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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 29, 2020 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. a group of armed men have stormed the stock exchange in the city of karachi — killing at least ten people. england's education secretary says schools will see full classroom sizes when children return in september, as the government promises £1 billion to rebuild crumbling schools. we do need to ensure that every child is benefiting from the education that we all so richly value. in the uk, current lockdown restrictions — which are due to ease in england at the weekend — may stay in place for another fortnight — because of a spike in cases there. further easing of restrictions across the rest of the uk as schools
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in wales and high street shops in scotland reopen. the number of people to die with covid—19 worldwide passes 500,000. in the us — the worst affected country — the governor of texas warns infections have taken a "swift and very dangerous turn". air bridges — or travel corridors — to allow brits to go on holiday abroad are set to be confirmed by the government later today. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world — and stay with us for the latest news and analysis from here and across the globe. for the latest news and analysis the number of people who've lost their lives as a result of the coronavirus pandemic around the world has now reached more than 500,000. we'll have all the latest on the developments from around the world
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in the next hour. but first, officials in pakistan say four men, who attacked the country's stock exchange in karachi, have been killed. six other people are reported to have died in the assault. the militants threw grenades and opened fire as they tried to force their way into the stock exchange compound, which lies in a high security zone that also houses the head offices of many private banks. the police chief says all four of the attackers were killed and the situation is under control. clearance operations continue in the area. umer draz from bbc urdu have us the latest on the situation in karachi. the police have just informed that they have cleared the building. they have conducted the search operation and now have declared their building is clear from the militants. they are saying they were four gunmen who have been taken down
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by the security agencies and there have been deaths and injuries among the security guards who first engaged the militants when they attacked and there's also a police official who died. there are reports about civilian deaths as well. the government officials are saying that there are two civilians who died in this attack and there are a number of injured people who have been moved to the hospitals as well. so, for now, the police and the security agencies are saying the building is clear. the business there is going as usual. a spokesperson from the karachi stock exchange earlier spoke to the local media and he said that the trading is continuing, it did not stop at the building and there are offices, people in the offices who are working as per their routine at the moment. schools in england are to receive £1 billion of funding over the next ten years in a programme building projects being launched by the prime minister today. he's also announcing a further £560 million towards repairing crumbling school buildings this financial year. unions say the money
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is welcome, but is only a fraction of what is needed. here's our education editor, bra nwen jeffreys. some school buildings in england are in a shocking state. now a promise of money for rebuilding. plans for more than £1 over ten years — that stretches beyond the next election. the first few should start next year, with 50 projects getting approval this autumn. what we know from the national audit 0ffice three years ago is much money was needed then to restore the school and college estate. this £1 billion announcement is welcome but there is a lot to do to make amends for the underinvestment over the yea rs for the underinvestment over the years in education. but the extra cash for repairs will make a difference first. £560 million more for next year, an increase of about a third on the repairs budget. but still, nowhere near
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the almost £7 billion needed. the true cost of getting england's school buildings to an acceptable standard. branwen jeffreys, bbc news. 0ur assistant political editor, norman smith is at westminster. tell us more about this announcement and what it signifies about the direction of the government post coronavirus? we are going to have a massive building spree seems to be the government does not plan to kick—start the economy but also longer term, to try and re—engineer the british economy. so we are going to see huge emphasis on building roads, rail, hospitals, prisons, schools. in part, of course, to try and create jobs in schools. in part, of course, to try and createjobs in the schools. in part, of course, to try and create jobs in the aftermath of the covid crisis but a particular emphasis on education because part of it will also be a major push in getting schools back in september. 0bviously,
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getting schools back in september. obviously, the government tried to get them back injune and failed. now, if they get schools back, the view is people will return to work. the two are intimately linked and you can't get the economy going again until people go back to work and that means getting schools back. what the government are now committing is that both primary and secondary schools, all year groups, all classes will be back in september. how? in part by easing off in social distancing in schools. so, the education secretary gavin williamson said this morning clearly that they will abandon the bubble which they have had so far of same class sizes must only be 15 and go back to full class sizes of up to 30. that will make it possible for all pupils to go back into school. interesting that at the weekend borisjohnson said it would be mandatory for parents to send their children back to school because the current system of fines has been suspended but it seems from
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september, there is the possibility that if the parents still do not send their children back, they will be fined. listen to gavin williamson talking about it this morning. we want to see every child back into school. we want to see all year groups back into school. we have rapidly approaching 1.5 million children actually going back into school at the end of last week. i imagine those numbers are going to grow this week and grow the following week as more children return to school, parents' confidence about what their children are receiving increases. and schools get comfortable about what they are offering. but we are going to have to make changes as to how it currently operates. we've seen the relaxation of social distancing rules and we are going to see the return of full class sizes, for primary schools and for secondary schools, because we do need to ensure that every child is benefiting from the education that we all so richly value. labour has said schools could have
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gone back already had the government had actually put a plan in place. for example, to create more classrooms, to enable you to have the maximum class size of 15, possibly by putting portakabins in playgrounds or requisitioning vacant council buildings to provide the additional classroom space. this is the labour leader sir keir starmer this morning. the question is — how quickly can we get all children back into school safely? i think we could have done it by now, had there been some leadership on this from the prime minister. it was obvious from the day that schools were closed what would be needed to get them back open, because most of the problems are practical problems. all the head teachers i've spoken to have said if you've got a big school with a lot of space, it's possible to do it. if you've got a small school with almost no space, it's very difficult. had the government put forward, put together a task force or something to bring people together and say what needs to be done, risk assessed every school, if you need temporary classrooms, let's build them. we put up nightingale hospitals,
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which was a good thing, we could have put up temporary classrooms or used libraries, community centres, which at the moment are empty. the problems are practical, they could have been solved, it needed leadership from the top from the prime minister and that's been found wanting here. the leader of the labour party, sir keir starmer. a top civil servant is moving on, being moved on, what is the significance of that? the cabinet secretary who is the most senior civil servant in whitehall, sirmark senior civil servant in whitehall, sir mark sedwill, who is being shuffled towards the door, shall we say. partly, isuspect, it's a personality issue because he was never part of the vote to leave leak who now dominate downing street. he was theresa may's cabinet secretary and stayed on through brexit and through covid. partly, it's because borisjohnson through covid. partly, it's because boris johnson wants a through covid. partly, it's because borisjohnson wants a different sort of feel to the civil service. part of feel to the civil service. part of his plans for so—called levelling
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up of his plans for so—called levelling up the country in this huge building programme, central to that is having civil servants who can actually make it happen. in other words, notjust having brilliant minds but having people with the practical ability to negotiate contracts, took contract manage —— project manage different schemes. they are looking for a different type of civil service and it seems to me sir mark didn't quite fit that template. civil service rest from the team johnson is very much part of what they think is necessary if they are to deliver on levelling up for the whole of the uk. thank you very much, norman. thank you. school bells in wales will be ringing for the first time since lockdown began this morning, as pupils begin to make a phased return to the classroom. but it will be a very different experience for children and teachers, with measures put in place to stop the spread of the coronavirus. 0ur wales correspondent tomos morgan has been to see how the schools, and the children are getting ready to return. after 1a weeks away, today, children in wales will begin returning to the classroom.
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but it won't be school as they used to know it. i don't think i've been part of education where we've had to dismantle every aspect of education and then rebuild it with a covid—19 element to it. so, from pupils leaving their house in the morning, making sure they've got a packed lunch because we've got no catering facilities, through transport, where buses have been adapted. the fact we can only get eight learners on a bus at any one time, through to the fact they're going to be taught in one classroom. when i last visited eight—year—old evan in may, he'd been enjoying the past three and half months being home—schooled by dad, jason. but he had missed the interaction with other children at school. if you see your friends, you're like, "oh, mum, dad, can i go play with them?" evan will be going back for two days over the next three weeks, as only a third of pupils will be in class at any one time in wales. and now that school is back on the cards, he's not quite so sure if he'd rather at home. yeah! i don't want to go back to school but...
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it's kind of like i want to but i don't want to because seeing your friends, playing football. seeing your teacher... but doing homework at home, there's lots of distractions and stuff but doing it in school... easy — no distractions. it will be a phased return for pupils here in wales, just like across all the devolved nations of the uk. certain year groups at primary level have been back in school for four weeks already in england. scottish schools will reopen at the start of the autumn term on the 11th august, with some continuing home learning, with some northern irish pupils going back in late august. but for all children of any age, school will certainly look, feel and be a completely different learning environment by the next academic year. tomos morgan, bbc news, cardiff. pubs and restaurants in the city of leicester may stay closed for two more weeks due to a surge in coronavirus cases.
