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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  March 9, 2020 2:00pm-5:02pm GMT

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hello, you're watching
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afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm. trading on wall street was halted immediately after stock markets crashed creating an automatic cutout. no need to panic buy — the government says it remains focused on containing the spread of the coronavirus as the prime minister chairs a meeting of the government's emergency committee. there is absolutely no need for anybody to stockpile or anything like that. we are in constant contact with the major retailers. italy's prime minister says his country is facing its "darkest hour" with 16 million people in quarantine. the trial begins of alex salmond — former first minister of scotland — on charges of sexual assault and attempted rape. coming up on afternoon live all the sport with jane dougal. it has been confirmed and added the six nations match between france and ireland has been postponed
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because of fears of the coronavirus sewing the tournament into disarray, but as it stands, wales against scotland a man in cardiff will go ahead. thanks jane, and nick miller has all the weather — nick there is yet more rain to come in areas that do not want any more. we will find out who is going to be worst affected in the forecast and it is something for everyone any purpose, including worms. also coming up... leaving the fold — the duke and duchess of sussex make their final public appearance as working members of the royal family at the commonwealth service in westminster abbey good afternoon. the prime minister has been chairing an emergency cobra meeting on the coronavirus
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outbreak. 280 people are infected in the uk and three people have died. the government said it remains focused on containing the outbreak and has not moved to cancel public events, which would be in the next stage of measures. cobra will meet again on wednesday but warned it expects the virus to spread in a "significant" way. stock markets around the world have plunged, with london's ftse opening more than 8% down this morning, as fears over the virus combined with a sharp fall in the oil price. trading on wall street has been temporarily halted immediately after opening as us stocks crash and that triggered an automatic 50 minute cut out. it has resumed recently. and in italy, much of the country is in lockdown, after the number of deaths there rose by more than 130 in a single day. our health correspondent, lauren moss reports. another emergency meeting as the number of uk cases of the biggest leap in 2a hours,
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meeting in 2a hours, ministers, medical and science advisers have reconvened at a cobra committee to decide if and when we should officially move to the next phase of delaying the spread of covid—i9. if that happens, measures which could be taken, including encouraging people to work from home, limiting the number of big public events, and even closing schools. but more likely, the first steps will be a phased approach to reducing unnecessary social contact. we will take those based on the facts, the evidence and the scientific advice. at the moment, the scientific advice is not pointing towards taking further social distancing measures, but if that changes we will change accordingly. more than 23,000 people have been tested so far. the third death of a patient with the coronavirus was confirmed yesterday. at the weekend, some supermarket shelves were stripped bare of toilet rolls and hygiene products, prompting retailers to put a limit on the number of items people can purchase. and the government repeating the message that there is no need to stockpile. the supply chains are robust.
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this is not the first time we have gone through something like this. we have had swine flu, sars virus, even the beast from the east, and what we will continue to do is to adapt and make sure that people have exactly what they need, and that is what we are continuing to do. another health care worker has been placed in isolation. it a tested positive for the virus after working one night shift in the high dependency unit in southampton. but there is the sense of normality returning for some. passengers who have been held in quarantine at arrowe park hospital after travelling on the diamond princess cruise ship have now been allowed home. what has it been like in there? very well looked after, the hospital were really terrific. they have looked after us. and one of the dozens of schools which was shut after a student tested positive will reopen later this week following a deep clean. the number of infections is roughly doubling around
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the world every seven days. decisions about what to do next will be critical in determining how the uk responds to what is a rapidly developing situation. lauren moss, bbc news. just to confirm what you can see on your screen, we have just just to confirm what you can see on your screen, we havejust had just to confirm what you can see on your screen, we have just had the latest figures and the number of confirmed cases in the uk has risen from 272 yesterday to 319 today. that is a rise of 36. —— 273 to 319 today. a rise of 46. meaning that 319 confirmed cases of coronavirus here in the uk. it has the markets at the moment that have our full attention. ben thompson is here from business unit. just expect, there is a trip mechanism and when it
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opened at half past, all hell broke loose,. it was likely expected because of what has happened in asia overnight and europe. if you look at the state of play so far, that is what is happening in europe. the ftse one and down similar picture in france. in france. in the us, markets opened and they followed that lead. the elite that was followed by each other. —— that was started by each other. —— that was started by each other. that is the current state of play. this is what we call the big bird, the representation of the dow jones. it's that figure on the left we need to keep an eye on. it hit a 796, we need to keep an eye on. it hit a 7%, so that triggers the circuit breaker, that means that a trade is suspended for 50 minutes. and that isa suspended for 50 minutes. and that is a technical thing? that isjust a stop a run on the stock market —— it is suspended for 15 minutes. there
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is suspended for 15 minutes. there is suspended for 15 minutes. there is another trip at 13% so if that hits a 13% they will be another pause for 50 minutes. and then if things are so bad that it hits 20%, then a trade ceases by the day —— pause for another 15 minutes. and if it hits a 20% of them trade ceases by for the day. all of this because, quite clearly because of worries over coronavirus and businesses affected by it, not only people not travelling, not conserving, not buying things, but also because businesses would slow down, staff would work from home, and were seen particularly things like travel stocks, energy stocks that are really struggling with this. over the weekend, saudi arabia and russia had a big fight about oil prices. they are two of the world's largest oil producers and what saudi arabia said is given this big slump in demand for oil, why didn't cut production to prop up prices. russia said they were not going to
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do that and so, instead, saudi arabia said, i will flood the market with as much oil as i want, which therefore means that there is a massive oversupply and that has forced prices down pretty severely. so do no cutting prices by the biggest amount in 20 yea rs. prices by the biggest amount in 20 years. —— saudi cutting prices. so the prices will drop in the forecourt immediately? that never seems to happen. we have to remember that if oil prices fall, then fuel prices, we might see that things in the shop becomes cheaper as well. blinkered before $40 a barrel, given that a few months ago we were talking about it being closer to 60 01’ talking about it being closer to 60 or70. talking about it being closer to 60 or 70. lots of numbers moving right 110w. or 70. lots of numbers moving right now. i'm just looking at the big bird in the us. the dowjones down 5.6%. dash make the big board in the us. it is worth pointing out that clocks move forward at the weekend, so we clocks move forward at the weekend, so we having this conversation and we would normally be waiting another
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hour before having the sort of... number 2:30pm is when it us markets would happen a time —— open our time. it would appear that things have come down. those going to be a bit of a knee jerk reaction. the result was going to be a bit of an element of traders looking at what has happened in europe, what has happened in asia and they are sort of make to the game, really, because of make to the game, really, because of the time difference and this is their first chance to react and because markets were closed over the weekend,. what we may see now is investors stepping back a little, taking a bit of distance and trying to record what is going on and rather than following that herd mentality. who is making money right 110w mentality. who is making money right now question make their overs people making money. there will be individual stocks that are particularly well, cleaning firms doing really well as people are cashing in on trying to get more industrial cleaning done. what you find is that a lot of shares or stocks are subject to short selling,
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essentially a company or investor betting on the price of that following. so there is a little bit of that too that they bite a certain place and then sell at a different place and then sell at a different place and then sell at a different place and they are raking in the difference —— buy at a certain price and then sell it a different price. markets are and then sell it a different price. markets a re really and then sell it a different price. markets are really nervous and lots of people on edge and that is why we see these big swings. what is worth looking at is where the ftse closes, where the dow closes, rather than some of the through the day big swings in another direction. thank you. we need a voice of calm and that comes in the form of our chief political correspondent... vicki young, she's at downing street for us. that sense of can do something that the government is trying to push at the government is trying to push at the moment. it is. we havejust had a briefing from the prime minister's official spokesman. there was that meeting this morning that the prime minister chaired, the so—called cobra meeting. as things stand, there has been no change in the advice being given to
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people. it was said that the payments are said all along that he will be guided by the advice from the medical advice —— the prime minister said. that is what is going to influence him and inform any decisions that he is to make. there are lots of questions from journalists, lots of questions from journalists, lots of questions from members of the public to come out that weather has not been a shift. the guidance as it stands is wash your hands, if you have come back from an area such as northern italy, you must self—isolate for 14 days, whether or not you have symptoms, but apart from that, everything else is the same. regardless of the fact that other countries have approached any different way. the response to that was to say that, it is up to different countries to decide what they want to do. here the government is listening to that medical advice, but you do get the sense that they will be some kind of shift at some stage. maybe as early as today, but thatis stage. maybe as early as today, but that is not saying that we are going to go into the delay part, the delay phase of all the test, but there could be a change in advice. the
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idea of a mass of school closures, working from home, cancelling sporting events, that is very much not on the agenda at least at the moment. and in that vein, there has been a response from the meeting this morning, which was broadcasters and leaders of sporting events, they are saying they are from the department of culture, media and sport that they are not at any stage of cancelling sporting events, they are taking advice as well from public health england does not that there is any need to do that now and at the response, we will remain in regular dialogue with sport bodies and make sure that they are in the receipt of the most up—to—date guidance from health authorities. as things stand, no change to any of that. but you get the impression that. but you get the impression that things could change. 0ne possibility is that you give me advice to groups. those who are more
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vulnerable, they could be told to ta ke vulnerable, they could be told to take different action. the saturn, the impairment secretary will be chairing a meeting from representatives of the supermarkets. that idea of deliveries —— this afternoon. 0r change the errors that drivers work, all that is on the table —— change the hours that drivers work. another urgent question. the government is aware that people do want to have this co nsta nt that people do want to have this constant dialogue, this constant source of information because, of course, that is this issue of making sure that people are vigilant. you look at other countries, people will be looking at italy, particularly the pressure on the health service there and that is still the deepest concern here. it's her nhs could cope, particularly intensive care units. even though most people will
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only get this virus and they will get it madly, there will be people who get it very seriously and will require hospital treatment. —— will get it mildly. the government to much want to panic people, but they wa nt much want to panic people, but they want people to be aware. —— do not wa nt to want people to be aware. —— do not want to panic people. they're mental if you go to la, with things like closing down schools are telling people go work from home —— they are aware that if you go telling people to close ten schools, that has the balance that they are trying to rape at the moment. in the end, it is —— they are trying to weigh up at the moment. in spain, the government there has said that classes are being suspended in schools and universities in
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the basque regional capital for two weeks —— in vitoria. the foreign office is warning against all but essential travel to northern italy. with more than 360 deaths confirmed, italy is the worst—hit country in the world after china. the italian prime minister has called the outbreak his country's "darkest hour". up to 16 million people in the north of the country, including venice and milan, are facing the toughest restrictions on movement since the second world war. the lockdown in lombardy and 14 other provinces is set to last until the 3rd april. bethany bell has sent this report from bologna, near the restricted zone. sirens large areas of northern italy are in quarantine. the italian government has taken tough measures to try to stop the spread of the coronavirus. milan, italy's financial capital,
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is under partial lockdown. people have been told they can only leave or enter the area for essential work orfamily emergencies. venice, one of italy's top tourist destinations, is also affected. british visitors can travel home. planes and trains are still running. but the uk government has said anyone returning from the red zones in northern italy should self—isolate for two weeks. for the locals, this is a very uncertain time. translation: my thoughts are for my children — another week at home and i'm afraid they're bored. but these are the restrictions and we must respect them. translation: it's all rubbish. keep calm. we're absolutely fine. i'm leaving anyway. this is having a dramatic effect both inside and outside the quarantine zones. people here say they don't know whether to be more worried about their health or
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the economy. the italian government has promised to increase spending. a step they're are calling massive financial shock therapy. northern italy has a well—developed health care system, but it's under increasing strain. in some places, people are being treated in hospital corridors. the virus is particularly dangerous for the elderly, and italy has one of the world's oldest populations. the average age of people dying from the disease here is 81 years old. riots have broken out in some italian prisons against restrictions to combat the spread of the coronavirus. reports on the italian media say at least six people died in a prison in modena in the north. bethany bell, bbc news in northern italy. meanwhile, here are some of the other things we know about what's happening with coronavirus. the government says it is working intensively to arrange repatriation
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flights for about 140 britons stuck on the grand princess cruise ship off san francisco. the ship is expected to dock in oakland this afternoon, but a spokesperson for princess cruises said passengers won't be tested for the virus until they reach their next destination. the france v ireland six nations rugby match is the latest sporting event to be postponed. it was due to take place in paris on saturday, but the french government advised against holding it. more on sport a little later. and authorities in vietnam have made the deicison to suspend visa—free travel for citizens from eight european countries, includng the uk. professor george lomonossoff is a virologist from thejohn innes centre, which is an independent centre based in norwich. looking at what is happening in europe and around the world, how would you assess where we are at the moment in terms of coronavirus?m the uk, just looking at the cases in
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europe, i would say that we are about a week behind france, germany and spain in terms of the number of cases and about two weeks behind italy. from that, you can sort of work out a very approximate doubling time for cases of about four days. is there anything that we could do to slow that process down that we are not already doing? at the moment, we are obviously trying to prevent the spread by hand washing and being careful about if we sneeze 01’ and being careful about if we sneeze or cough. the problem is going to be a decision by the government shortly is if you're going to put more draconian measures, you're going to have to do it sooner rather than later for them to be effective. the thought is that maybe italy waited a bit too long and that doing this kind of shutdown may be a bit late in the day to be effective. so you agree with what george is promising on the radio this morning that if we wa nt to on the radio this morning that if we want to avoid that, we need to start action now otherwise we will be in
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italy's position? and 60 million people there effectively in isolation is what faces us? —— 16 million people. if you delay, you then go into this lockdown, it is probably not going to be effective because too many people have travelled. the difficulty, of course, and rather bizarrely at the moment, we still seem to be accepting sites these infected areas. yes, i have been contacted about that. it is difficult to say what to do because one of the problems is that simply taking a temperature, which is a very quick thing to do, you pick up all sorts of other things, common colds, all sorts of radiance and a lot of people now believe to be effectively asymptomatic —— also civilians and a lot of people are believed to be asymptomatic. the other issue that is becoming apparent is the time gap between taking a sample for diagnosis and actually getting the result of that diagnosis. i think thatis result of that diagnosis. i think that is the lesson from the outbreak
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in china that it is very important to make that difference time lag as short as possible so that you can do effective isolation. if it is too long, it is much less effective. looking at television, radio and what you're saying in the newspapers, are we in the media over reacting? no, i do not think so. there may be cases to make things look a bit overly dramatic, but i think generally it has been quite moderate and quite sensible. and fairly accurate reporting. in a way, you're damned if you do and damned if you don't. i think it is better to be open about these things and for people to be aware of what the situation actually is rather than just say don't worry about it at all. panic and doesn't help, equally, for any situation, notjust about as situation. thank you so much for
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your time this afternoon. let's move to other news. the joke and thus sussex are making their —— the duke and duchess of sussex are making their final and duchess of sussex are making theirfinal appearance and duchess of sussex are making their final appearance as the duke and duchess of sussex are making their final official appearance as senior royals later today. harry and meghan will attend the commonwealth service at westminster abbey — their last royal duty before they step back from the monarchy. 0ur royal correspondent, nicholas witchell, has this report which contains some flash photography. they've spent the last couple of days fulfilling what has been described as their final formal duties as members of the royalfamily. this was the royal albert hall on saturday night. a packed house for a festival of military music, and an audience which appreciated the royal presence. harry was there as captain general of the royal marines. that's just one of the honorary military positions from which he's having to step down. and it was a military theme on friday evening when harry attended the endeavour awards for wounded servicemen. he spoke about the concept of service.
