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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 9, 2020 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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by this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. uk police step up checks ahead of the easter weekend as the government says it's too early to lift the lockdown. let us not undo the gains we have made and waste the sacrifices we have made. we mustn't give the coronavirus a second chance to kill more people and to hurt our country. he also said the prime minister remains in intensive care, and continues to make positive steps forward. in the united states, another 6.6 million workers have filed for unemployment in the past week — 1 in 10 have now been laid off. meanwhile there are warnings that the uk economy could shrink by around 1a % between now and june. and, concerns for the eu,
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as the italian pm warns it could fail as a project unless the leaders better co—ordinate their response to the pandemic. and no safer place than space — the mission not even coronavirus could stop. hello and welcome to audiences in the uk and around the world. we're covering all the latest coronavirus developments here in britain and globally. the british government confirmed that lockdown measures would remain in place. dominic raab said this is not the time to relax the rules. the number of people that died from coronavirus in the uk in the past 2a
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hours at 881. that brings the total number of reported deaths in the uk due to coronavirus to almost 8000. the uk foreign secretary added that it is too early to lift the lockdown restrictions, saying that the uk has not yet reached the peak of the virus. he also gave an update on the health of the british prime minister, who remains in intensive ca re minister, who remains in intensive care where he is being treated for coronavirus. dominic raab said that borisjohnson is coronavirus. dominic raab said that boris johnson is making coronavirus. dominic raab said that borisjohnson is making a positive steps forward since being admitted to hospital on sunday evening and remains in good spirits. around the world, the number of confirmed coronavirus cases has now passed 1.5 million, that is according to a tally by the johns million, that is according to a tally by thejohns hopkins university and that is having a knock—on effect. the us has seen the sharpest ever rising unemployment, the northern 6.5 million new claims made in the past week. that takes the number of jobs lost made in the past week. that takes the number ofjobs lost in the last three weeks to more than 50 million. italy's prime minister has warned that the european union it needs to rise to the challenge of what he
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calls the biggest test since the second world war. 0ur calls the biggest test since the second world war. our first report comes from our health editor, hugh pym. it was just so dreadful that no one was able to visit him for three weeks and furthermore no one was able to be with him during his final hours and minutes. emily remembers her grandfather tony, who died yesterday. he had gone into hospital with another health issue, and then contracted covid—19. she told me visitors weren't allowed because of the virus risk, but she's reassured to know two nurses were with him in his final hours. for me and my relatives, it is really comforting, just a picture of those two amazing people at his bedside comforting him and saying all the right things at the right time, and we'll forever be in their debt. we are just so grateful for everything they did. i raised the issue at the downing street media briefing today. we've heard some harrowing stories of people dying alone
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because family can't be with them, for understandable reasons to do with the virus risk. what do you say to the british public about how things will develop from here? the key thing is for people to understand how much of what they've already done has helped contribute to avoiding an even worse situation in terms of the spread of the virus and the number of deaths, and how important it is that we don't slow up or take pressure off at this critical moment before we've come through the peak. in general, i'd expect the deaths to continue to keep going up for about two weeks after the intensive care picture improves, and so we're not there yet in terms of knowing exactly when that will be, but that's the sort of timeframe i'd expect. the latest analysis of data in england and wales suggests that death rates go up with age in both men and women, but men are ahead of women in all age groups. alex died in hospital with the coronavirus ten days ago. none of his family
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could be with him. but staff did set up a video call, and his son said that made all the difference. it felt like we were together. it was really rich, it was really real. he was weak. but we also connected as a family, so often there'd be three or four of us on the telephone, a group video call, and we could speak with each other, comfort each other, make plans. we felt together, which is... i've not been explained that before. this is what patients will be aware around them — staff like these in papworth hospital in masks, visors and gowns. it's confusing and communication is difficult. that's tough for doctors and nurses as well as those who they care for. dr rachel clarke, who specialises in end—of—life care, says it can be an emotional drain. sometimes at the end of the day, you know, you take off your gown and mask, and you just cry your eyes out in the car on the way home, because you've seen things you don't want to see, but at the same time you've tried your utmost to be
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there at a time when perhaps a loved one, a son or daughter or spouse, can't be there, and you are literally all the patient has and with every fibre of your being all you want to do is support that patient. the upward trend in deaths appears to be slowing. but whatever the statistics say, there are life and death issues for thousands of families to confront every day, in every part of the country. hugh pym, bbc news. jessica, you are watching the briefing, where do you think the discussion on when and whether restrictions can be eased? there is a lot of focus on that and the government is repeatedly being questioned on when the lockdown might be lifted, i think there is a clear reluctance from downing street
