Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 29, 2020 10:00am-1:00pm BST

10:00 am
this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. in the uk, the chancellor is set to reveal how employers will contribute to the cost of the coronavirus job retention scheme which is currently paying the wages of more than eight million people a police station in minneapolis has been set alight during a third night of protests over the death of an unarmed black man in custody. and the row between donald trump and twitter escalates — the social media site hides one of the presidents tweets with a warning that it ‘glorifies violence'. it suggested minneapolis rioters could be shot. as lockdown restrictions start to ease — the uk's chief scientist says people should keep to the rules — groups of up to six people can meet outside in england from monday. it means that you can get
10:01 am
an opportunity for people to, for instance, go and visit parents or visit other friends and family and to do so in a way outdoors, ina garden, i think that's the thing that people want to be able to do most of all. in scotland, up to eight people can meet members from another household, and in wales there's a similar easing of restrictions from monday and later this hour we'll speak to super trooper bjorn from abba about the impact the coronavirus has had on the creative industries. hello and welcome to audiences in the uk and around the world. we're covering all the latest news and analysis from here and across the globe.
10:02 am
iam i am annita mcveigh. the uk chancellor, rishi sunak, is expected to set out plans for employers to contribute to the cost of the coronavirus job retention scheme — which is currently paying up to 80 percent of the wages of more than eight million furloughed workers in the uk. it's thought the chancellor will ask firms to contribute 20 percent of wages from august. meanwhile, the uk's chief scientific adviser has urged people to stick to social distancing guidelines as further easing of lockdowns begins. from monday, groups of up to six people in from different households in england will be able to meet in parks and private gardens. in scotland from today, groups of up to eight people from two different households will be able to meet outside, as long as they stay two metres apart. and in wales, people will be allowed to meet friends and family from another household from monday — with no restrictions on numbers, but social distancing must be maintained. away from coronavirus and in the united states,
10:03 am
a police station in the city of minneapolis has been set alight during a third night of protests over the death of unarmed black man, george floyd, while he was in custody. and in an escalating row between twitter and the white house, the social media giant has hidden one of president trump's tweets from his profile, saying it violates rules about glorifying violence. in the tweet which was at first hidden but then revealed by twitter on the grounds that it had public interest, the president suggested minneapolis looters could be shot. we'll bring you more on those developments shortly. first, our business presenter — ben thompson — has been looking at how the uk's furlough scheme works, and how much it's costing it's costing a lot of money to pay workers wages, those who aren't able to go
10:04 am
into work and he's hoping that as the economy starts to reopen, more of those workers can be transferred back onto their employers' books not paid for by us as taxpayers. let me remind you what that scheme involves and how this scheme works because it was launched in april, as you touched on, it currently pays 80% of workers' wages, up to a maximum of two and a half thousand pounds per worker. originally, it was set to run until the end ofjune, figures show this week that 8.4 million workers are now covered by that scheme, that's a cost of £10 billion a month. the overall cost and this is the real issue for concern, according to the government's tax and spending watchdog, the office for budget responsibility, they say the total cost could be £80 billion and so what we are expecting to hear later are details about how this scheme might be wound down and as some people are able to go back to work i think the chancellor will be hoping that if people may be able to work fewer hours or work part time because maybe the business isn't fully up and running or there's not as much demand as there was before the outbreak, employers will pay for the proportion that they are working and the government will top up the rest
10:05 am
so it might be a bit of both, taxpayers contributing some and the employer paying some. he might also decide that he's going to stop the scheme for new entrants, new businesses won't be able to put their workers onto the scheme after a certain cut—off point. clearly big questions about how viable it is in the longer term. let's discuss this with pauljohnson, director of the institute for fiscal studies. good to have you with us today. we are hearing broadly what the chancellor is going to announce. do you think employers will be ready to start paying some wages again and also, what about the self employed, because there is a big difference, isn't there, about the level of support for employees and the self—employed? support for employees and the self-employed? well, for employers is going to depend very much on their situation. some employers that won't be too much of a problem, they will be able to pay a small
10:06 am
fraction, 20% of wages in order to keep their employees on the books and ready to come back when demand returns or when they can't reopen fully but for other employers, for example if we are still in a position where boris or cafe is can't reopen, even a 20% payment towards wages might be quite difficult. —— where cars. different employers are in different situations, we may find that in some sectors quite a lot of people are losing theirjobs and in other sectors, they are being kept on. you also asked about the position of the self—employed, they are in very different place, some of are being incredibly generously rewarded, as it were, at the moment, in that they are being paid 80% of their previous pay, even if they've only taken a small cut to their current income.
10:07 am
others, if they were earning over 50,000 a year last year, are getting absolutely nothing at all and we don't know, for the moment, how long that programme is going to continue oi’ that programme is going to continue or in what form. i know that you've been talking about a concern that these furlough figures will hide the figures are people effectively waiting to find out whether or not they actually will have a job to return to? i think there are two groups of workers that are being furloughed at the moment and they don't necessarily know which group they are in at the moment, one will return to work after the economy recovers , return to work after the economy recovers, they have gotjob to go to and that was the intention of the scheme, employers haven't had to sack them in order to get over the 3-6 sack them in order to get over the 3—6 months that we are going through at the moment and that will help the economy recovers and obviously help individuals enormously. and there's another group who will find that
10:08 am
once the furlough runs out, the scheme runs out once the furlough runs out, the scheme runs out or once the furlough runs out, the scheme runs out or indeed at the point at which their employers have to pay 20%, thejob is gone and it's not just to pay 20%, thejob is gone and it's notjust 3—6 month rate, it's gone for good. and we don't know at the moment how many people are in each category but it must be, it will be the case that once the scheme starts to be withdrawn and certainly when it's fully withdrawn, a significant number of people will find that the job is gone altogether. beyond that, even for the first group you refer to, beyond that period, if there isn't the sort of economic upturn that many people are hoping for, potentially that presents a threat tojobs potentially that presents a threat to jobs slightly further down the line. people might be hoping that evenif line. people might be hoping that even if some people are laid off initially there will be the upturn, people will be re—employed but that isn't a given, is it? we are all just dependent, as you say on the speed of the upturn. if the economy
10:09 am
recovers as fast as the office for budget responsibility and the bank of england hope it will over the next year or 18 months, then even if some people are losing theirjobs in the short run, their projections suggest they will be moving back fairly quickly in the medium run but i think many people think that those projections are pretty optimistic. and there is a good chance that we'll have higher levels of unemployment for some considerable period of time, it generally takes economies quite a while to bounce back and that is why the furlough scheme, as i said, was put in place initially. much better to keep people engaged with their employers for as long as possible so that they are still there when the economy sta rts are still there when the economy starts to come back but i fear we are infora starts to come back but i fear we are in for a period, having had a decade of incredibly strong employment growth, very low levels of unemployment, we are in for a period of somewhat raised unemployment. paul, thank you for your time.
10:10 am
twitter has for the first time hidden one of president donald's trump's tweets from his profile, saying the post violates the site's rules against glorifying violence. twitter has replaced the tweet with a warning message where it would usually appear on the timeline — but it can still be viewed by clicking on it. twitter has said it is in the public interest for people to be able to see this tweet. the president's post describes minneapolis rioters protesting the death of a black man in police custody as ‘thugs', and threatens the use of force to restore order. ‘when the looting starts, the shooting starts' — trump said in the early hours of the morning. in the last few minutes, twitter said it was worried the message's glorification of violence could inspire real—life shootings. the move comes hours after president trump acted against social media companies
10:11 am
by signing an executive order seeking to limit their legal immunity. the site says it's in the public interest to keep the tweet viewable. let's speak to our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones. the president is an avid user of twitter, it will be interesting to see his response when he wakes up and sees what twitter is doing. this really escalates the locking of horns between the two, doesn't it, that started earlier this week? horns between the two, doesn't it, that started earlier this week7m really does, for months on end twitter has been dithering about what to do about donald trump has macro tweets, on one side people we re macro tweets, on one side people were saying to the company he's getting away with stuff that would not be allowed for any other person, on the other side, voices were saying social media is biased against us, don't you dare do anything. on wednesday, they engaged
10:12 am
in some limited action. with regard to tweets about postal ballots in the united states. putting in fact checking line. and they said that was very narrow action because they had got rules about something which could for instance dissuade people from voting. so that's how they justify that. of course the president didn't see it that way, lashed back, threatened to go as far as closing down social media platforms and protein that measure which would be pretty damaging if it went through, in terms of the ability of social media platforms to protect themselves and in the last few hours, twitter could havejust sat back, hunkered down and waited for what happened next, instead of which they acted again in a much broader way, really. with this big label on the tweet saying it violated the twitter rules about glorifying violence. they could have gone further. than any other user. they might have removed the tweet or
10:13 am
even suspended the account but this will be quite enough, i'm sure, to enrage the president when he wakes up. 0k. thank you very much for that. president trump's tweet was about the situation in minneapolis. a police station in the city has been set alight during a third night of protests over the death of an unarmed black man. george floyd died after he was pinned down by police. the last few days have seen multiple buildings burned to the ground or looted. the unrest continued despite the governor of minnesota ordering the deployment of hundreds of members of the national guard to restore order. our north america correspondent david willis has more — his report contains some distressing images. minneapolis burned again last night. protesters clashing with police for the third night in a row. we got gunshots, we got gunshots, guys. officers fired tear gas but couldn't
10:14 am
prevent another night of arson, looting and rioting. all of which culminated in the city's main police station being set ablaze. earlier, the state governor announced he was activating the national guard after declaring the time had come not only to rebuild the city but the fractious relationship between its people and the police. we need to make sure, we need to make sure that people are looking out for our city right now. it's notjust enough to do the right thing yourself. we need to be making sure that all of us are held accountable to make sure that we are holding up the highest ideals that we stand by. george floyd died after being handcuffed and pinned to the ground by a white police officer who put his knee on mr floyd's neck and held it there, as he pleaded for air.
10:15 am
as the minutes pass he stopped speaking. then he stops moving. the four officers involved in the arrest have since been sacked but there are growing calls for them to face criminal charges. what that additional evidence consisted of, he didn't say, but the longer officials delay pressing charges the more the anger here seems to grow. earlier, in an ultimately futile attempt to defuse the tension, the local police chief issued a public apology. i know that there is currently a deficit of hope in our city and as i wear this uniform before you i know that this department has contributed to that deficit of hope but i will not allow to continue to increase that deficit re—traumatised and those of folks in our community. protests over george floyd's death has spread to other cities putting race
10:16 am
relations firmly on the political agenda but as this country ‘s racial fault lines are laid bare once again the sight of minneapolis burning serves as a stark reflection of a community now at boiling point. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. let's look at the easing of lockdown restrictions now across the uk. from monday, groups of up to six people will be allowed to meet outside in england. in scotland, two households can meet up outside from today, and similar changes will come into force in wales from next week. in northern ireland, small groups will be able to meet for outdoor weddings from next month. and for the tenth time last night — millions of people turned out to applaud our frontline workers. charlotte rose reports. applause. in every corner of the country and every community, people came out again last night to clap for carers. it was the tenth week in a row that people have
10:17 am
applauded our front line workers. and the woman who came up with the idea now says she thinks it should be the last. yesterday, the prime minister said that england has met the five tests required, which means changes like the reopening of schools and non—essential shops can go ahead. and he had a further announcement. from monday, in england, up to six people from different households can now meet outside, in parks, but also back gardens — as long as those from different households continue to maintain social distancing. these changes mean that friends and family can start to meet their loved ones, perhaps seeing both parents at once or both grandparents at once. and i know that for many people this will be a long—awaited and joyful moment. but the government's chief scientific officer warned that people must remain cautious, because the number of people being infected is still high.