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being able to serve queen and country is something that we're all rightly proud of, and it never leaves us. once served, always serving. harry looked at home, as did meghan when she visited a school in dagenham to speak about womens‘ rights. it's fair to say she went down a storm. the head boy, 16—year—old aker 0koye, seemed to catch the mood. she really is beautiful, innit? all of which leaves many people wondering, "why are they stepping back?", "have they really thought this through?", and "will it work for harry?" he is giving up everything that he has known, a huge family that he is very close to, and his work, to go and live in canada. at westminster abbey this afternoon, the sussexes will attend the annual commonwealth day service with the queen and harry's father and elder brother. they, too, must be wondering whether harry is doing the right thing. the royal family is leaving
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the door open in case there's a change of heart. a final appearance? we shall have to see. nicholas witchell, bbc news. i will speak to an american who married into the aristocracy who joins us now from westminster abbey. as we wait for their arrival, i am wondering whether they will be feeling sad at what is a fundamental change for hardy or excited about a brand—new futurelike i have got to be honest here. i think that over the past few days we have seen any two of them smile like we haven't seen two of them smile like we haven't seen them smile in quite some time, s0 seen them smile in quite some time, soi seen them smile in quite some time, so i think they are very excited. meghan seems so relaxed, likely burden has been lifted and harry is all smiles, they are holding hands. i think it is more excitement than sadness, actually. you know better than anybody because you did something very similar. the
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importance of that relationship, of yours a couple, is what is going to get through this. i think marrying into the aristocracy, marrying into the royalfamily, into the aristocracy, marrying into the royal family, it into the aristocracy, marrying into the royalfamily, it is not what people think that it is. everybody says, oh, meghan must have known what she was getting into. i do not think you know what you're getting into until you're in it. it was a —— it would have been a very difficult transition for her, it was first hand for me. she then had the british tabloid press and we know how that had affected hardy and his mother, the late princess diana. this is something that they have said they have had enough of —— would have affected harry. and especially now with their new son archie. and hadi now —— and harry are now having to stick
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with his wife, is that a popular perception that you agree with? he emphatically said, i made the decision for meghan and i to take this step down as being a senior royals. he put that in his speech very carefully to say that it was his decision. i think he had seen that the press was in, oh, this is all meghan, she is taking him away, she has had enough. absolutely, it was a joint decision because that is what you do any manager, you make decisions together. you make compromises. but you look at his compromise. he is giving up a family life, a royal life that he has never known anything but. absolutely. and he has. i think it will be, of course, a transition for him, pressure but i'm not sure if harry ever really liked this lie. we see after the death of his mother, he was at the hadi that was wild, broke the rules —— ever really liked this life. this is all he has ever
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known, but maybe meghan is giving him an opportunity to actually really live the life he wants to live. do you think, and there have been a couple of photographs, a couple of moments where you have a look at him but maybe this is just sinking in, where you have a look at him but maybe this isjust sinking in, the enormity of this for him? yes, i think there are a couple of photographs and we can all sort of guess around what they must be thinking, but again, if i look at the few photographs and images that we have seen the few photographs and images that we have seen over the few photographs and images that we have seen over them of the past few days, they look relaxed, happy, excited. and i think once you have a child, you do anything and everything. i have for myself, that child becomes around. —— i have four myself. they are a family now and are doing what they can to protect her son and they decided the best thing to do is for them to move away. what was the hardest thing for you? there were a lot of hard things. i have been here now for 20
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yea rs. things. i have been here now for 20 years. where do i start? i think, obviously, there is a lot of protocol, a lot of tradition. i cannot go down to breakfast in my pyjamas any more. when i go back to america i certainly can, but little things like that, which might sound a little and futile, but they can ta ke a little and futile, but they can take effect. you see meghan in canada and she is an yoga pants all the time and jumpers and in her boots, where she could not do that over here. she had to be dressed in a day in and day out. i think it is very ha rd a day in and day out. i think it is very hard for an american who has had that kind of life where it is very laid back. she is from california, to all of a sudden have to really transform into being on parade every single second of every single day. it is very difficult. we should call you your ladyship, should call you your ladyship, should be?
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ijust go by julie. and i'm sure harry will be just going by harry. will you be sure go, girl later? i don't want to get into too much trouble. time for a look at the weather... it is the film and at the moment. i wa nt to it is the film and at the moment. i want to show you a selection of weather watcher pictures from earlier on today. it is a newly this isa earlier on today. it is a newly this is a super moon, simon. let me have agoat is a super moon, simon. let me have a go at this one. this is when the moon's orbit around the earth, it comes quite close to the earth and when that happens it is cold a super moon because it can appear larger than usual in the sky, particularly
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when it is... the superman. it is going to be bigger than usual. it is not just us who going to be bigger than usual. it is notjust us who enjoy this —— the super notjust us who enjoy this —— the super moon. notjust us who enjoy this —— the super moon. the native americans like to give names to the full months and this moon was cold at the worm are men because at the ground was and —— the —— the and also the sap melting and rising at all of that. we have the strawberry moan for the strawberry harvest a nd strawberry moan for the strawberry harvest and a beaver mona later on. there is
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something for everyone. —— the beaver moon. and that was because the beavers were trapped for their furs because the beavers were trapped for theirfurs and because the beavers were trapped for their furs and the furs would keep people warm. you have to be able to see if the moon. you're going to spoil the whole thing by saying that we cannot see it. you just five minutes. when you go. there is a lot of cloud around, they willjust be a few pockets of opportunity to see that moon tonight. the greater problem is that from that cloud that there is more rain moving in. this isa there is more rain moving in. this is a very important for casa how much pain is on the way. this is the wet weather moving in —— how much
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rain is on the way. the winds are starting to pick up as well. 40, 40 five miles per hour gusts around the irish sea coast. technically now that there, but we are losing any early sunshine. we will see that speu early sunshine. we will see that spell of rain, but it does come and keep coming into wales. this is where we see the greater likelihood of seeing some destruction, flooding and some travel disruption. there will be a few breaks in the cloud. perhaps to the eastern side of the pennines, or scotland, if that super one moon. up to 100 millimetres of rain. there is a met office amber warning. it does raise the likelihood of flooding once again as at those totals mount. a messy start in the morning with some out there coming her way tomorrow. a lot of the rain coming tomorrow is going to ease away so
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the rain coming tomorrow is going to ease away so for many of us it will brighten up. some rivers will continue to rise after the rain, so keep a weather flood warnings. we brighten up, very gusty winds, 50 to 60 miles per are in places. some cloud hanging on to read southern england. these are warmer winds as we have noticed. we have the warmer colours here to read the east midlands, east anglia, the better parts of east england. 16 or 17 celsius could well be yours. it is quite windy out there. another spell of rain to the south on tuesday night, wednesday at the showers, perhaps across the north. in scotla nd perhaps across the north. in scotland it has blasted again, on wednesday, another spell of rain just starting to emerge by me. that comes to on wednesday night. and for the remainder of the week, it is sunshine and showers. it will be turning a bit cooler. they are important by their winnings, details ona important by their winnings, details on a website.
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this is bbc news. our latest headlines: the prime minister chairs an emergency cobra meeting, as the number of uk coronavirus cases rises to 319 the government says there's no need to panic buy. there is absolutely no need for anybody to stockpile or anything like that. we are in constant
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contact with the major retailers. italy's prime minister says his country is facing its ‘darkest hour‘ with sixteen million people in quarantine. trading on wall street was temporarily halted immediately after opening this morning, as us stocks crashed, triggering an automatic 15 minute cutout it's now resumed. the trial begins of alex salmond former first minister of scotland on charges of sexual assault and attempted rape. sport now on afternoon live with jane dougall. coronaviruses hitting sport badly. u nfortu nately coronaviruses hitting sport badly. unfortunately and news from the six nations because it has been confirmed that the match between france and ireland due to take place this weekend has been postponed. italy against england was already put off because of the high number of cases and deaths in italy. 0ne put off because of the high number of cases and deaths in italy. one of the reasons the match has been postponed is because the french government made an announcement
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yesterday that gatherings of more than 1000 people would be banned until further notice. as than 1000 people would be banned untilfurther notice. as it than 1000 people would be banned until further notice. as it stands, immense match between wales and scotla nd immense match between wales and scotland and cardiff will go ahead but the women's match is off because one of the scotland players has tested positive for the virus and seven members of the team and backroom staff are self isolating. very fast moving. it all comes after a meeting this morning between sports governing bodies. broadcasters and the government, where they discussed holding events behind closed doors but the dcms said the current scientific advice form the government ‘s medical experts was there is no need to close or cancel sporting events as things stand. that is unless government advice changes over the next few days. the rugby football union ceo was speaking about it outside the meeting afterwards. there is no medical rationale
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for cancelling events but clearly it is a moving situation so we'll keep talking and go from there. the game this weekend in cardiff, how confident are you it will go ahead? i don't see any reason why that won't proceed. the message is let's not panic, let's monitor the situation. with the england and italy game, that is already off. in terms of the meetings going on about when that could be rescheduled, when is that likely? we are working on that right now. we are working on finding a date that works for both teams. further afield, the decision was taken to further afield, the decision was ta ken to cancel the further afield, the decision was taken to cancel the indian wells tennis tournament in california. 0rganisers saying it was to big a risk to hold a gathering of that size. many of the players had already arrived for the event. some only found out about the cancellation on social media. it is such a big tournament it is sometimes referred to as the
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unofficial tenth grand slam. we asked our tennis correspondent what the ramifications would be for the tour. ifa tour. if a decision is taken to cancel a tennis event because of one local case in the area, you would think it would be very difficult for any major events to be played in weeks and months to come. it may well be other events take a different view. if we look ahead to miami, that ta kes pla ce if we look ahead to miami, that takes place in florida. there are three confirmed cases of the coronavirus there. and a very big music festival in march has been called off. steve simon, the wto chief executive says it is too early to speculate about events to come but after miami, the tour moves on to europe and big events are scheduled there in monte carlo, madrid and most notably in rome. i think there have to be serious question marks as to whether tennis can put together a calendar over the weeks and months to
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come. the champions league match between paris saintjermaine and the rescheduled men will take place behind closed doors. it comes after that government announcement from france. paris police authority have ordered no fans attend the last 16 leg because of concerns about the outbreak. the england midfielderjordan nobbs says they are lucky to have both ellen white and beth england in the scored. they started their match against japan but ellen white scored. they started their match againstjapan but ellen white came off the bench to score the winning goal. england's final match is against spain on wednesday. i wouldn't like to be picking that tea m i wouldn't like to be picking that team and it is incredible we have two top form strikers in the league at the moment. ellen white does what she does best, she gets on the right places but it showed today we needed beth to be part of
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the squad and thatis beth to be part of the squad and that is what got us the win in the end. more details about the impact the coronavirus has had on all those sporting events on the bbc sport website. more on coronavirus now, and stock markets around the world have slumped dramatically following big falls in the price of oil. the new york stock exchange suspended trading for fifteen minutes after a main index fell by seven percent soon after opening. the last time the so called ‘trading curb' was used a move that's designed to limit panic was back in 2008 during the financial crisis. let‘s speak to michael hewson, the chief market analyst for cmc markets. iam i am guessing you were watching but we re i am guessing you were watching but were you expecting that to happen? yes, we were expecting a us markets to open lower and to basically get suspended. because us futures markets which are open before the us markets which are open before the us market opened were also suspended as well. there was a decent likelihood
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given the declines we have seen here in europe that that was going to happen so it wasn‘t a surprise when trading was suspended. have things calmed down now? they have calmed down a bit. we are currently staging a bit ofa down a bit. we are currently staging a bit of a comeback but when i say to you the ftse is only 6.5% down when it was 8.5% down it gives you the indication of the type of moves having today. they have come down a little bit, the oil prices off its lows but nonetheless, we will have to get used to potentially more declines in stock markets. certainly much more volatility. to the average person watching, a fall of 8%, 6% doesn‘t mean as much as it does to you. what was the reaction when you had that figure on the floor?|j you. what was the reaction when you had that figure on the floor? i was prepared for it from last night when we saw asian market slump on the back of the oil price decline but the oil place decline tells us part of the story. this virus outbreak
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has been showing signs of slowing global growth for some time. we have come off the back of a strong market rally since 2009 and we haven‘t seen significant pull—back in that time. now we are starting to see those declines come about simply because the economic outlook is starting to darken, markets hate the uncertainty of not knowing what profit potentials are likely to be for big companies and as a result, you are getting large scale sell—offs. companies and as a result, you are getting large scale sell-offs. this row between saudi arabia and russia on the oil market, that has caused this blip but it is quite a turnaround in the old market, isn‘t it? a huge turnaround. the biggest one—day fall since the gulf war in 1991 but ordinarily, and all price fall of this magnitude i think would suggest that is good news for the consumer because ultimately it will cost you much less to fill up your carand your cost you much less to fill up your car and yourfuel cost you much less to fill up your car and your fuel costs will be less but it is coming at a
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time when the economic outlook is looking pretty dark and there are large scale warranties being thrown up everywhere and against that backdrop, consumers are not going to spend money and as a result you have concern about supply shock and a demand shock and an economic retraction and that is why all of these coming together are seeing an awful lot of volatility and big declines in equity markets.“ awful lot of volatility and big declines in equity markets. if the price had gone up in a similar way, i would know it would cost me more straightaway, presumably any fall in oil would not come through on the forecourt which gets people angry. it will come through but it will ta ke it will come through but it will take longer. you know what oil prices are like, they go up quickly and they come back very slowly. u nfortu nately i and they come back very slowly. unfortunately i think for well companies, they are already feeling the pressure from low oil prices and very tight margins and ultimately if they do cut prices quite drastically, you could see further falls in big multinationals like
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bp, we re falls in big multinationals like bp, were dutch shell who are a staple of pension funds across the world. they pay a dividend yield of 10%. if there is a risk that dividend could be at risk if this all price falls continues over the next few weeks. be at risk if this all price falls continues over the next few weekslj have no idea if you are a drinker or not but on a scale of ten, where are we right now in terms of the market? iam we right now in terms of the market? i am probably on the scale of a double gin and tonic at five o‘clock tonight. thank you. meanwhile as we reported earlier, more than 100 britons stranded on a cruise ship hit by coronavirus off the coast of california will soon be allowed to leave the vessel. passengers on the grand princess have been confined to their cabins since thursday but the ship is expected to dock at any moment, so that those on board can finally disembark. cbs news correspondent, carter evans has the latest
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from san francisco. well, the ship is going to pass behind me on its way to the bay port of oakland. the first passengers to be evacuated are going to be those who require medical attention. they will be taken to area hospitals. the rest will then be transferred to military bases across the country, where they will be tested for the virus and then held for another two weeks. the coronavirus, the spread of it on the grand princess, set off a massive operation to keep the 3500 passengers in quarantine after the ship docked here. california officials surveyed the dock on sunday. they said us passengers will be bussed to four military bases. the foreign passengers, from about 54 different countries, will return on charter flights. now, the process could take two or three days, but it‘s a big relief, as you can imagine, for the thousands of passengers who have been stuck in their rooms. california is also monitoring, by the way, another 1500 people who had previously travelled on the grand princess. now, after the passengers disembark, the crew will be quarantined on the ship,
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and the state department is now warning us travellers not to take any cruisers. italy‘s prime minister says his country is facing its darkest hour with 16 million people in quarantine. trading on wall street was halted immediately after opening today as us stocks crashed triggering an automatic 50 minute cut out. trading has now resumed. the trial has opened in the netherlands of three russians and a ukrainian who‘ve been charged with the murder of the passengers and crew of flight mh 17, the malaysian airlines jet shot down over ukraine in 2014.