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to do anything that hints towards any kind of specific date because they seem to really want the focus to be on getting people to keep sticking to those guidelines in order to help flatten that curve in terms of the transmission of coronavirus. dominic raab, the first secretary of state in today's press conference saying, we are not done yet, we must keep going, we must stick to the plan. that was pretty specific and clear direction from dominic raab. that is the immediate concern over the easter bank holiday weekend, concerns that people will be tempted in the good weather to venture out, go to the countryside, i think the government are very keen to discourage people strongly from doing that, i think that is an immediate concern. dominic raab in terms of when we might hear whether the lockdown will be extended, we have had strong, pretty explicit hints from the scottish government and the welsh government that they think it will carry on. dominic raab saying that the government needs to look at the scientific data next
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week before it makes the call, we 110w week before it makes the call, we now expect an announcement was the end of next week. just to bring you a bit of other news, dominic raab, obviously deputising for boris johnson whilst the prime minister is in hospital with coronavirus, as we know, dominic raab has had a cross— party know, dominic raab has had a cross—party call, downing street has said that that call has taken place that evening, also on the call, chris whitty and sir patrick balance, statement saying throughout this crisis we have worked constructively across the political spectrum, the call was constructive, the party leaders spent their best wishes to the prime minister. the leader of the snp and the leader of the labour party, the acting leader of the liberal democrats and several others, i understand from sources, others, i understand from sources, other people who are not call, other issues were discussed such as the
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issues were discussed such as the issues regarding distributing personal protective equipment to some people on the front line, specifically those working in care and also concerns that, as i mentioned before, people could be tempted to venture out to their second homes in the countryside, those indeed that have them, and whether the police need more powers 01’ whether the police need more powers or the ability to find more people in order to stop that from happening because it is clearly against the guidance when it comes to unnecessary travel. thank you very much for that. ppe is still an issue here in the uk as it is in other countries and we will speak to an italian doctor shortly. the coronavirus pandemic will cause the worst economic fallout since the great depression almost a century ago — that's the warning from the head of the international monetary fund. it comes as a bbc survey of leading economists suggests the uk economy could shrink by 14% between now and june. 0ur economics editor, faisal islam reports.
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this is what trying to keep the wheels of industry during a global pandemic looks like. a production line that is socially distanced at the same time as keeping this british export classic, the brompton foldable bike, being made. cycling is one of the industries where demand should eventually shoot up, but even here and in the british economy generally, you can't escape the thumping impact of coronavirus and the shutdowns needed to slow its speed. in no time at all, it hit europe, so suddenly europejust drops down, 30% of our sales potential just went overnight and then it started hitting our supply in the uk, lockdown in the uk, and then we had our staff, our ability to sell, our supply chain, the whole lot, knocked for six. the first thing is protect cash. cash, cash, cash. and what goes here, goes for the entire economy. the immediate hit inescapable and beyond imagination. the bbc has surveyed all the top independent economists, used by the treasury to
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calculate estimates of the initial hits to the economy. from april to june, the numbers are incredible. have a look at the last ten years. outside of the 2008 financial crisis, the economy has grown and sometimes fallen by 0.3%. the next quarter, the fall anticipated by these economists on average is over 14%. that ranges from a minimum forecast of down 7.5%, extraordinary enough, to as much as 24%, a temporary loss of a quarter of the economy. there is no precedent for such moves. the only precedent for moves of this size and speed is what has happened a century ago at the start of the 1920s depression. the treasury has been doing its own analysis of the hits to the economy from the virus and from the shutdown. my understanding is that it is in line with the bottom end of the range, extraordinary numbers in terms of decline of the economy in this quarter and the great hope
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would be that companies such as this can be part of a rapid rebound, but that is far from certain. the impact right now being felt up and down the country. i was recently made unemployed and have spent today looking forjobs. matt, an it worker and father of three has computer skills ordinarily in high demand. i've been let go from myjob, we have some reserves but they are getting rapidly depleted so we don't know what we are going to be able to do after the next couple of weeks. and you have three boys? yes, that is correct. how are they taking it? they are not taking it too well, they don't understand what is going on with the potential that we might have to move house, and we are having to really cut back. the rest of the industrial estate remains eerily idle under a lockdown, necessary to protect lives and the nhs, but for which the impact on the economy is onlyjust been revealed.