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the city's mayor has said said the government has recommended current restrictions are maintained for a furtherfortnight, but have not advised a return to earlier lockdown meausres. 0ur reporter navtej johal sent this update from leicester. the situation here in leicester has been serious enough for the department of health to describe the city has an area of concern that it has stopped short of saying that a localised lockdown here is likely. to give you a bit of background, this all began when the health secretary, matt hancock, mentioned ona secretary, matt hancock, mentioned on a daily government briefing that there had been in his words and outbreak in the city. the latest figures show that there have been almost 900 people who have tested positive for coronavirus in the two weeks up to 23rd june. which represents almost a third of the total number of cases in the city. in the last few days, we have seen several schools have to cut temporarily closed due to positive cases being reported there. local
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businesses have also been affected, including a supermarket and a local big sandwich maker, where there have been positive cases also. and yesterday, we had priti patel, the home secretary, say that a localised lockdown was something that the government was considering for leicester. but this morning, said peter salsbury, the mayor of leicester, has said that recommendations he has received overnight from the government suggest that the current restrictions, the current lockdown measures, should be in place for an extra two weeks rather than stricter measures being reimposed, which would mean from 11th ofjuly, as the rest of england says the likes of hairdressers, pubs and restaurants reopen, they will remain closed under current measures here in the city, which will have a huge impact on those businesses. now, we are expecting still a meeting to take place today, a virtual meeting, between the mayor of leicester, public health england and public health officials which may provide more clarity for people in the city,
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who are desperate to find out what the next measures are going to be, what the next few days and weeks are going to look like and if there will be any restrictions imposed to the people of leicester. many high street shops in scotland have been opening their doors for the first time in three months this morning. it only applies to those with street access, and shoppers will still be encouraged to maintain social distancing and cover their faces. the housing market is also reopening and scottish premiership football clubs can resume contact training. northern ireland becomes the first part of the uk to adopt a 1 metre social distancing guidance, with some restrictions today. the move was agreed by the northern ireland executive last week, ahead of the hospitality sector preparing to reopen fully on friday. also from today, churches can reopen for indoor services, and ministers at stormont are expected to sign off on a proposal to make face coverings mandatory on public transport. the headlines on bbc news:
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officials in pakistan say a group of four armed men, who stormed the stock exchange in karachi, have been killed. six other people are reported to have died in the assault. england's education secretary says schools will see full classroom sizes when children return in september, as the government promises £1 billion to rebuild crumbling schools. current lockdown restrictions — which are due to ease in england at the weekend — may stay in place in leicester for another fortnight — because of a spike in cases there. the british government is expected to confirm today that travel corridors, also known as air bridges, will go ahead. it's the beginning of plans to relax restrictions on nonessential overseas travel in the uk. the final list of countries that uk residents be able to travel to — without having to quarantine — will be announced this week. 0ur europe correspondent, damian grammaticas, is in torremolinos in southern spain, one of the countries expected
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to be on the list. you can see it is lovely, why it's called the costa del sol — sunshine every day. there just aren't the tourists here yet. and if you look at this, i mean, take a look at the beach here now, you can perhaps see, from the sunbeds and everything, the sunbeds have been spaced apart so they are ready for the tourists to come when the announcement comes. they are a couple of metres apart each. when people come down to the beach, when those arrivals, if those arrivals start coming, they will have to keep a distance on the beach. there will be wardens on the beach, telling them to keep apart. when you are on the streets behind and anywhere you go in a public place, a shop or anything, you have to wear a face mask. that is mandatory. if you cannot keep safe separation in spain and you can be fined 100 euros. and the hotels too, most of them empty, many of them shut at the minute, waiting for flights to resume.
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but in there, they also have lots of special measures, limited numbers of people will be allowed in swimming pools, in the rooms they are all being sanitised and sort of stripped bare of anything that could be touched and transmit the virus. so, a lot of procedures in place. what there isn't in place is the tourists here. and what they are waiting for is the green light for those quarantine restrictions in the uk to be lifted. because this place, it had 10 million visitors along just this costa del sol stretch in spain last year, and brits were really one the biggest components in that. the next question, then, is, they may be ready, but will they welcome british tourists? 0h, with open arms, i can tell you. you talk to the business people here, and they are desperate for british tourists to come back. their takings, their business at the minute, is way down, and they say that it's the foreign tourists who come that they rely
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on at this time of year, and the foreign tourists who spend the money here, much more than spanish tourists. so, they are desperate for arrivals, really hoping for them, and saying they are very, very keen to see things start up. but it could take a couple of weeks for all the flights and things to get back in place once the travel restrictions are lifted, and at the minute, the advice is no overseas travel unless it is essential. that has to change. one of the countries not expected to be included on the list of air bridges is portugal. let's speak now to jorge azevedo, manager of the porto palacio congress hotel & spa. and to clare hakeman who had an holiday booked to portugal this summer. hello to both of you. jorge, if portugal doesn't make the less, how will you react? with absolute shock. 0utraged just to think on... that this may happen because portugal, so far, has been one of the countries that has behaved better. at the
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moment, portugal is the seventh european country testing more per million of inhabitants. we have one of the lowest mortality rates and just as in the last piece they were talking about the measures in spain, the portuguese government since the very beginning has launched a programme called clean and safe for all the hospitality sector, in which we are giving intensive training to every hotel owner, every hotel manager to learn how to proceed with the coronavirus. we are actually suffering from being a good student here because portugal is doing more tests tha n here because portugal is doing more tests than most of the european countries. we are registering a very low fatality rate, less than france, belgium, italy, even the uk. wejust
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can't comprehend this, that we can't be included in these countries. potentially it could be because of the recent uptick of cases in the capital and the algarve? yes, just in lisbon are not even central lisbon. but spikes like this are being identified all over europe. germany, spain again, even even in the uk, you just spoke about the leicester case. absolutely. in porto we have been without one single case in the last 22 days. again, we don't feel that this is correct and we are just paying the price of being a good student here. portugal is one of the country that remains with the daily reports about the newly infected. shock if we are integrated
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in the blacklist. we don't know yet, it is speculation, we haven't had the announcement to get. portugal may end up being on the list of air bridges or travel corridors, whatever you prefer to call it. clare, what do you think you have this holiday, flights booked, when you due leave? yeah, we have booked our second set of flights to try and get out because we have a holiday home in the algarve. we are really hoping we can get out three weeks today with our flights but without the air bridge, there is a chance airlines could look to cancel more flights and it might mean we can't get out there. in terms of the algarve, horrendous as it is to say, but they have had only 15 deaths since march. although lisbon has had a spike, it's two and half hours north of where we are. from everything we are hearing, they are doing better than us in terms of they are doing the traffic light syste m they are doing the traffic light system on the beach, masks in supermarkets are compulsory, so they
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seem supermarkets are compulsory, so they seem to be doing everything in the right manner, from what we are hearing. and it was one of portugal's senior politicians who was one of the first countries to say, actually, we really want the brits to come back, we want an air bridge with the uk. definitely, they are really keen for us to travel. we have lots of friends over there who own restaurants and they are really keen for us to travel. i think they need the tourism. if portugal doesn't make that first list, even if it gets on the second stream a few weeks later, everyone may have opted to go somewhere else, the flights may have changed and going elsewhere and i think it will massively affect it. it means our holiday home, we could go back to a very different algarve when we go back. on the flip side, we are literally two hours down the road to seville. we could go across the border with no corentin. would you consider doing that? definitely. i'm a teacher so my aim is if we get out
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in three weeks, i will stay for six weeks. given the scenes we had seen on the beaches in england recently, i honestly think we will be safer there. there is lots of outdoor space. the restaurants, most of the ones we eat in, are outside. for me and my family, i think it will be a better option to drive over the border if i had avoid the two week quarantine so i can go back to work in september. jorge, portugal had two week quarantine so i can go back to work in september. jorge, portugal had 2.5 million visitors from the uk last year. how much of an impact with this have on your business if portugal isn't one of the countries on the list? the most affected area will always be the algarve. it is the preferred area for the british to travel. 2019, 30% of the tourists in the algarve were british. not only the british tourists but the bad reputation this will bring along. i'm effecting it will bring along. i'm effecting it
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will affect more than 50%, just in the algarve. 0f will affect more than 50%, just in the algarve. of course, cities like lisbon and porto are other areas that don't register this high number of british tourists. still, it's a matter of the reputation that this will create around the whole world. just in porto, we are having a decrease, an occupation rate of 20, 30%. if we reach that. last year, at the season, we would register 90% of occupation. this is the loss that we are registering right now. wright lets see what happens, fingers crossed. thank you jorge and clare for talking to us. more now on the £1 billion fund to help build 50 major school projects across england, with an extra half a
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billion set aside to repair crumbling buildings. the prime minister has been visiting the construction site of a high school in west london, setting out more details about the scheme. we want to be spending a huge amount on schools, on 50 schools we are building or rebuilding with this initial £1 billion investment. but thatis initial £1 billion investment. but that is of course just part of a ten year project now to get our schools upgraded and our further education colleges. i think the point i would stress is it's notjust important to improve our schools but given where we are now in the economic cycle, given we are coming out of the medical covid crisis into the economic after—shocks, we want to be investing in staff that will drive jobs, drive high skilled, high—paying jobs and pensions. jobs, drive high skilled, high-paying jobs and pensions. on the schools, the national audit 0ffice the schools, the national audit office says it needs the best part office says it needs the best part of £7 billionjust office says it needs the best part of £7 billion just to make them
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satisfactory, will they get the best at that? we are obviously... this is pa rt at that? we are obviously... this is part of a ten year programme now that we are launching. so this initial chunk for the 50 schools is just the beginning. we are acutely conscious of the need to refurbish and repairand we conscious of the need to refurbish and repair and we see the advantage of putting in long term investment for the country, but also driving job creation now. the money that you are going to be spending on that long—term investment, that job creation, where will it come from? the cash is there. we will be very prudent, very careful with public finances. i believe personally that what the government has got to do right now is keep going, with an activist, interventionist approach. that is the way also to get business to be confident, to start investing, to be confident, to start investing, to start taking people back, start creating new jobs to start taking people back, start creating newjobs and driving new growth. there is a lot of cash that businesses are sitting on. we want to say that cash coming into the
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economy as well. talking of new jobs, there is one coming up in whitehall. was it mark sedwill‘s idea to go or yours? he has done just about everything you can think of across whitehall. he has been in afghanistan. he ran the home office. some of the toughest gigs. national security adviser. i have no doubt that he will continue to offer a huge amount to this country, both nationally and internationally. that is his departure, coming as it does in the middle of a pandemic and potentially an economic crisis, is that part of a greater project to shake up the civil service question market seems a funny time to do it otherwise. i think it is very logical. mark, as i say, he's done a huge amount. he came in in tragic circumstances, you will remember,
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after the death of jeremy circumstances, you will remember, after the death ofjeremy heywood. he took it on and the nsa, the national security adviser role. he did a change of premiership, an election, brexit and now he has managed the country through the most difficult passage of the coronavirus crisis. as i say, i think he's got a lot more to offer. does his successor need to be a brexited, a proven brexiteers? i think the great thing about the civil services nobody should know, least of all me. i think we have a wonderful civil service. they are impartial, they are the best in the world and who knows what his or her views will be? just one on leicester. based on the information you have, is that your view that there is a surge in coronavirus cases in leicester and will they be facing a longer lockdown than the rest of the country? well, i've talked to a lot of colleagues over the last few days
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about this. matt and others over the weekend. we are concerned about leicester. we are concerned about any local outbreak. i want to stress to people that we are not out of the woods yet. it's very important. we are making these cautious, calibrated steps, we are opening as much of hospitality as we can on july the 4th, as much of the economy as we canvassed up some july the 4th, as much of the economy as we canvassed up some things, alas, still remain closed until they can become covid secure but to make all that possible, we have to be, we have to remain vigilant. we have to continue to do the basics, washing our hands and all that, plus we need to have local lock downs and local whack a mole strategy is where it is necessary. it has worked in places like weston—super—mare or where we have had outbreaks in gp surgeries in london. we... and that's the same
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approach we will bring to bear in leicester as well. boris johnson. let's go back to that attack in karachi this morning — officials in pakistan say four men, who attacked the country's stock exchange, have been killed. let's talk to our correspondent farhat javed in lahore. do fill us in. as we speak now, police and paramilitary forces have entered the building and they are conducting a search and clearance operation while people who are inside the compound are being evacuated from the building now. this happened this morning when four men armed with automatic rifles, hand grenades and some ammunition tried to enter the pakistan stock exchange building in the port city of karachi, which is the financial hub of the country. although there
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are conflicting reports about the death toll, but reports say that at least ten people have been killed, including armed men. police and other paramilitary forces are still there at the port conducting the operation. according to the officials, these attackers could not enter the main compound area and they were spotted and stopped and killed at the entrance gate. they tried to enter the building and the number of people who were inside the building is still unknown. the offices of some of the biggest financial institutions into pakistan are in that building and it was also said by the authorities that on any normal day this compound can host up to 8000 people. but luckily these attackers could not enter the compound. police say that food items
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we re compound. police say that food items were also found on the bodies of these attackers, which indicates they were probably planning a long siege if they have succeeded in entering the main area. the building is in the high security zone and police are still there collecting the evidence and talking to the witnesses. a banned militant outfit in the south western province, the baloch liberation army, has claimed responsibility for this attack and this organisation has been involved in other attacks in other cities, especially in this province in pakistan for the past few years and has been banned by britain and the us as well in 2019 and have once again today claimed responsibility for this attack. in balochistan. thank you. the number of people who've lost their lives as a result
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of the coronavirus pandemic around the world has now reached more than 500,000. the worst affected country is the united states, followed by brazil. most european governments believe they have the situation under control, but there are warnings that the easing of restrictions could lead to further outbreaks. simonjones has been assessing the global situation. counting the cost of coronavirus. brazil alone has seen more than 57,000 deaths as the global toll reaches 500,000. applause tears and applause to remember those who have lost their lives in brasilia. the world health organization says the pandemic is still at an intense stage of growth in the americas. in haiti, the poorest nation in the region, international aid agencies are trying to help the sick but many are often only coming to them when they are seriously ill. translation: people here deny the existence of the pandemic. they don't believe it.