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anna holligan reports. it took the prosecutor 18 minutes to recite the names of all 298 people on board. their families believe this trial is their best hope of justice. the suspects had the chance to be here. they had a chance to be represented by a lawyer. they didn‘t. that is their own choice. and if they don‘t want to defend themselves, that is up to them. two of the suspects allegedly have close the most prominent is igor girkin, a former colonel in russia‘s fsb intelligence service will stop according to prosecutors, he was the highest—ranking officer in the pro—russian rebel held territory in eastern ukraine, and was in direct contact with the russian federation. sergey dubinsky and 0leg pulatov, alleged former members of russia‘s gru special
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forces, and the only ukrainian national, leonid karchenko, who has no military background, but was allegedly acting as the commander of a combat unit. these hearings are taking place within sight of the runway where flight mh17 took off. the suspects were never expected to appear for a trial, but it‘s culmination of the most complex criminal investigation in dutch history. in 2014, a conflict was raging — pro—russian separatist militia fighting ukrainian forces for control of an area in the east of ukraine. according to the prosecution, the defendants asked russia‘s defence ministry for heavy weapons. a convoy was allegedly sent from the 53rd anti—aircraft missile brigade, based in the russian city of kursk, across the border, to the rebel—held territory, carrying the buick rocket launcher used to shoot down
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flight mh17. anna holligan, bbc news, schiphol. the duke and duchess and sussex are making theirfinal the duke and duchess and sussex are making their final appearance as royals in westminster abbey today. prince harry and meghan, they will join the queen and other roles at the commonwealth day service here. the duke and duchess carrying out a series of public arrangements before stepping back as working royals, this theirfinal stepping back as working royals, this their final outing as senior royals. 0ur royal correspondent is at the abbey for us. some strange changes which have resulted most recently in the duke and duchess of cambridge also going straight to their seats rather than being part of the procession. yes, interesting. when the order of service was given to us earlier this morning initially, it said that there
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would be the queen ‘s procession led by the queen, the prince of wales, the duchess of cornwall and the duke and duchess of cornwall and the duke and duchess of cornwall and the duke and duchess of cambridge. harry and meghan would not be part of that, they would be mere observers of that moment. that has changed. actually, yes, harry and megan will go down with the queen. but also kate and william will not be part of the procession. clearly, if the duke and duchess of cambridge had walked with queen and the duke and duchess the queen and the duke and duchess of sussex had and, perhaps the message they would have looked like they would have been immediately demoted or their status was diminished within the royal family and perhaps that wasn‘t the message that wanted to be put out today. particularly on this day because this is a service that is important to the queen herself. the commonwealth is extremely important to the queen. it has been throughout her reign and this is family
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in her diary this service every year. it is there to celebrate the work of the 54 commonwealth countries and there is an expectation that all senior members of the royal family are with her today to celebrate this. it is at the heart of the work she does. she sees it as a unifying force for good and she wants to emphasise and promote the work it does. early d rafts of promote the work it does. early drafts of the order of service suggest the duke of york would have some involvement. are we expected to see him? we don't anticipate we will see him? we don't anticipate we will see him? we don't anticipate we will see him here today. he is not in the latest draft of the order of service. we are looking at pictures. you can see there those inside the abbey, the prime minister‘s fiancee, jacob rees—mogg, the home secretary and craig david, one of the performance at the service. he will be singing to go with alexandra burke and they will be a reflection
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during the service and that will be delivered by the boxer anthony joshua. yes it will be full of pomp and ceremony and formality but it will have a lighter, more modern mood also. this really is it in terms of harry and meghan and the royalfamily terms of harry and meghan and the royal family and royal duty. terms of harry and meghan and the royalfamily and royal duty. we terms of harry and meghan and the royal family and royal duty. we are seeing some royal cars arriving. we would expect the wessex ‘s would be first to arrive. we are expecting the earl and countess of wessex to be the first to arrive outside westminster abbey. yes, print ad with their just getting westminster abbey. yes, print ad with theirjust getting out of the car with his wife sophie countess of wessex. both of whom had visited a number of commonwealth countries in recent yea rs number of commonwealth countries in recent years and done an awful lot of work around how than education in commonwealth countries. they are the first of the royal visitors. they will go into the abbey
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observing scottish dances, they will be taken to their seats. the next arrivals we are expecting to be the duke and duchess of sussex. i just want to bring in anna whitlock a royal historian and head of history at royal holloway university of london. how do you think history willjudge a moment where royals step down in such a public way like this?|j a moment where royals step down in such a public way like this? i think only time will tell. it is of course important to remember this is now to bea important to remember this is now to be a one year transition that will be a one year transition that will be reviewed in 12 months' time. i think the queen has tried as far as possible to leave the door open to harry and meghan to return to the royal family, so yes this is a public stepping down... royal family, so yes this is a public stepping down. . ij royal family, so yes this is a public stepping down... ijust royal family, so yes this is a public stepping down... i just want to bring the shot in because this is them arriving. it is all smiles. looking at the prince, the
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importance of this, he is stepping away from a life he has known nothing else. yes, he had a clear set way forward, he was going to be a supporter to his father when he became king and then his brother when he became king. ithink became king and then his brother when he became king. i think both charles and william were very much set to rely on harry. harry is now saying, no, i am set to rely on harry. harry is now saying, no, lam stepping back, i'm stepping down for a very different life, with his wife and son. it is yet to be seen exactly what that life is going to look like. one can imagine that charity, speaking out on important issues, military veterans, injured veterans is clearly going to be at the heart of that. how they will make their money is also of course up for grabs. speaking engagements would seem to be probably the main thing that they will do, but clearly this is an emotional day for harry because he is surrounded by his family and they
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will remain his family, but he is stepping away from the firm. it is a family business and he has really turned his back on it, at least for now, certainly for the next 12 months. although this isn't the first time the family have come together, they did that yesterday at windsor, clearly this is a very public outing and one can imagine that both harry and megan are filling up take today. we are just seeing the cambridge is awry. a bit strange that they should at the last minute say they will go straight to their seats as well. it is a bit strange and you had to presume it was felt that the mood music wasn‘t good if they didn‘t have everybody sort of in the same place at the same time and to allow the duke and duchess of cambridge to work with the queen and not the duke and duchess of sussex on a day like today. perhaps it was felt that didn‘t look right. that is not what
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is being said, but there clearly has been some kind of change to what was planned because we can see that from the order of service and it was clearly thought it looked better and felt better on a day like today that they should all be seated together and it will be just the queen, the prince of wales and duchess of cornwall that take part in that procession. it is interesting, they are not shaking hands. yes, as we all know, what with the coronavirus, they have decided not to do that today. it is the first time in recent days we have seen a royal engagement reflect that because we saw the queen last week at buckingham palace wearing gloves but still handshaking and still behaving in that way, but clearly today a decision has been made that they wouldn‘t be doing any of that. here we can see the duke and duchess of sussex walking down towards their seats, lots of school children taking part in the service today and they are acknowledging them as they
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ta ke they are acknowledging them as they take their seats inside westminster abbey. of course, for his father, for prince charles, this must be a difficult moment, both his son is not part of the procession and one with a future nobody can be really sure of at this stage. it is a difficult day personally for the royal family. there is difficult day personally for the royalfamily. there is no getting away from that. this is quite a moment. it is the final engagement for now. yes, the door is open for harry and meghan to come back but they are going to leave for canada after today‘s service and try and forge a very different life for themselves, away from this, what we are seeing here today, the heart of the british royal family, are seeing here today, the heart of the british royalfamily, the formality, these services, the duty. they will not be doing that kind of stuff a ny they will not be doing that kind of stuff any more. it will look and feel different going forward and for the prince of wales, he must look at this today and think, it will not be like this going forward, it will look and feel different.
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the irony is for people the commonwealth was thought to be the very backdrop for harry and meghan and with cement their role within the wild family. that had always been indicated right from the start but they with the obvious partnership to move forward and take on some of the commonwealth duties as both the queen and then the duke of edinburgh were not doing as much. perhaps harry and meghan would take on more of that travel and be real ambassadors for the commonwealth, but he hasn‘t worked out that way. clearly they didn‘t feel they could do the kind of work that they wanted to from within the constraints of the royal family, they want something different for themselves and that different kind of life effectively starts after today‘s service. of life effectively starts after today's service. i want to return to anna whitlock because the role of prince harry is something he is thinking about along with his wife. he may look at his uncles and see there is no real role for the
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brother of a future king and that is really at the heart of all this.” think that is right. certainly some people have rather unfairly blamed meghan for this break, but i think harry has spoken for a long time of his auntie is about being a member of the royal family and he really was a bit player, increasingly so. the focus in recent years and months had been very much on charles, william and then george, and we have seen william and then george, and we have seen pictures, harry is six in line to the throne, he wasn't really part of that come his not part of the core group of future kings. but it is important to remember that harry and meghan in that initial statement, it is only two months ago but it feels like a lifetime since that original story broke, but they talked about having a progressive role within the royal family, sol
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think they imagine they might be able to fly the flag for the queen and the commonwealth perhaps be not be bound by the protocol that others have but as we have seen, the queen was not going to have any of that. you could not be half in, half hour. harry is her beloved grandson but unfortunately he is either a royal or he is not and if he doesn't want to bea or he is not and if he doesn't want to be a senior royal signing up to all the expectations, the protocol, the responsibilities, then unfortunately he will have to step down and of course will no longer after the 30th of march b h r h. e could change a year down the line but certainly we are now entering uncharted territory and i think harry and meghan i'm sure will be relieved when theyjet off back to canada to see archie, but they are flying into the unknown and everybody will be watching to see what happens next and left behind of course is william. i think there will be a sense of william
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feeling rather bereft. his future is mapped out, he is there to support his father and i think he had hoped his brother would be alongside him over the next few years and clearly that is not going to be the way it is going to play out. there is a real personal loss as well as a public and professional one for both william and charles. anna, thank you. we arejust william and charles. anna, thank you. we are just covering the arrivals at westminster abbey where prince harry and meghanjoining the queen and other worlds at the commonwealth day service here at westminster abbey, by setting apart, the two brothers and as the queen arrives, daniela, for this service, the body language, at the moment they haven‘t spoken to each other at this service. it doesn't look as though they have from the pictures we have been shown so far. it is so ha rd to we have been shown so far. it is so hard to look at these pictures and try to read too much into them. it
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feels like it looks a little tense maybe but we just don‘t know. harry and meghan are talking to one another and talking to edward in particular and that seems rather jolly, particular and that seems rather jolly, but it didn‘t look and feel tense. are we looking for attention? perhaps we are but these things are a lwa ys perhaps we are but these things are always quite difficult when you know the cameras are on you, but you didn‘t see a lot of chat between william and harry. that fanfare signals the arrival of the queen at westminster abbey. daniela, just before we hear the national anthem, this is her day, this is a very important for the queen. it is very much her day. she puts great value on the commonwealth, on the work it does and on promoting and emphasising the
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kind of unity and the message that it sends, so she is very much about celebrating the work of the 54 countries of the commonwealth. in many ways, the departure of harry and meghan is something of a distraction today and it takes away some of the focus on the commonwealth, which is what she would like the service to be purely about. with making the point that it is strange to see no offering of hands, no physical contact, obviously given what is going on with the coronavirus. perhaps i could bring anna in once more. how will historyjudge the last public appearance of harry and meghan, do you think? i think it will very much depend whether this is really the end of the book in the sense of the duke and duchess of sussex as senior royals or, instead, the end of a chapter and another one will begin,
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may be any few years time. i do not think we know. this is really a barrage, of course, —— a marriage thatis barrage, of course, —— a marriage that is only two years old. there we re that is only two years old. there were such great hopes for harry and meghan, meghan bringing a new emphasis, a biracial element to the monarchy. forgive me. i'mjust going to pause because i think we‘ll be hearing the national anthem at any let‘sjoin hearing the national anthem at any let‘s join that service.