10:18 am
we still have a significant burden of infection. we are still seeing new infections every day at quite a significant rate. and the r is close to one. that means there is not a lot of room to do things and things need to be done cautiously, step—by—step, and monitored. the scientific advice remains that people should stay two metres apart, despite the government's hopes that this could be reduced. from today, people from scotland will be able to meet their friends and family outside in groups of up to eight. plans for wales will become clear later today. but its expected that an unlimited number of people from two different households will be able to meet up from next week, as long as they stay within five miles of their home. while in northern ireland, outdoor weddings with up to ten people present may be allowed from june eight. a further 377 people have died
10:19 am
with coronavirus across all settings in the uk, taking the total death toll to 37,837. a reminder that as the uk follows other european countries in moving towards a new normal, the impact of the virus will still be felt for some time. charlotte rose, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... the chancellor is expected to announce changes to the coronavirusjob retention scheme — companies will have to start paying towards the wages of their furloughed workers a police station was set on fire during a third night of rioting in minneapolis. the protests are over the death of an unarmed black man in custody the uk's chief scientist has urged people to continue following the rules as lockdown restrictions begin to ease. spain's socialist—led government
10:20 am
is set to introduce a monthly basic income scheme for those hardest hit by the coronavirus crisis. the plan will aim to reach at least 100,000 households initially, with each adult receiving a payment of at least a62 euros. it's rarely been implemented in europe before and some are welcoming it as a new type of universal basic income. guy standing has written extensively in favour of the idea of a universal basic income, and is the co—president of the basic income earth network. and javier morillas is professor of applied economics at the ceu san pablo university in madrid. you are both very welcome, thank you for taking the time to talk to us today. first of all, is this really a universal basic income in this instance, i understand it's means tested 7 instance, i understand it's means tested? yes, it isn't a basic income, it's what we call a minimum income, it's what we call a minimum income scheme. it's not only means
10:21 am
tested, but it's based on last year ‘s incomes. and it's going to be very selective and my concern is that it's very timid. and that the real problem we are facing with the pandemic, notjust real problem we are facing with the pandemic, not just in real problem we are facing with the pandemic, notjust in spain but in all countries, including britain, is we need to build resilience and resilience is going to be weakened if large numbers of the poor and vulnerable are left out of any income support scheme. there are about 11 million impoverished people living below the official poverty line in spain at the moment. and it's current income loss that matters, not last year ‘s income so i think the scheme is moving in a good direction in the sense it recognises income support is needed but i think the design flaws are quite serious. big gulf between the 11 million new site and the hassles initially benefiting from the
10:22 am
scheme. professor, what is the political debate been like in spain around the introduction of this measure? well, we have several universal basic income is, in madrid, andalusia, etc. ithink it depends, we don't know yet if we will be with or without, for instance, food stamps. we don't know if we will be permanent, this kind of help. so i think that the black economy will be up with this measure. you talk about this being a little bit timid but you know, can't the government, the spanish government afford it? how long is the support intended to go on for? well i think they can certainly afford it, they've been giving out in other countries, huge amounts to the financial markets and various
10:23 am
other schemes. it's not a question of the affordability in the short term. but i think the design flaws will mean that they will have to make changes. for example, it's been given on a household basis. and what we know is with a basic income scheme, you would give it on an individual basis and it's very important for women, in particular. we've seen a dramatic increase in domestic violence in all parts of europe. due to the lockdown and pandemic, increased income insecurity and women having basic income would be more able to walk out of abusive relationships but with a household unit, very complicated formula that they are devising, i think it's going to have incredible exclusion errors, large numbers of people who will be eligible on paper, will not be receiving this benefit. so i anticipate that when it comes income
10:24 am
inafew anticipate that when it comes income in a few weeks time, very rapidly, the government will have to make amendments to the design. otherwise, the problem of lack of resilience that i mentioned earlier, is going to continue and worsen in the coming months. you may not think that now is the time for ideological debate around a scheme like this but what are the pros and cons of this particular scheme versus something like a wage subsidy scheme. presumably the latter would not reach potentially as many people, as many types of people as this minimum income? well, in favour, it will be the private consume, will be up. but the private consume, will be up. but the other side, as i say, i think it's a measure to increase with this kind of money. you talk about issues
10:25 am
with the design of the scheme. i know some pilots had taken place. what are the pilots for this particular scheme, what have they been like and when you talk more broadly about a universal basic income, what sort of pilots had there been for an idea like that? well, there have been about 20 pilots of real basic income and there is one ongoing in barcelona at there is one ongoing in barcelona at the moment. and what happens with basic income schemes is you give every individual a fixed amount and you can't tax back from the wealthy so that the costs can be controlled. but it gives people a sense of empowerment, it gives them security. and what we've seen from all the pilots, whether in canada, finland, india, various other places, including britain, incidentally, is that it increases mental stability, it improves people's mental health
10:26 am
and capacity to face shocks and have greater resilience. and i think that this pandemic is making that issue the cardinal one for this year. and u nless the cardinal one for this year. and unless the schemes that are introduced reach the vast majority of people, we are going to see post covid 19 excess deaths dramatically higher. and a second and third wave that we anticipate in the illnesses, leaving people excessively vulnerable. with homelessness rising and so on. and i think it's absolutely important that we have schemes that are, i don't like that are universal, but cover the vast majority of legal residents and give them individual capacities to face them individual capacities to face the shocks that are coming. but at the shocks that are coming. but at the moment, this scheme isjust a timid step in a good direction, i don't want to be totally critical,
10:27 am
but i think it could be vastly improved, without actually increasing the cost. 0k, thank you both very much forjoining us. we have lost the line to madrid but thank you to the professor. french car—maker renault says it will be cutting nearly 15,000 jobs worldwide, that's almost 10 % of its workforce. it's facing plumetting car sales made worse by the coronavirus pandemic. the company says 4,600 positions will be lost in france, prompting employees to gather outside one of its at—risk plants near paris. the company says it intends to make cuts of 2.2 billion dollars over three years. renault and its partners nissan and mitsubishi were already struggling to reorganise their business following the arrest of former boss carlos ghosn. on thursday, nissan announced 20,000 job losses over the next two years. staying in france, as lockdown measures continue to be eased, the prime minister has announced
10:28 am
a re—opening of bars and restaurants, which he said were a central part of the french way of life. parks and gardens can open this weekend, and in some parts of the country, schools are preparing to open next week. rich preston reports. police enforcing social distancing in paris. reminding people to keep apartand to in paris. reminding people to keep apart and to stay in groups of fewer than ten. now, as the country enters its second phase of lifting lockdown restrictions, restaurants and bars have been told they can reopen next week. wedding staff will have to wear masks and in badly affected areas like paris, only outside terraces can be used. translation: we are exhausted by this invisible enemy that has exhausted our morale, that will maybe bring us to our knees financially. parks and gardens
10:29 am
will open as of this weekend, their gates locked shut since march. translation: the virus is still present in varying degrees in the entire country but the speed of its spread is under control. we are where we hoped to be at the end of may and in reality, we are in a slightly better position than we'd hoped so it is very good news. restrictions on domestic travel are being eased, in the moment there is a ban on travelling more than 100 kilometres from your home, as of next week and just in time for the summer holidays that will be lifted. france has seen the fourth highest death toll from covid 19 in the world. but for the seventh day running, that death toll has risen by under 100. and officials are confident with infection rates are slowing, it's as safe as it can be for life to begin to return to normal. richard preston, bbc news.
10:30 am
the headlines: the uk chancellor is set to reveal how employers will contribute to the cost of the coronavirus job retention scheme, which is currently paying the wages of more than 8 million people. a police station in the us city of minneapolis has been set alight during a third night of protests over the death of an unarmed black man in custody. and the row between donald trump and twitter escalates — the social media site has covered one of the president's tweets with a warning that it "glorifies violence." the post suggested minneapolis looters could be shot. as lockdown restrictions start to ease, the uk's chief scientist has stressed people need to stick to the rules — groups of up to six people can meet outside in england from monday. in scotland, up to eight people can meet members from another household, and in wales there's a similar easing as of from monday. meanwhile, northern ireland will soon enter phase two of its lockdown exit.
10:31 am
more than a quarter of people in britain who've been told to shield themselves because they are deemed most vulnerable to covid—19 have lost 60% of their income during lockdown. that's according to new findings from the charity, citizens advice. it says a combination of unclear guidelines and irresponsible employers have meant some shielding people will feel a pressure to go back to work and in turn, risk their health. we're joined now by one of those people, sarah, not her real name, who joins us on the phone. she has been told to shield because of her daughter's asthma, but has also been told by her bosses that if she does not go back she will be put on unpaid leave. we're alsojoined by the principal policy manager at citizens advice, morgan wild. let's begin with the young morgan, thank you forjoining us, and to
10:32 am
have sarah come about this detail you have uncovered about a quarter of the people shielding having lost 60% or more of their income, which isa 60% or more of their income, which is a striking amount, a really huge amount. how has this situation arisen? it has been really difficult for millions of households across society to cope financially with the coronavirus pandemic. it has been particularly difficult for people in the shielded group, that people have been advised to remain within their homes until they receive advice that it is safe to leave. many of these people have jobs outside the home and are therefore, often facing difficult choices to make between protecting their health and putting food on the table. they are eligible for thejob retention food on the table. they are eligible for the job retention scheme food on the table. they are eligible for thejob retention scheme but we are seeing too many employers who are seeing too many employers who are not using it would protect their employees' health. let's find out from sarah a little bit more about
10:33 am
her situation. thank you for talking to us. you want to remain anonymous. you obviously feel you are in a really difficult situation. tell us first of all what it's been like in lockdown worrying about your little girl who has asthma who you have to shield. it has been very stressful, as you can imagine. i'm trying to look after my children, trying to keep it together myself and trying to keep my job keep it together myself and trying to keep myjob for the future. keep it together myself and trying to keep myjob for the futurelj understand you work in childcare. have you been receiving furlough pay? no. and where you are not entitled to furlough pay? what did your employer say to you ? entitled to furlough pay? what did your employer say to you? apparently not. apparently a lot of companies don't do furlough, so that's what i was told. morgan, on that specific point, should sarah have been in receipt of some pay? we are seeing too many heartbreaking cases like sarah's and the thing i want to be
10:34 am
really clear about is employers can use thejob retention scheme to protect people who are shielding and guarantee 80% of their incomes. too often we are seeing employers either won't use it or they don't understand that they can use thejob retention scheme to protect their employees' health in this way. so it isa employees' health in this way. so it is a yes, sarah should have been receiving fellow money from her employer? she should have but there is no obligation on employers to use it. it is really in the gift of employers whether to put people on the retention scheme or not. that's why at a citizens advice we have been calling for people like sarah who are in the shielded group to have a right to be furloughed in a difficult time where they have to cut off contact from people and not leave their home, so they are not having to worry about putting food on the table, or facing an impossible choice between their
10:35 am
incomes and their health. sarah, listening to what morgan is saying, do you feel that you had enough information when you were speaking to your employer about what was going on, and what did they say to you? i kind of didn't understand it, it wasn't entirely clear. it was more of an it wasn't entirely clear. it was more ofan argument, it wasn't entirely clear. it was more of an argument, if anything. so that's why i got in contact with citizens advice in the first place. it is more hurtful the fact that she can do something to help me and is choosing not to. i understand that you have been told that you need to return to work next week or else you will be put on unpaid leave. yes, that's correct. and that puts you in a pretty impossible situation, because as we said, one of your children has asthma you have been told that she must be shielded, that's what you've been doing. what's running through your mind
10:36 am
right now? i mean, i've kind of stopped worrying about it too much. imean, i stopped worrying about it too much. i mean, i have great support from my parents and my child's father, so i've just kind of accepted the fact i will have no income. but i mean, it isjust dreadful, it really is. yes, you clearly shouldn't have been put in this position. morgan, what advice would you give to sarah right now and anyone else in her position who is shielding but has been told, look, you need to get back to work? there is a few things. it is really difficult for lots of people to have this conversation with their employer. understandably people find it anxiety inducing and very challenging. we would always advise people to speak to citizens advice to see if we can help them find a way forward. there is a couple of specific things that it's important to be aware of. the government's health and safety advice to employers says very clearly that people in the shielding group
10:37 am
shouldn't be asked to work outside the home, that it is not safe for them to do so. thejob retention scheme can be used to protect their incomes so that they are not facing the fall in income that sarah has experienced. the problem is the loophole where they are not obliged to use that retention scheme, so we are seeing too many people facing greater hardship when it is not necessary and could be fixed by the government giving these people are right to be furloughed. sarah, listening to morgan and armed with this situation, and if the chancellor said anything later on to say something specific about you who are shielding, would you go back to your employer and tried to push them to give you some money at this stage, or to organise for you to receive some money from the government? yes, of course, yes. and i guess you wish you had this information to hand at the beginning. but for everyone it has
10:38 am
been a really confusing situation, hasn't it? yes. it is a lot, it is confusing because no one knows where they stand and it's also a stressful time, everyone is missing their families and everyone is trying to protect themselves. it is kind of the last thing you want to be worrying about. absolutely. sarah, thank you for talking to us. i know it isa thank you for talking to us. i know it is a difficult situation for you. we do appreciate your time and we wish you and your little girl well and to morgan wilde from citizens advice, thank you for your time and that good advice as well. some breaking news coming to us from our political team over in millbank in westminster saying that dominic cummings, the prime minister's chief adviser, has no plans to leave his post. the bbc understands the prime minister's adviser dominic cummings has told no 10 officials this morning that there is no plan for him to leave his post, following a report in a newspaper today that he would be leaving in about six
10:39 am
months' time. but the bbc has been told that the situation remains that he will decide after an operation that was delayed from march what he will do. but he has told no 10 officials. this morning the bbc understands there is no plan for him to leave his post. we have heard the prime minister says several times this week that as far as he's concerned the issue of dominic cummings and what he did when he was in the durham area is a matter that is now closed, despite the consternation and the anger that that has caused. so dominic cummings, no plans to leave the post of chief adviser to the prime minister, the bbc understands. hundreds of schools have been closed
10:40 am
in south korea just days after they reopened — because of a spike in coronavirus infections. pupils are taking classes online again and people have been told to avoid large gatherings, with parks and museums closed once again. our seoul correspondent laura bicker has this update. health officials in south korea are describing the current cluster outbreaks as a crisis situation. the reason they are concerned is that these outbreaks are in areas of high population. they are all linked to a distribution warehouse for one of the country's biggest e—commerce firms, coupang. so far, over 90 people related to that warehouse outbreak have been confirmed as having coronavirus. there have also been secondary infections within the community. now, as ever, south korean health officials are excellent at tracking, tracing and testing everyone in relation to the warehouse, but these cropping up of outbreaks continue to happen and that is one of the reasons why they are putting out this warning. so far, they have urged people to stay indoors if they can this weekend. they are saying this is a criticaljuncture if they are to stop secondary spread
10:41 am
within the community. now, they have rowed back some kind of restrictions, so public parks and museums have been closed. businesses are being urged to allow people to work more flexible hours, so work from home is back. schools too have had to close their doors, some of them. around 800 schools have stayed closed just days after the next phase of reopening. the ministry of education said next week they will continue with the phased reopening of schools, but this is the plea they are making to people. they are saying continue with the social distancing measures, continue to wear a mask, continue to stay vigilant for the sake of your children's education. it is a plea that has worked in the past and they are hoping it will work again. remember, south korea has never been in lockdown. they have relied on this aggressive testing and tracing strategy. it is one that has been so far incredibly successful and one the world is using as a role model and that is why the eyes of the
10:42 am
world are currently on this country. if, even here, they are finding it difficult to keep this virus under control, it shows how difficult it will be in countries with large outbreaks. laura bicker there in seoul. australia is now seeing very few new cases of covid—19 — and across the country restrictions are being eased. in new south wales — the country's most populous state — students have returned to full—time, face—to—face learning in the classroom. our australia correspondent, shaimaa khalil, looks at how schools and families are adjusting. back to school after nine weeks at home. go ahead and pop your bag in the classroom. a familiar place in very different times. even the school drop—off has changed. a quick goodbye at the gate and hand sanitiser to start the day. watch over the students, teachers and families of saint columbus.
10:43 am
there are no more big gatherings at saint columbus primary, morning assembly and prayers now happen in small groups. all: and the holy spirit, amen. and in pe classes, contact sports are out. almost everyone is back in the classroom here, but social distancing with children in school is tricky, if not impossible. instead, the focus is on good hygiene and doing what they can to minimise the risk. after getting to grips with learning from home, students now have to adapt to the new safety measures. it's a bit different to when i left. there is hand sanitiser in all of the classrooms, lots, so we have to use that when we eat and after we eat. there's been staggered dismissal times and we leave from different parts of the school. well, it's good being back at school, because then we can everyone and face—to—face learning is easier to understand, but i guess it's also a little bit nerve—racking, being back at school. has anyone ever been
10:44 am
in a helicopter before? while teachers can't avoid being close to their students, they are trying to maintain social distancing with each other. despite the relatively low number of covid—19 cases in australia, the risk of infection remains. some sydney schools have had fresh coronavirus cases this week, and have been forced to close. there appears to be a degree of complacency creeping in. we're not out of the woods yet. this is a pandemic and we need to be very careful to ensure the health safety of all concerned. for some parents, it's not going back to school that worries them, it's how their children get there. twins peter and matthew used to take the bus and then a train, but now their mother does the drop—off and the pick—up. how was your day? all right. there's going to be a lot of people returning to work. with winter coming there is an increase injust the normal cold and flu season and so lots more people coughing and sneezing.
