opened up an avenue where people can really go in on this kind of thing? of course, and they are anonymous people, often, keyboard warriors, you know, often sat in their mum's back bedroom, eating hot needles and having a pop at people that they don't know anything about. but i would reiterate again, please listen to what we have to say because it is a really important time in the media for the press and certainly with borisjohnson deciding for the press and certainly with boris johnson deciding who for the press and certainly with borisjohnson deciding who he will
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and won't speak to, we need to press the government again and again to make sure that your viewers and my constituents really understand what is going on as we go into the negotiations with the eu.” is going on as we go into the negotiations with the eu. ijust wa nt to negotiations with the eu. ijust want to ask you one more question because i think there are changing standards of dress in parliament as well. do you think that needs to be looked at? well, there has been a loosening of expectations. men can now wear ties or not if they wish. ultimately, the speaker has the final say in whether or not something is appropriate and there are something is appropriate and there a re rules something is appropriate and there are rules about whether you can wear branded t—shirts, i think, and are rules about whether you can wear branded t—shirts, ithink, and hats are still acceptable, i think. it is down to the speaker but i would say again that a woman is always judged more harshly than a man and i know that if tom watson, my predecessor in this role, was stood at the dispatch box, that no one would comment about what he was wearing.
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has the speaker spoken to you about this incident because you know, and i would be surprised if he would. let's talk about the things you are mentioning and we know about this consultation about the decriminalisation of the bbc licence fee. what is your view on that? should it be changed? certainly, looking at the statistics, it would cost the bbc millions of pounds in order to go through the civil courts, it would cost the public more in an increase in the licence fee and when only five people last year went to prison for nonpayment of their tv licence, and it is probably part of a larger package of debt, i do think that the government two years ago hired a qc to look into this and their conclusion was that the best way to fund the bbc is through the licence fee. of course, there are challenges to the bbc, but i really believe that we need to protect public service broadcasting and the way to do that is to look at the licence fee that is the way we should do it. can ijust be clear,
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so you would oppose the decriminalisation in the labour party, would you ? decriminalisation in the labour party, would you? certainly, i am not sure that is the way forward because it would cost the bbc more which would impact on the quality of the programming. what we are looking at is not just the programming. what we are looking at is notjust the programmes they make but the added value of radio, regional, global, and whether you like strictly or david attenborough or you go to bbc bite size or cbeebies, it is the broader offer from public service broadcasting that we must absolutely protect and certainly i was quite vocal about the cut of victoria derbyshire, which i believe is a really fabulous example of what the bbc does best, in that it reaches audiences that might not normally watch the news, issues that come into our surgery continually, things like the menopausal mesh, or grooming in sports, or whatever it is. fantastic shows like that should not be under
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pressure and we should fight tooth and nailto pressure and we should fight tooth and nail to keep the bbc as it is. certainly going forward, post brexit, it is our global identity and an opportunity to bring communities together. good to chat to you, tracy brabin, thank you very much. it is approaching 8:20am. thousands of women placed their trust in the surgeon ian paterson. but he exploited his patients, falsely told them they had breast cancer and carried out unnecessary operations. he was jailed in 2017. yesterday, a report found his victims were let down by the entire health care system, which repeatedly missed opportunities to intervene. before we speak to some of those affected, let's briefly hear from the report's chair, the reverend graham james. the suffering described, the callousness, the wickedness, the failures on the part of individuals and institutions as well as paterson himself, these are vividly described in what patients told us. the scale of what happened, the length of time this malpractice went on,
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the terrible legacy for so many families. it is difficult to exaggerate the damage done, including to trust in medical organisations and clinicians. for years, judith eva and herfamily thought she had breast cancer, —— that was the chair of the inquiry. for years, judith eva and herfamily thought she had breast cancer, after ian paterson lied to her. judith is here, with her daughter harriet. good morning to you. alsojoining us is nadia measures. she did have breast cancer, but paterson carried out an unapproved and dangerous operation in order to treat her. thank you forjoining us. judith, ta ke thank you forjoining us. judith, take us back, then, to yourfirst meeting with ian paterson. what happened? meeting with ian paterson. what happened ? what were meeting with ian paterson. what happened? what were you told?” first met ian paterson injune 2000, soiam first met ian paterson injune 2000, so i am going back nearly 20 years now. i had been referred by my gp. i had found a lump in my right breast.