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# god save our gracious queen # long live our noble queen # god save the queen # send her victorious # happy and glorious # long to reign over us # god save the queen. # trumpet fanfare. as the first hymn gets under way, the firm a procession of the queen. a much shorter possession
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than had been expected just 24 hours ago. anna, if i could ask about that because behind the scenes, to drop the duke and duchess of cambridge from this possession, that does not just happen. something has gone on behind the scenes, hasn‘t it? —— the duke and duchess of sussex. the duke and duchess of sussex, sitting there, waiting for the royalfamily to arrive and, you know, the duke and duchess of cambridge behind the queen, with prince charles and the duchess of cornwall would not have looked quite right. it would have looked quite right. it would have looked very much like them in excel, as it were, already in the abbey. and i think itjust emphasises that the split, in a way, that those around the royal family will see as an unnecessary diversion from the focus of today, which is the queen and the commonwealth. as i said, this is a really, really important
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to the queen. the commonwealth is a great legacy from her father. to the queen. the commonwealth is a great legacy from herfather. she sees it, really, is one of her defining parts of her reign and a common purpose, the unity that has been achieved across a 54 countries in the commonwealth. so it is really, really important to her and there is no doubt that the queen will be feeling hurt and bereft with what has happened with harry and meghan. those statements over the last couple of months from the queen in the midst of the great crisis and the summits that we had, billy revealed that. this is not what she wanted. she has been hurt by it. today, it is all about business, it is about the firm, the royal family and about the commonwealth. 0n is about the firm, the royal family and about the commonwealth. on that basis, it was decided that the duke and duchess of sussex, the duke and duchess of cambridge could simply sit down and it was unnecessary to draw attention to that division. thank you very much forjoining us. i would like to go back to daniela. this is the moment as the
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queen arrives, this will be a picture that appears everywhere in tomorrow‘s papers, of course. we will collect a glimpse of that royal family together for the last time on duty, if you like. it is interesting just watching this procession and digging about how different it was just 12 months ago when we watched this same a walk through the abbey, but behind the prince of wales and duchess of carmel was at the duke and duchess of sussex, meghan then seven months pregnant —— the prince of wales and the duchess of cornwall. it feels a little bit different now, doesn't it? the final engagement is one that puts them at the heart of the royal family, almost emphasises the pump, the ceremony, the formality that they are now going to leave behind and these will be some of the final pictures that we see of harry and meghan alongside numbers of the
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royal family. perhaps we will see them ata royal family. perhaps we will see them at a remembrance, trooping the colour, other occasions, but then it will not be as working was, not on official duty, so it is something special and something different today because they will not have this kind of role again going forward. a deep curtsy there from the duchess of sussex as the queen passes. that is the image, that is the royal family together on duty as a family, perhaps by the last time, daniel? you get that image there, the queen, the prince of wales, her air, the duchess of cornwall, the duke and duchess of cambridge, and behind them the duke and duchess of sussex. they will be stepping away and living in canada, forging a very different kind of life in
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themselves, with the private and commercial interest, as well as other charity work. this is the kind of occasion that theyjust will not be at going forward. yes, it is going to be reviewed in 12 months' time, but if it works out for them, they want to live for themselves thatis they want to live for themselves that is known royal, that is not attending these kinds of events. we will see them, as i say, privately at some of locations, but we are not going to get that kind of view of the wider royal family with them and forward. thank you very much. i royal correspondent, and also thanks to anna. if you want to keep watching the service, bbc one has live coverage of the commonwealth service, we are going to pull away now and the service gets under way. bbc one if you want to continue to watch that. you‘re watching after the knife here. let‘s bring up—to—date with the main story. the prime minister
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chiding an emergency cobra meeting. public health england have announced within the last hour, public health england has announced that the number of confirmed cases in the uk has risen by 46 to 319. three people have died. the government said it remains focused on containing the outbreak and has not moved to cancel public events which would be in the next stage of measures. cobra will meet again on wednesday but warned it expects the virus to spread in a "significant" way. stock markets around the world have plunged, with london‘s ftse opening more than 8% down this morning, as fears over the virus combined with a sharp fall in the oil price. trading on wall street has been temporarily halted immediately after opening as us stocks crashed, triggering an automatic 15 minute cutout. 0ur health correspondent, lauren moss reports. has the government got a grip on this, health secretary? another emergency meeting discussing the next steps to tackle the coronavirus. as the number of uk cases saw the biggest leap in 24 hours, ministers, medical and science advisers have reconvened at a cobra committee to decide if and when we should officially move to the next phase of delaying
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the spread of covid—19. if that happens measures which could be taken, including encouraging people to work from home, limiting the number of big public events, and even closing schools. but more likely the first steps will be a phased approach to reducing unnecessary social contact. we will take those based on the facts, the evidence and the scientific advice. as i say, at the moment, the scientific advice is not pointing towards taking further social distancing measures, but of course if that changes we will change accordingly. more than 23,000 people have been tested so far. the third death of a patient with the coronavirus was confirmed yesterday. at the weekend, some supermarket shelves were stripped bare of toilet rolls and hygiene products, prompting retailers to put a limit on the number of items people can purchase. and the government repeating the message that there is no need to stockpile. the supply chains are robust. this isn't the first time we have gone through something like this. we have had swine
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flu, sars virus, even weather—related stuff we have had swine flu, sars, even weather—related stuff like the beast from the east, and what we've done before and we will continue to do is to adapt, be fleet of foot and make sure that people have exactly what they need, and that is what we are continuing to do. another healthcare worker has been placed in isolation. they tested positive for the virus after working one night shift in the high dependency unit in southampton. in the high—dependency unit in southampton. but there is a sense of normality returning for some. passengers who had been held in quarantine at arrowe park hospital after travelling on the diamond princess cruise ship have now been allowed home. what has it been like in there? ah, very well looked after. the hospital were really terrific. it‘s been 0k. they have looked after us. and one of the dozens of schools which was shut after a student tested positive will reopen later this week following a deep clean. the number of infections is roughly doubling around the world every seven days.
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decisions about what to do next will be critical in determining how the uk responds to what is a rapidly developing situation. lauren moss, bbc news. we can speak now to our chief political correspondent vicki young, she‘s at downing street for us. the message from that cobra meeting is no need to panic at this stage will stop yes, that is right. that is what the politicians are trying to convey to people and the prime minister making very clear that he will take medical and scientific advice. that is what will inform the decisions that he ultimately will have to take. it is clear at the moment that there has not been any change in that advice it is still to wash your hands, if you have come from an area of northern italy, you should go into self isolation, whether or not you have the symptoms. i think the pressure that the government will come under is because people will be looking at
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other countries, such as italy or france, they will be looking at the different approaches that countries are taking, whether they are playing football matches behind closed doors, putting scratch mixing to people, this is a red zone, you cannot leave this area, they will be questioning whether or when the government here should take the same approach. i think the answer to that is that they are worried about doing it at the wrong time, so doing it at a time that is too early to have actual sketch make any actual effect on the spread of the various idolaters in the end is to make people get bored with it, frankly —— the spread of the virus in the end. and that is justly that wayne they to be going into isolation. all of those things that will be the destruction things to take —— destructive decisions to take, masco closures, telling people to work from home, are not on the cards at the moment. —— mass school closures.
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the government has been very open at the moment about the fact that they expect this virus to spread any significant way. there could be changes to the advice, but they could be targeted at the people who need that message must now, so those who are particularly vulnerable to this illness. , the elderly in particular. the prime minister is currently at the commonwealth day service there is an urgent question in the house of commons welch will be answered by the health secretary and labour already critical of the government has neck support. up until now they have been supportive. the questions they will ask will be the questions that people are asking every day. you have not and flights coming in from italy, for example. why are you still letting people in? from that region questioning even though we know that if i was there isa though we know that if i was there is a very widespread. why are you not testing those people as they get off the plane? again, they are going by scientific medical advice. because the problem with this virus
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is that people can have it, but not have any symptoms, so you can test them, take the temperatures they could have that plane, it could say they don‘t have the coronavirus, but they don‘t have the coronavirus, but they might have it and the problem there is that those people and i think that they are cleared of the illness, and so they will not sound isolate. you have to factor in how people will behave and there is a behavioural committee looking at all of this, how do people respond questioning things that we have seen, panic buying in some cases, and we know that and later on the environment secretary will be hosting a meeting with representatives from the supermarkets to try and see how they can identify the most vulnerable, may be elderly people who might want to go into self isolation to self testing to keep away from people because they are so vulnerable —— to south distance to keep away from people. there are no shortages, people. there are no shortages, people just need to make sure they do not go over the top panic buying. urgent question is
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at? 3:30pm. and it is live on? this wonderful channel. that is a pad we have saved any new promo. thank you. wall street has followed europe and plunged dramatically following big falls in the price of oil. the new york stock exchange suspended trading for 15 minutes after a main index fell by 7% soon after opening. 0ur our business presenter ben thompson joins me now. that is procedural, but what is going on certainly is not. in no way whatsoever. wall street did a full load lead set by europe, following the lead set by each overnight. we seen the ricochet overnight at times and is caught up with each other. this morning the ftse100, the index of the leading 100 companies, was an 8.4%. huge falls there. it has since stabilised a little bit. it is still down 7.2%, the last minute. if i can show you the last minute. if i can show you the bird. this is how we count
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the look. the ftse100 down more than 7%. in frankfurt in germany, down by nearly 7.5%. that was set by each, the in tokyo. it is caused by the coronavirus, the body of spread, that people may not be able to get to work. but also because of a big argument between russia and saudi arabia. saudi arabia said that demand is falling, if we cut supply, it will keep the price up. russia said they were not going to do that. saudi arabia said we willjust flood the market with oil, so because there is no such supply, prices have plunged. at scratch make some have said it could go as low as $20. we
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almost looking at a perfect storm here, when the one thing that you did not need with coronavirus what is happening with oil. let me show you some of the biggest follows if we can take to be an expert. across the board, it is different things that are feeling this, oil firms, bp down nearly 20% there. centrica, the pa rent down nearly 20% there. centrica, the parent company of british gas another big follow. royal dutch shell, down 15%. and carnival, the cruise company that owns all sorts of chris benz, down nearly 15%. all of chris benz, down nearly 15%. all of those filtering into that ftse 100 figure. —— all sorts of cruise companies. the first figure you can see there was what was known as black monday back in 1987, october 1987. a lot of parallels are being made with this and that. 12.2% with a day after black monday and then that 8% fall was
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back in 2008, the day that lehman brothers collapse, sparking that global financial crisis. those are the three worst for the ftse100. what we saw this morning with the open in london was the fourth west, so just to put that into a bit of context for you. we will keep an eye on how that closes in the next hour or so, but nonetheless, lots of nervousness right now. as you said, on wall street, that circuit breaker kicking m, street, that circuit breaker kicking in, so the market fell by 7%, trade was suspended for 15 minutes. if it goes beyond a 30%, it will be suspended again, if it goes to 20%, which i do not think we are any danger, then we will have trade suspended for the date —— if it goes beyond a 13% it will be suspended again. the foreign office is warning against all but essential travel to northern italy. with more than 360 deaths confirmed, italy is the worst hit country in the world after china. the italian prime minister has called the outbreak his country‘s "darkest hour". up to 16 million people in the north of the country,
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including venice and milan, are facing the toughest restrictions on movement since the second world war. the lockdown in lombardy and 14 other provinces is set to last until the 3rd april. bethany bell has sent this report from bologna, near the restricted zone. sirens large areas of northern italy are in quarantine. the italian government has taken tough measures to try to stop the spread of the coronavirus. milan, italy‘s financial capital, is under partial lockdown. people have been told they can only leave or enter the area for essential work orfamily emergencies. venice, one of italy‘s top tourist destinations, is also affected. british visitors can travel home. planes and trains are still running. but the uk government has said anyone returning from the red zones in northern italy should self—isolate for two weeks. for the locals, this is a very uncertain time.
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translation: my thoughts are for my children — another week at home and i‘m afraid they‘re bored. but these are the restrictions and we must respect them. translation: it's all rubbish. keep calm. translation: my thoughts are for my children — translation: it's all rubbish. keep calm. we're absolutely fine. i'm leaving anyway. this is having a dramatic effect both inside and outside the quarantine zones. people here say they don‘t know whether to be more worried about their health or the economy. the italian government has promised to increase spending. a step they‘re are calling massive financial shock therapy. a step they‘re calling massive financial shock therapy. northern italy has a well—developed health care system, but it‘s under increasing strain. in some places, people are being treated in hospital corridors. the virus is particularly dangerous for the elderly, and italy has one of the world‘s oldest populations. the average age of people dying from the disease here is 81 years old.
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riots have broken out in some italian prisons against restrictions to combat the spread of the coronavirus. reports on the italian media say at least six people died in a prison in modena in the north. bethany bell, bbc news in northern italy. meanwhile, here are some of the other things we know about what‘s happening with coronavirus. the government says it is working intensively to arrange repatriation flights for about 140 britons stuck on the grand princess cruise ship off san francisco. the ship is expected to dock in oakland this afternoon, but a spokesperson for princess cruises said passengers won‘t be tested for the virus until they reach their next destination. the france v ireland six nations rugby match is the latest sporting event to be postponed. it was due to take place in paris on saturday, but the french government advised against holding it.
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more on sport a little later. and authorities in vietnam have made the deicison to suspend visa—free travel for citizens from eight european countries, includng the uk. you can keep up—to—date with all the latest developments of the coronavirus outbreak, the symptoms to watch out for, how to guard against the virus and what it means for you on the bbc news app and it is on our website as well. we will have more from what is happening with the coronavirus and do not forget that 3:30pm were expecting an emergency question in the house of commons and we will bring you the latest from westminster abbey, where the duke and duchess of sussex have joined the queen and the multiservice. they did say hello to the duke and duchess of cambridge —— at the commonwealth service. there are no shaking of hands at the event, unusual at an event like that, following the protocol of westminster abbey. with the
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coronavirus square, bodily handshakes and other contact being kept an absolute minimum as a result. that is the latest and will have more from daniela later. let‘s have a look at the weather. we are looking at the moon. there is a full moon this this evening. it is at 530 7p on this evening. it is not just spectacular, it is a super moon. that means that the moon‘s elliptical orbit around the earth, every now and again, when it is a film on, it is closer to the earth —— when it has a full moon. it could be tempted orange a bit.
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a spectacular view. there is something that also goes along with the title. it isa that also goes along with the title. it is a super worm moon. it is to do with the native americans, they gave at monza to full moons. there is one for every month. in march it is at the worm moon. the ground was dying and the worm is a sign of spring —— the ground was thawing. alternatively it is cold the crow moon because they were taking advantage of the worm. in april, it is the pink moon, one of the flowers blooming in america. there is a strawberry moon in june. he laughs.