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those who do believe have someone close to them who is infected. face masks are not worn regularly. we need to have more social distancing too. coronavirus is also taking a serious toll in south asia. india alone has recorded more than 500,000 cases. despite this, hair salons in the western state of maharashtra are reopening as they try to bring back a degree of normality. siren wails but testing capacity still differs significantly between countries. so in other states like bangladesh, many cases may be going undetected. iran, the country worst hit by coronavirus in the middle east, is making the wearing of masks mandatory in enclosed public spaces and large gatherings. orchestra plays in italy, a concert at bergamo cemetery to commemorate the victims of the virus.
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but there is currently no vaccine and no cure. the warning is this still has a long way to run. simon jones, bbc news. keith neal is professor emeritus of the epidemiology of infectious diseases at the university of nottingham. he has 30 years of experience in contact tracing and has previously served as a consultant for public health england. hello to you, professor neal. how do you react to passing 500,000 figure? it is probably an underestimate because they are counting numbers in different ways in different parts of the world and if you are not testing you cannot count accurately. it is probably not as inaccurate as you might expect because in the country is whether it is less likely to be testing you have a younger population who are less likely to die when they get the disease. how does this figure compare with other
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respiratory diseases like sars at a similar stage? i think sars which was clearly quite closely related virus only affected about 8000 people and because of its long incubation period and people were infectious after symptoms had developed, it was quite easy to contact trace and stop in its tracks. it was also more serious than this current coronavirus which gave more of an impetus to get on top of it sooner. how significant is the fact that many people have this virus will not show any symptoms?” think this complicates the control strategy, which is why contact tracing in any form isn't a particularly useful strategy. we don't know how many people are asymptomatic and i've seen figures from two 20% up to more than 80%. it
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is probably in the lower range of that. which countries would you say have dealt with this new virus well? i think china dealt with it well, but ina i think china dealt with it well, but in a way that was completely draconian, in a way that wouldn't be tolerated in many other countries. new zealand has done well as well. but they were dealt a very good hand because if you look at the map new zealand is quite isolated. we probably had more people going into europe every month, and possibly bringing infection back, than the entire population of new zealand. there isn't a lot of travel per head of population in new zealand. they also had plenty of time to get ready and had a competent system to address it. in terms of the uk, how much would a hot summer help with keeping a lid on this virus?” much would a hot summer help with keeping a lid on this virus? i think the warm weather weather, certainly the warm weather weather, certainly the virus outside, from what we
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know, it's survival time is quite short, particularly as the one weathered dries out the drops of aerosol and then they lose their lipid fatty coat and they are not able to infect. and ultra light, we know, damages rna quite easily at sufficient doses and we also have more social distancing is people go outside rather than inside. really we need to think of this as an inside disease because even if when you are outside, the who talks about 15 minutes at one metre, and that's quite close, and we are not keen on people invading our personal space, particularly outside. thank you for talking to us, thank you, professor neal. by far the worst affected country is the united states, with more than 125,000 deaths. the governor of texas, greg abbott, said matters have taken a very swift and very dangerous turn. his remarks coincide with a rise in infections in several
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southern and western states, mostly those that had eased restrictions early. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes reports. applause the us vice president attending a church service in dallas. texas is one of several southern and western states where record numbers of people are testing positive for covid—19. it's a huge setback for a region that once thought it had seen the worst of the outbreak. if we will but hold fast to him, we'll see our way through these challenging times, we will restore our nation's health, we will renew our freedom. but this is a daunting struggle for the lone star state with governor greg abbott issuing a stark warning about the resurgence of coronavirus cases. covid—19 has taken a very swift and very dangerous turn in texas overjust the past few weeks. 0verjust the past few weeks,
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the daily number of cases have gone from an average of about 2,000 to more than 5,000 per day. at the same time, hospitalisations have increased from about 2,000 per day to more than 5,000 per day. it's a similar picture in florida where officials blame a rush to socialise again after weeks in lockdown. the average age of people infected has dropped sharply to 33 from 65 two months ago. governor ron desantis says there's been an explosion in new cases. you can't control those... i mean, they're younger people, they're going to do what they're going to do, and i think the pubs was mostlyjust a matter of administration, there was no way to ensure compliance because it was so widespread noncompliant that the secretary took the action he did, and i said do what you gotta do to ensure compliance, but at the end of the day, my view is, i'd rather have those
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places open complying because i think that's probably less risky than what a lot of the young people end up doing. pubs in the state have now been ordered to stop serving alcohol. as in california, where bars have been closed in seven counties including los angeles. americans are once again been urged to wear face coverings in public although president trump has resisted calls to make it mandatory. nancy pelosi, the speaker of the house, says masks should be compulsory across the country. mr trump should set an example. with july 11th approaching, usually a time for a parting usually a time for a partying on the beach or at barbecues, the all—american holiday next weekend will be like no other. this is a country that's both weary and deeply worried about the days ahead. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. more now on the £1 billion of funding for english schools which will form part of the uk government's major spend on infrastructure. the money will spent on 50 major school building projects
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over the next ten years with the first due to start in september 2021. a further £560 million has been set aside to help with the maintenance and repair of crumbling schools across england. geoff barton is the general secretary of the association of school and college leaders. he joins us from bury st edmunds. mr barton, good morning. good morning. how do you react to these sums? we would always want to welcome more investment in education. it is worth reminding ourselves that ten years ago when the coalition government came in, the coalition government came in, the first act was to get rid of the building schools for the future programme and that secondlyjust three years ago the national audit 0ffice three years ago the national audit office said it would take £6.7 billion to rebuild the school and couege billion to rebuild the school and college estate, so this is an important step towards that recognition by the government today but much as done if we are to rebuild the quality of learning facilities young people deserve. what needs rebuilding and what needs starting from scratch and what needs
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refurbishing? i think there will be the whole range of that and there will be some young people who will be in conditions that really they shouldn't be in. what i hope today from a prime minister who has a little bit of a tendency to like big shiny things, is that we really do appropriate granular survey of where that money should be spent so that young people in communities that possibly haven't been served well by education start to get facilities they can feel proud of, and that's not about they can feel proud of, and that's notabout gimmicks, they can feel proud of, and that's not about gimmicks, i don't think, it is about looking at the quality of the school and college estate and putting the money in. we will need to see the detail of what is proposed. what do you think about the fact that schools in wales are able to go back, all classes, although phased, from today? whereas schools in england, all of them would be going back apparently now until september? i think we have seen an until september? i think we have seen an ambition of purpose in wales that most parents will want to applaud because the starting point in wales was essentially two things. it was, what would we need to do for
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every child in wales before the summer holiday to have some experience back in school? and secondly, how can we achieve that working with local authorities and teaching unions? i applaud kirsty williams, the cabinet secretary there, of having that sense of ambition and starting today to deliver on that sense of every child not having a full experience in school because they couldn't do that, but having some experience ready for september when they hopefully get back to some kind of normality. as you know, some conservatives blame a lack of collegiate working from trades unions for wire schools couldn't fully go back in england. yes, i've heard that, and i think it's a shame we have had that kind of caricature. i lead a trade union and trade unions have a proud tradition of doing two things, one is to look after and protect their members, but also to speak on behalf of children and on behalf of communities. we have tried to be eminently constructive about that. the approach in wales was one we have been saying right from the beginning. why did you sate is more
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important that child in in year six or year run should be in school rather than the parent of a child in year two three, four, five? those pa rents would year two three, four, five? those parents would say my child is important too. it is a reasonable discussion. we have seen a different approach in england. —— why did you say. we hope to see something more akin to normality in september but lots of planning still needs to be done before then. thank you for joining us. we know the impact that covid—19 has had on people from ethnic minority backgrounds, with some being vulnerable physically and financially. the muslim community here in the uk, has rallied around by raising zakat — that's the compulsory act of giving a proportion of one's wealth to charity. bbc asian network's ankur desai report. meet mohammed, he is a husband and father of two young children in the west midlands. and lockdown almost left him and his family shut out and on the streets. i was happy when my boss
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told me that you will be back after three weeks. but then he told me that they haven't got any confirmation from the government so we will be closed for the next three months. after two weeks i was completely collapsed. even the food bank was closed so i was in a desperate situation. british muslims have been one of the hardest—hit communities, notjust in terms of health issues but finance too. those that are or working in the gig economy often wonder how they will feed their families. how many days did you go with no food? three days. 0n the third day i called the food bank and they said you can come this afternoon. i was crying as well. i don't know what to do. i told my wife, just feed the kids first and whatever is left we will do with that what we want to do. getting nowhere with universal credit applications, mohammed, for the first time, turned to charity. they paid my bills, two months' rent and council tax,
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and they gave me a little bit of money for my food and fuel and it was a very big help. mohammed, like many british muslims, sought help from the national zakat foundation. they have told us they have seen a quadrupling of requests forfinancial aid during the covid crisis. you have an office here. how many people roughly work here? about 25 people. before covid the charity would be dealing with just ten applications in a day. but during the crisis. at its peak we were receiving something in the region of 200 applications in a day. and that's just an indication of the desperation people find themselves in. zakat is basically a muslim wealth tax to help those in need. we have definitely seen a shift, in that we have seen more and more people are recognising the needs of their own communities and they may even know someone who is going through difficult times. they recognise that there
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is actually a need for zakat to be given locally. mohammed is now back on his feet and extremely grateful for the support he received. if i would be waiting for the government to give me, by the time they do my kids willdie, iwilldie, without food or anything and i will be outside on the street. ankur desai, bbc news, in walsall. lockdown has been difficult for many of us, but for some it has also provided relief. people with facial markings say staying at home has actually provided a respite from stares and insensitive comments. graham satchell reports. school was pretty horrendous. bullying at school was relentless. i have been attacked — physically, verbally attacked — because of the way i looked. physically attacked? physically attacked, yeah. yeah. what happened ? just some guys come over and were taking the mickey and just started pushing and shoving me about. phil's birthmark covers a third of his face. he's had a lifetime of stares, whispers and abuse. i got to a point about ten years
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ago where ijust didn't want to be stared at any more, i didn't want go out, i didn't want that, so lockdown has given me the freedom to stay at home and not go out. in glasgow, jude has also been abused for the way she looks. she has psoriasis — a skin condition. lockdown has brought back some uncomfortable memories. i remember days when i was younger where i didn't leave the house unless necessary, because i was ashamed of how i looked. i could not handle the stares, i couldn't handle the comments. and i almost, even if people weren't staring or commenting, i felt like they were. so for me, lockdown felt very familiar that way. and it meant i spent 52 — over 52 days in the house by myself, and it was really — it felt easy because i've done it before almost. this is a campaign video by the charity changing faces. more than a million people in the uk have a visible difference.