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faisal islam, bbc news. and not just here and notjust here in the uk, the epidemic is having a profound effect on the united states, we have had some new figures today in the past week, another 6.6 million americans have found new claims for a name appointment benefits of the epidemic ta kes appointment benefits of the epidemic takes hold. it brings a total of the people who have lost theirjobs in the past three weeks to 16 million, equal to 10% of the country's workforce. the extraordinary thing when you look at those figures, those total figures, is that that might not even be the true picture, it may be more than that. that is right, it may actually be more because of just how right, it may actually be more because ofjust how many people are calling on employment offices right across the country, these systems are being overloaded, they normally get 500 to 800,000 calls in a single week, now they are getting millions
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of phone calls and as a result, these systems are being overloaded and people are not actually getting the money that they want, they haven't been able to successfully file for unemployment insurance but the number that was released today was absolutely staggering, another 6.6 million americans filed for unemployment in a single week and that brings the total of people that have filed for unemployment insurance in the united statesjust in the last three weeks to more than 16 million people. that is extraordinary. the fed has weighed in today, what support are they offering? the central bank is trying to help the us economy and this time it is pumping $2.3 trillion into the us economy and what they want that money to go to is for loans to small businesses and households and when we talk about small businesses, yes we talk about small businesses, yes we have heard that congress has
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approved a massive stimulus plan that would go to help some very small businesses, but these are more medium—size businesses that cannot get that money that congress has approved but are still in need, so they may employ some 10,000 people and the idea there is that they don't want to see more people start claiming for unemployment insurance because these systems are overloaded. so, by giving these businesses loans, these businesses can therefore keep their employees on the payroll. thank you very much for that update. all of us watching around the world will know the importance of social distancing but the uk's chief scientific adviser says it is working and it will prevent deaths. spain, france and italy are a month or more into their locked out the restrictions in those countries will continue, who knows how long, our science editor looks at what the government will have to ta ke at what the government will have to take into account here in the uk before easing the lockdown
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here. around the world there are many different ideas for fighting the virus. in the czech republic, they are relying on disinfectant and a lockdown, and the government there reckons the outbreak is now sufficiently under control to allow more shops to open. in denmark, schools and daycare centres have been told that they can start reopening. but many other countries believe it is still far too early to relax any of the restrictions. the very first step is reducing the number of deaths. that's the whole point of any lockdown. so what does this mean for the uk? well, the strictest measures like closing nonessential shops happened on march the 23rd. and the hope is that by the middle of this month the numbers of deaths from covid—19 will start to fall. but even in the best case scenario it won't be until late may or even earlyjune that there is a really dramatic fall in the numbers dying
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down to really low levels. so lifting the lockdown is not going to happen quickly. and this evening the government's chief scientific adviser explained why the measures have to continue. the social distancing we are doing is breaking transmission. we are going to come out of that report because we are getting breaking news about the condition of the prime list i'm reading here that he has come out of intensive care, he will receive close monitoring during the early phase of his recovery, he went into hospital at the weekend, so this would have been his fourth night in intensive care, i think we can go back tojessica parker who is just sitting in, so breaking news about the condition of the prime minister, good news because of you think back to the weekend, the place that the country was in, there was a very grim mood here about the
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condition of the prime minister. yes, we knew that the prime list had been suffering with coronavirus symptoms what were repeatedly described as mild, specifically a temperature of over a week, he was in self isolation in downing street and then on sunday evening of course, it emerged that he had gone to hospital. as we were told a precautionary measure because of the persistence of those symptoms. then, on monday night, it emerged that he had been moved to an intensive care unit. he wasn't put on a ventilator but he was getting what was described as standard oxygen treatment. that situation carried on through the last few days but as you say, we have literallyjust had a statement from downing street. i know you've been looking at it but it is worth repeating, number ten spokesman saying the prime list has been moved this evening from intensive care back to the ward where he will receive close monitoring during the early phase of his recovery. he is in extremely
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good spirits. i don't think we expect to hear more news from downing street on the prime minister's condition, i think that approaches they have been wanting to give updates where necessary, not necessarily a running commentary on the prime minister's health but clearly, positive news this evening for the prime minister, for boris johnson, after that stay in intensive care, his recovery clearly going to continue though over a number of days, it will be up to his medical team of course to advise on that, meanwhile dominic rav, foreign secretary and first secretary of state, continuing to deputise for the prime minister. very good news and i'm sure he has the warm wishes of every and in the country and beyond. dominic raab said today he hadn't actually spoken to him since saturday so there has been no direct communication between the first secretary in the prime minister and what did they say, for every day that he had been in intensive care, it is properly a week of recovery so the current setup, you would imagine politically is going to be in place
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for some time to come. politically is going to be in place for some time to comelj politically is going to be in place for some time to come. i think it is early to speculate in terms of how long the situation will last and of course, it will be, as i say, up to the prime minister's medical team to decide what his recovery period should be and when he should start working. we have been told from downing street since the prime minister was moved into intensive ca re minister was moved into intensive care was that he had not been working as of monday, before that move when he was on a st thomas hospital. we were told he was still receiving his red box, the ministerial box of important government documents in there, that situation of course changed when his condition worsened, but for now the expectation will be that dominic rav continues to deputise for the prime minister. he has been chairing those morning meetings, that happen every morning meetings, that happen every morning and of course he chaired a cobra meeting today and tonight hosted a cross—party call with opposition leaders from across westminster, something the prime
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minister had originally initiated so i think is positive news tonight, clearly it doesn't mean that boris johnson is back in number ten. for now, he is still recovering, i think thatis now, he is still recovering, i think that is clear from the statement here. 0k, that is clear from the statement here. ok, that is good news. so, if you are just here. ok, that is good news. so, if you arejustjoining us, boris johnson is out of intensive care and it is clearly still a long road ahead for him. in the uk, dominic raab has insisted the uk must keep going with the lockdown measures. he said the peak of the outbreak had not yet been reached and more data is being gathered on the impact of social distancing. scotland and wales said that there is no likelihood of the restrictions being lifted soon and nicola sturgeon said there may be talk next week of an exit strategy.