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keep going. there is a beaver moon in november. and that is when they will be trapped forever and that will be trapped forever and that will come in useful. there is a harvest moon... and then? what is the weather going to do? they laugh. this is unfortunately the cloud which is coming in to block the view of the full moon. more importantly, and willingly, from the cloud there isa and willingly, from the cloud there is a lot of rain coming into areas that really do not need any more low pressure feeding in these weather fronts and that could well cause a few problems we will find out any a moment. the rain is advancing east, those areas that started the day with some sunshine and the rain will reach all parts as we go into the
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evening. the wind starting to pick up evening. the wind starting to pick up as well. gusts around the irish coast, technically mad out there, but it is cloudy, wet tear and winter. i want to focus on wales and north—west england. in the rain keeps on coming here and that means that the rain totals will start to mount. it is through these areas that there is the greatest possibility of seeing some flooding once again, and it will leave some travel disruption, a very messy start to the day tomorrow with alan that going on. particularly in wales. that is where the met office has an amber weather warning. we could see 100 millimetres of rain. it then has to feed back down into the river systems again. even when the river systems again. even when the rain stops tomorrow, and it will free time, the rivers will continue to rise in response. wejust have to watch that. warm mild air coming in tomorrow. you will really notice that, where you do ditch the rain, especially when you get some sunshine. it wet
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start for north—west england, wales, blustery showers for northern scotland, northern england and northern ireland. it is going to be gusty across the uk. keeping some cloud toward southern england and south wales, still a bit patchy rain around here. the warm colours representing the well above average temperatures by the time of year. sunshine for east midlands, east anglia, 16 or 17 celsius could be yours tomorrow afternoon. then again, it is very windy. another speu again, it is very windy. another spell of rain across southern parts and then into wednesday. further blustery showers, particularly across the northern part of the uk, turning increasingly wintry over the hills and mountains of scotland. another blustery day on wednesday. more rain pushing through on wednesday night. thursday, friday, looking like a sunshine and showers and by then, it will be turning a bit cooler. all ice are marine but it is not wanted at the moment. details about our weather warnings, the met office weather warnings available
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online. here is the health secretary. the coronavirus outbreak continues to advance around the world. the number of cases in china and south korea keeps rising but at a slower rate. however the outbreak in iran, italy, switzerland and france and germany is growing. in italy alone we have seen is growing. in italy alone we have seen 1492 more cases overnight and 102 more deaths. here in the uk as
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of this morning there were 319 confirmed cases. very sadly this now includes four confirmed deaths. i entirely understand why people are worried and concerned. and we send our condolences to the families. the uk response is guided by ourfour point action plan. we continue to work to contain the virus but we‘re also taking action to delay impact, to fund research and to mitigate its consequences. throughout, our approach is guided by the science. that is the bedrock on which we base all our decisions. 0ur that is the bedrock on which we base all our decisions. our plan sets out what we are prepared to do and we will make the right choices of which action to pursue at the right moment. the scientific advice is clear, acting too early creates its own risks, so we will do what is
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right to keep people safe. guided by the science, we will act at the right time and we will be clear and open about our actions and the reasons for them. these are the principles that underpin the very best response to an epidemic like this. turning to research i can report to the house that we have made available a further 46 million to find a vaccine and develop more rapid diagnostic tests. we will continue to support the international effort to stop here at home the nhs is well—prepared with record numbers of staff, record nurses and record doctors. i want to thank all those involved for their work so far. the number of calls to nhs 111 work so far. the number of calls to nhs111 has increased and we have now added an extra 700 people to support that effort. 111 online is now dealing with more enquiries than the voice calls. to date, public health england has tested nearly 25,000 people and the time taken
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to testis 25,000 people and the time taken to test is being reduced as we are bringing ina test is being reduced as we are bringing in a new system for faster results. but of course responding to corona will take a national effort and everyone must play their part. of course that means government, it also means everyone washing their hands more often and following public health advice. but there is much more that we can all do both through volunteering and through support for those who are the most vulnerable. we will bring forward legislative options to help people and services to tackle this outbreak. the bill will be temporary and proportionate with measures that last only as long as necessary in line with clinical advice. i can also report that over the weekend, we initiated action to help 120 passengers on the grand princess cruise ship off the coast of california to assist them in coming home. madam deputy speaker, we will stop at nothing to get this response right and stop at nothing to get this response rightandi stop at nothing to get this response right and i commend the statement to the house. i
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thank the secretary of state for his answer. 0ur the house. i thank the secretary of state for his answer. our thoughts are naturally with the loved ones of those who have sadly died from covid-19. we those who have sadly died from covid—19. we also want to put on re cord covid—19. we also want to put on record again our thanks and gratitude to our hard—working nhs staff and public health england stuff. can i press the secretary of state further on the response he has just given. he will know we have repeatedly called for an emergency funding package for our nhs. we are short of 100,000 staff and will note that critical bed capacity was at 81%. the chancellor has said the nhs will get whatever it needs. does he agree that in this wednesday's budget we need to see more resources for the nhs not just budget we need to see more resources for the nhs notjust rhetoric? scaling up and freeing up capacity in the nhs now is absolutely urgent. can he tell us what is being done to scale up intensive care beds in the
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nhs? what work is being done to expand capacity to the oxygen and ventilation machines that will be needed and can he tell us what the current capacity of ecmo beds is? we welcome the distribution of personal protective equipment across nhs staff but does he agree that gps and social care staff also need access to that equipment? for those in receipt of social care, they are some of the most vulnerable who could be really badly affected by this virus. indeed many who work in social care are low paid and if have to go off sick, has huge implications for delivery of social care. what advice is being given to social care providers and local authorities to ensure the most vulnerable are protected and what plans are in place to protect staff and get more stuff into social care sector? public health directors are expected to play a leading role in their local preparations was that they need to make decisions about
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deploying staff, public health england have asked. to be seconded for example, yet they still don't know their public health allocations for the next financial year starting in three weeks' time. we are begging the secretary of state, please tell local directors of public health what their budget is for this coming april. we are still officially in the containment stage. at some point we presume we will need to move into delay stage where social distancing measures will be necessary. many of our constituents our asking why were not yet considering more home—working. should we be asking those over 65 to isolate, should we cancel large events and those returning from northern italy be taken to quarantine? it would help our constituents if he can run through those. if we move into the face we re
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through those. if we move into the face were measures of this magnitude are proposed, will be secretary of state come to the house and explain why and allow members to question him? on the mitigation stage here suggested we will need emergency legislation. as a responsible opposition we would like to sit down with the secretary of state to understand the content of that legislation because we want to work ona legislation because we want to work on a cross—party basis, by let me leave the secretary of state in no doubt, we also want statutory sick pay for all from day one. asking people to wait five weeks for universal credit is not a serious solution. could he update the house on food supplies and what conversations he has had with supermarkets and can he reassure us that our constituents don't need to be panic buying as we have seen on social media in some parts of the country over the weekend. does he agree that whatever happens we must find a way for parliament to continue to hold ministers to
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account and so we continue to hold ministers to account and so we can continue to hold ministers to account and so we can ask questions on behalf of our constituents. but we continue to offer to work constructively with the government because the public health interest in the safety of our constituents must always come first. thank you very much, madam deputy speaker, and i will start with concurring with what he said about the legislation, because they should be taken through ona because they should be taken through on a cross—party basis and of course i would be happy to talk to him about the proposals in that legislation and also ensure that the clinicians are able to explain why these are necessary and proportionate and i‘m gratefulfor the tone that he has taken throughout this, recognising that we are led by and guided by the science in the responses that we make. he asked about the nhs and their preparedness. 0f asked about the nhs and their preparedness. of course, there are numbers, record numbers of nurses and doctors come
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8700 increase in the number of nurses is welcome in this context. we are scaling up intensive care beds and also, making sure we have as much availability of ventilation equipment and the skilled and trained people to use it because ventilation equipment without trained people is dangerous. and on the same subject, making sure that we have the oxygen that is neededin that we have the oxygen that is needed in order to go into those ventilation, ventilation kits, working with oxygen supplies to make sure that is available. he asked whether gps would get access to the equipment they need and the answer to that is yes, we have stockpiles of protective equipment. we will release it at the right time and i‘m working very closely with nhs england on making sure that happens. he asked about social care and he is absolute right to draw attention to the importance of social care, both
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making sure that the staff are well enough supported including if they are sick and critically, because many of the residents in residential social care will also be some of the most vulnerable people and those living in the community in receipt of social care will also be likely to be vulnerable, whether with prior health conditions or because they are elderly or both, and that is an error of significant attention and we will be updating the existing guidance that there already is this week with further information for social care providers. he asked about public health budgets. public health budgets are going up and on the home—working and cancellation of large events, we are not at this stage proposing the cancellation of mass events because we are following the scientific advice that that is not what is proposed at this stage. of course, home—working and
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flexible working is something that in many cases is advocated anyway and people will make their own decisions as to when that is appropriate. what we are saying from a government point of view as you should follow the public health advice so that for insta nce public health advice so that for instance if you are returning from an area that is affected and you have symptoms, then you should stay at home and that means of course home—working. we added over the weekend northern italy to the list of places that the foreign office does not recommend travel to unless there are exceptional circumstances and therefore those returning from northern italy, we are recommending that they self—isolate if they are symptomatic. two more points. he asked about the food supply. we are confident that food supply will continue even in our reasonable worst case scenario.
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continue even in our reasonable worst case scenario. we have been talking to the supermarkets for some time about this scenario. i appreciate that on friday there was discussion about whether every single supermarket executive had been involved in those talks. if any further executive wants to be involved in those conversations, then they should get in contact, but those conversations have been ongoing and it is very important, especially as we announce more people to self—isolate and stay at home that we can show we can get supplies that are needed to the people who we are asking to stay at home. he asked about statutory sick pay and we are proposing to put changes to statutory sick pay into the legislation and i‘m happy to go through with him the details of the talks i mentioned at the start of my response. finally on parliament, of course this is a matter for the whole house and i know that the commission met this morning, but what i would say is i
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think parliamentary scrutiny of decisions of the magnitude that we are having to ta ke of the magnitude that we are having to take in response to coronavirus and the novel nature of it, that parliamentary scrutiny is incredibly important and parliamentary scrutiny is incredibly importantandi parliamentary scrutiny is incredibly important and i will do all i can to ensure that parliament remains open. cani ensure that parliament remains open. can i commend the health secretary for the way he is handling this crisis and ask him to reflect on what we now feel we have learned from the situation in china given that yesterday, was the first day when reported new cases in the uk exceeded reported new cases in china. the chief medical officer told the select committee that he would hope that a smaller proportion of the population in the uk would get the virus given what we can learn from what happened in china. but one of the reasons for growing concern amongst our constituents is the only number out there is the 80%
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reasonable worst—case scenario. is it not time for the health secretary to share his central estimate of what he thinks the proportion of the uk population is that we get this virus even though we would all understand that that estimate may change over the passage of time.” wa nt to change over the passage of time.” want to also pay tribute to the chair of the select committee for the way that he is handling the need for transparency and the questioning of the chief medical officer who last week. i will take away the point that he makes on the need for a central estimate. the figures out there in terms of the proportion of people who will get it are a reasonable worst—case scenario. on the central estimate, there are still things that we do not know about the spread of the virus through china and in particular, the degree to which the slowing of the increase in the cases in china is
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because the virus has reached a large proportion of the population and there is a large proportion who are not symptomatic which would mean the mortality rate was lower than otherwise, or whether it is the very significant measures the chinese have taken are having a very significant effect and therefore as and when they are lifted, the virus will continue to spread. neither of those options —— either of those options is possible but which ever it is the approach we are taking in the uk is the right response to both of those scenarios. it seems we have had some media confusion that the move from a contain to delay face will be an instant flick of the switch moment. will he assist in confirming this is not the case and any move is rather a phase transition? another area of particular vulnerability as the uk
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prison system which is extremely short—staffed and what measures will he be taking following reports of deaths amongst inmates and rights in italy is presence to ensure that the presence remain under control during a period of heightened tensions and frustrations at restricted measures being introduced? will he confirm he is aware of the latest workplace advice from health protection scotland published today which urges routine cleaning of phones and keypads and says food should not be left open for other people to share and will this department be making a similar recommendation for england? he is absolutely right that the transition to the delay phase is indeed that, it is a transition. we will not give up hope of containing this disease whilst we can still ta ke this disease whilst we can still take containment actions and many of the actions that are needed to contain it are also very effective for delaying. 0f contain it are also very effective for delaying. of course the prime of which is for everyone to wash their hands but much more than that. he asked about the advice
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from the health protection agency in scotland and we are working very closely with them and public health england will be bringing forward further and updated guidance very shortly. we have been working on that over the weekend not just in have been working on that over the weekend notjust in social care but more broadly for businesses and employees and others. can i thank the secretary of state for his statement. he will know that in hertfordshire the figures are now into double figures of cases and it isa into double figures of cases and it is a county with large businesses with an international footprint as well as many commuters going into london. has the time come for discussions with these large businesses on how to reduce the numberof businesses on how to reduce the number of international visits that are made, perhaps through telecom, and also how to know more people to work from home when possible and to try and just reduce the number of visits backwards and forwards which
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may be affecting the virus. a lot of companies are taking these steps and other employers and telecom for insta nce other employers and telecom for instance is usually cheaper and better for the environment than travel and so there is good reasons to use it anyway. as my honourable friend's questions and the secretary of state answer has made clear, parliamentary accountability is fundamental as is evidenced by so many members on all sides of the rice rising to rangers a whole myriad of issues. as the secretary of state has acknowledged, parliamentary accountability is fundamental and yet we are hearing reports that the house might after easter be suspended until september. could he absolutely undertake that this is not going to be the case and recognise that we can play our part asa
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recognise that we can play our part as a big organisation of 650 mp5 and thousands of staff, we can play our pa rt thousands of staff, we can play our part as an organisation in containment without closing down accountability altogether and other measures can be considered, for example using westminster hall and making it on a uq basis so we have continuous accountability for what the government is doing through this parliament will bmi in a different form. i haven't seen those specific reports but i do know the commission met this morning, and what i can say isi met this morning, and what i can say is i think parliamentary accountability is incredibly important and accountability is incredibly importantandi accountability is incredibly important and i will be doing all that i can to make sure that parliament stays open through this process and make sure of course we followed the clinical advice as to how we make sure that can happen, but that we keep that parliamentary accountability. that is my position,
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it isa accountability. that is my position, it is a decision for the house but my position on the government‘s position is quite clear. the government is absolutely right to be putting a lot of public money into research into a possible vaccine, but he will know that research is no good unless you can produce vaccine at scale and this country is not great at producing vaccine. what can he do to ensure we grow indigenous capacity very quickly so that the uk public and the particular key workers in our health service do not have to wait in line when a vaccine becomes available. this is a very important point. we do have some significant vaccine capabilities and vaccine production, there is a broader point which is investment into the whole production chain not just the
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research is critical. the government has outlined emergency legislation which will extend new powers to wash government. when i speak to council representatives, they are concerned that there are currently legal obstacles which hinder the swift deployment of emergency staff, including vehicle insurance and limits on working hours, i insurance and limits on working hours, lam insurance and limits on working hours, i am applying this to social ca re staff. hours, i am applying this to social care staff. what discussions has he had with wash governments to ensure clear guidelines for emergency implementation in the care sector? we had ongoing discussions with the welsh government and the wash government for instance joins the cobra that we held this morning and have been present at all the cobra meeting is we have had throughout and we have had very good engagement on the bill. i will look into the two specific points that she raises and talk to my wash colleagues about
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them. we will pull away from that. we will keep an eye on that urgent question but most issues are dealt with thereby the health secretary. principally the announcement in the commons of the fourth death as a result of the coronavirus in the uk. and then within moments of that announcement from the health secretary, a statement from professor chris whitty who is of course the chief medical officer for england, confirming that news that the patient was being treated at the royal wolverhampton hospital, was in their 70s and had underlying health conditions. it appears the virus was acquired in the uk and full contact tracing has begun. that is from chris whitty, chief medical officer for england. there has been a statement from the wolverhampton nhs trust, saying a patient had died. the patient had tested
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positive for covid-19. the the patient had tested positive for covid—19. the family has been informed and our condolences and our thoughts are with them at this difficult time. we will not be commenting further, they said. so the death toll in the uk are 24. looking at what is happening in europe, just hearing that the eu parliament is‘s session has been shortened to 1.5 days and this coming as cyprus now confirming its first case of coronavirus which means all eu countries have been affected and the news of the last few minutes that if germany, to death now as a result of coronavirus in germany. the irish government saying it will cancel this year saint patrick‘s day parade in dublin because of the outbreak. aaron currently has 21 cases of covid—19 and the country‘s second city, cork,
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has already cancelled its festivities as well. the parade due to be held on march 17. from ryanair, of course based in dublin, ryanair, of course based in dublin, ryan air saying it will run a severely reduced schedule of international flights. severely reduced schedule of internationalflights. no severely reduced schedule of international flights. no flights will operate between tuesdays and thursdays on its routes, including bergamot, venice, panama, rimini and treviso airports. routes with multiple daily frequencies will be restricted. so the impact on the coronavirus continuing to be felt further and further across europe and the financial impact we have been reporting on as well with stock markets plunging as a result of concerns. that is our main story. more at four o‘clock but now let‘s catch up with the weather.