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many are used to hiding themselves away. people with visible difference experience this daily grind so the stares, the comments, the pointing. so because of that, for some people, lockdown has almost been the easy part. it's a relief not to have to go out into the world and experience that every day. so what people are saying is it's not necessarily lockdown that's been hard — although, of course, it has been for some — but it's looking ahead and saying "how will i prepare myself for the world again and what i know is coming when i've had a break for some time?" over the years, jude has developed a series of coping mechanisms, but is worried as we leave lockdown they may not work. i usually try and, you know, take the awkwardness away with a smile — which is a nice, human thing to do — but, you know, with us coming out of lockdown and the need to wear masks, that initial human interaction is kind of taken away.
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what both phil and jude want as life returns to a new normal is some understanding and acceptance. what i want you to do is to smile and say hello and talk to me normally. that's what we want. we just — we want normality. just because my skin's a different colour doesn't mean to say i'm going to do anything differently than you might do. i still enjoy my gardening, stroking my cat, watching telly, riding my push—bike. i'm just a normal bloke. graham satchell with that report. pubs and museums are preparing to re—open in england but one activity hasn't been given the go—ahead — singing. when some choirs were identified as virus hotspots — there was a complete ban on communal singing. the uk government is now being urged to help find out if singing is any more dangerous than speaking. 0ur arts correspondent david sillito reports. singing
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wells cathedral, and an activity that is, these days, considered dangerous — singing. it's not the voice that's the problem, it's what might be carried on the breath, and how far that travels. it breaks my heart to know that that's dangerous and that could actually hurt people. there has to be some science. there has to be something concrete to actuallyjustify the decision to ban singing. all: # hallelujah! communal singing has, in recent months, become an online—only activity. all sing housemates singing in the garden has been the closest to a public performance in three months. there's been a lot of work put into working out how pubs and cafes and restaurants can be safe for people to go and enjoy themselves and yet, the arts just don't seem to be receiving the same treatment.
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put this down here. that's three metres there, is it? so, what would a safe and socially—distanced choir be like? one set of proposals being considered is to have three metre gaps and to limit the number of singers to six. and so, we tried it out, in the safety of the open air. singing standing well back, it sounded beautiful to me, but the singers? i'm going to say it's going to be very difficult. you are spending too much time trying to listen out for everyone else. so it really wouldn't work? i don't think so. so what is a safe distance? and the answer to that is no—one really knows. so, is it one metre plus?
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maybe we go back to two metres? or maybe three metres, which is pretty much what we think the guidelines are going to be. well, the question is, what does the science say? the answer to that is, we have no idea. i spoke to declan costello, a consultant who specialises in the singing voice. there's been no documented studies, there's been no significant research studies looking at this in an objective way. so what you need to do is just measure the droplets coming out of the mouth and how far they go, isn't it? that's right. so we are measuring the amount of aerosol that comes out of the mouth or instrument, and therefore, how does that compare with speaking or shouting, calling somebody over a canteen. the hope is the go—ahead will be given soon for work to begin and allow us to once again sing and listen together. david sillito, bbc news, wells.
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thanks for your messages about whether you think lockdown in england is effectively over. helen tweets: i did brave frey at the weekend and 0mg, never again, felt as busy as usual even though they we re as busy as usual even though they were trying to restrict numbers. there was no social distancing and no two metres at the tills either. —— prime arc. sarahjane says: i think it does feel it's over, we are still sticking to the rules but it feels risky other shops, i worry about the saturday, shouldn't have been a week the 11th ofjuly is the worst date i feel for the police. joanna gosling is next. before that, let's bring you the weather with louise. hello there. there was cloud, wind and rain on offer over the weekend whether you wanted it or not. and that area of low pressure, well, you can see it,
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this bass clef swirl of cloud across the north has anchored itself to the north of the country. and it's still producing some rain. it will gradually drift over to scandinavia and then another weather front is going to replace it across central and southern parts of england and wales. we have still got some rain around, some of it quite heavy across parts of scotland, northern ireland and north—west england. so weather warnings remain in force. that rain should start to turn a little more showery into the afternoon and further south there will be quite a lot of cloud around. the best of the breaks perhaps to the south of the m4 corridor. there will be fleeting glimpses of sunshine. and just to add insult to injury, those blustery winds continuing, gusts in excess of 35 mph. so that's going to make it feel a little cool, 15—19d. those temperatures down on where they should be really for the time of year. the low will start to ease away. we keep a few scattered showers through the night and quite a lot of cloud generally. so temperatures are going to hold up into double figures and we start off tomorrow on a cloudy, dull note. that next frontal system pushing into the south—west.
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we are not expecting too much in the way of rain from it but it will nevertheless bring quite a lot of cloud and will also bring quite a few bits and pieces of drizzle as well. so a misty, murky start particularly across those exposed coasts, drizzly rain moving east. but on tuesday there is a greater chance of seeing more sunshine across scotland and northern ireland with a scattering of showers. but the sun is pretty strong and if you get some coming through temperatures will peak at 20 degrees. now, that weather front may well just continue to bring a little bit of cloud and rain across southern fringes first thing on wednesday morning. that's subject to change. you might need to keep abreast of the forecast for that one. but as it clears off into the near continent, wednesday is a day of sunny spells and scattered showers but the winds swing round to more of a northerly, so scotland and north—east england could be slightly cooler field to the day, could be slightly cooler feel to the day, temperatures only around 1a degrees. into the south—east we should see 21. but then on thursday, a brief ridge
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of high pressure builds, the best day of the week is likely to be thursday, before another low pressure starts to move in for the weekend. so, drier and brighter for thursday, more wind and rain for the weekend.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the number of people to die with covid—19 worldwide passes half a million after more than 10 million global cases of the disease. tackling localised flare—ups. lockdown restrictions, which are due to ease in england at the weekend, may stay in place in the city of leicester for an extra fortnight because of a spike in cases there. a billion pounds promised to rebuild crumbling schools in england and millions more for repairs. borisjohnson says the pandemic gives an opportunity to do things better. we are coming out of the medical
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covid—19 crisis into the economic after—shock. we want to drive jobs. further easing of restrictions across the rest of the uk as schools in wales and high street shops in scotland reopen. officials in pakistan say a group of four armed men, who stormed the stock exchange in karachi, have been killed. six other people are reported to have died in the attack. and air bridges — or travel corridors — to allow britons to go on holiday abroad are set to be confirmed by the government later today. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world, and stay with us for the latest news and analysis from here and across the globe.
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the number of people across the world who have lost their lives as a result of the covid—19 pandemic has now reached more than half a million. the worst affected country is the united states, followed by brazil. most european governments believe they have the situation under control. however, there are warnings that the easing of restrictions could lead to further outbreaks. pubs and restaurants in the city of leicester, in england may stay closed for two more weeks due to a surge in coronavirus cases. the prime minister borisjohnson said ministers will keep a close eye on the situation in the city, and will imposes restrictions if they are needed. elsewhere it's feared that countries like russia or india with a high number of infections but relatively low mortality rates so far could see a large number of deaths. simonjones has been assessing the global situation. counting the cost of coronavirus. brazil alone has seen more than 57,000 deaths as the global toll reaches 500,000.
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tears and applause to remember those who have lost their lives in brasilia. the world health organization says the pandemic is still at an intense stage of growth in the americas. in haiti, the poorest nation in the region, international aid agencies are trying to help the sick but many are often only coming to them when they are seriously ill. translation: people here deny the existence of the pandemic. they don't believe it. those who do believe have someone close to them who is infected. facemasks are not worn regularly. we need to have more social distancing too. coronavirus is also taking a serious toll in south asia. india alone has recorded more than 500,000 cases. despite this, hair salons in the western state of maharashtra are reopening
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as they try to bring back a degree of normality. but testing capacity still differs significantly between countries. so in other states like bangladesh, many cases may be going undetected. iran, the country worst hit by coronavirus in the middle east, is making the wearing of masks are mandatory in enclosed public spaces and large gatherings. in italy, a concert at bergamo cemetery to commemorate the victims of the virus. while there is currently no vaccine and no cure, the warning is there still is a long way to run. schools in england are to receive £1 billion of funding over the next ten years in a programme building projects being launched by the prime minister today.