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we have just had that breaking news about the prime minister and i know you are very close to him, maybe would like to comment on that.|j think would like to comment on that.” think you covered it clearly, eve ryo ne think you covered it clearly, everyone will be delighted, it is good news, good news naturally for him, for his family, one wishes him a speedy recovery, hope they will ta ke a speedy recovery, hope they will take it easy but it is good news for the country, i think it will lift sentiment slightly. do you think is the sort of money will take it easy 01’ the sort of money will take it easy or will want to get back to it straightaway? i think he will be under strong, clear, doctor's straightaway? i think he will be understrong, clear, doctor's order to ta ke understrong, clear, doctor's order to take it easy. i think dominic raabis to take it easy. i think dominic raab is a good substitute if one can call them that so i think the biggest challenge now will be to make sure the prime minister does actually take his time before he steps back into the heavy workloads that he was doing before he became ill. let us turn to the job in hand, discussion about when the lockdown is lifted and what it might look like, natasha let me come to you.
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maybe i should state the obvious that, so long as we don't have a vaccine it can't be business as usual? that is what most experts are saying, we won't be able to go back to normal until we have an effective vaccine. there may be some period where we can ease restrictions and we are already starting to see some countries like the ones mentioned in the piece, like the czech republic, austria, denmark, who were making some moves to ease restrictions to open up some businesses, even spain has said they might allow people to ta ke has said they might allow people to take walks, in the past, they hadn't even been able to do much of anything, they are hoping by easing some of these restrictions they can get people back working into the economy. even italy has a more controversial plan though it may not go into effect where they may be giving people an immune certificate, to prove that they have had the virus and that they can get these people back into the workforce. but, if they decide to go forward with these types of plans and then there
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is another reinfection rate, which is another reinfection rate, which is what happened with the spanish flu, the reinfection rate was actually really devastating, countries will have to go into lockdown again but what they are hoping they can do is reduce the transmission rate to such a level that they can do better at testing and tracing, so that if they can do that, they can start to isolate these cases and some of the more successful countries have been really good at over testing to the point where the actual rate of infection was quite low, then they isolated these cases and then they communicated very clearly with their public who had these cases, and who needed to go into lockdown. they added to that, temperature test when you enter public buildings and wearing face masks when you are out and about. there are things countries can do to be able to deal with is more effectively but it does require a great level of cooperation from the public and high levels of state capacity. and you have advocated, i know you have looked at this, sort of traffic light system
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where you sort of scale it up and down. well, i have done some detailed work with... and clearly the lockdown is working, here in the uk the lockdown will likely have to stay in place for the rest of this month but the key thing is that it is not a clash between medics versus economics, what we need to have in the locking of the economy is both a medical and scientific analysis working with the economic and behavioural analysis. so clearly when we have had medical triggers, debtor peaks, infection rates are down... the infection when one person gives the disease to another is well below one, may be the estimate is around 0.300.4, then you can estimate is around 0.300.4, then you ca n start estimate is around 0.300.4, then you can start unlocking the economy. and unlocking the country, that is good for the economy, but then you need to do it in for the economy, but then you need to do itina for the economy, but then you need to do it in a gradual and predictable way. we have designated a red, amber, green process so that
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people know what is expected, a sense of direction and the important thing is. i will have to jump in there generally are out of time. do stay with us on bbc news. hello, the warmest day of the year so far in the uk, cardiff had a high of 20 .5 celsius, the warmest day of the year survivor wales, it has being colder and cloudier with wind of the north sea for northern england and scotland. 0vernight, it pushes its way northwards bringing patchy normal rain to northern ireland and scotland. breaks in the cloud across scotla nd scotland. breaks in the cloud across scotland and northern england and northern ireland, clear sky the further south and west er across england and wales, temperatures for many not much lower than seven or eight celsius, five or six celsius.