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more rain to come in areas that don‘t want any more at the moment, even though some of us started the day with sunshine, but we‘re all going to get into the wet weather and it is not too far away from those areas that started with the sunshine. this area of low pressure is feeding in these weather fronts, the wind is picking up as well but some areas will see a lot of rain in the next 12—18 hours. the rain is pushing east across all parts. it will eventually get to those used in most areas but for much of the day, it has still been dry. technically mild, temperatures into double figures for some but tempered by the cloud, the rain moving in, and a strengthening wind and on the irish sea coast. a spell of rain. for some it uses overnight. another spell of rain towards northern ireland doesn‘t let up and it
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is wales, north—west england with the greatest chance of seeing some disruption and flooding. travel disruption as the rain totals mount, 40—70 millimetres in places but particularly in mid wales where we could see 100 millimetres of rain and that is where the met office has an amber warning in force, so again flooding likely and some really difficult travel conditions going into the morning. it will be a messy start tomorrow morning but the warm colours, the wind direction, it will be unusually mild for the time of year, particularly if you get any of the sunshine only. for many it will brighten up tomorrow. blustery showers across scotland, northern england, northern ireland with wind gusts of 50, 60 mph. it will be windy across the uk. some cloud across southern england and south wales holding on so you could see some patchy rain on and off during the day. you can see where it will be particularly mild and especially if you get to see some
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sunshine, the east midlands and eastern england, 16-17dc. east midlands and eastern england, 16—17dc. another spell of rain running across southern parts then on wednesday, sunshine and showers. blustery in strong winds, wintry over the hills of scotland. more rain on wednesday night, showers on thursday and feeling cooler by then.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. today at 4pm:
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a fourth person in the uk has died from coronavirus, says the health secretary, as the number of cases rises to 319 overall. i entirely understand why people are worried and concerned and we send our condolences to the families. italy‘s prime minister says his country is facing its "darkest hour" with 16 million people in quarantine. trading on wall street was temporarily halted immediately after opening this morning, as us stocks crashed, triggering an automatic 15 minute cutout. it‘s now resumed. the trial begins of alex salmond, the former first minister of scotland, on charges of sexual assault and attempted rape. and all the sport, the six nations match
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between ireland and france has been postponed because of fears of the coronavirus. but the match against wales and scotland will go ahead. and with all the weather... there are more rain on the way to areas that do not want war. it brings the increasing likelihood of flooding again. find out who is going to get the worst of it in the forecast coming up —— it leaving the fold — the duke and duchess of sussex make their final public appearance as working members of the royal family at the commonwealth service in westminster abbey. hello everyone, this is afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy.
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a fourth person has died from coronavirus — the latest was a man in his 70s with underlying health conditions, who was being treated at the royal wolverhampton hospital. there are now 319 confirmed cases in the uk — an increase of 46 on yesterday. within the last half an hour, the health secretary, matt hancock, has told mps that he understands why people are concerned about the outbreak but insisted the government was working to contain the spread of the virus. as of this morning, there were 319 confirmed cases. very sadly, this now includes four confirmed the deaths. i entirely understand why people are worried and concerned and we send our condolences to the families. the uk response is guided by ourfour point families. the uk response is guided by our four point action plan. we continue to work to contain the virus, but we are also taking action to delay its impact,
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to fund research, and to mitigate its consequences. throughout, our approach is guided by the signs. that is the bedrock on which we base all our decisions. our plan sets out what we are prepared to do and we will make the right choices of which action to pursue at the right moment. the scientific advice is clear — acting too early creates its own risks, so we will do what is right to keep people‘s safe. guided by the science, we were out at the right time, we will be clear and open about our actions and the reason for them. madame madam deputy speaker, these are the principles that underpin the very best response to an epidemic like this. responding to an epidemic like this. responding to matt hancock, the shadow health secretary asked a series of questions over the readiness of the nhs to deal with the epic. it can impress the secretary of state a little further on the response he has given. we have
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repeatedly called foran has given. we have repeatedly called for an emergency has given. we have repeatedly called foran emergency funding has given. we have repeatedly called for an emergency funding package for nhs and he will know that we are short of staff, and critical care bed capacity was 81% in the week that the latest figures were available. the chancellor has said that the nhs will get whatever it needs. does he agree that in this when's budget, we need to see significantly more resources for the nhs, notjust rhetoric. scaling up and freeing up capacity in the nhs now is absolutely urgent. can he tell us what is being done to skill up in intensive care beds in the any chess? what is being dubbed to ensure capacity to the auction a ventilation machine that will be needed and what is the current capacity of akmal beds? we welcome the discussion of nhs staff, but does he agree that gps and social ca re staff does he agree that gps and social care staff need access to that equipment —— we welcome the
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dispensation of health the government says it remains focused on containing that bit, and it is not intended to cancel public events, which would be in it stage. stock markets have plunged around the world, with the ftse opening more than 8% down this morning after fears of the virus combined with the sharp fall in the price of oil. trading was temporarily halted as a us stocks experience sharp falls, triggering an automatic 50 minute cut out. in italy, much of the country is in lockdown after the number of deaths there rose by more than 130 any single day —— an automatic 15 minute cut. has the government got a grip on this, health secretary? another emergency meeting discussing the next steps to tackle the coronavirus. as the number of uk cases saw
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the biggest leap in 24 hours, a ministers, medical and science advisers have reconvened at a cobra committee to decide if and when we should officially move to the next phase of delaying the spread of covid—19. if that happens measures which could be taken, including encouraging people to work from home, limiting the number of big public events, and even closing schools. but more likely the first steps will be a phased approach to reducing unnecessary social contact. we will take those based on the facts, the evidence and the scientific advice. as i say, at the moment, the scientific advice is not pointing towards taking further social distancing measures, but of course if that changes we will change accordingly. more than 23,000 people have been tested so far. at the weekend, some supermarket shelves were stripped bare of toilet rolls and hygiene products, prompting retailers to put a limit on the number of items people can purchase. and the government repeating the message that there is no need to stockpile. the supply chains are robust. this isn't the first time we have gone through something like this. we have had swine flu, sars virus, even weather—related stuff like the beast from the east, and what we've done before and we will continue to do
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is to adapt, be fleet of foot and make sure that people have exactly what they need, and that is what we are continuing to do. another healthcare worker has been placed in isolation. they tested positive for the virus after working one night shift in the high dependency unit in southampton. but there is a sense of normality returning for some. passengers who had been held in quarantine at arrowe park hospital after travelling on the diamond princess cruise ship have now been allowed home. what has it been like in there? ah, very well looked after. the hospital were really terrific. it‘s been 0k. they have looked after us. and one of the dozens of schools which was shut after a student tested positive will reopen later this week following a deep clean. the number of infections is roughly doubling around the world every seven days. decisions about what to do next will be critical in determining how the uk responds to what is a rapidly developing situation. lauren moss,
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bbc news. we can speak now to our political correspondentjess parker, she‘s at downing street for us. from the mud from downing street and the cobra meeting was do not panic. yet the health secretary announcing before death in the house a moment ago. they are trying to play down any semblance of panic, we have heard of people emptying the shelves in some supermarkets. the government are still sticking to the contain base in terms of their strategy for tackling the coronavirus. what would be next, if they move on to the next phase, and i think the mood music as it seems likely that will happen at some point, is the delay phase, you could see more dramatic matters. —— isa could see more dramatic matters. —— is a more drastic measures — like
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closing schools, stopping sporting events. it is suggested will not see that imminently, but a social distancing strategies, people having less interaction with each other, less interaction with each other, less likely therefore, to pass on the infection, perhaps more people working from home, there are potentially the kinds of things that we could see over the coming days. what about the emergency legislation that we heard about in the past couple of weeks? for example, if statutory limits on class sizes had to be lifted. i do not sense we are going to get that emergency legislation yet, but the government very much suggesting it will be ready if it is needed on the line. interesting that the issue was raised, harriet harman praised it, ofa raised, harriet harman praised it, of a possible suspension of parliament because of coronavirus. this has been discussed extensively here in westminster over the past few days. because of course, you have an awful lot of people notjust working in parliament, because you have over 600 mps, but all of their staff, all of those people who visit parliament, told us, school groups,
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downing street seen today that it‘s a matter for the uk downing street seen today that it‘s a matterfor the uk parliamentary authorities and they will ensure that they follow the scientific advice, but as far as downing street is concerned, they do not necessarily see a need to something like that. something i have heard in westminster from sources is the idea that perhaps could you look at curtailing the number of visits, fewer school groups, fewer tourists coming into parliament, potentially, an official but announcement on that. another consideration for those over the road in parliament is the message that that might sound if they were to shut down parliament in any way because, of course, mps will wa nt to any way because, of course, mps will want to keep coming to the house, holding the government to account, hitting statements like the one that we have heard from the health secretary this afternoon. —— healing statements. and the timetable, cobra is due to meet on wednesday. what else could we hear in the meantime? wednesday shaping up to be a pretty busy day. the other thing that we have on wednesday, prime minister‘s questions and the budget. as you say, we now know that a copper
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meeting as well. not clear who will —— a cobra meeting. the prime minister chaired today‘s meeting and monday, but the others have been chaired by the health secretary matt hancock. the prime minister may be busy because of the budget, but wednesday shaping up to be a busy day. with the budget... over there is at the chief medical officer going into downing street. the chief medical officer very important in delivering this public health messages, a very delivering this public health messages, a very important role in terms of deciding when the government might look to move to the next phase of its strategy tackling coronavirus, but wednesday, cobra meeting, budget, prime minister‘s questions, so we could see some development plan. we believe leave it there. thank you very much. trading in united states shares this afternoon was
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briefly suspended afternoon was briefly suspended after dramatic falls. it saw the worst day since the 2008 financial crisis. i‘m joined now by economist and columnist grace blakeley. this looked very dramatic, but it was expected questioning we have seen successive was expected questioning we have seen successive days of shocks and successive recoveries. the most important thing to know about this, they fall in equity prices that we have seen, and another stock markets around the world, is that it comes in the wake of what has been called the longest bull run in history, for us shares, and this has to be thought of in the context of the financial crisis recovery since 2008. it has been wea k recovery since 2008. it has been weak and fragile in certain economies. and are driven predominantly by very low interest rates and quantitative easing from the world‘s like a central bank is and what that is none, quantitative easing, it is now widely agreed this has actually busted asset prices,
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equity prices, but also has presses, and reduced bond yields. —— also house prices. we were in a situation of people waiting for a correction, because there was a sense that the current value any lot of equities was not representative of the kind of long—term returns that you would expect to get from us. the other thing we have seen as a result of those low interest rates is a big accumulation of debt, particularly corporate debt in the us in the uk where some are talking about corporate debt bubble. but also in china, where you have a huge amount of corporate debt, municipal debt, household debt. it has been driven by, basically, the recovery from 2008 any of ways, by is chinese‘s stimulus programme. it had fiscal and monetary elements. and there was mention this morning of a possible cut in interest rates. there are only a certain number of central banks around the world who are going to be able to do this, the ecb is unlikely to be able to the same with
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interest rates extremely low. it has been noted very very long time that because of the dynamics of the business cycle, which tend to lead toa business cycle, which tend to lead to a recession every ten to 15 yea rs, to a recession every ten to 15 years, that we were waiting for the recession, perhaps at some point over the next two or three years, probably beginning in some parts of the years on, germany for example, the years on, germany for example, the uk because a brexit and the us as well. this could push it into an early recession and the problem is, of course, because monetary policy is already so this, there is not a lot of that central banks can do to ease this burden. this does reflect the underlying weakness in productivity, investment and in other areas of the global economy.” thought we we re we were told after the crash of 2008 and nine that we had to make sure that this could never happen again. and yeah, we appear to be in the presence of something very similar.” we appear to be in the presence of something very similar. i think it would be a stretch to say that something we are looking at every similarcan an something we are looking at every similar can an accredited thousand eight, which was a combination of the build—up of private debt in some
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of the biggest economies, particularly the us and the uk, combined with that international banking crisis that resulted from the particular financial... but banking crisis that resulted from the particular financial. .. but you have a global pandemic, possibly, issues with the oil price, which is really... this looks like a perfect storm again. the things that we should be worried about today are less a kind of immediate, massive international banking crisis that we cited as an it and more a long—term slowdown, potentially beside some big defaults in some big economies and amongst some big corporations because of those huge levels of debt. over the longer term, because of those huge levels of debt. overthe longerterm, if because of those huge levels of debt. over the longer term, if we wa nt to debt. over the longer term, if we want to see a stronger recovery, we are going to need governments to step in and start spending money, start using fiscal policy rather than lying solely on monetary policy —— are relying on monetary policy. and to direct that spending two things that are going to help the environment long term because that is another big risk that is on the horizon. and to make sure that that has done in a way that will boost productivity and investment. and certainly, they hate uncertainty, thatis
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certainly, they hate uncertainty, that is what it is all about. it is great to see you. thank you. the foreign office is warning against all but essential travel to northern italy. with more than 360 deaths confirmed, italy is the worst—hit country in the world after china. the italian prime minister has called the outbreak his country‘s "darkest hour". up to 16 million people in the north of the country, including venice and milan, are facing the toughest restrictions on movement since the second world war. the lockdown in lombardy and 14 other provinces is set to last until the 3rd april. bethany bell has sent this report from bologna, near the restricted zone. sirens large areas of northern italy are in quarantine. the italian government has taken tough measures to try to stop the spread of the coronavirus. milan, italy‘s financial capital, is under partial lockdown. people have been told they can only leave or enter the area for essential work orfamily emergencies. venice, one of italy‘s top tourist
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destinations, is also affected. british visitors can travel home. planes and trains are still running. but the uk government has said anyone returning from the red zones in northern italy should self—isolate for two weeks. for the locals, this is a very uncertain time. translation: my thoughts are for my children — another week at home and i‘m afraid they‘re bored. but these are the restrictions and we must respect them. translation: it's all rubbish. keep calm. we're absolutely fine. i'm leaving anyway. this is having a dramatic effect both inside and outside the quarantine zones. people here say they don‘t know whether to be more worried about their health or the economy. the italian government has promised to increase spending. a step they‘re calling massive financial shock therapy. northern italy has a well—developed health care system, but it‘s under increasing
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strain. in some places, people are being treated in hospital corridors. the virus is particularly dangerous for the elderly, and italy has one of the world‘s oldest populations. the average age of people dying from the disease here is 81 years old. riots have broken out in some italian prisons against restrictions to combat the spread of the coronavirus. reports on the italian media say at least six people died in a prison in modena in the north. bethany bell, bbc news in northern italy. irish broadcaster rte is reporting that dublin has cancelled its annual saint patrick‘s day parade. that dublin has cancelled its annual saint patrick's day paradem that dublin has cancelled its annual saint patrick's day parade. it has also been confirmed that the
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taoiseach the overnighter is shortening his sympatric‘s day to attend further readings about coronavirus. meanwhile, here are some of the other things we know about what‘s happening with coronavirus. the government says it is working intensively to arrange repatriation flights for about 140 britons stuck on the grand princess cruise ship off san francisco. the ship is expected to dock in oakland this evening, but a spokesperson for princess cruises said passengers won‘t be tested for the virus until they reach their next destination. the france v ireland six nations rugby match is the latest sporting event to be postponed. it was due to take place in paris on saturday, but the french government advised against holding it. and authorities in vietnam have made the deicison to suspend visa—free travel for citizens from 8 european countries, includng the uk. and you can keep up with the latest developments about the coronavirus outbreak, the symptoms to watch out for, how to guard against the virus and what it means for you, on the bbc news app and