10:45 am
so, i think if you can, it's good to drive them to school. most of the children here seem happy to be back. but even in australia, which has fared far better than most with the virus, school days will be different for a while. shaimaa khalil, bbc news, sydney. the number of cars on the roads in the uk has fallen dramatically in the last couple of months — but the number of crashes hasn't. now, one of britain's biggest police forces is warning drivers to stop using empty roads as if they were racetracks, as phil mackie reports. racing down the m6 toll in staffordshire, this driver was clocked at over 140 mph, and he is not the only one using excess speed since lockdown began. on this stretch of dual carriageway in the black country, another driver was stopped doing 124. even here where the speed limit is 30, some drivers are doing nearly twice the speed limit.
10:46 am
the amount of traffic on our roads during lockdown has fallen significantly, but the number of crashes and accidents has fallen by nearly as much, which is why west midlands police are running operations like this to remind people that an empty road isn't an excuse to speed. people who drive ordinarily very safely, some of them now seeing some of these roads are clear, and they are driving far too fast. there is a real hazard in doing that, even if the roads are clear. there is another group, the boy racers, and some of them are now taking the opportunity of the emptier roads to use the road as a race track. i'm delighted to see here that the police are taking tough action, certainly against those people speeding on this piece of road. at the start of lockdown, this motorbike led police on a chase through birmingham. the rider experienced tough action first hand. 0h, oh, yes, good sting.
10:47 am
injust over an hour during this operation, they pulled over 24 drivers for speeding. eight were going so fast they will get a fine and three points. this driver was just given a warning. please slow down and pay attention to your surroundings. and the distraction of a telephone call, even though it's hands—free, obviously just pay a bit more attention. we are stopping and educating people who are in excess of the speed limit, but what you would class as low—level speeding, and we are giving them roadside inputs around the risks that they are posing to themselves, to other road users and the potential strain they are going to put on the nhs if they are involved in a collision. with roads quieter than ever, the problem is everywhere. a number of forces have reported an increase in speeding since the start of lockdown. greater manchester police recorded a driver doing 129mph on the m62. police scotland said they recorded a driver doing 130 near aberdeen. and in london the met police clocked a driver doing 134mph where the limit was 40. now lockdown's ending, roads are getting busy again.
10:48 am
sadly, when they were at their quietest the number of speeding incidents didn't fall proportionately. and officers have continued to pursue those breaking the law. phil mackie, bbc news, birmingham. during the pandemic, content is being streamed online on an unprecedented scale as people search for entertainment at home. but, with easy sharing, content creators are often being left uncredited and are struggling to maintain their incomes. this is where the international confederation of societies of authors and composers — or cisac — comes in. in march it has worked with unesco to get the voices of creators heard by governments. let's speak now to bjorn ulvaeus, the president of cisac. one quarter of abba, of course. we are delighted to have you here with us on are delighted to have you here with us on bbc news. thank you for taking the time to speak with us. good morning. i read in an interview you
10:49 am
never expected to be appointed the president of anything, but here you are, and certainly with your experience you are absolutely in the right position to champion the rights of creators. tell us what youraims are in rights of creators. tell us what your aims are in these unprecedented times. well, everyone is trying to help support the music industry, which is very vulnerable and the live industry, for instance, is all shut down for the moment and there are people there who don't know how they will get money for their rent in the next few months. so it's very desperate. cisac has members who are collecting societies and they have locally set up emergency funds to help creators. so we are doing our bit. and the rest of the industry is as well. we are talking about not
10:50 am
just musicians but visual artists, people working in drama and literature. how are you going to use your experience and influence to help them? i don't know yet. i have a honeymoon as a president, don't i? well, it is a strange kind of honeymoon in the middle of a pandemic, it has to be said. probably more challenging than any of your predecessors. absolutely. absolutely, it is, but i'm learning. and my ambition is, i've always been very interested in technology and music. and my ambition is that technology, because i know it's there, to create that for the collecting societies to help creators get their payments more efficiently and more accurately. that is one of my big ambitions. and i also want more female songwriters. i'd love to hear more about that in a second. you talk about technology
10:51 am
and in abba you build your own studio in stockholm, you used synthesisers to create your distinctive sound, you've been involved in the last couple of years in setting up something called session, which as you mention, enables artists to be paid for their contributions. how can you ensure specifically on that front when artists can't perform so easily, when money is tight, that they do get money where they are owed it? the idea is that cisac, which is an organisation for almost 240 collecting societies around the globe, to make them more efficient. and we can do that by building technical tools that are cloud native mud that are in the cloud, which are tools that all societies around the globe can use so they can all become more efficient, which
10:52 am
they can't afford to do on their own. and on championing female artists, tell us more about that if you would. my ex-wife is a terrific songwriter and i urged her to write more for abba, but i tried to inspire as much as i can, because i think that's important. i know that you want to come as part of your role as president of cisac, to appeal to governments to play their pa rt appeal to governments to play their part as well to support the creative industries and creative individuals. what is your message to governments around the world ? what is your message to governments around the world? the message is that the cultural sector is extra vulnerable to this. the first to suffer. and i think that the last two kind of comeback
10:53 am
because it will look at the live sector, if we look at live entertainment, it has almost come to a complete shutdown. the theatres will be the last to open some time next year. and meanwhile, my message is that this culture is so important to people. so it is worth their support. absolutely, it has been so important sustaining people during the lockdown whether they are listening to music, reading literature etc. thank you so much for talking to us, beyond. we appreciate your time. i think people will be saying thank you for the music again. i was challenged to get one of the names of your songs into the interview so there you go, i did it! thank you very much. bjorn ulvaeus, one quarter, of course, of abba. great to talk to him.
10:54 am
the pandemic has led to all kinds of businesses and activities being suspended. shops, restaurants, sporting events — all of them were curtailed to some extent or another. something you can add to that list is mountaineering. the consequences for many have been dramatic — as the bbc‘s tim allman explains. in the age of coronavirus, it can be surprisingly quiet at the top of the world. this chinese survey team have the summit of everest pretty much to themselves. normally, they are queueing up for this view but with climbing suspended, only official expeditions like this one are allowed. the impact on nepal has been stark. tourism is the lifeblood of kathmandu. translation: this happened in the main season of march, april and may, which is the high season. just when the groups were due to come, the lockdown happened, so it feels like someone just snatched away food from our mouths. this is a huge loss for us.
10:55 am
among those hardest hit, the 200,000, orso, sherpas, the local ethnic group who make every climb possible, but the pandemic of present opportunities as well as challenges. translation: we hope for relief from the government. by relief, we are not asking them to give us free money. there's the case of the mountains being polluted, so if we can clean the mountains during this time, there will be job creation, and the mountains will become cleaner. the hope is, as restrictions are lifted, climbing can resume but some fear it may be years, rather than months, before tourism returns to normal. the challenge of everest becomes harder than ever. tim allman, bbc news. for something completely different. the deepest ever sighting
10:56 am
of an octopus has been made by cameras on the floor of the indian ocean. the octopus has been photographed at a depth of 7,000 metres — that's almost two kilometres deeper than the previous record. i'm so sorry, we have lost the pictures for you. researchers say it's a species known as dumbo because of its resemblance to the disney character. if you want to look it up. you're watching bbc news. martine croxall will be here with more news for you in the next few minutes but first let's ta ke in the next few minutes but first let's take a look at the weather forecast with matt taylor. hello, we saw a dramatic turnaround in weather conditions at the start of this spring. things have changed so dramatically that we finish with the announcement that this spring has been the sunniest on record in the uk according to provisional data from the met office and there is little to break that stride as we see the month out. this we staying dry and sunny and warm in many areas. certainly a day of blue skies from dawn to dusk today
10:57 am
across most parts of the uk. there are some high cloud in the west particularly, the odd patch of sea fog close to north sea coasts, more across parts of shetland. the wind is coming in from the east or south—east, that means the warmest air will be in the west sheltered from the gentle breeze. north—west highlands of scotland today, one of the warmest spots, could hit 28 celsius, 82 fahrenheit, the record for scotland in may stands closer to 31 degrees. 20s widely across the rest of scotland. we will see up to around 25 in the west of northern ireland, 25—27 in western parts of england and wales, cooler down cooler down the east coast of lincolnshire, east anglia and kent with the chilly wind coming off the north sea. but whether you have got 17 degrees or 28 this afternoon the sun is every bit as strong this afternoon and pollen levels continue to rise, grass pollen at its highest through wales, the midlands and southern parts of england. the sunshine by day replaced by starry skies tonight with all areas staying dry. the odd mist or fog patch particularly close to eastern coasts of england. after the warmth of the day it
10:58 am
should be anotherfresh night so you can open your windows and let in the fresh air as you start your weekend as temperatures dip down below 10 degrees in a few spots. this is the picture over the weekend, high pressure keeping things dry, nudged away a bit further allowing a more east to south—easterly winds to develop a limiting temperature is a touch across scotland on saturday relative to today. but still a warm day for many, still sunny for many, the odd mist or fog patch across east coasts of england, fair with a cloud across england and where is later. while temperatures drop on eastern coasts with the breeze off the sea, still well into the mid 20s across western areas. and into sunday, a greater chance of morning sea fog across eastern parts of scotland and eastern england, most of which will break up, western areas sheltered from the breeze. still pretty warm, the warmest of the air on sunday towards wales and the south—west of england. see you soon.
10:59 am
11:00 am
this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. as lockdown restrictions start to ease, the uk's chief scientist warns people to stick to the rules — groups of up to six people can meet outside in england from monday. it means you can get an opportunity for people, for instance, to visit parents or visit other friends and family and to do so in a way outdoors or in a garden. i think that is the thing that people want to be able to do most of all. in scotland, up to eight people can meet members from another household. and, in wales and northern ireland people will be allowed to meet friends and family from another household from monday. a police station in the us city of minneapolis has been set alight during a third night of protests over the death
11:01 am
of an unarmed black man in custody. and the row between donald trump and twitter escalates — the social media site hides one of the presidents tweets with a warning that it ‘glorifies violence'. the post suggested minneapolis looters could be shot. the chancellor is set to reveal how employers will contribute to the cost of the coronavirus job retention scheme which is currently paying the wages of more than eight million people. coming up... britain in lockdown — we'll talk to a researcher who's found we're eating and drinking more and nearly half of us have gained weight. hello and welcome to audiences in the uk and around the world. we're covering all the latest news and analysis from here and across the globe.
11:02 am
the uk's chief scientific adviser has urged people to stick to social distancing guidelines as further easing of restrictions begins. from monday, groups of up to six people in from different households in england will be able to meet in parks and private gardens. in scotland from today, groups of up to eight people from two different households will be able to meet outside, as long as they stay two metres apart. and in wales and northern ireland, people will be allowed to meet friends and family from another household from monday, but social distancing must be maintained. away from coronavirus and in the united states, a police station in the city of minneapolis has been set alight of the unarmed black man, george floyd, while he was in custody. in an escalating row between twitter and the white house, the social media giant has hidden one of president trump's tweets from his profile, saying it violates rules about glorifying violence. in the now hidden tweet, the president suggested minneapolis
11:03 am
looters could be shot. here in the uk, the chancellor, rishi sunak, is expected to set out plans for employers to contribute to the cost of the coronavirus job retention scheme, which is currently paying up to 80% of the wages of more than eight million furloughed workers in the uk. it's thought the chancellor will ask firms to contribute 20% of wages from august. let's talk to our political correspondent jonathan blake does then it will come to the fellows schema moments, but the easing of restrictions, a some somewhat complex picture, because the four nations in the uk can do their own thing. yes, depending on where you live, the guidelines are very different, and as you suggest, thatis very different, and as you suggest, that is because the devolved nations have response abilities for health ca re have response abilities for health care in allfour have response abilities for health care in all four nations and so those respective governments and their public health officials have decided to introduce slightly different changes to the lockdown
11:04 am
restrictions. as you are outlining there, the changes either happening today, in the case of scotland, or in the next couple of days in the, in the next couple of days in the, in the cases of england, wales and northern ireland. the numbers vary slightly in broadly speaking, groups of people from different households will be able to meet outside. it is a significant change, but one that is not without risk, because the guidance is still very much that people need to maintain a two metre social distancing role, even when they are meeting in groups outside. as for the discrepancy in the numbers, the environment secretary for england, he's been explaining what's the thinking was behind allowing six people from any number of households to meet outside in england. we think that sex is a sensible level, we know that the risk of transmission outdoors is actually very low, but actually if
11:05 am
you've got lots of people crowded in a garden, if you've got two families of six crowded and, of the day, that's not to be more difficult to maintain social distancing, so we think sex is a sensible number, it means you can get an opportunity for people to, for instance, to go and visit parents or visit other friends and families and to do so outside in and families and to do so outside in a way that outdoors or in the garden, andl a way that outdoors or in the garden, and i think that's what people want to do most of all. like the number in wales will be so different, the rule is, as i was a front no more than two different households. that new guidance in wales, when we hear from the minister later on, it will be accompanied for a new message for people to stay local, which is they don't want people to be travelling long distances around the country to meet up with others. he explain the thinking behind this morning. blue we have parts of wales we have a
11:06 am
very little parts of coronavirus and we don't want the virus to be brought into those communities. you can be infectious to other people while feeling perfectly well yourself and travelling more than five miles away from your home runs the risk that you could be taken coronavirus from your community to another community, where the fiery virus isn't circulating, that is why our message to people in wales is very simple, stay local, keep wales say. while the guidelines are changing our nation to nation basis as to how many people you can meet with outside, the economic response isa with outside, the economic response is a very much driven by the government here at westminster for the whole of the uk and we will hear later on about how one be part of thatis later on about how one be part of that is going to change in the coming months. the fellow scheme, or thejob retention coming months. the fellow scheme, or the job retention scheme, coming months. the fellow scheme, or thejob retention scheme, its proper name, which was launched back in april, is currently paying the wages
11:07 am
of 80% of workers wages come up to a maximum of two and half thousand pounds per worker. originally, maximum of two and half thousand pounds perworker. originally, it was scheduled to run until the end ofjune, but we know it will now run until october. as to how much costing, figures of speech show that 8.4 million workers and are covered by the skin, and a cast of £10 billion per month and the overall cost, according to the government's tax and spending watchdog, could be up tax and spending watchdog, could be up to £80 billion. this is a hugely expensive scheme for the government to have put into operation. as we know, so many people are relying on it to pay their wages and keep them inajob. we it to pay their wages and keep them in a job. we will hear from the chancellor later on, but we are expecting that he will say that companies who are taking advantage of the scheme to keep their workers on, will need to start contributing towards the cost of their staffs
11:08 am
wages. we think around 20%, companies will have to pay, with the government paying 60%. many companies may be able to do that, there is a worry, that those in the hospitality sector specifically, who are not able to open up and get any income at the moment, may decide that they cannot take part in the scheme because they simply cannot afford to even pay a small portion of their staff wages. there is a delicate bank balancing act that make balancing acts, hours before the chancellor to set out the data is of the scheme. jonathan, there is also concern for people who are self—employed, they feel like they got left behind when this fellow scheme was first introduced and they sort of had to play catch up. what announcement might there be regarding them? announcement might there be regarding them ? it announcement might there be regarding them? it is unclear if we get anything more on the self—employed support scheme today, but there has been pressure on the
11:09 am
chancellor to keep the scheme running so far, but it is different to it is so far, because it has been offering to help people support themselves on a one—off grant, to ta ke themselves on a one—off grant, to take support on the ground like over a set period. over the magnet is not designed to keep the attach to a particular job, designed to keep the attach to a particularjob, as the fellow designed to keep the attach to a particular job, as the fellow scheme is. nevertheless, there is pressure from the chancellor and a group of mps —— mike on the chancellor from from the chancellor and a group of mps —— mike on the chancellorfrom a group of mps and i would expect to hear more from labour, in terms of pressure, for the chancellor to act. they are arguing that as part of the economy returns to work, and the track and trace system comes in, which will ask people to self—isolate, if they have come into contact with someone who has coronavirus, those people should be eligible for financial support. jonathan, for the moment, thank you very much.