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the good friday, across much of the uk it is dry and mostly sunny but heavy showers across the finals of england, scotland, later in the day across the west of ireland. very warm across. . . across the west of ireland. very warm across... are much warmer day for north—east england and eastern scotla nd for north—east england and eastern scotland with a bit more sunshine and change in wind direction. 0n saturday, little change for england and wales, more sunshine, more warmth, that of clow developing over northern ireland, northern and western scotland, patchy rain across the western isles. starting to turn cooler across scotland, northern ireland and northern england, still that one continuing across much of england and wales, temperatures up to 26 celsius for south—east england on saturday afternoon but through easter sunday, changes are afoot, an atla ntic easter sunday, changes are afoot, an atlantic system pushing in from the west, likely to generate showers on easter sunday, this time across england and wales, such as the nature showers, not everyone will see them but they could bring quite a bit of rain in a short amount of
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time and we do get in. try a bit cloudy and windy for scotland and northern ireland and northern england, certainly technical here, still a bit of warmth, sunshine in east anglia and south—east england where they mist the showers. area of high pressure building from the north—west but notice what it does to the isobars, real squeeze on the isobars so some stronger winds developing on easter monday, we lose the warmer air we have been seeing recently and replace it with something much colder across the uk something much colder across the uk so initially some outbreaks of rain across the far south of england on easter monday, that were clear, dave sunny spells, variable cloud but feeling much colder especially in the win.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. borisjohnson is boris johnson is out borisjohnson is out of intensive care. uk police step up checks ahead of the easter weekend as the government says it's too early to lift the lockdown. in the united states, another 6.6 million workers have filed for unemployment in the past week. 1in10 have now been laid off. meanwhile, there are warnings that the uk economy could shrink by around 14% between now and june. and concerns for the eu as the italian pm warns it could fail as a project unless the leaders better co—ordinate their response to the pandemic. and no safer place than space — the mission not evencoronavirus could stop.
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hello and welcome to audiences in the uk and around the world. we're covering all the latest coronavirus developments here in britain and globally. let us look at the hardships for front line health care workers. the shortage in hospitals of ppe, including facemasks and clothing. it is often the only line of defence failed workers against contracting the disease from the patients that they are treating. we will speak to an anaesthetist and intensive care doctor working in southern italy and it is very good to have you with a
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doctor, and a day where we have had some grim news from italy, i... for more doctors and surgeons have died which takes the toll to 100. yes, sadly that is correct. let me say that the data we have now it is more or less ten or 11% of health care providers that are infected with coronavirus, from what we know, because these percentages is calculating around what positive cases we do know so it is probably higher. dreadful news for people on the front line, why do you think thatis the front line, why do you think that is happening, is it down to the quality of the ppe they are wearing or is ita quality of the ppe they are wearing or is it a general shortage? is a larger problem, there is shortage because we have been overwhelmed by the number of doctors involved in all of this, i don't have data, i
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can't say that this matter of quality of ppe, there a shortage so we need to use what we have but there also a matter of... power heavy to take care of patients, it was really something strange for most of us, we are used to working with our surgical masks or whatever and suddenly we were suddenly projected inside a horror movie where we need to wear these kind of ppe and most of us are not familiar with that. so a certain number of infections might depend on certain use of ppe, certainly in the doffing phase, because if you don't follow precise rules, there is a high risk of getting infected. so, the diffusion of infection here in italy, it is easy to happen,
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especially if you're working on the front. that is an important point that you made there. i know you are sharing best practice with other doctors and hospitals around europe but the process of taking of the equipment, because that is the moment when you face the highest risk, could you explain that to us? basically, there are some rules about this so that taking on taking off should follow a process, you have to follow a precise sequence when you wear this ppe and the reverse sequence when you when you wear this ppe and the reverse sequence when you take them off. you can cross check and double check with your colleague, you can work six hours, maybe eight hours, maybe more, because we try to resist as long as we can because of shortage of ppe and when you get out, believe me, you can't wait to remove your mask and breathe some
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fresh air because if it is perfectly working ppe, you feel a shortage of air. so, when you move them...” just had another question and i am running out of time but i'm keen to ask you as much as i can, one final question, is there a problem that you all send ppe to the north where the pandemic was centred in the early stages and now you have a problem in the south where the virus is spreading in you don't have the best equipment, is that part of the problem is your no, the pandemic exploded in the north. so early consumption of the ppe, but the shortage is around europe everywhere because they were consumed and not produce enough. probably in the south, i can't say that everyone in the south was experiencing trouble
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with ppe, people are trying to do their best, i am more than keen to think that we are trying to do our best right now, i can't say... we need too many and i think that it was much more than the production could predict. i am absolutely certain you are doing our best, thank you very much for coming on the programme and sparing some time and stay safe. there has been a spike of deaths in the care homes. these figures are not included in the daily figures reported which only reports on the deaths in hospitals after testing positive. 0ur social affairs correspondent has been taking a look. the staff at this care home,