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on our website. let‘s turn to the day‘s other news. the trial has begun at the high court in edinburgh of alex salmond, who denies sexually assaulting ten women while he was first minister of scotland. the former snp leader has pleaded not guilty to all 14 charges, including one of attempted rape. our scotland correspondent, lorna gordon is outside the court. what‘s the latest? this afternoon we heard from the first witness in this trial. a woman who was then a scottish government official who it is alleged that mr salmond sexually assaulted an attempt to paper. the alleged offences were said to have run up to the 2014 referendum. she said she did not remember the exact date, but that they took part not very far apart. she has said that all she did was work and that this was a
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campaign ofa was work and that this was a campaign of a lifetime. she said that on the evening of the first alleged incident, she had been in bute house, and the sitting room of the second floor of the minister‘s official residence where they were doing a wrap—up of the day and she claimed that mr salmond was, in her words "half—cut", and he said he was touching her, touching her leg and then at one point he was kissing her face. she was asked if she wanted this to happen and she said no. she said she said to him, what are you doing? you should not be doing this. she claimed that he found it funny possible by the time that she could not talk her way out of this, she managed to get up, make excuses and leave. she said i basically got out of dodge and went home. she said she was embarrassed by the incidents did
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not speak about it to anyone. she felt she had done nothing wrong, but she did not want people to know, in her words, she did not want to be another one of his women. they went on to question her about the second alleged incident, which is also claimed to have taken part in bute has not long afterwards. alex salmond, she claimed, came to sit next to her on a sofa beside the building, built her legs over his, she alleged he started to try and kiss her, touching her shirt, and she said she started to edge towards the door. i felt, she said she started to edge towards the door. ifelt, she said, that at that point i was being chased, that i was that point i was being chased, that iwas in that point i was being chased, that i was in the ring with muhammad ali. it was consent, he would not stop pursuing her and touching her. —— it was constant. she said later she felt they had made good progress, she had moved to another room, she had agreed to stay over so that he could go upstairs to his bedroom. she said let‘s talk and say good night. she claimed that point he talked for a second and then pounced. he was physically all over
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her, she claimed. he was taking her clothes off. i was telling him, she claimed, to stop, the whole time. in her words, she said, claimed, to stop, the whole time. in herwords, she said, i claimed, to stop, the whole time. in her words, she said, ifelt i claimed, to stop, the whole time. in her words, she said, i felt i was hunted, i felt him her words, she said, i felt i was hunted, ifelt him on top her words, she said, i felt i was hunted, i felt him on top of me, her words, she said, i felt i was hunted, ifelt him on top of me, i made one final push to get him away and managed to push him to the other side of the bed. she claimed i did not want any of this to happen, i did not want any of this to happen at work. i did not want to feel as ifi at work. i did not want to feel as if i was hunted. the evidence has finished by the day. women it has still to be cross examined by the defence team. alex salmond strenuously denies all of the charges he is facing and his legal tea m charges he is facing and his legal team has lodged special defences of alibi and consent. the trial at the high court hid in edinburgh continues. thank you very much the chinese company, jingye, has completed its takeover of british steel this afternoon, securing the future of more than 3000 workers
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in scunthorpe and teesside. our business correspondent sarah corker is in scunthorpe they have said that this deal secures the future of this site and marks a new illustrious chapter for the british steel industry. they have said that this is a huge vote of confidence in the sector and it will secure 3200 jobs. the bulk of them here in scunthorpe. with me now is alan davies from the community union. a huge relief for you and your members. since the 22nd of may la st your members. since the 22nd of may last year there has been uncertainty around the business and it is good to see it now finally start to relax done. we are starting to see some more details of this rescue package, £1.2 billion invested over the next decade. but there will be did redundancies as well questioning the investment is huge and that is only a positive thing to come in for this
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dillinger site. the steel industry is all in terminal at the moment. getting stability is great, but we cannot forget the people who have not been given jobs. cannot forget the people who have not been givenjobs. we will be working with jingye to hopefully offer people'sjobs, positions in the future as the investments come in. this huge investment package, but would that entail? what kind of things will be seen here in terms of upgrading and modernisation? everything is around making it a greener place to work, so there will be things around the blast furnaces, making it more efficient and cleaner. it will be right across the pond and obviously in teesside as well. some people have been asking why on earth does a chinese steel—maker want to take over a loss—making plant in north lincolnshire? there has been some scepticism, really, that the level of influence china will have any uk steel industry. i think you have to remember that even though you see it asa remember that even though you see it as a loss—making industry and it has struggled from time to time, the government needs to do more, jingye
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see a vision for the business and believe that they can take it forward. pa rt of believe that they can take it forward. part of the negotiations that we had with jingye forward. part of the negotiations that we had withjingye enabled us to cut the implement costs through terms and conditions, however we did not accept and did not agree to the job losses. but moving forward, there will be significant changes now and it will become more efficient to operating practices, but the government still need to do more. and this deal hasjust been signed in the last half an hour or so bya signed in the last half an hour or so by a delegation that have come from china, what have workers been saying to you throughout the day question are currently feeling question are currently feeling question like the work that kept theirjobs are obviously very happy, but, like i said, you have to remain a little upset for the ones that have lost theirjob. it is not a nice place to be. i have been in that position in 2001 and i would not want anybody else to go through that and like i said, obviously, we're going to work to try to get them back into full—time employment. thank you very much. there is some
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caution around this deal because over the last decade there have been a string of owners of the site from coders, to try to steal, to global capital and they have all tried and failed to turn this business around. workers will be looking closely to see whatjingye can and will do differently to try and turn this business around. thank you very much. the duke and duchess of sussex made theirfinal official appearance as senior royals at westminster abbey today. harry and meghan attended the commonwealth service — where they were greeted by the dean of westminster, and a group of dignitaries including borisjohnson and the commonwealth‘s secretary—general baroness scotland. they were followed closely by the duke and duchess of cambridge. in a change from last year‘s event, the four royals did not wait at the abbey‘s great west door to meet the queen and join her procession. instead, they went straight to their seats — where they waited for the queen. the queen arrived shortly after with her son, the prince of wales and his
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wife the duchess of cornwall. as the service got under way, the congregation was treated to a performance by a troupe of professional ghanaian performers playing the drums. the procession made its way through the whole cathedral. it was the first time harry and meghan had been seen with the queen since the couple thrashed out an exit deal from their royal roles injanuary. the champion heavyweight boxer anthonyjoshua paid the champion heavyweight boxer anthony joshua paid contribution the champion heavyweight boxer anthonyjoshua paid contribution to the contributions made to britain by the contributions made to britain by the commonwealth. i am proudly nigerian and proudly british and i joina nigerian and proudly british and i join a long and, perhaps too long to count, of uk citizens of carmel origin who made enormous contributions to this great multicultural society of ours. in my world, that would include
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names of many and there are so many members of the commonwealth family, including one of your keepers may architects, and arguably britain has plainest family. and the countless nurses, teachers, and doctors that have made the uk their home and strengthening the fabric of our society and economy —— britain‘s brainiest families. the duke and duchess of sussex concluding the final engagement as senior members of the royal family, final engagement as senior members of the royalfamily, looking final engagement as senior members of the royal family, looking fairly relaxed there as they chatted to choristers on their way out. a moment of history, the last appearance of the duke and duchess of sussex with other members of the royalfamily on of sussex with other members of the royal family on an official engagement. for the time being at least, the palace making it clear
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that they are welcome to rejoin, as far as the queen is concerned. that was it the events at westminster abbey a little earlier. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with nick miller. up up to 100 nanometres of rain and some flooding and destruction. like the others totals mounting through the others totals mounting through the night. it is clearly not the only place, seeming, we are all going to get some of that as it is now pushing east across the uk. while tonight, some of it will clear for some of us, there will be simpler spent developing. not scotland, there will be another early arrangements northern ireland,. again the totals mount. it is but here again in the morning and at the rain will is, but england, northern ireland and sunny spells blustery showers. some
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cloud hanging on toward south wales, with something that with patchy rain, very mild, particularly in eastern england. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: a fourth person in the uk has died from coronavirus, says the health secretary, as the number of cases rises to 319 overall. i entirely understand why people are worried and concerned and we send our condolences to the families. italy‘s prime minister says his country is facing its ‘darkest hour‘ with sixteen million people in quarantine. trading on wall street was temporarily halted immediately after opening today, as us stocks fell sharply, triggering an automatic 15 minute cutout — it‘s now resumed. in fact it closed a moment ago.
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wall street has followed europe and plunged dramatically following big falls in the price of oil. the new york stock exchange suspended trading for fifteen minutes after a main index fell by seven percent soon after opening. our business presenter ben thompson joins us now. it thompsonjoins us now. has been quite a day. it thompsonjoins us now. has been quite a daym looking it has been quite a day. just looking at the numbers and it takes a while for these things to settle but looking at it, the ftse100 down 7.25%. which if my numbers are right, would make it the fifth worse close ever. a real challenge of a day as far as markets are concerned and fora number of day as far as markets are concerned and for a number of reasons and this sort of tells you the story. the stock market in tokyo, that set the
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lead and that was prompted by the price of oilfalling lead and that was prompted by the price of oil falling sharply because ofa price of oil falling sharply because of a big spat between russia and saudi arabia, two of the world‘s biggest oil producers. they said look, given all this worry about coronavirus, let‘s cut production and keep prices high. what russia said is no, we will not play ball. we will keep providing what we do so saudi arabia said they would flood the market with oil. there is so much oil out there it has forced prices down sharply. prices could fall as low as $20 per barrel. that was enough to spook the oil markets but that also investors around the world saying, how non—, what about the wider economies that will feel the wider economies that will feel the fallout of any coronavirus spread? they are worried about productivity, people buying stuff, so that is why the market
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in frankfurt is down 6.8% and it is also translated through two pretty dreadful open on wall street and as you said, at one point trade was suspended because of the automatic locks kicked in to prevent massive losses. so mirror is at the stock exchange for us. she gave us her assessment of that first pretty volatile half hour of so and the new york stock exchange. it is something automatic that happens if there is a 7% drop there is a 15 minute hold on trading. it gives people here a chance to take a breath, to absorb what is happening and reassess. and they didn't have that 15 minute trading stop and then they resumed trading stop and then they resumed trading and then it continued, some of these dramatic falls. it has now levelled out and if i am looking now at the big board, it is down 5.5%, which is better than the big
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drops we saw at the open, almost 2000 points. really never seen something like that before. we have been trading here for over an hour and just the scene and the sense of how tense traders are. there is a lot of activity, a lot of very nervous traders around here. new york with the latest. i just traders around here. new york with the latest. ijust want traders around here. new york with the latest. i just want to show you, the latest. i just want to show you, the ftse 100 the latest. i just want to show you, the ftse100 settling down but these are the biggest fall is on the day and that tells you some of the story. energy firms, bp, centrica, royal dutch shell, all the biggest falls of the day and carnival, the cruise line company, that is one of their real concerns, big falls in terms of travel and energy. and that is one of the problems. just to put this into context for you, a graph to explain where this close focus because some of the biggest closest
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we got were to do with black monday and black tuesday back in the 80s and black tuesday back in the 80s and then in 2008, the collapse of the lehman brothers, markets are falling significantly. big falls there, 8.8% was the fall on the ftse 100 in october 2008 that prompted the global financial crisis but today we are seeing 7.25%. deutsche bank has disbursed some of its trading teams in london as a precaution against coronavirus. that is emergency planning procedure.” had dinner with a colleague who works for a big bag and he said they have been given three options, one is to work from a back—up pub, the other is to work from the office and the other is to work from home. they we re the other is to work from home. they were all drawing straws as to who would work well. the three scenarios that the city is playing out to make sure it is business as usual.” wonder if the
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bbc will take note.” wa nt to wonder if the bbc will take note.” want to work from home. nothing personal. jane has all the sport now. lots of developing news lines for you on the impact coronavirus is having on sport. the match between france and ireland due to take place this weekend in paris has been postponed. italy against england had been put off because of the high numbers of cases and deaths in italy at the moment. one of the reasons the france ireland match has been postponed is the french government made an announcement yesterday that gatherings of more than 1000 people would be banned untilfurther notice. as it stands, the immense match between wales and scotland in cardiff will go ahead but the women‘s match is off because one of the scotland players has tested positive for the virus and seven members of the team in the backroom staff are self isolating. whether
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the women‘s match between france and ireland goes ahead is still to be decided. as you can imagine the situation is fast moving and it was the subject of debate at a meeting earlier between the government, sports governing bodies and broadcasters. they discuss the possibility of holding sporting events in britain behind closed doors. however afterwards, events in britain behind closed doors. howeverafterwards, dcms confirmed they have taken advice of medical experts and there was no need to cancel sporting events and as the government ‘s advice and changes in the next few days. the chief executive of the rugby football union spoke afterwards. there is no medical nationalfor cancelling events or behind closed doors yet but it is a moving situation so we will keep talking. the well scotland game, how confident are you that will go ahead? it looks good. i don't see any reason that will not proceed on the basic message coming out today is let‘s not panic, let‘s monitor
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the situation but carry on. with the england italy game, that is already. in terms of the meetings going on about one that could be rescheduled, what is most likely? we are working on that right now. we are working with six nations and the italian federation, we will find a date that works both teams. one more rugby line to bring you from the six nations and joe marler and courtney lawes have both been cited following saturdays win over wales. joe marler grabbed alun wyn jones inappropriately during the first half. the well is capped and called for action after the match. he has been cited for a dangerous tackle. the pair will appear before a disciplinary hearing in dublin on thursday. the ceremony for the lighting of the olympic flame will take place in greece without any spectators. again because of the impact of the coronavirus. tokyo 2020 have said the travelling delegation with the
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torch relay would be reduced and in america, the decision has been taken to cancel the indian wells tennis tournament in california with organisers saying it was just too big a risk to hold a gathering of this size. many of the players including rafa nadal had right for the event. some only found out on social media. indian wells is such a big tournament it is sometimes referred to as the fifth grand slam. we asked our tennis correspondent what the ramifications would be for the tour. it ifa the tour. it if a decision is taken to cancel a tennis event because of one local case in the area, you would think it would be difficult for any major events to be played in weeks and months to come. it may well be other events months to come. it may well be other eve nts ta ke months to come. it may well be other events take a slightly different view. if we look ahead to miami, that takes place in florida, there are already three confirmed cases of the coronavirus the and a big music festival in march has been
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called off. steve simon the wta chief executive says it is too early to speculate about events to come but aftermiami, speculate about events to come but after miami, the tour moves on to europe come onto the clay court season and big events are scheduled there in monte carlo, madrid and rome. i think there have to be serious question marks as to whether tennis can put together a calendar over the weeks and months to come. and the champions league match between paris sayjermaine and rashad dortmund will take place behind closed doors. no fans attend the last 16 leg because of concerns about the outbreak. the french government with that order. dortmund lead the tie to — one. if you want any more updates on postponements or managements being played behind closed doors, more details on the website.