11:10 am
the rules around lockdown are different depending on which nation within the uk you live in. in one hour's time, we'll be answering your questions on what the new rules are where you are — you can send your questions by emailing yourquestions@bbc.co.uk or you can use the hashtag bbc your questions — and we will answer your questions injust around an hour. twitter has for the first time hidden one of president donald's trump's tweets from his profile, saying the post violates the site's rules against glorifying violence. the site has replaced the tweet with a warning message where it would usually appear on the timeline — but it can still be viewed by clicking on it. the original post describes minneapolis rioters protesting the death of a black man in police custody as ‘thugs', and threatens the use of force to restore order. ‘when the looting starts, the shooting starts' — the president tweeted in the early hours of the morning. twitter has explained its decision to hide the post,
11:11 am
saying it's worried the president's glorification of violence could inspire real—life shootings. the site says it's in the public interest to keep the tweet viewable. the move comes after donald our technology correspondent rory cellan jones says twitter‘s decision is likely to enrage president trump. months on end twitter has been dithering about what to do about donald trump's tweets. on the one side, people were saying to the company, "listen, he is getting "away with stuff that would "not be allowed for any other user in the content of his tweets." on the other side, conservative voices were saying, "social media is biased against us, don't you dare do "anything." on wednesday, they engaged in some limited action with regard to tweets about postal ballots in the united states, putting in a fact checking line. and they said that was very
11:12 am
narrow action because they have got rules about something which could, for instance, dissuade people from voting. so that is how theyjustified that. of course, the president did not see it that way, lashed back, threatened to go as far as closing down social media platforms, and brought in that measure, which would be pretty damaging if it went through, in terms of the ability of social media platforms to protect themselves. and then, in the last few hours, twitter could have just sat back, hunkered down and waited for what happened next. instead of which, they acted again in a much broader way, really, with this big label on this tweet saying that it has violated the twitter rules about glorifying violence. now, of course, they could have gone further. with any other user, they might have removed the tweet or even suspended the account, but this will be quite enough, i'm sure, to enrage the president when he wakes up. president trump's tweet was about the situation in minneapolis.
11:13 am
a police station in the city was set alight during a third night of protests over the death of an unarmed black man. george floyd died after he was pinned down by police. the last few days have seen multiple buildings burned to the ground or looted. the governor of minnesota has ordered the deployment of hundreds of members of the national guard to restore order. and this is the scene there live now. our north america correspondent david willis has more — his report contains some distressing images. minneapolis burned again last night. protesters clashing with police for the third night in a row. we got gunshots, we got gunshots, guys. officers fired tear gas but couldn't prevent another night of arson, looting and rioting. all of which culminated in the city's main police station being set ablaze.
11:14 am
earlier, the state governor announced he was activating the national guard after declaring the time had come not only to rebuild the city but the fractious relationship between its people and the police. we need to make sure... we need to make sure that people are looking out for our city right now. it's notjust enough to do the right thing yourself. we need to be making sure that all of us are held accountable to make sure that we are holding up the highest ideals that we stand by. george floyd died after being handcuffed and pinned to the ground by a white police officer who put his knee on mr floyd's neck and held it there, as he pleaded for air. as the minutes pass, he stopped speaking. then he stops moving. the four officers involved in the arrest have since been sacked,
11:15 am
but there are growing calls for them to face criminal charges. what that additional evidence consisted of, he didn't say, but the longer officials delay pressing charges, the more the anger here seems to grow. earlier, in an ultimately futile attempt to defuse the tension, the local police chief issued a public apology. i know that there is currently a deficit of hope in our city and as i wear this uniform before you, i know that this department has contributed to that deficit of hope, but i will not allow to continue to increase that deficit by re—traumatising and those of folks in our community. protests over george floyd's death has spread to other cities putting race relations firmly on the political agenda but as this country's racial fault lines are laid bare once again the sight of minneapolis burning serves as a stark reflection of a community now at boiling point. david willis, bbc news, los angeles.
11:16 am
we have the latest pictures of another building being set on fire. you can see it completely ablaze against the night sky there in minneapolis. again, reaction to the death of george floyd, the 46—year—old man who was apprehended by police and an officer knelt on his neck. he said he could not raise and he died some time later. this is the latest incidents of arson. we have really been telling you about the police station that was set alight. before that had even happened, the minnesota governor has activated the national guard's troops that were stationed in the state at the request of the mayo of minneapolis. —— may of minneapolis. he also declared that a peacetime
11:17 am
emergency and the looting and arson had seen on wednesday night had resulted on the damage to many businesses including ones owned by minority ethnic people. he said, in a statement, george floyd's death should lead to thejustice and systemic changes that we need, not more death and destruction. those are the latest pictures of a recent arson incident. this is in minneapolis. the headlines on bbc news... the uk's chief scientist has urged people to continue following the rules as lockdown restrictions begin to ease. a police station was set on fire during a third night of rioting in minneapolis. the protests are over the death of an unarmed black man in custody. the uk chancellor is expected to announce changes to the coronavirus job retention scheme — companies will have to start paying towards the wages of their furloughed workers. it's the second day of the new test
11:18 am
and trace scheme in england. a team of 25,000 contract tracers have been deployed to track down people who've been in contact with someone who tests positive for coronavirus. they'll then tell them to self—isolate. mike beck is the global head of threat analysis at the cyber defence company darktrace. hejoins me now. welcome to bbc news. how limited is this test entry system going to be without an app up and running? there isa without an app up and running? there is a good question, i think...|j think the key part of this approach is going to be the human touch points with these researchers we can —— you can get to the bottom of people who test positive who have beenin people who test positive who have been in contact with, but there is this other side of it, as restrictions left, and as we start to move around again, technology is going to play a really important pa rt going to play a really important part in those brushes with people
11:19 am
that researchers aren't able to get to. the two need to work hand in glove, i think there is clearly pressure mounting to get the tracing app delivered to a general release now outside of the trial and to bring online. i would agree that the two together are very important. what are the challenges though of using an app across the entire country except in small part of the country except in small part of the country like the isle of wight as a has—been you so far? not everybody has—been you so far? not everybody has smartphones these days. is a huge challenge, and we should not underestimate it. bringing to market an application, a smartphone application that is used by millions of people is a tough thing to do. they bring it to market very quickly, are busy trying it and
11:20 am
fixing bugs that have occurred and they are rapidly understanding how to operationalise it at a national level. i think on the second point about smartphone usage, again, that isa about smartphone usage, again, that is a concern that there is a certain level that the government needs to achieve in the actual number of downloads, people using the app day—to—day to get that tipping points where they can get to the points where they can get to the point of people brushing past each other. it is a concern, but i think we are going to live and breathe in this for a long time and it is what it is to appoint. so they will have to live with a number of downloads they can get. what are the number of concerns that you have regarding privacy of this whole system, whether it is via an app or particularly via an app, or even being contacted by someone who says
11:21 am
that they eye contact tracer, you need to trust that they are doing a legitimate job? need to trust that they are doing a legitimatejob? i need to trust that they are doing a legitimate job? i think... need to trust that they are doing a legitimate job? i think. . ij need to trust that they are doing a legitimate job? i think... i think there is a side of the contact contacting you, very clearly contacting you, very clearly contacting you, very clearly contacting you outlining what is happening. on the technology side, i think the privacy angle is, we are talking about the scale factor there, in terms of how many people are contributing to the data pod, i think there is a good amount of debate that there has been on the nhs app, they have followed a centralised approach which means that the application on people's phone will talk centrally to a database that is controlled by the nhs team. that just database that is controlled by the nhs team. thatjust means there are all sorts of concerns about how long
11:22 am
that data will be stored, what has been taken, i think all of us would agree that we want this to work. we absolutely want to be able to release those restrictions and mobilise again, but there is that view about actually how long 1's data is stored and algae start to get twea ks, data is stored and algae start to get tweaks, usage of the data that may change over time, but as a key privacy can send may change over time, but as a key rivac can send i'm may change over time, but as a key privacy can send i'm definitely hearing. global head of threat analysis at dutch race, thank you very much forjoining us. hundreds of schools have been closed in south korea just days after they reopened —— because of a spike in coronavirus infections. our seoul correspondent laura bicker has this update. health officials in south korea
11:23 am
are describing the current cluster outbreaks as a crisis situation. the reason they are concerned is that these outbreaks are in areas of high population. they are all linked to a distribution warehouse for one of the country's biggest e—commerce firms, coupang. so far over 90 people related to that warehouse outbreak have been confirmed as having coronavirus. there have also been secondary infections within the community. now, as ever, south korean health officials are excellent at tracking, tracing and testing everyone in relation to the warehouse. but these cropping up of outbreaks continue to happen, and that is one of the reasons that they are putting out this warning. so far they have encouraged people to stay indoors if they can this weekend. they are saying this is a criticaljuncture, if they are to stop secondary spread within the community. now, they have rolled back some kind of
11:24 am
restrictions, so public parks and museums have been closed. businesses are being urged to allow people to work more flexible hours, so work from home is back. schools, too, have had to close their doors, some of them. around 800 schools have stayed closed just days after the next phase of reopening. the ministry of education said next week they will continue with the phase reopening of schools, but this is the plea that they are making to people, they are saying to continue with the social distancing measures, continue to wear a mask, continue to stay vigilant for the sake of your children's education. it is a plea that has worked in the past, and they are hoping that will work again. remember, south korea has never been in lockdown, they have relied on this aggressive testing and tracing strategy. it is one that has been, so far, incredibly successful and one the world is using as a role model. and that is why the eyes
11:25 am
of the world are currently on this country, if even here they are finding it difficult to keep this virus under control, it shows how difficult it will be countries with larger outbreaks. so as we touched on earlier — the chancellor is being urged to extend support for millions of self—employed people who have been unable to work during the coronavirus pandemic. the government had given self—employed workers who qualify, a grant of 80% of their average profits, up to £2,500, for three months. yshani perinpanayagam is a self—employed pianist and music director and one of those who has had government support. when lockdown began she was working as the music director on two productions at the royal shakespeare company, which were both closed. she's in south london. thank you very much forjoining us. just tell us a little bit more about
11:26 am
the work that you do, and it's out sounds a fascinating and thrilling things to do. i make my living from a lot of different things, from playing the piano in small groups to an orchestra, orchestras, to a music doc director, i do this composing and a little bit of teaching, so lots of different things. how much of that though, have you been able to do and continue during lockdown? very, very little. all of the music directing has stopped, inevitably and everything with orchestras and everything that involves being in close interaction with other people. there is a bit of composing it is going on, but with the performances down, there is not all that much to compose for. work has essentially evaporated for me. is a very personal question, but how have you managed to make ends meet?|j personal question, but how have you managed to make ends meet? i have been relying on my savings. i have
11:27 am
been relying on my savings. i have beenin been relying on my savings. i have been ina been relying on my savings. i have been in a privileged position may have been able to save, so it has just been or small amounts of money that i have been relying on. other people creative —— my other creative people creative —— my other creative people that you know, however they then managing? and has been very different situations for everyone, there are people like me relying on savings, some are relying on their partners, others who are running out and getting jobs. that is unable to pay their rent and afford food. so you meanjobs pay their rent and afford food. so you mean jobs that are nothing pay their rent and afford food. so you meanjobs that are nothing like the creative work that they do? yes, sojobs like working the creative work that they do? yes, so jobs like working in corner shops or deliveries. there have been a lot of people having to go and involve themselves in a totally different
11:28 am
areas of work in order to make ends meet. how well has the fellow scheme that the government launched some weeks ago worked for you another southern ploy people? it has really helped. a lot of people can't manage to do any work, i can't say the work i have done while lockdown has kept me financially afloat on its own, but i have been able to do some things with that support. it has really helped. they have been other people who are home—schooling, who can't find a space to compose in quiet or perhaps they are really specialised in their skill and only perform, which has disappeared. so it has been invaluable. what extra announcement would you like to hear from the chancellor rishi sunak later? i would like to see, very
11:29 am
simply, i would like to see extended. i would like to see the recognition that, as we pay our taxes, debt that help and support from our government and our chancellor will come to us. thank you for speaking to us. thank you for some... . hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: as lockdown restrictions start to ease, the uk's chief scientist has stressed people need to stick to the rules — groups of up to six people can meet outside in england from monday. in scotland, up to eight people can meet members from another household, and in wales and northern ireland there's a similar easing from monday. a police station in the us city of minneapolis has been set alight during a third night of protests over the death of an unarmed black man in custody. and the row between donald trump and twitter escalates —
11:30 am
the social media site has covered one of the president's tweets with a warning that it ‘glorifies violence'. the post suggested minneapolis looters could be shot. the uk chancellor is set to reveal how employers will contribute to the cost of the coronavirus job retention scheme, which is currently paying the wages of more than 8 million people. in spain, cases of covid—19 appear to have stabilised after claiming the lives of more than 27,000 people. but the country now faces a major economic crisis. in response, the cabinet of socialist prime minister, pedro sanchez, is today expected to approve a guaranteed basic income for the country's poorest families, an initiative which has rarely been implemented before in europe. guy hedgecoe reports from madrid. in this working—class district in southern madrid, volunteers hand out food. many of those receiving it have fallen through the cracks
11:31 am
of the welfare system. the unemployed, zero hours workers, immigrants. life was already difficult for them before, but coronavirus and more than two months of lockdown have left them desperate. translation: in my family, my mother is the only one who works. she does half days cleaning houses, my father is unemployed like me, and i have a one—year—old girl. thanks to this association, we are getting help. the neighbours' association started distributing food just a few weeks ago as the pandemic started to spread. it isjust incredible the amount of people who have decided, if my neighbour has nothing on their fridge, i am going to give them some. so we have queues and queues of people bringing bags and putting money into an account we have open. the health care crisis has now
11:32 am
stabilised, but it is turning into an economic crisis, the leftist government has now unveiled a guaranteed basic income, a monthly payment for the country's poorest people, starting at around 500 euros per household. translation: it is a historic measure for a democracy to make sure nobody is left behind, and this has been a commitment since this coalition government took office. it is a very good use of government money because it is directed to the people, not to companies, i think that creates some moral problems, that giving money to people does not have, and we are always giving money to people that really need it. but not everyone agrees with the government's policies. supporters of the far right vox party protested last weekend. it has accused the government of drifting towards leftist radicalism. this week, spain has been lifting for the restrictions following what has been one of the toughest lockdowns in europe.