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borisjohnson said the government was taking an "interventionist approach" to get cash back into the economy as the uk comes out of the covid—19 pandemic. the money will spent on 50 major school building projects over the next ten years with the first due to start in september 2021 and a further £560 million has been set aside to help with the maintenance and repair of crumbling schools across england. education unions say the money is welcome, but it's only a fraction of what is needed. 0ur assistant political editor, norman smith is at westminster. the government tying this in with the economic difficulties caused by covid—19 and talking about a big project of infrastructure spending. what we're going to hear from boris johnson is a build masterplan to kit out the infrastructure of this country. it is historically an ambitious proposal and the education
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repairs announced today are a sort of taster of what is expected to be unveiled tomorrow. in part, it is an attempt to create some sort of economic growth and jobs to help people with the aftermath of the crisis, and there is the fear that many people once the furloughing scheme begins to be phased out, there will bejob scheme begins to be phased out, there will be job losses. part of it as well is designed to regear the british economy to update its ageing infrastructure. part of it is part of the levelling up agenda. a lot of this money, we are told, is going to be figured in the north and the midlands and areas where schools have been most dilapidated and most run down. the announcement today is really the first stage of what is
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set to be a huge spending programme which is set to be unveiled tomorrow. this is what the prime minister said this morning about the school spending. we want to be spending a huge amount now on schools, on the 50 schools we are building or rebuilding with this initial £1 billion investment. but that's, of course, just part of the ten—year project now to get our schools upgraded and our further education colleges. and i think the point i would stress is that it's notjust important to improve our schools, but, given where we are now in the economic cycle, given we're coming out of the medical covid crisis into the economic after—shocks, we want to be investing in stuff that is going to drive jobs, drive high—skilled, high—paid jobs and apprenticeships. that is a ten year programme. more pressing for the government and for pa rents pressing for the government and for parents is will schools go back in september? we are seeing a concerted
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push this morning to see all schools, both primary and secondary, all year groups are expected to be backin all year groups are expected to be back in school in september. the education secretary gavin williamson has said that parents who do not send their children back, unless there is a particular localised outbreak of coronavirus, will face fines. in other words, schools will be mandatory. you will have to send your children back to school. labour are saying this could have been done already if the government had put measures in place to provide more classrooms for schools to take in peoples. possibly by putting portakabins in, peoples. possibly by putting porta kabins in, playgrounds, peoples. possibly by putting portakabins in, playgrounds, using empty council space. the question is — how quickly can we get all children back into school safely? i think we could have done it by now, had there been some leadership on this from the prime minister. it was obvious from the day that schools were closed what would be needed to get them back open, because most of the problems are practical problems. all the head teachers i've spoken
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to have said if you've got a big school with a lot of space, it's possible to do it. if you've got a small school with almost no space, it's very difficult. had the government put forward, put together a task force or something to bring people together and say what needs to be done, risk assessed every school, if you need temporary classrooms, let's build them. we put up nightingale hospitals, which was a good thing, and we could have put up temporary classrooms or used libraries, community centres, which at the moment are empty. the problems are practical, they could have been solved, it needed leadership from the top, from the prime minister and that's been found wanting here. the reason i think the government are now saying that schools have to go back and parents will have to send their children back is because if people are to go back to work, they need their children back in school. it is linked to the economic prospects and aftermath of a covid—19. there is a real push now
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to try and prepare the ground for all schools to be back up and running. later, we are expecting an announcement for the government on travel corridors. if you are thinking of going away, stay with us. thinking of going away, stay with us. if you want to travel abroad, that information is coming up at 1130. between both our guests, they should be able to give you the a nswe rs you should be able to give you the answers you are looking for. pubs and restaurants in the city of leicester, in england, may stay closed for two more weeks due to a surge in coronavirus cases. the city's mayor has said said the government has recommended current restrictions are maintained for a furtherfortnight, but have not advised a return to earlier lockdown measures. borisjohnson said ministers will keep a close eye on the situation in the city, and will imposes restrictions if they are needed. we are concerned about leicester.
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we are concerned about any local outbreak. and i want to stress to people that we are not out of the woods yet. it is very important we are making these cautious, calibrated steps. we are opening as much of hospitality as we can onjuly the 4th. 0pening as much of the economy as we can. some things, alas, still remain, you know, closed until they can become covid—secure. but to make all that possible, we have to remain vigilant. we have to continue to do the basics, washing our hands, and all that. plus, we need to have local lockdowns and local whack—a—mole strategies where that is necessary. it has worked in places like weston—super—mare or where we have had outbreaks in gp surgeries in london. and that is the same approach
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we will bring to bear in leicester as well. 0ur reporter navtej johal sent this update from leicester. well, the situation here in leicester has been serious enough for the department of health to describe the city has an area of concern, but it has stopped short of saying that a localised lockdown here is likely. now, to give you a bit of background, this all began when the health secretary, matt hancock, mentioned in a daily government briefing that there had been, in his words, an outbreak in the city. the latest figures show that there have been almost 900 people who have tested positive for coronavirus in the two weeks up to 23rd june, which represents almost a third of the total number of cases in the city. in the last few days, we have seen several schools have to cut temporarily close due to positive cases being reported there. local businesses have been affected too, including a supermarket and a local big sandwich maker, where there have been positive cases, too. and yesterday, we heard priti patel,
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the home secretary, say that a localised lockdown was something that the government was considering for leicester. but this morning, sir peter soulsby, the mayor of leicester, has said that recommendations he has received overnight from the government suggest that the current restrictions, the current lockdown measures, should be in place for an extra two weeks rather than stricter measures being reimposed — which would mean from 11th ofjuly, as the rest of england sees the likes of hairdressers, pubs and restaurants reopen, they will remain closed under current measures here in the city. which, of course, is going to have a huge impact on those businesses. now, we are expecting still a meeting to take place today, a virtual meeting, between the mayor of leicester, public health england and department of health officials which may provide more clarity for people in the city, who are desperate to find out what the next measures are going to be, what the next few days and weeks are going to look like and if there will be any
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restrictions imposed to the people of leicester. officials in pakistan say four men, who attacked the country's stock exchange in karachi, have been killed. six other people are reported to have died in the assault. the militants threw grenades and opened fire as they tried to force their way into the stock exchange compound, which lies in a high security zone that also houses the head offices of many private banks. the police chief says all four of the attackers were killed and the situation is under control. clearance operations continue in the area. let's speak now to our pakistan correspondent secunder kermani who is here in london. tell us more about what happened. the pictures look dramatic. for gun men arrived outside the gates of the stock exchange in karachi, the
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commercial capital of the company. they opened fire. they tried to gain entry to the main entry of the stock exchange building. security guards killed in trying to stop them from doing so. it is unclear if any of the attackers managed to get inside the attackers managed to get inside the building. there are reports from injuries from inside, but the fatalities that we know about and that have been confirmed where members of the security forces who tried to prevent them from getting inside. also there are reports from local police officials that they found food amongst the belongings of the dead militants, suggesting that they were perhaps planning on holding people hostage inside the pakistan stock exchange for a period of time because of the actions of the security forces, they were not able to do that. pakistan has seen
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violence over the years from a number of different groups. most of the attacks have come from jihadist groups, but there are also militant groups, but there are also militant groups operating... areas that are home to separatist groups, militant groups that want to be independent from the rest of pakistan. most of their attacks are generally within their attacks are generally within the western province of this area. they have attacked karachi. in 2018, they launched a similar attack with a number of gunmen carrying out and attack on the chinese concert in —— consort in karachi. security forces
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have tried to track down the masterminds behind this attack. as for the pakistan stock exchange, they said that they continue to trading. they did not stop for a minute. the markets did fall briefly but has since recovered because this attack is over. i should add that pakistan, even around ten or five yea rs pakistan, even around ten or five years ago, saw very high levels of violence by militant groups, but in recent yea rs, violence by militant groups, but in recent years, the number of attacks carried out by militant groups has really decreased. the security situation has improved. but as we see from events of today, those militant groups still have the ability to carry out these sporadic attacks. school bells in wales will be ringing for the first time since lockdown began this morning, as pupils begin to make a phased return to the classroom. but it will be a very different experience for children and teachers, with measures put in place to stop the spread of the coronavirus.
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0ur wales correspondent tomos morgan has been to see how the schools, and the children are getting ready to return. after 1a weeks away, today, children in wales will begin returning to the classroom. but it won't be school as they used to know it. i don't think i've been part of education where we've had to dismantle every aspect of education and then rebuild it with a covid—19 element to it. so, from pupils leaving their house in the morning, making sure they've got a packed lunch because we've got no catering facilities, through transport, where buses have been adapted. the fact we can only get eight learners on a bus at any one time, through to the fact they're going to be taught in one classroom. when i last visited eight—year—old evan in may, he'd been enjoying the past three and half months being home—schooled by dad, jason. but he had missed the interaction with other children at school. if you see your friends, you're like, "oh, mum, dad, can i go play with them?" evan will be going back for two days
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over the next three weeks, as only a third of pupils will be in class at any one time in wales. and now that school is back on the cards, he's not quite so sure if he'd rather at home. yeah! i don't want to go back to school but... it's kind of like i want to, but i don't want to because seeing your friends, playing football. seeing your teacher... but doing homework at home, there's lots of distractions and stuff but doing it in school... easy — no distractions. it will be a phased return for pupils here in wales, just like across all the devolved nations of the uk. certain year groups at primary level have been back in school for four weeks already in england. scottish schools will reopen at the start of the autumn term on the 11th august, with some continuing home learning, with some northern irish pupils going back in late august. but for all children of any age, school will certainly look, feel and be a completely different learning environment by the next academic year. tomos morgan, bbc news, cardiff.