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now on afternoon live let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let‘s go to in salford where we have north west tonight‘s rogerjohnson, talking about the death of man with covid19 in north manchester hospital last night. and look east‘s stewart white in norwich who is talking about how a local school is responding to the coronavirus outbreak. roger, what do we know about this man who has died there? he was the third person to die in the uk from coronavirus. he died in the north manchester general hospital. a man in his 60s. a man who had several underlying health problems, that phrase we keep hearing, underlying health issues so it wasn‘tjust covid-19 health issues so it wasn‘tjust covid—19 making him poorly. there is a special separate unit in the north manchester general hospital for dealing with infectious illnesses.
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we know of the four national ones, two in london, one in newcastle and one in liverpool and they are starting to fill up and local centres a re starting to fill up and local centres are starting to be brought on as increasing numbers test positive, and that is why north manchester general has been brought into play. the man was taken there specifically because he had coronavirus, he wasn‘t a member of the hospital population being treated for something else, he was taken there specifically because of that. the hospital says therefore there is no risk whatsoever to staff, other patients, relatives or visitors. it remains open as normal, all services and appointments are carrying on. patients should attend their appointments normally and people who are visiting are free to do so and can come and visit their relatives in there. this man was in the special unit, but the number of cases certainly here as in other areas slowly starting to go up. we had an example of someone who had to go home because a of theirfamily
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being tested. lots of workplaces will be having this conversation now, what happens? we have been speaking to a senior boss from public health england in the north west. he told us what the protocol is. what will happen is that the team here will follow them up, and they will get in contact with the places at risk and try and assess everyone at fault. if you haven't heard from us, we will slowly work through this process. we are dealing with a very large number of suspected cases. the confirmed cases are a very small proportion of those, so actually most people are worried about coming into contact with a suspected case, we are focusing on the confirmed cases. we have been breaking news of a fourth death in wolverhampton but in the north—west, cases rose sharply over the wrekin. they have edged up
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slightly today. —— we can. for more confirmed in the last 24 hours. it isa confirmed in the last 24 hours. it is a slight increase. 319 as you have been reporting across the uk, so just over have been reporting across the uk, sojust over 10% of have been reporting across the uk, so just over 10% of them in this pa rt so just over 10% of them in this part of the country but still very much containment rather than delay. we have seen shots of shelves in supermarkets being cleared out, collea g u es supermarkets being cleared out, colleagues have seen that here, people clearing out toilet rolls. and yet the advice coming back loud and clear time and yet the advice coming back loud and cleartime and and yet the advice coming back loud and clear time and time again, there is no need for panic buying. indeed. roger, thank you. north west tonight at 6:30 p:m.. stewart, you have to feel for school heads, they had to balance education and children‘s safety. it is a big problem for them as well. i have been to one high school about ten miles away from norwich and talk to the head teacher
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there. they have had some people go on their school trips, they have had people go to italy and come back and those people have had to self—isolate. one child went up to the head teacher and said, are you going to take those two weeks of my summer going to take those two weeks of my summer holiday? the head teacher said, you never know. the problem is that he has had to cancel this week some trips to eurodisney because of fears over that and that is causing a lot of problems, and the head teacher was telling me today about his priorities. first of all his priority is the safety of the children but also of the wider community. this is what he had to say. particularly when you have a national event such as this happening, you understand what a privilege it is i think it is to do the job and with that privilege comes a great degree of responsibility to the local community. when i am considering a course of action, i had to
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take into account a whole variety of views and there is a huge spectrum of views, of both challenge and support from the local community. i will make a decision in the best interest of the children here within our school but also be mindful for example with the visits, be mindful of children going abroad, could they come back infected with this particular virus and the impact that could have on their families and the wider community. what about the wider community. what about the wider community in the east? the thing is actually when you listen to roger talking about what is happening in manchester, down here we have had no cases confirmed in norfolk, none in suffolk and two or three in essex. we had a new one today confirmed in essex, a grandfather who had been to his grandson‘s vocal score, talk to some teachers and other people. he has been confirmed positive now and the head teacher there and other teachers and other people who came
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into co nta ct teachers and other people who came into contact with, have been sent home to self—isolate. but at the moment, this part of the country is fairly safe but of course that will change i‘m sure over the next weeks and days. is it your main story tonight? the main story is the one from westcliff in essex, all of those cases are in essex. we have had one in harlow. two scored only three miles apart and we‘ll be talking to the person in charge of health in essex life tonight. look is, 6:30pm on bbc one. thank you both very much. if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can access them via the bbc iplayer and a reminder, we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm here on afternoon live. more on the coronavirus outbreak.
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the head of the world health organization has said there is a real threat of a pandemic. it is certainly troubling that so many people and countries have been affected so quickly. now that the virus has a foothold in so many countries, the threat of a pandemic has become very real. but it would be the first pandemic in history that could be controlled. the bottom line is, we are not at the mercy of the virus. the head of the world health organization. the ftse100, shows in london closed today down 7.796, shows in london closed today down 7.7%, its shows in london closed today down 7. 7%, its lowest level shows in london closed today down 7.7%, its lowest level in almost four years in 7.7%, its lowest level in almost fouryears ina 7.7%, its lowest level in almost four years in a biggest fall since the financial crisis
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in 2008. and also, looking at what is happening in europe, just hearing that the coronavirus death toll in lombardi has climbed to 333 from 267 the day before. that is the death toll in lombardi, climbing to 333 from 267 the day before. just to let you know, we are awaiting a news conference in downing street. we will take you to that schedule at any moment now. just to let you know, deutsche bank also has dispersed some of its trading and infrastructure teams in london across different locations. that is asa across different locations. that is as a precaution against the spread of coronavirus. it is among the bank‘s main offices, disaster recovery site has been opened while
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some staff may be working from home. that is the latest from the bank. a number of banks carrying out similar action as well. and also as i was reporting earlier, the us trading was halted in the opening hours, in the first ten minutes of opening earlier today but falls across the world on markets. we will go to downing street when that news conference gets under way. the trial has opened in the netherlands of three russians and a ukrainian who‘ve been charged with the murder of the passengers and crew of flight mh 17, the malaysian airlines jet shot down over ukraine in 2014. anna holligan reports. borisjohnson boris johnson taken to borisjohnson taken to the podium. good afternoon. this morning i chaired a meeting of
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the government‘s cobra emergency committee on the coronavirus outbreak. the first ministers of scotla nd outbreak. the first ministers of scotland and wales and the first minister and deputy minister of northern ireland also attended and we agreed to continue to work closely in the weeks and months ahead. we received a detailed briefing from the chief medical officer and the chief scientific adviser. my gratitude to both chris and patrick. there have been four deaths due to coronavirus in the uk and our deepest sympathies are with their friends and our deepest sympathies are with theirfriends and and our deepest sympathies are with their friends and families. our action plan as you know sets out four macro faces of our approach to attacking the virus, contain, delay, research and mitigate. we remain in the contain phase of the outbreak but watching what is happening around the world, our scientists think containment is extremely unlikely to work on its own
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and that is why we are making extensive preparations for a move to the delay face. we are preparing various actions to slow the spread of this disease in order to reduce the strain it places on the nhs. the more we can delay the peak of the spread to the summer, the better the nhs will be able to manage. patrick and chris will give you some more detailed information on the latest advice we are giving the public today, and how we expect that advice today, and how we expect that advice to change as the outbreak develops. as things stand i‘m afraid it bears repeating that the best thing we can all do is wash our hands for 20 seconds with soap and water. we will also take questions because i know there are lots of things the public wa nt to there are lots of things the public want to hear from there are lots of things the public want to hearfrom our advice is about. but before that, i want to stress the following things. first, we are doing everything we can
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to combat this outbreak based on the very latest scientific and medical advice. second, we have a truly brilliant nhs where staff have responded with all the determination, compassion and skill that makes their service so revered across the world. they will continue to have disc government‘s full support, my support, in tackling this virus on the front nine. third, we will set out further steps in the days and weeks ahead to help people protect themselves, their family and in particular the elderly and vulnerable. finally, while it is absolutely critical in managing the spread of this virus that we take the right decisions at the right time based on the latest and best evidence, so we mustn‘t do
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things which have no or limited medical benefits, nor things which could turn out actually to be counter—productive. there is no hiding from the fact that the coronavirus outbreak were present significant challenges for the uk, just as it does in other countries. but if we continue to look out for one another, to pull together in a united and national effort, i have no doubt that we can and will rise to that challenge. and i‘m now going to that challenge. and i‘m now going to ask patrick and then chris to give their own perspective on where we are. patrick, overto give their own perspective on where we are. patrick, over to you. numbers are increasing and they are increasing across europe and the uk and that increase in numbers is consistent with the fact there is transmission of this within the community. the number that
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is important is the number in intensive ca re important is the number in intensive care which shows there are those that have had it and have come come into contact with seriously ill patients. we know there is community transmission. in terms of the things that could be done to try and suppress the number of people that get this at the peak, push the peak into the summer, and also to protect those that are the most vulnerable in society, we need to understand where we are in the epidemic and make sure that we take the actions that need to be taken at the right time, and those possible actions are laid out in the plan. they have all been modelled and there are others that were looked at that were less affected than the ones in the plan as well. they have all been modelled and we get together and review those numbers through sage, looking at the numbers through sage, looking at the numbers ona numbers through sage, looking at the numbers on a daily basis with groups of mathematical modellers,
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people who understand disease epidemics, clinicians, biologists, other types of scientists with expertise across a range of disciplines. those different options than can be modelled to give a certain percentage effect on both the peak and the numberof percentage effect on both the peak and the number of potential deaths and the number of potential deaths and the numberof and the number of potential deaths and the number of potentially very ill people. it is important that no single intervention on its own is enough to make the difference, you have to do things in combination and you have to do them at the right time. do it too early, you end up with the measures not having any effect, so for example, if you asked everybody with a mild sniffle at the moment to go into isolation, you get a lot of people who haven't got coronavirus, they have some other illness. in due course that will change so that we need to get the measures at the right time so they can be implemented properly and people can adhere to them and it is sensible to make the difference we
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are looking for. those combinations we will look at and trigger at the right time in the right combinations to make sure we have the effect that we are looking for. and that approach of being very driven by the data and by the science is exactly why some of the measures we are taking may look different from some of the decisions that others have made with the outbreak they have in their country which might be progressing at a different stage. that is what we're trying to do and chris will say more about the details of where we are of now. in addition to what patrick has just said, it is important to remember that both the nhs and public health professionals are already doing a large numberof professionals are already doing a large number of things and those are steadily changing as this epidemic goes on. so we started off very heavily concentrating on geographical issues, looking at fevers and other symptoms in people who had come from areas with the outbreak had begun and then how it is seeded out, including most
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re ce ntly is seeded out, including most recently to italy. but as time is going on, for the recently to italy. but as time is going on, forthe nhs, for our public health colleagues, we are moving more and more to looking at people who have never left the uk, to check that they might have coronavirus and if they do, that they can be treated and isolated properly and the key at this stage remains to find early cases, to isolate them and where appropriate to follow their contacts. we will be making one additional change on the health side tomorrow. at the moment of your screen everybody in intensive care for coronavirus if they have symptoms that are compatible with coronavirus, so if they have a bad pneumonia, and we will be extending that out now to everybody who has a significant enough pneumonia or other respiratory tract infection to get into hospital at all. that is a medical advance. but i think what we are moving now to is a phase when we will be having to ask members of the public to do different things
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than they would normally do. but i would repeat the point that the prime ministerand repeat the point that the prime minister and patrick have just said, it is important on this, it is not just a matter of what you do, it is also a matter of when you do it because anything we do we have got to be able to sustain. once we have started these things you will have to continue them through the peak and that is for a period of time and there is a risk we go too early, people will understandably get fatigued and it will be difficult to sustain this over time. getting the timing right is absolutely critical to making this work. at the moment, the things we are doing which are appropriate are also appropriate for the very small number of coronavirus cases we have in the uk, those would include washing your hands with soap and water, covering your mouth when you cough or sneeze and
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disposing of tissues, as everybody

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