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deeply distressing fight as they try to protect the old and disabled people are careful. the staff have been working very hard to shield residents themselves and their own families while continuing to provide the care and support needed by our residents. we have been applying additional precautions as far as we are able to do so. we send our condolences to family and friends at this very sad time. many cares that the only vital role they are playing is being largely overlooked. in care homes like this one, the vulnerability of the residents means they are on the of dealing with the coronavirus, but for weeks now, up and down the country to have been asking for more personal protective equipment and protesting. the sheffield nursing home is one of three run by the same ca re home is one of three run by the same care provider. i visited them in the past to talk about the staffing and funding pressures already faced by
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the care sector. now across the homes they have had six residents die and 30 people are showing symptoms. we need support, the ppe, additional and extra funding to pay staff more, at the minute it is so challenging. we are reacting daily to more problems. this 90-year-old isa to more problems. this 90-year-old is a resident at one of the homes. her son says no one on the corridor has the virus, but he is worried. what are they doing to protect these people? it seems to me the care homes are at the bottom of the pile again. basically, we will end up with these care homes being used as hospices. both councils and those representing care providers say... say getting the right equipment per sta b say getting the right equipment per stab me to be a higher priority. we need greater recognition from the
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syste m need greater recognition from the system there is a real need to see testing coming through, and that social care is not forgotten. the government says it is distributing more protective equipment and stepping up testing. uk police step up checks ahead of the easter weekend these signs are clear but not eve ryo ne these signs are clear but not everyone is getting the message. this pc was guarding one of the road routes into the lake district today. there is a need to do so. what i'm doing is using the policeman knows, if you like and if a car is coming in past me with more than one person
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and and they are from out of county, they will get stopped. a car with a canoe on the roof then dress pass. andy runs a registration check. —— drives past. he later tweeted a picture of the stop. two men from more than 80 miles away or order do a u—turn and go home. in nearby bowness, police were checking with bed & breakfasts. hill we booked and close to the end ofjune. air b&b announced today they are stopping all uk bookings for non—key workers for at least the next ten days. but search online for somewhere in the la kes search online for somewhere in the lakes and you can still find... search online for somewhere in the lakes and you can still find. .. it is frustrating. all accommodation providers must block out, but on
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their side and on sites as well. it is important we don't give the impression we are open for visitors. this is why people want to come here. i can't tell you how cripplingly difficult it is for me to say to people to stay away from the national park, when i was spent 12 years in the shop encouraging people to come here. but right now it is important that we concentrate on fighting this virus and people don't visit the national park but there are stay at home. away from there are stay at home. away from the terra site cumbria's terra centres are being turned into makeshift hospitals. checks are taking place nationwide. the home secretary says these comments from one chief constable go too far. we have a minority who are quite blatantly flouting the law and
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it is to those people that i'm saying enough is enough and we are going to come looking for you and if necessary we will arrest you. police are also warning people not to take the law into their own hands. that is after a district nurse staying in a holiday home a few miles from here woke up this morning to find all her car tyres had been slashed. she is not a terrace, a key worker isolating herself from herfamily while working in the community. —— not a tourist. there is a concern that a minority will disregard the government restrictions that have left so many places deserted. now normally many areas across the uk would be encouraging people to visit this easter weekend, but these aren't normal times. in fact, many businesses, councils and tourist boards are telling people stay at home. let's speak to the leader of south hams district council in devon,
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councillorjudy pearce. south hams encompasses popular tourist destinations including totnes, salcombe and dartmouth. normally this is the beginning of our season and we love seeing people, but not this year. what is there not to understand? have you seen a there not to understand? have you seen a huge influx in the past three weeks? indeed. ever since it was announced that the schools were going to close, it was like buying, overnight they all arrived. and they have been arriving ever since. —— it was like buying. it has helped with the commercial outlets being closed down, but people are still coming to their second homes. we have one of their second homes. we have one of the highest proportions of second homes in the country.” the highest proportions of second homes in the country. i know as a regular visitor, you have an age profile down there in typing that is much older, and therefore more at risk. indeed, i'm afraid we do it. so far devon and cornwall have done pretty well in keeping the buy this out, but there is little doubt that
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people will unwittingly be bringing out. i'm sure they don't mean to bring out, but because it is often asymptomatic, we don't know who's got it and who hasn't, nor do they until it really hits them. they may get there without it hitting them at all. with more people in the area, does that put more pressure on the services? indeed it does, because all the restaurants and pubs are close, so everybody has got to do shopping. there is huge pressure on the supermarkets. it puts pressure on all the services and will eventually on the hospital. i know of several holiday—makers who have already had to go to our local hospital because they become ill with the virus. i suppose some second home owners with say i need to come and check on my property, it has been three weeks, ijust need to get some eyes on it. well, they have someone get some eyes on it. well, they have someone who looks after the property all through the winter usually, so a couple more weeks would make any difference. actually, the directions