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nonessential shops in scotland can open today if they have doors that open out onto the street. 0utdoor attractions such as zoos and garden attractions can also reopen. let's speak to adam welsh, head of education at five sisters zoo in west calder. thank you forjoining us. to lions behind you. are you open already? we opened up at ten o'clock this morning. that is the first time we have opened our doors began. how is it going so far? either many visitors coming along? the pack is still quite quiet. we are limiting the numbers that we let through the doors at any one time. it is quieter than normal, but that is what we wa nt than normal, but that is what we want at this point in time. people have arrived, and as you can see it
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isa have arrived, and as you can see it is a particularly miserable day today. we are delighted that eve ryo ne today. we are delighted that everyone has come out to visit. today. we are delighted that everyone has come out to visitm does look like it is raining, but never mind. i know that zoos have had a particularly tough time of it because you can't completely furlough like some companies because the animals still need to be looked after. how does the zoo manage that? we don't want the day to day for any of our animals to change. we still wa nt of our animals to change. we still want the excellent husbandry work to continue. we have been selling adoption and education and home learning packs in the post to people. we are doing online education sessions as well. today is fantastic and it is a massive help being able to open the doors again, but it is the online learning centres that we have set up and the adoption packs that have been great. we also had a crowdfunding campaign
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that was successful as well. we have had fantastic support throughout this, but it has been a real struggle. going forward, because you will not be able to have the same number of visitors that you would have had without the restrictions in place, how do you see the viability of the zoo? it is a bit of a concern because normally at this time of the year we would have thousands of people coming through the door. right now, we don't have that. we are saying to people, please support us, support your local zoo. if you are not living near us, visit your local zoo. it would really help to see places like ourselves to see us through the winter as well. that is the concern for us now, we are going from one winter into the next without being able to welcome our usual numbers. that will really help us usual numbers. that will really help us through this, visit your local zoo. us through this, visit your local zoo. as head of education, i would
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like to know your favourite zoo animalfact? my like to know your favourite zoo animal fact? my favourite zoo animal fa ct. animal fact? my favourite zoo animal fact. that is a very good question. we have animals that look like hedgehogs and come from madagascar, but they are actually a genetic relative of the elephant. go and look them up. they are called tenrecs. northern ireland becomes the first part of the uk to adopt a one metre social distancing guidance, with some restrictions today. the move was agreed by the northern ireland executive last week, ahead of the hospitality sector preparing to reopen fully on friday. also from today, churches can reopen for indoor services, and ministers at stormont are expected to sign off on a proposal to make face coverings mandatory on public transport. the uk government is expected to confirm today that travel corridors, also known as air bridges, will go ahead.
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it's the beginning of plans to relax restrictions on nonessential overseas travel in the uk. the final list of countries that uk residents be able to travel to — without having to quarantine — will be announced this week. from john lennon airport in liverpool our business reporter nina warhust has been finding out what impact this will have on the tourism and airline industry. eerily quiet atjohn lennon airport as it has been for months now. you know, this time last year, they were seeing around half a million passengers coming through those doors every month. over the lockdown period, that has dropped to less than 1000. 0bviously here, like millions of people across the uk, they are desperate to hear what will happen when this traffic light system comes into place, which will allow free travel via a reciprocal agreement to certain countries. that will mean you will not have to quarantine when you get home. great news for travel companies like tui, lastminute.com, eurotunnel who announced their website crashed over the weekend because there is so much pent—up travel
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enthusiasm among consumers. great news as well for the chief executive of the airport, john irving. very good morning to you. just in a nutshell, what have the last few months been like? good morning. yes, it has been extremely challenging for us as an airport, as i am sure many businesses have seen since lockdown. we, as you said, went from, you know, full planes flying out in march to pretty much an effectively closed down airport for three months. we have maintained an operation of one flight a day, but that is against 80 to 100 a day in a normal experience. so it has been very challenging. 0bviously, our revenues have been turned off, in effect. and we have a fairly fixed high cost base which we have had to manage extremely hard over this time using the furlough scheme, of course, from the government. but it has been a difficult time for us. also to think about planning for when this lockdown might ease for airports and travellers being one of the key challenges we have faced alongside our airline partners. you talk about planning being an issue and, at the moment, things aren't even crystal—clear, are they?
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we expect this announcement today on air corridors, but we won't necessarily get the specifics of where we can go to and when. yeah, i know, that's true. and planning is so important for us in the airline and airport industry. and the key is that people are confident and comfortable to travel. and we welcome this announcement in moving from a blanket approach to a risk—based approach and i think it's a sensible one. and we hope that there are many holiday destinations that we normal travel to injuly and august available for people to go to. will it be fun, though? because, for lots of people, the holiday starts when they walk through those doors. you know, you go for a drink, you take the kids for some food, you pick up some bits from the shops. are we going to be able to enjoy that? i think the key for us is to make sure that everyone feels comfortable, safe, and make sure we do everything we can from a safety point of view. so you will see differences as you walk into our airport. you will be wearing masks. we've got screens up and we'll have areas for social distancing which is very lucky for us both
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in security and in the check—in hall. i think when you walk into the departure lounge, it will be very much, you know, over time, business as usual, we hope, with more bars and restaurants and shops opening all the time. and we are here to get people to go on holiday, to be safe and secure as we do always, but we want people to enjoy themselves. and it will look slightly different. but we will do everything we can here at liverpooljohn lennon to make sure that experience is as good as it always was. that's what it's all about, isn't it? having a nice time but doing it safely. priti patel, the home secretary, warned yesterday it is not going to be as simple as packing your suitcase. these agreements have to be reached individually with individual countries, and that means there may be limits to your insurance policies. the advice at the moment is to wait for the full plans to emerge over this week before you book and take out your insurance policy. standing by to answer your travel
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questions are our guests, and they will be answering your questions and i will be putting them into them in the next five minutes or so. partial results in poland's presidential election show the incumbent andre duda in first place, but short of the 50% of votes needed for an outright win. rafau chas—kofski, the liberal mayor of the capital warsaw was his closest rival getting just under 30% of the votes. it'll now go to what looks set to be a closely fought run—off.. the bbc‘s adam easton reports from warsaw. president duda celebrated his first round victory with his wife in a small provincial town. in places like this, mr duda's socially conservative views and support for the government's generous welfare benefit scheme are very much appreciated. those payments have helped lift many poles out of poverty and restored a sense of dignity to people who felt neglected by previous administrations. but their support was not enough
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to secure an outright victory and mr duda will now face a second round in two weeks' time. translation: thank you very much, thank you. the result is far better than the one from five years ago and with ten other candidates this time, thank you very much for your support. first and foremost, i'd like to thank my compatriots for the turnout, for this massive participation in the election, i thank you with all my heart. turn out of almost 63% was the highest in 25 years. long queues formed outside many voting stations as people observed social distancing. the coronavirus pandemic itself was not a big campaign issue but it stopped the election taking place last month as it was originally scheduled to. that allowed the main opposition party
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to put forward a new candidate, rafal trzaskowski, the liberal mayor of warsaw who supports greater engagement with the eu. he ran a dynamic campaign and quickly became president duda's main challenger. translation: this result shows that 58% of people want a change and today, i want to tell you all, i will be your candidate. i will be the candidate of change. cheering and applause. this election is important because the president can veto a legislation. if he wins the second round, mr trzaskowski has blocked the government's plans to take even greater control of the media and thejudiciary. the eu says the sweeping changes the government has already made has undermined the rule of law and democracy. the stakes are high and the final result at this stage is too close to call. adam easton, bbc news, warsaw.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines... the number of people to die with covid—19 worldwide passes half a million after more than ten million global cases of the disease. tackling localised flare—ups. lockdown restrictions — which are due to ease in england at the weekend — may stay in place in the city of leicester for an extra fortnight because of a spike in cases there. £1 billion promised to rebuild crumbling schools in england — and millions more for repairs. borisjohnson says the pandemic gives an opportunity to do things better. further easing of restrictions across the rest of the uk as schools in wales and high street shops in scotland reopen. officials in pakistan say a group of four armed men, who stormed the stock exchange in karachi, have been killed. six other people are reported
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to have died in the attack. and air bridges or travel corridors to allow britons to go on holiday abroad are set to be confirmed by the government later today. now on bbc news it's time for your questions answered. the uk government has confirmed it plans to create travel corridors with certain countries nonessential international travel. since 8thjune, only arrivals from the republic of ireland, the channel isles and the isle of man have been exempt from a 14—day quarantine period, but it's thought countries like france, italy and spain will join that list from sixth july. the full details are yet to be published. you've been sending in your
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questions about holidays abroad. here to answer them isjonathan smith from abta, the body which represents travel agents and tour operators. and also i'm joined by the independent‘s travel editor simon calder. from david green, when flight restrictions are lifted injuly, can you fly anywhere? the vast majority of countries will still be on the warning list. it seems almost incredible we are just a week away from when we understand we will be able to travel and we have no idea, for example, if portugal or turkey will be on that list. as you say, it is absolutely certain spain, france, greece will be included, although greece will be included, although greece has had its not sure it once british holiday—makers there just yet. ireland will also be on the list but they are imposing quarantine at least until the 9th of
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july. almost everywhere else, which means the vast majority of the world's countries are still going to carry the foreign office warning against all but essential travel and if you come back, you will face 1a days of quarantine. you can go against that advice but your travel insurance will be void and of course, the prospect of staying indoors but two weeks is not going to appeal to many people, which is why the travel industry is so desperate for these warnings to be lifted so that people can actually get on holiday again. jonathan, i expect you are waiting as eagerly as anyone for people wanting to travel with the news we are expecting data from the government? that's right. the news is hotly anticipated to be this week. the industry needs to know which countries people can travel to and people want to know where they are likely to go on holiday this summer. the list, there has been lots of countries talked about in the press but this might be
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longer than we think. hopefully, on wednesday we might find out what that is. jenny asks, will australia be included in this list and, if i was flying directly from the uk to australia, would i still need to quarantine in australia ? australia, would i still need to quarantine in australia? simon?” australia, would i still need to quarantine in australia? simon? i am sorry to say, it is irrelevant. because australia, there are no direct flight from the uk to australia any more. they were shot down by qantas, the australian airline, simply because australia is cutting itself off from the rest of the world. if you are an australian citizen, my understanding is you can go back into australia. he will be quarantined in a government facility for two weeks before you are allowed to go. but australia and new zealand are simply not wishing to accept any visitors from overseas. i am sure australia will be regarded as a safe country because it looks relative to
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us, very safe. new zealand even better. but that is an academic status, i am afraid. someone has asked that i am planning to travel to spain for two weeks injuly, under the current measures and the forthcoming announcements, will i be able to return to the uk without having to follow the 1a day quarantine, jonathan? the advice from the foreign office is still not to travel unless it is essential but it is likely spain is on the list and if it is on the list and you are travelling after the date when the measures come into place, then it should be fine. i wasjust going to add to that that of course, these are not absolutely guaranteed. it is possible, has the government has stressed, even a country on the 0k to go list, may turn into a place where you do have to quarantine. so