11:33 am
the hope is that in the coming weeks the economy as a whole and those who have been hardest hit by this crisis can get back up on their feet. guy hedgecoe, bbc news, madrid. around one in seven people may have broken uk lockdown rules by being visited at home by friends or family, research suggests. a study by king's college london with ipsos mori found that members of the public claimed to be sticking to the now—altered "stay at home" advice to an "extraordinary degree". professor bobby duffy, director of the policy institute at kcl, said the study showed a reasonable proportion of those surveyed have had visits from family and friends while this was not permitted. welcome, how good is a result of six out of seven people observing the rules strictly? the level of compliance was really quite extraordinary, the restrictions of how we have had to change our lives
11:34 am
has been incredible, that is the normal cross. most of the things that you look at, nine and ten people say they are observing social distancing by saying two metres away from people, people are taking it even further, you have 55% of people washing and disinfecting items that they bring into their house. the only thing that stands out within all that measures that we asked about is they said visiting at home, where 14%, about is they said visiting at home, where14%, about one in seven people say that they have done that against the lockdown rules, not has trickled since we first asked the question backin since we first asked the question back in the beginning of april. so it really points to what people have been suffering around, and that is that lack of contact with family and friends. how do people rationalize that if they know it is not what they should be doing?|j that if they know it is not what they should be doing? i think it is not emotional reaction, we found it very tough to be apart from our family and friends, and we have had incredible levels of compliance that
11:35 am
have been driven by a strong sense of both personal threat, for in ten people think that if they caught coronavirus that they would have to go to hospital, when that is much higher than the likely reality, and we re higher than the likely reality, and were very worried about its impact on others. so i think this visiting at home showsjust on others. so i think this visiting at home shows just how much we have missed each other and how important these measures to be able to meet up at least outside of the home are going to be for people. what struck me as well as having to stay two metres apart from people, you realise how little personal space you normally require. yes, that is true, it is a different way of living. and many aspects of our lives things are completely transformed, and people are getting used to it very quickly, so now 38% of people say that they wear masks outside their home, and that was nonexistent at the start of the crisis. so we have shifted, and it
11:36 am
is driven by that sense of duty, responsibility, partly to ourselves, partly protecting ourselves, but for most people it is the protection of others, not kind of community spirit that we have had around the crisis —— we have that community spirit around the crisis. i find it very tiring, because you have to be thinking about what you have to be doing all the time, what of the other changes, a lot of us are eating and drinking more, seeking comfort? now, we think that we are putting on weight as a result of the lockdown, i feel very connected to that as a trend that we are seeing. when we ask you people are drinking more as well, not has gone up significantly, three and ten people say that they are drinking now more than they did before the crisis, not as related to that sense of anxiety and distress that people have. so
11:37 am
half of people are saying that they are more anxious and distressed than before the crisis started, so you do get that sense of comfort eating and drinking, needs one of the things that we need to be aware of as a crisis continues. there are health effects, mental health, physical health, it is very unusual and stressful way to live. thank you very much for your time today. let's bring you some live pictures now from istanbul, where mosques are reopening for friday prayers, as the country begins to ease coronavirus restrictions. close to 4,500 people have died of covid—19 in turkey with more than 160,000 confirmed cases. australia is now seeing very few new cases of covid—19, and across the country restrictions are being eased.
11:38 am
in new south wales, the country's most populous state, students have returned to full—time, face—to—face learning in the classroom. our australia correspondent, shaimaa khalil, looks at how schools and families are adjusting. back to school after nine weeks at home. a familiar place in very different times. even the school drop—off has changed. a quick goodbye at the gate and hand sanitiser to start the day. watch over the students, teachers and families of saint columbus. there are no more big gatherings at saint columbus primary, morning assembly and prayers now happen in small groups. and the holy spirit, amen. and in pe classes, contact sports are out. almost everyone is back in the classroom here, but social distancing with children in school is tricky, if not impossible. instead, the focus is on good hygiene and doing what they can to minimise the risk.
11:39 am
after getting to grips with learning from home, students now have to adapt to the new safety measures. it's a bit differnet to when i left. there is hand sanitiser in all of the classrooms, lots, and we have to use that when we eat and after we eat. there's been staggered dismissal times, and we leave from different parts of the school. well, it's good being back at school, because then we can see everyone and face—to—face learning is easier to understand, but i guess it's also a little bit nerve—racking, being back at school. has anyone ever been in a helicopter before? what teachers can't avoid being close to their students, they are trying to maintain social distancing with each other. despite the relatively low number of covid—19 cases in australia, the risk of infection remains. some sydney schools have had fresh coronavirus cases this week, and have been forced to close. there appears to be a degree of complacency creeping in. we're not out of the woods yet.
11:40 am
this is a pandemicm and we need to be very careful to ensure the health safety of all concerned. for some parents, it's not going back to school that worries them, it's how their children get there. twins peter and matthew used to take the bus and then a train, but now their mother does the drop—off and the pick—up. there's going to be a lot of people returning to work. with winter coming, there is an increase injust the normal cold and flu season and so lots more people coughing and sneezing. so, i think if you can, it's good to drive them to school. most of the children here seem happy to be back. but even in australia, which has fared far better than most with the virus, school days will be different for a while. shaimaa khalil, bbc news, sydney. there have been more than 10,000 online grooming offences in england and wales, in the two and a half years since the law making it illegal to send sexual messages to children came into effect.
11:41 am
55% of those offences have taken place on facebook—owned apps, that's according to the children's charity, the nspcc. the charity is now urging the prime minister to get on with regulation of social networks and publicly commit to having an online harms bill within 18 months. joining me now is andy burrows, who's head of child online safety at the nspcc. tell us a little bit more about these findings, i think these figures came up there a freedom of information request. yes, that is right, so it is two and a half years since a new grooming offence, that ascending sexual communication with the child, was put out. and in that time, within england and wales, we have seen 10,000 offences, and as you said at the introduction, what is really concerning is that more than half of those are on facebook owned apps. sadly, it's a depressing
11:42 am
problem that we have seen before, but it is the largest site with the greatest resources to get top of child abuse risk are the ones that are child abuse risk are the ones that a re really child abuse risk are the ones that are really dragging. how is it happening given that the social network sites themselves have this responsibility? what we're looking at is years of failed self—regulation comb relating in the scale of child abuse —— cumulating in the scale of child abuse that we see now, that legal requirements that we see now, platforms have not prioritise making sure that their platforms are safe and that they are saved by design. we know that if you ta ke saved by design. we know that if you take a site like facebook, people are actively able to exploit the design features of the site, that is like the friend suggestions that people have. if you are a groomer and you are looking to make contact with children, we know that they can simply refresh the page and get a fresh list of children to be able to contact him at his those design features which really accentuate the risk. children under13 aren't meant
11:43 am
to be on these platforms, are they? children under 13 are not meant to be on these platforms commonwealth avenue is an arbitrary age, it really underlines the blind guy that is turned to the risk of children safety. we a re is turned to the risk of children safety. we are clear that they said situation will not change, at best what we can expect is for a action, reactive action, in response to political concern or media concern, for example after the death and national outcry last year. it is only now that we see the prime minister borisjohnson only now that we see the prime minister boris johnson personally commit to getting this harm spill go through in the next few months, introducing regulation that no longer makes it a choice to protect children, that we will see this change. at can cause a awful lot of tension between parents and guardians and the children they are looking after, if you try to keep up with what your children are doing online, how do you go about doing that without causing that upset? and
11:44 am
if you find something has gone wrong, something that has happened, who do you take it to? and that is particularly the case right now with children being at home trying lockdown and relying much more on devices to stay connected with friends. our advice is quite simple, it is just to try and have regular conversations with your child and taken conversations with your child and ta ken interest and conversations with your child and taken interest and which apps and sites they use. you can get on a website that shows an overview of the most popular sites and games, and if you have those regular conversations, i think that is very important because that is something that does happen to a child to make them feel uncomfortable, they know that they can talk to you. have regular conversations, viewer having dinner in the evening, that is really important help to make sure that if something bad does happen, that if something bad does happen, that you can really help your child therein. thank you very much for joining us from the nspcc.
11:45 am
the headlines on bbc news... the uk's chief scientist has urged people to continue following the rules as lockdown restrictions begin to ease. a police station was set on fire during a third night of rioting in minneapolis. the protests are over the death of an unarmed black man in custody. the chancellor is expected to announce changes to the coronavirus job retention scheme, companies will have to start paying towards the wages of their furloughed workers. british car manufacturing came to a halt in april, as production plants closed due to the coronavirus. according to the society of motor manufacturers and traders, just 197 cars rolled off the production line last month. that's down over 99% on the same month last year. the news comes as renault announces it's cutting 15,000 jobs worldwide after sales plummeted. let's get the thoughts now of ian plummer —
11:46 am
commercial director of the new and used car website, autotrader. ian, when have you seen something like this before? are you referring to renault or the overall industry? the overall industry. i don't think anyone has seen a decline in market quite like this, we have seen a fall in supply and demand across virtually all markets across the world come to the end parks are noticeable, whether it be the brands or the industries. how predicted it was the renault situation? barry predicted, because we have artie heard from this week from the alliance initially about their plans to cut costs across those different structures, and we have heard this againa day structures, and we have heard this again a day later on and a very similar theme is that it feels like
11:47 am
they are writing up their strategy and trying to make an alliance, not so much a merger, but i must closer integration. and essentially, the first phase is going to be around cutting costs and rationalizing ranges and increasing synergies across their alliance. how could this have been avoided, the renault situation on the global picture, given that pretty much every country lockdown in some way with? the renault situation has been coming over the last few years —— has been coming over the last few months, i think they are focusing on strengthening the value any high—margin products and markets the economy. i think the intern chief executive of renault highlighted very well the approach that they have, which is now all about not looking to be top of the world, which they were aiming to do, but
11:48 am
aiming to be a sustainable and profitable company. and i think what they will need to do in this current period is look at all of their operations, cut capacity, rationalize brands, and consolidate across the industry, and try and lead how we go from here. many people have not driven for weeks because they have been told not to go anywhere. where is the optimism for this industry? there is a high level of optimism and what we can see there, i think the car buyer in the car driver in the uk is now starting to get back on the road, and increasingly starting to get backin and increasingly starting to get back in touch with retailers. and we as the leading market place for cars in the uk, we see a lot of audience, we see1.2 in the uk, we see a lot of audience, we see 1.2 million users each day coming on to our sites, people expressing their interest, so that gives us a unique opportunity to
11:49 am
understand what they are doing. we took a dive strongly at the beginning of the crisis, but it is coming back periodically, right now we are seeing extended leads that are significantly out, we are seeing large incoming inquiries, and the consumers are keen to get back into carbine. the research that we have done off—site shows that only 2% of people that are in the market to buy ca rs people that are in the market to buy cars this year, so they are now looking to defer, and around 84% are still confident that they will be buying in the year ahead. so i think thatis buying in the year ahead. so i think that is a reflection of that market being paused and not stopped, and the heart of the crisis it is not a question of not ever, butjust not now. so when retailers open on monday we will see the return that we are describing here and the return of telephone inquiries. we appreciate you, thank you so much.
11:50 am
we are going to take you to minneapolis again, we have some live pictures coming to us. if you wait just one second you should see in the background that there is some very heavily armed police officers on the streets and minneapolis, this is after a third night of rioting, and we are seeing buildings set on fire. there was a police station that was set on fire overnight, and another building that we are showing you a short while ago. it is these actions, the arson, the looting, this is in response to the death of george floyd, who is a 46—year—old unarmed black man who was knelt on bya unarmed black man who was knelt on by a police officer, this was filmed, he said he could not breathe and he died sometime later. his family are demanding that the four police officers implicated in his death face merger charges —— murder
11:51 am
charges. in the last year minutes, cnn release are reporting on the protests a nd cnn release are reporting on the protests and they were arrested while on air, months them with a correspondent was covering the protest for the channel's day programme when he was handcuffed by minnesota state control. police say that he was told to move and he did not come of the footage shows jiminez saying that he will move to wherever they are told to go. tell me why i am under arrest, sir. why am i under arrest, sir? you arresting me live on cnn. we told you before that we're with cnn. if you're just tuning in, you are watching our
11:52 am
correspondent being arrested by state police in minnesota. we're not sure why... dental practices in england will be allowed to reopen in less than two weeks' time, the chief dental officer has said. the choice of whether to accept face—to—face patients from 8thjune will be down to individual practices, but all surgeries must have sufficient protective equipment in place. i've been in pain since the end of march. i just couldn't cope with the pain any more. i would have gone through birth rather than that pain. it was horrendous. i've been told more antibiotics or tooth out. i didn't realise how hard it would be to take out a molar. i can go to mcdonald's, but i can't go to a dentist. we had to use these pliers here. it's dentistry of a victorian age. i mean, we don't do dentistry like that. over the weeks, our virtual waiting room has been filling up
11:53 am
with patients in pain unable to get treatment. it makes my blood boil, to be honest. i'm not interested in clothes, i'm not interested in clothes shops. i just want my tooth sorted out. you know? so i'm just outraged that this has just been, to me, ignored. emergency appointments have been hard to get, and treatment options have been limited. the urgent dental hub won't see me anyway, and even if they did, i'm not sure i want them to because i'll end up losing two teeth. so then came stories of diy dentistry. it was quite tricky. i thought maybe 10 or 15 minutes but an hour and a half it took me. he said, "mum, think there's something wrong with my tooth." 11—year—old charlie's tooth fell out still attached to his braces that should have been taken off weeks ago. i tried to get it off myself because i thought maybe i should pull it off. but then i found out it was actually attached to a little piece of my brace.