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are quite clear. it is not necessary travel to come to your second home. asi travel to come to your second home. as i say, i don't understand what there is to say any more about this. we have been saying it for long enough. everybody has said it, the prime minister is saying it, the chief constables have all said it, who else needs to say? and how many words to the need to use to say the same thing? is there any way you can enforce you're saying? we just open northamptonshire police saying they will start crackdown and be more strict. hell the chief constable here has given his word that they will be more active in their management of obvious holiday traffic. they will be looking for people going into the resorts. we have closed all the beach car park several weeks ago. the public toilets are closed because there was a risk of cross infection in those. if you do come down, there nowhere to go except the house, so you may as well stay in the house you are
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living in now. my i notice not a message to say easily, because it is a big cost or diving. we thank you for coming on none the less. —— a big cost for devon. a man who fled the war in syria apply to become a cleaner in the uk. he made a document to british journey to the uk and it won a ba fta. journey to the uk and it won a bafta. now he is disinfecting covid—19 wars. he cited this as way of giving back to britain.” covid—19 wars. he cited this as way of giving back to britain. i was very nervous when i apply for the job, because i heard the news of a shortage of ppe, nurses and doctors getting ill. and some of them are dying but that in itself pushed me more, it was a motivation because i knew if, the hospital is a hotspot for the virus, then disinfecting and cleaning the hospital is equally important as treating patients and being on the wards. i was nervous, but i showed up on the first day, last monday and the company
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which provides the training, they were reassuring, they told me that you would be given full ppe and i started and it has been ten days and, honestly, i have taken so manyjobs in my life but i have to say this is one of the most honourable jobs i will ever do in my life. well, we all thank you and it is vitally important, we have just shown the photo of you with the ppe and i know one of the problems with the ppe is that it is tricky to communicate, by definition, with a mask over your face, but what sort of conversations are you able to have, are you able to talk to patients, to explain anything, i know you can only get so close by definition, what sort of experiences are you having? it is difficult to breathe and it is difficult to communicate in ppe because having that mask on the whole time, it is not
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pleasant, but i have to say, i try as much as i can and i am disinfecting and spraying and cleaning, i have been doing this job for ten days and when i walk in, they wave at me and i wave back at them in the morning, hi, how are you? some of these guys could definitely be my neighbours and ifeel so thrilled that i am disinfecting and at the same time, we have small talks. i see people talking to their loved ones, i see patients reading a book and it is tough being there, i'm not going to lie, but i have to say the people, the nurses and the consultants, the catering assistants, they are absolutely heroic and incredible people. i am not a hero here, they are, i have taken this job temporarily, but these people have been doing this for years and they are from all over the world, just one ward,
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there are over 20 nationalities and that says a lot about the nhs and how diverse it is and i think we should embrace diversity in that sense. the first of seven repatriations flights from india arrived today. more than 20,000 british citizens stranded in india have asked for assistance to get home. the first go out to london repatriations out. this woman and her children, it was the start of a long journey home and the abrupt end, trip to goa. a seat on the
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press repatriations light for uk citizens in india. last night a packed plane flew more 300 brits. as amanda returned to london, a family reunion which couldn't come soon enough. relieve, really happy to be home. my children are really happy. at the same time, the uk government handled it very badly. they have left us, i felt, handled it very badly. they have left us, ifelt, out handled it very badly. they have left us, i felt, out on a limb. there was no information given to us. it was very hard to have hope at some points that we were actually going to be able to get home, just because of the lack of information that was coming through. that it is sentiment shared by the tens of thousands of brits stuck in india. why has it taken three weeks to get these purse re patriations why has it taken three weeks to get these purse repatriations fight started when other nations started getting the appeal back almost immediately? —— repatriations
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flights. were commercial flights are no longer running, the government will provide the necessary financial support for necessary flights to bring uk nationals back. more than a week on and many brits in india are running out of food, money and medicine. 12 days ago i talked to a woman in thinjab, today medicine. 12 days ago i talked to a woman in thin jab, today she still stranded and scare. we want to be home with their families, back on uk soil as soon as possible before things can get even more severe here. at the end of the day, we feel we have not been listened to. no one ca res, we have not been listened to. no one cares, no one bothers. it is appalling. this week by sleep from goa, delhi and mumbai, but one mp wa nts to goa, delhi and mumbai, but one mp wants to a white other parts of india have been ignored. —— that is
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what we as mps have been telling the foreign office again and again. that is why they are appealing to scrimmage against, because many of them are elderly and pass running out of medicine —— discriminated against. as india remains on lockdown, officials in the uk say they are working to get everyone home, but with an estimated 20,000 brits in the country, it could take time. this afternoon a spokesperson from the foreign & commonwealth 0ffice told the bbc, we know it is a difficult time for many british travels abroad, especially those with challenging circumstances. 0ur consular teams are doing everything they can, especially those in difficulty...