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it is not completely risk free. at the weekend there was a report that most bookings are being made and so many people were looking at bookings. shannon andrews as, when are they likely to take effect? you have already indicated there is so much uncertainty, but what is the thinking? it has to be the 6th of july, that has been named by the government, the foreign office at least. the chronology, as far as i understand it, there will be a written statement this afternoon confirming there will be an announcement on wednesday. so that will be the 1st ofjuly when a lot of europe is opening up anyway and airlines like easyjet and ryanair are ramping up their operations. but you will not be able to travel with foreign office blessings until the 6th ofjuly, which will be the date of the quarantine is lifted from those lucky, selected destinations. that has answered our next question. joanne says, i am still waiting for
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confirmation my package holiday is going ahead, if the air bridges don't come into effect on the 6th of july, can we travel on the first? the answer is no. jonathan, what are most companies doing now in terms of refunds or vouchers if trips cannot go ahead? the situation, when it comes to refunds and cancellations is getting better. a lot of travel companies have been under pressure, given the numberof companies have been under pressure, given the number of cancellations that have had to take place over the re ce nt that have had to take place over the recent weeks and months. abta members are being encouraged to refund money as soon as they can, but it has been a difficult time. as soon as we can get but it has been a difficult time. as soon as we can get travel going again the better and we welcome the government's steps to do that but we need to know the countries people can go to. a great question from dave, if you have seen any of the
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pictures on social media people on flights who are crammed onto planes, he asks how can flying be saved? flights who are crammed onto planes, he asks how can flying be saved ?m can't, it is a calculated risk. i was on the flight from belfast to heathrow on friday, the first time people were able to travel in northern ireland to anywhere in the uk. everything is carefully socially distanced in terms of the airport, as much as it can be. as soon as you are on the plane, it is usual rules apply. you will not be two metres from your fellow passengers, it will feel strange and uncomfortable for a lot of people. but i think many will ta ke lot of people. but i think many will take the risk. however, the aviation industry cannot possibly say that flying is safe, all they can do is say we are doing everything we can to minimise the risks. jonathan, it seems so to minimise the risks. jonathan, it seems so odd, why isn't there social distancing on the planes? safety does come first and there are a lot
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of measures being introduced to make people as safe as they can be. people who are travelling need to be aware that experience is not going to be like what they might be used to. when it comes to the airport, for example, they will be distancing at the bag drop boarding. 0n the plane, there will be no trolley service. sorry to interrupt, the issue on the flights is they will be crammed in next to each other on the aeroplane? the airlines themselves will be taking measures. the technology they have on board to change the air is sophisticated. people need to be aware of the risks, if there are any and be comfortable with that. but they won't be disability the measures we are experiencing in the uk when people travel around. steven from essex says, we are due to visit portugal in early august, we have booked with love holidays and flight
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with ryanair, booked with love holidays and flight with rya nair, we booked with love holidays and flight with ryanair, we are reluctant to travel and want to know our options. everything is paid in full by credit ca rd everything is paid in full by credit card and we had travel insurance in place before covid—19. who is best to a nswer place before covid—19. who is best to answer this? i am afraid at the moment, if you are expressing what is known in the trade as disinclination to travel, you have no rights. having said that, we do not know if portugal will make it onto the 0k to visit list. it might be that the package holiday is cancelled in any event so you will get all of your money back. but it is worth talking to any travel operator if you are reluctant to travel, if you can get through to them, explain your predicament and it might be they will let you postpone your trip. but at the moment, it sounds really unfair, millions of people with holidays in july and august, before we had heard of coronavirus, are facing this
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awful situation where they are required, as it were, to go on holiday or lose your money. my heart goes out to them. jonathan, how much latitude is there for people like steven who feel reluctant to go when it comes to going to their travel operator? we don't know his circumstances, but what if somebody had a health condition and that is the issue? these are unusual circumstances. the first port of call would be to speak to the travel provider you booked with to see what their policy is. it might be that in exceptional circumstances they will allow you to change the booking, depending on the situation of the customer. kerry in chesterfield says, i booked a holiday to fuerteve ntu ra says, i booked a holiday to fuerteventura last says, i booked a holiday to fuerteve ntu ra last year says, i booked a holiday to fuerteventura last year before covid—19. it looks like we will be going on the holiday with the flight corridors opening, but we cannot
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cancel without losing money despite booking early. can we claim for compensation if we go and cannot use the beach all the pool? that is a really good question and under the travel regulations there is some latitude for getting compensation, but in this particular case, you will be able to use the beach and the one thing about the fact that probably across europe, you will only get half the number of tourists as you want in an ordinary summer. you will be able to use the beach, there will be problems with the pools, there will be problems with all—inclusive arrangements, so it will be uncomfortable and it will be very different. whether it is significantly different for you to be able to say, i want some of my money back, or i don't want to go on this holiday because you cannot promise what i actually booked in the first place, that is a difficult legal question and i think i would advise that people don't rely on that sort of argument. i don't know
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if it will get them very far. james says, i had to cancel our holiday booklet on the beach, we paid £480, the balance was due and the holiday was booked for the 12th ofjuly. the reason we cancelled my partner is a key work in a care home, what are our rights, can we claim a refund, jonathan? it is unlikely if you cancel a holiday yourself, that you will be. because essentially, if you cancel it means the terms and conditions you booked with apply. in any situation, if it is particularly unique, our advice would be to speak to your operatorjust to be clear on where you stand. what about in insurance cover for the travel agents themselves to cover claims against them? what is in place there? it is very, very good question. they haven't got very
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much, they organise great holidays, the british travel industry has been, up to now, absolutely outstanding and it is a difficult position for them to be in, particularly they reliant on airlines and to hand them the money back. it is an awful mess, hundreds of thousands of people who work in the travel industry are having a tough time. deborah in northamptonshire, says me and my partner had a honeymoon booked to travel to budapest tomorrow and our hotel e—mail to six weeks ago to cancel the booking but the flights are still going ahead. would we be even be able to enter budapest, can we go? my understanding is, the flight we go? my understanding is, the flight is going ahead anyway. if you area flight is going ahead anyway. if you are a no show for it because you don't want to go or you don't believe you will be let in, then you are going, it sounds awful, but you are going, it sounds awful, but you are going, it sounds awful, but you are going to lose the money. airlines are legal to its —— legally
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able to say, the flight is going, it is not our responsibility. almost all the european countries are opening up on wednesday the 1st of july. i do not believe hungary is an exception to that. deborah, i think we will try to talk to you a bit later if we can, our hearts go out too. you had your wedding and honeymoon plans so i presume you are facing the prospect you are going to the place for your honeymoon without getting married. we do wish you the very best with everything happening in your situation. same as everybody who has been affected with their plans, but some have more involved than others. helen says, a friend in california wants to fly to edinburgh injuly to spend a week in scotland and then travel to england before flying home, spending two weeks. can't she come and what are the
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restrictions? the us is certainly going to be on the red list, so she will need to self—isolate as soon as she arrives in scotland or england. she has to go to a hotel or somebody‘s home and stay indoors for two weeks. it doesn't sound like much of a break and there will be restrictions in place when she turns up restrictions in place when she turns up at manchester to fly back to the us. transatlantic travel this summer will be extremely difficult, if not impossible for the vast majority of people. jonathan, one final issue, i mentioned the weekend apparently for being the busiest time for online bookings and people potentially bookings and people potentially booking holidays, do you know how much traffic there was and how many bookings were taken over the weekend? we have had feedback and it has been reported there has been a huge amount of interest in holiday since the announcement on friday, which is encouraging. we anticipate there is an uptake of the man for
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people to go on holiday this summer. once we have the confirmation of the list, people should have confidence to carry on with their plans in the knowledge the travel advice will change at the same time and they can have a summer holiday. simon, you are waving your passport. this is a passport, you might remember them! i wa nt to passport, you might remember them! i want to remind people before they book anything, to get their passport, check the expiry date because 1.5 million passports, i calculate, have run out since the start of lockdown. the passport office is not operating at normal service and it would be awful to spend hundreds of thousands of pounds, only to found you couldn't actually travel. so please, check your passport and don't book anything if you are not sure you are able to leave the country legally. that is such a good point, it could
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be devastating. you have everything planned and then your passport let you down. thank you very much, thank you down. thank you very much, thank you at home for your questions and i hope we have answered the questions you are looking to get answers for. by far the worst affected country is the united states, with more than 125,000 deaths. the governor of texas, greg abbott, said matters have taken a very swift and very dangerous turn. his remarks coincide with a rise in infections in several southern and western states, mostly those that had eased restrictions early. our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. applause the us vice president attending a church service in dallas. texas is one of several southern and western states where record numbers of people are testing positive for covid—19. it's a huge setback for a region
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that once thought it had seen the worst of the outbreak. if we will but hold fast to him, we'll see our way through these challenging times, we will restore our nation's health, we will renew our freedom. but this is a daunting struggle for the lone star state with governor greg abbott issuing a stark warning about the resurgence of coronavirus cases. covid—19 has taken a very swift and very dangerous turn in texas overjust the past few weeks. overjust the past few weeks, the daily number of cases have gone from an average of about 2,000 to more than 5,000 per day. at the same time, hospitalisations have increased from about 2,000 per day to more than 5,000 per day. it's a similar picture in florida where officials blame a rush to socialise again after weeks in lockdown.
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the average age of people infected has dropped sharply to 33 from 65 two months ago. governor ron desantis says there's been an explosion in new cases. you can't control those... i mean, they're younger people, they're going to do what they're going to do, and i think the pubs was mostlyjust a matter of administration, there was no way to ensure compliance because it was so widespread noncompliant that the secretary took the action he did, and i said do what you gotta do to ensure compliance, but at the end of the day, my view is, i'd rather have those places open complying because i think that's probably less risky than what a lot of the young people end up doing. pubs in the state have now been ordered to stop serving alcohol. as in california, where bars have been closed in seven counties including los angeles. americans are once again being urged
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to wear face coverings in public although president trump has resisted calls to make it mandatory. nancy pelosi, the speaker of the house, says masks should be compulsory across the country. mr trump should set an example. with july 4th approaching, usually a time for a parting usually a time for a partying on the beach or at barbecues, the all—american holiday next weekend will be like no other. this is a country that's both weary and deeply worried about the days ahead. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. we know the impact that covid—19 has had on people from ethnic minority backgrounds, with some being vulnerable physically and financially. the muslim community here in the uk, has rallied around by raising zakat — that's the compulsory act of giving a proportion of one's wealth to charity. one organisation says requests for help have quadrupled as the bbc asian network's ankur desai has been finding out. meet mohammed, he is a husband and father of two young children in the west midlands. and lockdown almost left him and his family shut out and on the streets.