11:54 am
i've been a dentist 31 years, and this has shocked me to the core. the best their dentist could do was talk them through it over the phone. so i had to ask charlie's mum and dad if they had got any pliers and they had to take these pliers to their child's mouth, and i'm embarrassed that, as a profession, we can't look after our patients. i think it's kind of crazy that i was able to have a plumber here today to fix my waste disposal, but i can't get my son to a dentist. some dentists say they've been ready to reopen for weeks, but not everyone can get the right protective equipment and there are fears higher costs and limited patient numbers, because of social distancing, will make it difficult to clear the backlog and hard to see a viable future for every practice. getting face—to—face with a dentist still won't be easy. dan johnson, bbc news.
11:55 am
the world's largest all—electric aircraft has made its maiden flight, taking to the skies over washington state. it's hoped the plane, which can carry up to nine passengers, will enter commercial use next year. roei ganzarski is the ceo of ‘magnix' who developed the zero emissions engine, and he told us more about the plane. it's actually a very old aeroplane given a new lease on life. we basically took a cessna grand caravan that's been around for quite some time now, quite a few decades. we gutted the gas guzzling, emission creating engine out of it and put in a lightweight, clean, very low—cost electric propulsion system, and today flew it for the very first time. today we flew for 30 minutes and it can do, with a passenger load, about that amount plus the reserve that's required by the regulatory authorities. that's probably with four orfive passengers on board plus the pilot, about 100 miles. by no means not guinness book of records. but it's a fantastic start to an industry that's about to revolutionise travel.
11:56 am
stay with us in the hours ahead if you can come of bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. we started off the season pretty wet, things are finishing off by saying that this has been the sunniest on record according to provisional data, and there is little to break that stride as we see it this weekend saying dry, sunny and warm and many areas. certainly a day of blue skies from dawn to death today across most parts of the uk, there is some high cloud particularly across the west, that on past of c cloud. winds are coming in from the south, so that means in the warmest of the art will be in the west, sheltered from that
11:57 am
central breeze. northwest scotland is one of the hottest spots, this could be a record for scotland in may, sense close to 31 degrees. in the 20s across the rest of scotland, was the up to 25 and parts of a linear wales was cooler in east anglia and wales with a chill coming in from the north sea. but whether you have 17 or 28 degrees, the sun is every bit as strong across the country. and pollen levels continue to rise, that is that the highest are wales and midlands and southern parts of england. the sunshine by dave's replaced by starry skies tonight with all area staying dry, the audit mist across the coast. it should be a fresh enough night, so you can open your windows and let the fresh air and to start the weekend as temperatures dip below 10 degrees in some spots. this is a picture of the weekend, things are
11:58 am
being nudged further away by the southeasterly breeze, that will limit the temperatures across scotla nd limit the temperatures across scotland on saturday relative to today. still a warm and sunny day for many, the audit mist or fog patch across the eastern coast of england, but a fair bit of cloud across the other parts of england, the temperatures will drop across the temperatures will drop across the eastern coast, well into the mid—20s across western areas. on sunday some great chances of morning fog across the east, western areas are sheltered from the breeze, so it is still pretty warm. see you soon.
11:59 am
12:00 pm
this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. as lockdown restrictions start to ease, the uk's chief scientist warns people to stick to the rules. groups of up to six people can meet outside in england from monday. it means that you can get an opportunity for people to, for instance, go and visit parents or other friends and family, and to do so in other friends and family, and to do soina other friends and family, and to do so in a way outdoors in a garden, andi so in a way outdoors in a garden, and i think that's the thing that people want to be able to do most of all. in scotland, up to eight people can meet members from another household. and in wales and northern ireland, people will be allowed to meet friends and family from another household from monday. as riots in minneapolis go in to their third day, a cnn reporter is arrested live on air as he reports on the unrest.
12:01 pm
meanwhile, the row between donald trump and twitter escalates. the social media site hides one of the president's tweets with a warning that it "glorifies violence". the post suggested minneapolis looters could be shot. and the uk chancellor is set to reveal how employers will contribute to the cost of the coronavirusjob retention scheme. it's currently paying the wages of more than eight million people. and coming up... it's official, it's been the sunniest spring in the uk in more than 90 years. hello and welcome to audiences in the uk and around the world. we're covering all the latest news and analysis from here and across the globe. the uk's chief scientific adviser has urged people to stick to social distancing guidelines as further easing of coronavirus lockdowns begins. from monday, groups of up to six
12:02 pm
people from different households in england will be able to meet in parks and private gardens. in scotland, from today groups of up to eight people from two different households will be able to meet outside, as long as they stay two metres apart. and in wales, people will be allowed to meet friends and family from another household from monday. in northern ireland, small outdoor weddings will be permitted from june 8th. away from coronavirus and in the united states, a police station in the city of minneapolis has been set alight during a third night of protests over the death of unarmed black man. george floyd died while being pinned down by a police officer. in an escalating row between twitter and the us president, the social media giant has hidden one of mr trump's tweets saying it violates rules about glorifying violence. the post had suggested minneapolis looters could be shot. here in the uk, the chancellor, rishi sunak, is expected to set out plans for employers to contribute to the cost of the coronavirus job retention
12:03 pm
scheme, which is currently paying up to 80% of the wages of more than eight million furloughed workers in the uk. it's thought the chancellor will ask firms to contribute 20% of wages from august. let's talk to our political correspondent jonathan blake who's in westminster. we will talk about the furlough scheme in a little while, but a slightly mixed picture as usual, if you compare the four nations of the uk with regard to restriction still in place? yes, a lot to get your head around today with respect to those new guidelines on how many people you can meet and in what context in different parts of the uk, as you are explaining just now. the numbers vary slightly from england to scotland to wales to northern ireland. broadly speaking, though, whether it is today or from monday, people will be allowed to gather outside in groups of between six and eight, and more if it is in
12:04 pm
wales, from different households, so long as the social distancing to metre rule is observed, and the reason for the distance and these guidelines is that public health is a devolved responsibility, so the government in scotland, wales, northern ireland and england have been making their own decisions on this and broadly speaking have moved at the right time to take similar steps, albeit with those differences around the numbers. so it is worth checking and getting the exact details of what applies to where you live, but the prime minister boris johnson set out the changes in england at the downing street news conference yesterday, and this morning, the environment secretary george eustis has explained the thinking behind allowing six people in england to meet at any one time. we think that six is about a sensible level. we note that the risk of transmission outdoors is actually very low.
12:05 pm
but obviously, if you've got lots of people crowded in a garden, if you've got two families of six crowded in, obviously that starts to be more difficult to maintain social distancing so we think six is a sensible number. it means you can get an opportunity for people to for instance, go and visit parents or visit other friends and family and to do so in a way outdoors, in a garden. i think that's the thing that people want to be able to do most of all. it's slightly different in wales. we will hear the exact plans later on, but there will be no limit on the number of people who can meet outside, as long as the group is from no more than two separate households, and that will also be accompanied by a message for people to stay local. the thinking there is stopping people travelling longer distances to meet up with friends or family, and the first minister of wales mark dra keford family, and the first minister of wales mark drakeford explained more about the thinking behind that earlier on.
12:06 pm
we have parts of wales where there's been very little coronavirus and we don't want the virus to be taken into those communities. you can be infectious to other people while still feeling perfectly well yourself. and travelling more than five miles away from your home runs the risk that you could be taking coronavirus from your community to to another community when the virus isn't circulating. that's why our message to people in wales is very simple. stay local, keep wales safe. mark drakeford, mark dra keford, the mark drakeford, the first minister of wales. we are expecting the uk chancellor to set out an announcement about plans for furlough. what are we likely to hear from him? that's right, while the public health response differs slightly according to the part of the uk you live in, the response is driven by the government hear it whence mr,
12:07 pm
and as you say, the chancellor will set out details later about how the job retention scheme will change. —— the government here at westminster. this is the scheme the government put in place in april which is currently paying the wages of 80% of workers whose employer has taken advantage of the scheme, up to a maximum of £2500 per worker per month. originally, it was set to run till the end ofjune, but it will now go on till october. as for how much it is costing, figures this week show that 8.4 million workers are now covered by the scheme at a cost of £10 billion per month, and the overall cost according to the government's tax and spending office the office for budgetary responsibility, could be up to £80 billion. so you can see from those eye watering numbers that this is a hugely expensive scheme for the government to run. we will hear later how the chancellor plans to extend it, and we think he will say employers who are taking advantage
12:08 pm
of the scheme need to contribute toward some of the costs of their workers' wages, probably around 20%, with the government paying the remaining 60%. jonathan, for the moment, thank you. jonathan, for the moment, thank you. jonathan blake in westminster. across europe, several governments are currently easing their lockdown restrictions while keeping a nervous eye out for a possible resurgence of the virus. here are some of the lastest developments from around the region. professional sports matches have been given the go ahead to take place in sweden without spectators from 14th june. elite athletes will be allowed to travel to different parts of the country for competitions and training. the top italian football division will kick off again on the 12th of next month. the country's sports minister said he hoped the return leg of the italian cup semi—finals could be played the week before. croatia has reopened its borders to several countries, including many of its key tourism markets such as austria, germany and the czech republic. but visitors will need to show a negative test for covid—19 in order to enter.
12:09 pm
and on thursday, france announced an easing of restrictions on the bars and restaurants from the second ofjune. but in the paris region, where the disease is still not under control, only terraces can open. the rules around lockdown are different depending on which nation within the uk you live in. in a few minutes' time, we'll be answering your questions on what the new rules are where you are. you can send your questions by emailing yourquestions@bbc.co.uk or you can use the hashtag #bbcyourquestions — and we will answer your questionsjust after 12. twitter has for the first time hidden one of president donald trump's tweets from his profile, saying the post violates the site's rules against glorifying violence. twitter has replaced the post with a warning message where it would usually appear on the timeline, but it can still be viewed by clicking on it. the original tweet describes minneapolis rioters, protesting over the death of a black man in police custody,
12:10 pm
as ‘thugs' and it threatens the use of force to restore order. "when the looting starts, the shooting starts," the president tweeted in the early hours of this morning. twitter has explained its decision to hide the post, saying it's worried the president's glorification of violence could inspire real—life shootings. the site says it's in the public interest to keep the tweet viewable. the move comes hours after president trump acted against social media companies by signing an executive order seeking to limit their legal immunity. our technology correspondent rory cellan jones says twitter‘s decision is likely to enrage president trump. for months on end, twitter has been dithering about what to do with donald tom's tweets. on one side, people have been saying, listen, he is getting away with content that no one else would get away with in his tweets. on the other side, conservative media seeing, social media is biased against us. don't you dare do anything. on wednesday,
12:11 pm
he engaged in some limited action with regard to tweets about postal ballots in the united states, putting in a fact checking line, and they said that was a very narrow action, and it is because they have rules about something that could, for instance, dissuade people from voting. that is how theyjustify that. of course, the president did not see it that way, lashed back, and threatened to go as far as closing down social media platforms, and brought in that measure which would be pretty damaging if it went through in terms of the ability of social media companies to protect themselves. in the last few hours, twitter could have just sat back, hunkered down and waited for what happened next, instead of which, they acted again in a much broader way with this big label on this tweet saying, it is violated the twitter rules about glorifying violence. —— it has violated the rules. of course, they could have gone further. with any other user, they could have removed the tweet or
12:12 pm
even suspended the account, but i'm sure this will be quite enough to enrage the president when he wakes up. president trump's tweet was about the situation in minneapolis. a police station in the city has been set alight during a third night of protests over the death of an unarmed black man. george floyd died after he was pinned down by police. the last few days have seen multiple buildings burned to the ground or looted. the us national guard has been deployed to restore order. let's show you the live pictures in minneapolis just now. it is just after 6am, after another night of looting and protest. you can see there is pretty heavy police presence, and earlier, we were also talking about the fact that a cnn who is in minneapolis was arrested while live on air. our north america correspondent david willis has more of the story, but a warning that his
12:13 pm
report contains distressing images. minneapolis burned the game last night. protesters clashing with police for the third night in a row. we've got gunshots. we've got gunshots, guys. officers fired tear gas, but could not prevent another night of arson, looting and rioting. all of which culminated in the city's main police station being set ablaze. earlier, the state governor announced he was activating the national guard after declaring the time had come not only to rebuild the city, but the fractious relationship between its people and the police. we need to make sure that... we need to make sure that people are looking out for our city right now. it is notjust enough to do the right thing yourself. we need
12:14 pm
to be making sure that all of us are held accountable, to make sure that we are holding up the highest ideals that we stand by. george floyd died after being handcuffed and pinned to the ground by a white police officer who put his knee and mr floyd's neck and held him there as he pleaded for air. as the minutes passed, he stopped speaking. then he stops moving. before officers —— the four officers involved in the arrest have since been sacked, but there are calls for them to face criminal charges. what that additional evidence consisted of, he did not say, but the longer officials delayed pressing charges, the more anger here seems to grow. earlier, in an ultimately futile attempt to defuse the tension, the police chief issued an apology. i know there is currently a deficit in our city, and
12:15 pm
i know that there is that wear this uniform have increased that deficit of hope. but i will not allow people to continue increasing the deficit by re—traumatising people in our community. protest over george floyd's —— have spread to other american cities, putting race relations firmly on the political agenda. but as this country's racial fault lines are laid bare once again, the site of minneapolis burning serves as a stark reflection of the community now at boiling point. asi as ijust mentioned, the minnesota state patrol have arrested cnn reporter omarjimenez, who was arrested while covering the protests live this morning. he and three crew members were led away in handcuffs. troopers say he was told to move and didn't. in the footage, you can hear mrjimenez saying to the officers that his team would move to wherever they were told to go. wherever you will want us, we will go. we arejust wherever you will want us, we will go. we are just getting out of your way while you are advancing through the intersection, sojust let us
12:16 pm
know, and we've got you. and this is the scene here right now in minneapolis. this is part of the advanced police presence we saw come over the course of really minutes when the local police showed up at the fire department, or with the fire department, i should say, and in the building we showed you, there was burning. this is among the state patrol unit that was advancing up the street, seeing and scattering the street, seeing and scattering the processes at that point, for people to clear the area, and so we walked away. i'm sorry? you're under arrest. ok. would you mind telling me why i am arrest. ok. would you mind telling me whyiami arrest. ok. would you mind telling me why i am i under arrest, sir? why ami me why i am i under arrest, sir? why am i under arrest, me why i am i under arrest, sir? why am i underarrest, sir? omarjimenez. the reports —— mr jimenez had shown someone being arrested when he himself was surrounded by half a dozen white police officers.