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if you are looking for summer coronavirus free if you're looking for somewhere coronavirus—free, you may need a russian space rocket to get there. a new crew has blasted off to the international space station, and one of the russian cosmonauts on board says right now the space station is the safest place to be. from moscow, steve rosenberg reports. with a pandemic sweeping the world, here's an idea. and lift off. leave the planet. a russian rocket blasts into space. we confirm separation of stage two. strapped inside, are cosmonauts, anatoly ivanishin and ivan wagner. and nasa astronaut chris cassidy. the new crew for the international space station. coronavirus had affected pre—flight preparations. the three men had been in tighter quarantine than usual, before launch, with contacts kept to a bare minimum. and that meant no family members
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present the lift off. obviously we would love to have our family is here with us but it is what we understand we have to do to be safe. you don't want to come down with covid—19 up here. but assuming they stay healthy, the crew will be well away from the dramas back on earth. translation: although space flight always carries a particular risk, we understand that for the next few months, the international space station will probably be the safest place on earth. of course, self isolation comes naturally to a spaceman. no popping to the shops orjogging in the park appear. 250 miles above the surface of the earth, the crew will be setting an example to us all. 0n the international space station, they will be staying home for the next six months.
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thatis that is the perfect place to lock down, no temptation outside the walls of the international space station. just a reminder, if you are joining us, some good news today on the condition of the british prime minister borisjohnson, the condition of the british prime minister boris johnson, who the condition of the british prime minister borisjohnson, who you may remember was rushed to hospital will stop he has spent three nights in total in intensive care, but will not be there for a fortnight, he has been put on the ward. he is out of intensive care, in good spirits we are told. of course, having just come out of intensive care, he will receive close monitoring during the early phase of his recovery. it will bea early phase of his recovery. it will be a long road, but it is good news that the prime minister is out of intensive care and making a recovery. you may remember that on thursday night last, he was on the steps of downing street applauding nhs workers, our doctors and nurses.
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this is the picture in london today as the country stands ready to upload everybody on the front lines, not just those upload everybody on the front lines, notjust those in the nhs, our pharmacist, or supermarket workers, everybody who is making a difference. west sussex saw a high of 2a so says this afternoon, the warmest day in the uk so by the share. the warmest day so far for wales. across north—east england and scotland, calder and cloudier. this frontal system generating much more cloud. 0vernight pushes northward, but not amounting to much. some brea ks but not amounting to much. some breaks in the cloud, clear skies further south. temperatures not much lower than 7—8dc. 5—6 across scotland, a much milder nature. for good friday, for much of the uk it
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is dry and fairly sunny. heavy showers across the far north of england, scotland, ireland and maybe with a rumble of thunder. a much warmer day per north—east england and eastern scotland, with a bit more sunshine and a change in wind direction. 0n more sunshine and a change in wind direction. on saturday, little change for england and wales. more sunshine and warm. , developing across of northern ireland, patchy rain across the western isles later in the day. turning colour across scotland, northern ireland and england, that one continuing across much of england and wales. temperature is up to 26 celsius across south—east england on saturday afternoon. their easter sunday, changes are afoot. an atla ntic sunday, changes are afoot. an atlantic system pushing in from the west, likely to generate some showers on easter sunday, this time across england and wales. such is the nature of showers, not everyone will see them, but they could bring quite a bit of rain in a short amount of time where we do get them.
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dryer and cloudier across most of the countries, and into easter monday this area of high pressure is building on the west. a squeeze on the isobars, so a stronger wind developing on easter monday. we lose the warmer air we've been seeing recently and replace it with something much colder across the uk. initially some outbreaks of rain across the far south of england on easter monday, that will clear, dave sunny spells, variable cloud bit for the much colder, especially in the wind —— some sunny spells.
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applause good evening, this is bbc news, it is eight o'clock and all around the uk, people are being urged to applaud the country's nhs workers and workers in these unprecedented times. among those grateful tonight i am sure will be the prime minister, who we are told is now out of intensive ca re we are told is now out of intensive care but still in hospital this evening. for the third week in a row, this is the carrots and key workers all over the uk, as you can see, are a lot of them are joining in to —— this is for the carers.

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