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i went along to see mr paterson, who was recommended to be really good, a very good surgeon. he was charming when i saw him, very pleasant and sympathetic. obviously, i had the mammogram and the other tests and he examined me and said there was definitely a lump there which needed removing. he advised me to have it removed because it was probably cancerous. so i went ahead. i had gone as a private patient to spire parkway in solihull. he did the operation and i thought it was wonderful when a few weeks later, he told me everything was fine and i hadn't got cancer, it was a benign tumour. in the meantime, this is yourfamily, your mum, and you were told she might possibly have cancer. yes, so told she might possibly have cancer. yes, 501 told she might possibly have cancer. yes, so i was 12, and actually, i can still remember the exact moment. i was sat with my brother and my mum sat us down and said she had been told, she had found a lump and it was likely to be cancerous. we still
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remember that was a huge blow as a family because you hear that word, you think it is a really serious illness. the impact it has had on us has been half my life ago, really. let's talk to you, nadia, as well. there are so many things going on, you did not have cancer but take us through your story, you did? yes. what did he do? i was referred from the doctor to see paterson, but i we nt the doctor to see paterson, but i went on the national health and he was not very pleasant. then i went to private and he totally changed. he did the operation and then later, he saidi he did the operation and then later, he said i had cancer of the leg and i had another operation. right. and thenl i had another operation. right. and then i had a mammogram which showed something was wrong and he operated again but it wasjust something was wrong and he operated again but it was just the something was wrong and he operated again but it wasjust the old scar. in total, with corrections, i had six operations. and the cancer on
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your leg was not actually cancer, the more you had removed? your leg was not actually cancer, the more you had removed7m your leg was not actually cancer, the more you had removed? it was cancerous but it was an incorrect operation he performed and he took glands that should not have been taken. we have heard from so many people who have been operated on by him and it is sort of staggering, isn't it? what is the impact on you question but we will come to you in a minute as well. one, you would not trust a doctor again. right, you know... regardless of how nice they are because you have seen the two sides of a person, a doctor. and the impact on the children, you know, they were at college, 16. you know, they were at college, 16. you know, the whole family. it isn'tjust the thousand victims, it is quadrupled because if you have two children and husband,is because if you have two children and husband, is affected. that is a really clear picture of the impact it has had on you and do this, for
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you, at what point, when you then find out the lies that you have been told, and as nadia was then, the trustee put in this manner, to have then found out that was really badly misplaced —— trust you put in this man. that he treated you and others in this terrible way, how does it make you feel when you find out yea rs make you feel when you find out years later? i did see him again, in 2002, i had another lump which he removed, and again, there was nothing wrong, he told me it was sinister this time, you know, it was going to be more serious. and then when everything did come to light come in 2017, at first, i couldn't believe it, i thought, "oh, come in 2017, at first, i couldn't believe it, ithought, "oh, no, that's a nice chap that looked after me, something is wrong somewhere". it just seemed unbelievable me, something is wrong somewhere". itjust seemed unbelievable and then the more that came to light, i felt quite angry. i thought, perhaps i need to go back to spire parkway hospital. i know a lot of ladies had been recalled but i had moved up to
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north yorkshire at the time so i did not have an address. i went back to the hospital and somebody else saw me. i had a further examination and they went through my notes and it all came to light that the lumps i had werejust all came to light that the lumps i had were just cysts and did not need any operating at all. i want to be clear, are you ok now? from the cancer point of view, are you ok? yes. we saw the inquiry yesterday, do and encourage this would not happen again from what we know? know, not really. really? what do you think needs to be done? well, i came back in court in 2009, paterson on the tv but he still worked until 2011. right. he was quite wealthy, a millionaire plus. and he was suspended for six years and... we had no money when we took him to court. it was only the victims that
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got him to court. it wasn't mps all the hospitals. it was ourselves fighting to get some justice done. and he got legal aid, £22,000. fighting to get some justice done. and he got legalaid, £22,000. when, you know, he was a millionaire. when you know, he was a millionaire. when you go through the details, you can see why it has been so frustrating, and made sony people who were under his care so angry. harriet, when you see the story covered on the news now, you are one of thousands of people who are fiercely protective of your mum and other members of the family who have been through this. yes, absolutely, i just family who have been through this. yes, absolutely, ijust hope it never happens again to anybody because as we have seen, there are so many people affected by this and they will be psychologically if not physically affected potentially for the rest of their lives. listen, thank you very much for coming to talk to us about it, i really appreciate your time, and you have mentioned spy and they have said they apologise for the significant suffering spirit by patients and accept there were a number of missed
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opportunities to challenge paterson's criminal behaviour and they say they have learned lessons and made significant changes since paterson operated. thank you for coming to talk to a stop grain there's lots of stuff coming out of there's lots of stuff coming out of the woodwork so they have not been making any changes, really. well, thatis making any changes, really. well, that is what they say and we will follow that up with you and them as well. thank you forjoining us. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we've had some patchy fog around this morning and a bit of frost in places, but for the next few days, it's going to be fairly quiet. high pressure dominating things, and that's before we get into the weekend, when it's looking potentially very stormy. more details in a moment, but high pressure dominating the picture across the uk today. a bit more of a breeze across scotland. that could bring in some showers around western scotland, but there will be sunny spells
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towards the east. some sunshine in northern ireland and certainly across england and wales, but some patchy fog in eastern areas. that will lift into low cloud. where you stick with cloud, temperatures may struggle. elsewhere, we will see highs of seven today. tonight, the issue is again with some light winds and clear skies. patchy fog will develop again, mainly around southern areas of england towards east anglia. some frost in the central parts, temperatures close to freezing. not quite as chilly further north and west. through thursday, another quiet day. any mist and fog will tend to lift up and it may stick around as low cloud in the afternoon. elsewhere, there will again be sunny spells. sunny spells towards scotland and the east of northern ireland. as we go into the end
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of the week into the weekend, we are going to see low pressure systems start to move in, particularly as we go into saturday. on sunday, this deep area of low pressure looks like moving its way in. the details at the moment are still open to change, but we're looking at some severe gales and heavy rain. disruption is likely, with the potential for some damage as well late saturday and into sunday. well worth staying tuned to the forecast for. bye— bye.
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this is worklife from bbc news, with sally bundock and karin giannone. a report out today shows the uk's biggest companies are failing to improve diversity in the boardroom — so what should be done? live from london, that's our top story on wednesday the 5th of february. slow progress in the boardroom — a review into ftse100 companies finds 37% of firms don't have any ethnic minorities on their boards. also in the programme...

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