12:17 pm
just to say that president trump has been tweeting. he is saying... so, talking about himself. he is referring with section 232 the communications decency act, which is in response, of course, to twitter hiding his tweet about the looters in minneapolis, which you now have to click on the tweet to actually see. twitter were concerned that it glorified violence, because it said, "when the looting starts, the shooting starts". so president trump is up and on twitter. you are watching bbc news. it's been the sunniest spring on record in the uk, and for some regions,
12:18 pm
it's been the driest too. rivers are running at low levels and even crops are starting to wilt. let's speak to our environment analyst roger harrabin. it's nice to have the sun on your back, roger, but you can have too much of a good thing, i'm sure? it has been more than nice, hasn't it? especially when we are all under lockdown. for those with access to a garden or who can get outside, it has been more like the mediterranean than manchester, hasn't it? but when you look down at these figures, they are you look down at these figures, they a re really, really you look down at these figures, they are really, really startling. let me give you some detail here. these records started in 1829, much later than other records, because it was difficult to measure sunshine, so they just discovered how to difficult to measure sunshine, so theyjust discovered how to measure it by then. since then, only nine yea rs have had it by then. since then, only nine years have had more than 500 hours' sunshine. this year, by wednesday, we have had 573.2 hours, so in other words, we haven't just
12:19 pm
we have had 573.2 hours, so in other words, we haven'tjust broken the record, we have absolutely annihilated the record, and that is still with thursday's record, friday's, saturday's and sunday's to go. so we are looking at a major anomaly here, and what it reminds me of was that huge anomaly last year when the french broke their previous heat records by huge, unprecedented amounts, and this looks to me like on the same scale of things. great for those of us who like to sit in the sun, but really in terms of long—term weather patterns, really odd. roger, thank you very much. quite startling statistics there. now, it is time for your questions answered. as lockdown restrictions in the uk begin to ease, each nation has their own rules. in england, groups of up to six from different households, can meet outside from monday. in scotland from today, groups of up
12:20 pm
to eight from two different households can meet outside. and in wales people will be allowed similar freedoms from monday. in northern ireland, small outdoor weddings will be permitted from june 8th. a lot of fabulous questions again. you are doing yourselves proud. our health correspondent catherine burns is here to take some of your questions. stephanie in enfield north london asks, if a friend comes into my garden by side gate, they then use the loo in the toilet? two things. they don't need to go through the side gate, although obviously that isa side gate, although obviously that is a good idea. if you don't have a gate, they can walk straight through your house to get through the garden. as for the loo, if you have to go, you can go. but yesterday, at the press conference, the chief medical officer said it is absolutely critical that you clean everything down. don'tjust watch your hands, cleaned and everything your hands, cleaned and everything you have touched. so the loo handle,
12:21 pm
the door handle, the taps? yes, everything. sparkling. it is setting new standards for some of us! we will have very hygienic bathrooms in the munster,! new habits, i suppose. yes, they can go to the loo. —— in the months to come. if they have two. if they have to. yes, we are not encouraging outdoor use of the garden in that respect. are there any changes in wales for those shielding, asks jonathan are there any changes in wales for those shielding, asksjonathan in cardiff? we are having to ask because there is never any reporting of this. quite a lot of people are saying to me on social media, those of us who are shielding have had to be indoors for pretty much 12 weeks u nless be indoors for pretty much 12 weeks unless they have a garden to go into. what happens to them? they seem to get messed off the list of changes. so, the reason for that is because this virus is still out there, so yes, we are starting to very slowly, very cautiously opened things up, but we haven't got all the answers yet, so specifically in
12:22 pm
wales, anyone who is shielding has already been told that they will stay that way untiljune the 15th, and right now, that advice still sticks. so they are being told, yes, we know this is very difficult, we are thanking you for the sacrifices, but nothing has changed for them. and it is for their own good, isn't it, at the end of a tour, as hard as it, at the end of a tour, as hard as it must be for many? the reality is, no matter which country you are shielding in, the rate of infection is still high. what we need to do is get down the number of new infections to free up the people who are shielding, we are not there yet. scotland. why is there a five mile radius to visit family, as where some of us live, more remotely, it will be more than five miles to get anywhere to see anyone? that is carol. i think nicola sturgeon said, we are not going to be too specific about it, but ideally no more than that? yes, this is a recommendation rather than than a legal limit, and it comes back to toilets again. they think if you drive for very long,
12:23 pm
you will need to use the loo, and this is a similar situation in wales. they also have a five mile limit, and some politicians there call it arbitrary and cruel, because they have a really large rural population who can't go very far, and the answer is that this is a guideline. wright, ok. northern ireland. tom says, i live in northern ireland and myjob regularly involves travelling to southeast asia, the us and parts of europe. 50 trips in a normal year. busy man! the normal way to do this is to fly from dublin, as it is cheaper and has better connections. what would my situation be if, when appropriate, i return from a business trip in singapore to dublin and then have to drive home to belfast? will not be allowed? that will be a problem, because actually, the republic of ireland has had strict limitations to us, so actually there, the distance you are supposed to drive for leisure is, i think, 3.1 miles for exercise, so that will be a hard argument for him
12:24 pm
to make. even if it is for work? i don't know specifically, but what i have read so far this morning, i think it would be difficult to argue that was essential, because they could fly into belfast. of course. back to england. alan asks, my daughter is expecting triplets in the next couple of weeks! brace yourselves! do newborn babies count towards the six people meeting in my garden, says alan from sandhurst? congratulations, alan! you will be a really busy ground that! yes, they do. a person is a person. we have had quite a few messages today from people saying, we are a family with a mum and dad and for kids. can we have anyone in the house? no. 66, whether they are babies or children or adults. if you have a big family, thatis or adults. if you have a big family, that is hard, isn't it? yes. and susan's question. we live in england, and we agreed several months ago to buy a puppy from someone in west glamorgan. the puppy will be available the middle of next week. can we go and collect the
12:25 pm
puppw week. can we go and collect the puppy?i week. can we go and collect the puppy? i rang some colleagues in wales about this, they said they have had a real problem is the lockdown has been loosened more in england than in is with people crossing the border when they are just not allowed to travel very far in wales, several leisure, in wales, you have that five mile recommendation, and mid glamorgan is not five miles away, so technically no. i suppose if they had anybody who could bring it to the border, would that work? both parties would have to be travelling five miles, and so the total of ten miles as the discussion they have got. obviously, there is discussion of these things. if you could argue somehow that your puppy if you could argue somehow that your puppy was essential, so the discussion is for things like essential shopping, for care, so this would be a hard one to argue is essential. catherine, thank you very much. lots more questions to come. catherine burns, our health correspondent, answering those questions.
12:26 pm
much more on what is happening in minneapolis and with president trump's twitter battle here on bbc news in the hours ahead. time for a look at the weather forecast now, with matt. hello. spring has brought us record—breaking amounts of sunshine, and little to break that stride today. sunshine from dawn to dusk in many areas. cloud turn sunshine hazy in the west. some low cloud lingering towards shetland, keeping temperatures here at 11—12. the warmest air today, with the east to south—easterly winds will be across the north west highlands, 28 celsius possible. mid 20s across other parts of mainland scotland to the west of northern ireland, up to 25. 25—27 in western england and wales. cooler towards the coast of kent, east anglia and lincolnshire, but it doesn't matter what the temperature is. with blue skies overhead, there is. with blue skies overhead, there is also strong sunshine wherever you
12:27 pm
are. into tonight, clearskies remain for many. we could see if you mist and fog patches form close to eastern coast of england. some very close to shetland as well, and after the warmth of the day, a comfortable night, temperatures down to between 7-10. night, temperatures down to between 7—10. into the weekend, it is a sunny and warm story continuing.
12:28 pm
hello, this is bbc news — with martine croxall. the headlines: as lockdown restrictions start to ease, the uk's chief scientist has stressed people need to stick to the rules — groups of up to six people can meet outside in england from monday. in scotland, up to eight people can meet members from another household — and in wales and northern ireland there's a similar easing from next week. as riots in minneapolis go in to their third day — a cnn reporter is arrested live on air as he reports on the unrest. and the row between donald trump and twitter escalates — the social media site has covered one of the president's tweets
12:29 pm
with a warning that it "glorifies violence." the post suggested minneapolis looters could be shot. the uk chancellor is set to reveal how employers will contribute to the cost of the coronavirusjob retention scheme — which is currently paying the wages of more than eight million people. more details on changes to the lockdown will be given by the first minister of wales, mark drakeford. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, is holding a virtual coronavirus briefing — let's listen in. lots let's listen in. of questions from people about the lots of questions from people about the details of the application of the details of the application of
12:30 pm
the new restrictions when they come into place, some of them coming in today, some of them next week. before we get the side of the first ministers of wales and scotland, lets just return to the situation in minneapolis. these are the light pictures. it is about half past six in the morning there. really heavy police presence you can see. there has been letting overnight, a police station were set alight, and other building was ablaze not very long ago. a reporterfrom cnn was arrested by state patrol while he was live on air. he asked where he wa nted was live on air. he asked where he wanted them to move to, and he didn't getan wanted them to move to, and he didn't get an answer. cnn have reported that their black reporter, omarjiminez, was arrested while legally covering the bias in
12:31 pm
minneapolis. it has not been cleared while he has been arrested. cnn say they have another correspond on the ground, a white reporter, who was not arrested, was left to carry on reporting. omarjiminez was asking why he was being arrested, what he had done wrong, whether he was in the wrong place— he didn't get an a nswer the wrong place— he didn't get an answer but was arrested. we haven't seen mark dra keford answer but was arrested. we haven't seen mark drakeford yet, but we have seen mark drakeford yet, but we have seen at nicola sturgeon. she is holding a virtual conference live from edinburgh, lets don her now. total of 40 people last night were in intensive care with confirmed or suspected of covid—19, that is an increase of three since yesterday. we should not read anything into that increase, these figures do fluctuate day—to—day. but it is a
12:32 pm
reminder that the virus has not gone away. i am also able to confirm today that since the 5th of march, a total of 3640 patients who had tested positive and required hospitalisation have now been able to leave hospital, we wish all of them well. unfortunately i also have to report that in the last 24 are workers, 15 deaths have been registered of patients who had been confirmed as having covid—19, that is the total number of deaths to 2331. we mustn't ever lose sight of the fact that these numbers are not just statistics, they represent individuals whose deaths are being warned by friends, family and loved ones. i want to send my condolences to everyone who has lost a loved one to everyone who has lost a loved one to this virus. let me also thank our health and care workers. for the tenth thursday in a bill last night, people across the countryjoin
12:33 pm
together to applaud your efforts and show our deep gratitude to you. i wa nt to show our deep gratitude to you. i want to recap on the changes to the lockdown restrictions on social interaction and leader of that i announce yesterday, and that have taken announce yesterday, and that have ta ke n effect announce yesterday, and that have taken effect today. i am very conscious that this weekend will be the first in quite some time that people will be able to meet up, so i wa nt to ta ke people will be able to meet up, so i want to take the time to outline once again what the changes are, and also the reals that you must follow to stay safe and avoid a resurgence of the violence. from today, you and your household can meet with another house out of doors, that can be any pa rt house out of doors, that can be any part ora house out of doors, that can be any part or a private garden. you should limit the total number of people meeting up to a maximum of eight, ideally, it should be less than that. you should not meet with more than one household at a time, please do not meet with more than one household per day. if you do meet
12:34 pm
up, you need to be outside and stay at least two metres away from people in the other household. you should also try to avoid touching the same ha rd also try to avoid touching the same hard surfaces, for example, if you are having a picnic or barbecue last weekend, mart only should you stay two metres apart from members of the other household, but each household should bring its own food, cutlery, plates and cups. please do not go indoors. being in somebody else's house should still be avoided unless you are providing support to somebody vulnerable. we are not putting a legal limit on how far you can travel to meet another household, but if the distance is so far that if you have too, for example, use someone else's bathroom— then don't go. these rules are important for a reason, it is important that these reasons are understood, it helps you apply judgment to different situations. we know that if you go inside a house
12:35 pm
or indoors, or if you come within two metres of people in other households, or if you touch the services of another household, that create for the virus to spread. —— surfaces of another household. from today, you're also able to set and son in parks and open areas. i suspect many of you normally watching this update are doing that now. you are able to travel, prefera bly now. you are able to travel, preferably by walking or cycling, for recreation but please stay within your local area and do not travel more than around five miles from your home. we do not want to see large numbers of people out local tourist and beauty spots. so if you do go somewhere already kauri, then change your plans and perhaps go somewhere else instead. if you haven't already done so already, i would urge you to go on to the scottish government's website
12:36 pm
and read the guidance that we publish yesterday, because that sets out the rules and the parameters that we are asking you to follow. i really hope, and i expect these changes will bring some real improvement to the quality of our lives, but they are deliberately and are by necessity cautious changes, and they have been very carefully considered and assessed. i said yesterday that i was nervous ahead of these changes, i have to tell you, that is still the case. the reason for that is this, if too many of us change our behaviour a bit more than these changes are designed to allow, then be good seeley buyer is spread quickly again, and that was take us back to square one. —— we could see this widest spread
12:37 pm
again. the consequences would also be measured in lost lives. i am not trying at all to cramp any one this weekend, i really do want everyone to enjoy these changes because all of you have more than ended. but i am asking you to please do so responsibly. i am appealing to your judgment and a sense of solidarity to each other, please stay within the rules, apply judgment. to each other, please stay within the rules, applyjudgment. we can't obviously give bespoke guidance for every single individual circumstance, but if you remember the purpose of the rose is to deny the purpose of the rose is to deny the buyer bridges to jump across, then you yourself can think about what you are doing a sensible or not. continue to limit the number of people from other houses you see, stay vigorous in your hand hygiene, and do not allow the virus to spread from you to someone is via a hard
12:38 pm
surface. if you find yourself wondering whether or not it's ok to do something this weekend, consider whether if in doing that, you might be providing a bridge for the widest tojump be providing a bridge for the widest to jump across. my be providing a bridge for the widest tojump across. my main message would this, if you are in doubt without your plans are within the rules or not, air within the side of caution. however harsh these rules might feel right now, abiding by them will never be as hard as a grieving the loss of a loved one. so before you make any plans— stop, think and protect yourselves and yourfamilies. the think and protect yourselves and your families. the second think and protect yourselves and yourfamilies. the second item i wa nt to yourfamilies. the second item i want to briefly recover relates to the economy. this morning, i chaired the economy. this morning, i chaired the cabinet subcommittee on the economy. among the items we discussed was our support for business, particularly for industries not yet be able to
12:39 pm
reopen. one of those is our manufacturing sector which i will briefly touch on it now. we have a lwa ys briefly touch on it now. we have always known that manufacturing is vital to scotland, but that fact has been underlined in the past couple of months. in at that time, manufacturers across the country has stepped forward to help our response to this crisis. many have repurposed or scaled up their operation to meet demand for things like hand sanitiser and ppe. they have helped us to provide our front line services with these supplies that they need. i want to thank everyone who has contributed to that effort and thank the many manufacturing businesses not involved in that essential work who have remained close. i know how tough things are for you at the moment, and i appreciate the sacrifices you are making. unfortunately, most of our manufacturing businesses will not be able to reopen until phase two of our route map. during this first
12:40 pm
phase, they will be able to make preparations for a safe return to work. we are determined to support our manufacturing industry as it prepares for that restart, we want to do everything we can to secure and i'm its future success. that was already a priority before, but it becomes even more important is the industry and our economy generally recovers. that is why i am announcing that we are providing an additional £20 million of funding for scotland new manufacturing institute, bringing our total investment as a government to 75 million. i can also confirm today that the contract to build on the street has been awarded, they work will only commence when it is safe to do so. no national manufacturing institute will be operated by the university of strathclyde, it will be operated by the university of strathclyde, evolving together or it will allow businesses of all sizes to assess research and development
12:41 pm
and ensure that scotland remains at the forefront of advanced manufacturing. we also want to improve the support available to manufacturers across the country say we are announcing today an investment in 12 new projects, each of them designed to help small and medium—sized businesses. we know that a strong manufacturing sector is vital to our economic success, so by investing now, we are preparing our economy folly challenges but also the opportunities of the post crewe and for now, our primary focus is on dealing with this crisis was not —— post—covert world. make no mistake, the virus has not gone away. before i hand over to the cabinet secretary, i want to set out for you once again what the rules are. let me be clear, you should still stay at home as much as you can, lockdown has been modified, it
12:42 pm
is not over. you should still be seen far fewer people than you would normally do, do not meet up with more than one household at a time, do not need with more than one a day and keep to a maximum of eight people within a group. stay two metres apart when you do meet, i know how difficult that will be, we all want to hug our loved ones, but please do not put them on yourselves at risk. wash your hands, often take hand sanitiser with you if you are out and about,. avoid hard surfaces, clea n a ny out and about,. avoid hard surfaces, clean any that you do touch. if you do get symptoms of the virus, get tested and follow advice on isolation. remember, each and every individual decision that we take will affect the safety and the well—being of everyone. we sweetmeats have been really tough, the toughest any of us,. recent weeks have been really tough, i cannot tell you that there are not tough time still lying ahead. but i
12:43 pm
have never been prouder of this country at that i am right now so let's continue to stick together and continue to write about each other. remember, at all stages, stop, think and protect. thank you in advance for doing that, and let me wish you all a happier and certainly a sunnier weekend that we have had for some time. let me hand over to the economy secretary to say a few words and givea economy secretary to say a few words and give a bit more detail on the announcement i touched upon. first of all, can i thank all the businesses and workers in the critical infrastructure sectors for continuing to work at help the country to keep going. i know that restarting the economy more widely is important for all of those looking for more certainty to the future, of theirjobs and their businesses. but unless phase one works safely, businesses in later phases will not be able to reopen.
12:44 pm
in response to the crisis, we have set out a unique package of business support totalling £2.3 billion, designed to reflect the specific needs of the scottish economy. i announce plans on tuesday to extend eligibility, to give more support to a wider range of smaller businesses across scotland. our priority now is our key ee phase return and going back to work in a safe and controlled way. — — back to work in a safe and controlled way. —— carefully phased return. guidance has been published to support retail, manufacturing, transport and construction. today we will be publishing guidance on forestry and environmental management to support the restart of work and our outdoor landscapes. this food standard scotland is publishing updated guidance that we expect take away and write fruit businesses to follow. reflecting our
12:45 pm
fair work principles, all our guidance has been developed in partnership with employers and trade unions— this is essential to give businesses and workers confidence that it will be safe to go back to work when at the time is right. what we need to plan and look to the future of our economy. i can also announce today that the advanced manufacturing challenging fund will support 12 projects across scotland to deliver three local support to manufacturing smes. in total, including match funding, those projects will receive investment of {15.8 projects will receive investment of £15.8 million. each project is led bya £15.8 million. each project is led by a local authority, an academic organisation or if third sector organisations. projects are targeted at developing technologies or skills across multiple manufacturing sectors. others focus on specific manufacturing sectors to boost scotland's considerable strengths, from health care, low carbon energy
12:46 pm
and aerospace. together i believe they will help more of our manufacturers to succeed. this along with our investment in the national manufacturing institute of scotland will complement investment in other sectors, such as construction scotland innovation centre which is leading work to support the centre through covid and adapt for a green, resilient future which will be critical for our long—term recovery. for the good of our economy, we need to phase one to work safely. for the good of our economy, we need to phase one to work safelylj for the good of our economy, we need to phase one to work safely. i will hand over now to professor leach. today does feel like a more hopeful day of these past few weeks, but it is also making me anxious, just as it is the first minister. this is a phase one. the timing of phase two is in no way guaranteed. when you try and put that in perspective for you. today, there are 800 people in hospital with this disease. there are 40 families living with the
12:47 pm
trauma of a loved one in an intensive care unit today with this disease. today, care teams around the country will have to tell families that their loved one has died of this disease. so do not take phase one likely, please do not take phase one likely, please do not take phase one likely, please do not take phase one lightly. i talked last week about the five things that have not changed. these five things become even more important now that lockdown has been released in this limited way. number!— lockdown has been released in this limited way. numberi— regularly lockdown has been released in this limited way. number i— regularly and thoroughly wash your hands for 20 seconds. number 2— and thoroughly wash your hands for 20 seconds. number2— and keep thoroughly wash your hands for 20 seconds. number 2— and keep at least two metres from people outside your own household. as a side issue, that is the only sure way of not being a contact when a tracer found you. you will not have to self—isolate if you have not been within two metres of somebody else, somebody else, unless it is somebody within your own household. number 3— i
12:48 pm
it is somebody within your own household. number3— ivow it is somebody within your own household. number 3— i vow to show your eyes, nose and mouth. number4— cough etiquette, if you're going to cough etiquette, if you're going to cough or sneeze, do into your elbow ora cough or sneeze, do into your elbow or a tissue, discarded and wash your hands. number 5— clean surfaces are regularly and thoroughly because touching the surface can pass it on touching the surface can pass it on to you or others. remember, if you have symptoms, go to the nhs website and book a test, if your test is positive a contact race it will be in touch. if you do not have digital access, through the numbers. if you deteriorate or are a the health service is available for you and your phone 111 if that happens. my final point is about physical exercise. in phase one, we have allowed unrestricted, noncontact exercise. studio: let's leave the press briefing in edinburgh. just a reminder that nicola sturgeon reiterated the need for people to stay at home as much as possible
12:49 pm
even though they are lifting some of the restrictions. up to eight people can now meet from two different households, but she says they really should not go into each other‘s houses yet. the first minister of wales, mark dra keford, houses yet. the first minister of wales, mark drakeford, has been giving an update on restrictions led. the latest review of the corona by district regulations in wales. we review of the big lesions he had ever read 21 days as the law requires us to do. —— we review at the regulations. when we review them, we look at a range of factors. transmission rate, known as they are right, the impact on the nhs, and compliance with the existing regulations to see whether we can make any changes to them. this may mean relaxing on the reels if we can, of if indeed the figures were to go in at the wrong direction,
12:50 pm
would have to tighten the rules to protect peoples health and to control the spread of the virus. this is the third review of the coronavirus regulations. three weeks ago, we made some very coronavirus regulations. three weeks ago, we made some very modest adjustments, including relaxing on day restrictions on exercise, drawing on the evidence that demonstrates a day restrictions on exercise, drawing on the evidence that demonstrates that coronavirus does not easily out of doors. during this review of the regulations, the evidence now shows us that the r rate is now better today in wales thanit rate is now better today in wales than it was three weeks ago. —— is no better a. that continues to put a limit on our ability to make too many changes. the good news is that the number of new cases has continued to decline steadily since the beginning of april, even though we are now conducting twice as many
12:51 pm
tests. population contact tracing will begin in wales on monday as pa rt will begin in wales on monday as part of our test, trace, protect plan. the very clear advice from sage and the who is that we should introduce changes one step at a time. we should monitor the impact of any changes we make, and if we are able to continue to slow the spread of the virus, we can introduce further changes at the next review date. over the last ten weeks, we know that people in wales have a really missed seeing their families and friends while they stay at home regulations have been in place. we have worked really hard over the last three ways to find a way within the headroom that we have to allow people to meet again when it is safe to do so. we are
12:52 pm
therefore changing the regulations in wales to allow that to happen. from next monday, people from two different households in the same local area will be able to meet up so long as they are outdoors and they maintain strict to meet our social distancing and hand hygiene. —— to meet her social distancing. by local, we mean not generally more than five miles. that is to reduce the risk of coronavirus spreading. that five mile rule of thumb will have to be applied carefully and sensibly by people using their own judgment in the different geographies of wales. this is so important because the need for care is clear. coronavirus has not gone
12:53 pm
away. it remains a silent spreader. you can be infectious without ever knowing that you are ill. we are putting five miles into guidance because as people go outside more and are more mobile, we need to reduce the risk of coronavirus spreading from one community to another, creating new hotspots. so the new rules are, you can eat and of the household outdoors in your local area in the open air and at a two metre distance. open air is important because the virus survives only four minutes in the outdoors, but for our worries on surfaces inside. —— for hours on surfaces inside. —— for hours on surfaces inside. very sadly, people can die every day in wales from coronavirus.
12:54 pm
these changes are emphatically not an invitation to act as allow the crisis of it over. the best way to reduce your risk from contracting coronavirus remains to have as little contact with other people as you can, and to stay as local as possible. but looking ahead beyond these three weeks, i want also to send an early signal to retailers of shops which have been close over the last few months to use kleenex freebies to begin the process of preparing to reopen. to use the next three weeks. the review to assess whether that will be possible will be taken at the next 21 day review. that will depend on the advice received from scientific and medical experts, and about what the r rate in wales will be then. only those
12:55 pm
shops that can comply with to meet our social distancing duty will be able to reopen. this will be a real opportunity for those businesses to plan purposely for reopening. in the same way that local authorities have used the last three week period to plan for recycling centres and libraries to reopen now in wales. i wa nt to libraries to reopen now in wales. i want to thank everyone at right across wales for your patience and for your ongoing support and cooperation. yourfantastic for your ongoing support and cooperation. your fantastic efforts are helping us all to reduce the spread of coronavirus, and in that way, to save people's lives. i want also to thank the police for all their hard work. they are playing a vital role in helping to engage people in wales about the regulations as well as enforcing them. the changes i have announced
12:56 pm
this afternoon will come into force on monday, until then, this afternoon will come into force on monday, untilthen, please this afternoon will come into force on monday, until then, please stay local, please keep on looking after yourselves and your loved ones, maintaining social distance, strict hand hygiene. in that way, together, we will keep wales safe. the first minister of wales, mark drakeford, they setting out how they are moving to the next phase and lifting some of the lockdown restrictions. in a moment, the bbc news at one with jane hill. first, a look at the weather forecast with louise. if you have outdoor plans and you wa nt if you have outdoor plans and you want something warm, dry and sunny, thatis want something warm, dry and sunny, that is exactly what is on offer this weekend. sunday is the final day of may, probably no surprise to hear that this spring is going to be
12:57 pm
confirmed as the sunny on record. quite a dramatic turnaround considering the beginning of spring was pretty wet, remember that? for the rest of the afternoon, hardly a cloud in the sky for many, a little bit of high cloud in the north—west, some coastal fog in the northern isles. there could be values as high as 28 degrees in scotland. a little bit cooler along the east coast because of the breeze coming in from the north sea. through tonight, we keep the clear skies but temperatures will fall away to the relatively comfortable values for a good night sleep. we do it all again for the start of the weekend, plenty of sunshine on saturday morning. an area of high pressure sifting a little further east munich there will be a subtle change in wind direction so perhaps not quite as one in west scotland, still in in the mid 20s. plenty of sunshine, more of a breeze for early
12:58 pm
afternoon, a little bit cooler along those north sea coasts. further west and inland, we could see values as high as 25 degrees. whatever your third monitor is a saying, it is worth bearing in mild that uv levels are high pretty much across the country. sunday morning starts with a bit of coast of miss anna lou cloud along that no see, that will disappear. dry and settled again, lighter winds on sunday, could see values of 27 degrees. enter next week, this where the front could introduce some showers into the north—west may be on tuesday and wednesday. behind that weather front, the wind direction is going to change, we see a northerly taking over, dragging cool air across the country. so it will say predominantly dry with just a slim chance of some showers, but the feel of the weather will be different as
12:59 pm
we go through next week. take care. ines.
1:00 pm
the coronavirus lockdown begins to ease across the uk, but different nations face different restrictions. rules changed in scotland today. many outdoor sports are now allowed, and two households can meet outdoors, as long as they're two metres apart. things change in england and wales on monday, when people will be able to gather outside — but groups must be no bigger than six in england. we'll talking to our medical correspondent about the different rules, depending where you live in the uk. also this lunchtime: changes are expected to the furlough scheme. the government looks likely to ask employers to pay around 20% of staff wages from the summer. a police station is set alight in minneapolis in a third night

27 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on