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i was happy when my boss told me that you will be back after three weeks. but then he told me that they haven't got any confirmation from the government so we will be closed for the next three months. after two weeks i was completely collapsed. even the food bank was closed so i was in a desperate situation. british muslims have been one of the hardest—hit communities, notjust in terms of health issues but finance too. those that are self employed or working in the gig economy often wonder how they will feed their families. how many days did you go with no food? three days. 0n the third day i called the food bank and they said you can come this afternoon. i was crying as well. i don't know what to do. i told my wife, just feed the kids first and whatever is left we will do with that what we want to do. getting nowhere with universal credit applications, mohammed, for the first time, turned to charity. they paid my bills, two months'
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rent and council tax, and they gave me a little bit of money for my food and fuel and it was a very big help. mohammed, like many british muslims, sought help from the national zakat foundation. they have told us they have seen a quadrupling of requests forfinancial aid during the covid crisis. you have an office here. how many people roughly work here? about 25 people. before covid the charity would be dealing with just ten applications in a day. but during the crisis. at its peak we were receiving something in the region of 200 applications in a day. and that'sjust an indication of the desperation people find themselves in. zakat is basically a muslim wealth tax to help those in need. we have definitely seen a shift, in that we have seen more and more people are recognising the needs of their own communities and they may even know someone who is going through difficult times. they recognise that there is actually a need for zakat to be given locally. mohammed is now back on his feet and extremely grateful for the support he received.
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if i would be waiting for the government to give me, by the time they do my kids willdie, iwilldie, without food or anything and i will be outside on the street. ankur desai, bbc news, in walsall. the author and former children's laureate michael rosen says he was warned by doctors he might not wake up, while being treated for covid—19. the 74—year—old spent 47 days on a ventilator in hospital, and didn't know he had been in an induced coma for seven weeks he's been praising the nhs. first of all, let me say thank you, many of you have been sending me best wishes, cards and messages on social media hoping that i will get better, which is very comforting and very better, which is very comforting and very reassuring. better, which is very comforting and very reassuring. so i want to say thank you for that. as you can see, look, i am
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thank you for that. as you can see, look, iam not thank you for that. as you can see, look, i am not in hospital, i am in my ordinary clothes and i am at home. so, you know, iam getting better so it does look as if this illness can be beaten with kindness and care from the nhs. so thanks again and who knows, i might see some of you soon. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise lear. hello there. there was cloud, wind and rain on offer over the weekend, whether you wanted it or not. that area of low pressure, well, you can see it, this base, a swirl of cloud across the north. it's anchored itself to the north of the country and it's still producing some rain. it will gradually drift off to scandinavia and then another weather front is going to replace it across central and southern parts of england and wales. so we've still got some rain around, some of it quite heavy across parts of scotland, northern ireland and north
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west england, so weather warnings remain in force. that rain should start to turn a little more showery into the afternoon and further south, there is going to be quite a lot of cloud around. the best of the breaks perhaps to the south of the m4 corridor, they'll be fleeting glimpses of sunshine. and just to add insult to injury, those blustery winds continue, gusts in excess of 35 miles an hour. so that's going to make it feel a little cool, 15—19 degrees. those temperatures down and where they should be, really, for the time of year. the low will start to ease away. we keep a few scattered showers through the night and quite a lot of cloud generally. temperatures are going to hold up into double figures and we start off tomorrow on a cloudy, dull note. that next frontal system pushing into the south—west. we're not expecting too much in the way of rain from it but it will nevertheless bring quite a lot of cloud, it's also going to bring bits and pieces of drizzle as well. so a misty, murky start, particularly across those exposed coasts, that drizzly rain drifting east. but, on tuesday, there is a greater chance of seeing more sunshine across scotland and northern ireland
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with a scattering of showers but the sun's pretty strong and if you get some coming through, temperatures will peak at 20 degrees. now, that weather front may well just continue to bring a little bit of cloud and rain across southern fringes first thing on wednesday morning. that's subject to change, you might need to keep abreast of the forecast for that one. but as it clears off into the near continent, wednesday is the day of sunny spells and scattered showers but they winds swing round to more of a northerly, so across scotland and north—east england, it could be a slightly cooler feel to the day. temperatures only around 14 degrees. into the south—east, we should see 21. but then on thursday, a brief ridge of high pressure builds. the best day of the week is likely to be thursday, before another low pressure system starts to move in for the weekend. so, drier and brighter on thursday, more wind and rain for the weekend.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the number of people to die with covid—19 worldwide passes half a million after more than 10 million global cases of the disease. tackling localised flare—ups. lockdown restrictions, which are due to ease in england at the weekend, may stay in place in the city of leicester for an extra fortnight because of a spike in cases there. £1 billion promised to rebuild crumbling schools in england, and millions more for repairs. borisjohnson says the pandemic gives an opportunity to do things better. we coming out of the medical covid crisis into the economic after—shocks. we want to be investing in stuff that's going to drive jobs, drive high—skilled, high—paid jobs and apprenticeships.
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further easing of restrictions across the rest of the uk as schools in wales and high street shops in scotland reopen. officials in pakistan say a group of four armed men, who stormed the stock exchange in karachi, have been killed. six other people are reported to have died in the attack. and air bridges — or travel corridors — to allow britons to go on holiday abroad are set to be confirmed by the government later today. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world, and stay with us for the latest news and analysis from here and across the globe. the head of the world health organization has warned of a dangerous new phase as we continue to fight coronavirus. the worst affected country
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is the united states, followed by brazil. across the world, the number of people who have lost their lives as a result of the covid—19 pandemic has now reached more than half a million. most european governments believe they have the situation under control. however, there are warnings that the easing of restrictions could lead to further outbreaks. in the city of leicester, in england, a surge in the number of cases has meant that pubs and restaurants may stay closed for two more weeks according to the city's mayor. the uk prime minister has said "the cash is there" for spending on long—term economic investment to recover from the coronavirus pandemic. he says a ten—year project of infrastructure investment will include a major school building plan for england. meanwhile, some other regions of the world are now seeing the disease spread at an accelerating rate. the us has seen rise of cases in arizona, texas and florida. brazil also has seen a worrying rise of cases in its cities, and india
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is experiencing its highest daily infection rates. here in the uk, wales has reopened its schools. in scotland, an ease of restrictions has seen shops reopen for the first time in three months. and in northern ireland, social distancing has been dropped from 2 metres to 1 metre. simonjones has been assessing the global situation. counting the cost of coronavirus. brazil alone has seen more than 57,000 deaths as the global toll reaches 500,000. tears and applause to remember those who have lost their lives in brasilia. the world health organization says the pandemic is still at an intense stage of growth in the americas. in haiti, the poorest nation in the region, international aid agencies are trying to help the sick, but many are often only coming to them when they are seriously ill.
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translation: people here deny the existence of the pandemic. they don't believe it. those who do believe have someone close to them who is infected. face masks are not worn regularly. we need to have more social distancing, too. coronavirus is also taking a serious toll in south asia. india alone has recorded more than 500,000 cases. despite this, hair salons in the western state of maharashtra are reopening as they try to bring back a degree of normality. but testing capacity still differs significantly between countries. so in other states like bangladesh, many cases may be going undetected. iran, the country worst hit by coronavirus in the middle east, is making the wearing of masks mandatory in enclosed public spaces and large gatherings. in italy, a concert
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at bergamo cemetery to commemorate the victims of the virus. but there is currently no vaccine and no cure, the warning is this still has a long way to run. simon jones, bbc news. schools in england are to receive £1 billion of funding over the next ten years in a programme building projects being launched by the prime minister today. borisjohnson said the government was taking an "interventionist approach" to get cash back into the economy as the uk comes out of the covid—19 pandemic. the money will spent on 50 major school building projects over the next ten years with the first due to start in september 2021. a further £560 million has been set aside to help with the maintenance and repair of crumbling schools across england. education unions say the money is welcome, but it's only a fraction of what is needed. and we are also hearing today from the education secretary gavin williamson that it will be "compulsory for children to return back to school" in september in england, with fines on families
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that don't comply. our assistant political editor norman smith is at westminster. that norman smith is at westminster. is a significant st it? that is a significant step, isn't it? there has been a lot of chewing and throwing with what is happening with schools —— toing and froing. gavin williamson very clearly that schooling is mandatory and if pa rents schooling is mandatory and if parents do not send their children to school they leave themselves open to school they leave themselves open to the possibility of fines. he is saying he expects all schools, all yea rs, saying he expects all schools, all years, all saying he expects all schools, all yea rs, all classes to saying he expects all schools, all years, all classes to be back all day in september. i do not think the expectation is that they are going to be handing out penalty notices left, right and centre. the hope is
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that gradually confidence is returning and that by september, pa rents returning and that by september, parents will be thinking, let's get children back into schools. but i think it underlines just how crucial they see getting schools back to the wider arguments about kick—starting the economy. the fear is that if children don't go back, parents will not go back to work either. we are expecting a mega £1 billion build programme to be unveiled by boris johnson. we have got the first instalment of that today, with this ten year programme to refurbish schools, starting with 50 schools. that is a cost of £1 billion. have a listen to the prime ministers setting out those proposals. we want to be spending huge amounts now on schools, on the 50 schools we are building or rebuilding with this initial £1 billion investment. but that's, of course, just part of the ten—year project now to get our schools upgraded and our further education colleges. and i think the point i would stress is that it's notjust important
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to improve our schools, but, given where we are now in the economic cycle, given we're coming out of the medical covid crisis into the economic after—shocks, we want to be investing in stuff that is going to drive jobs, drive high—skilled, high—paid jobs and apprenticeships. interesting, a lot of that projected spending in schools is going to go to schools in the north and the midlands so it will form part of boris johnson's midlands so it will form part of borisjohnson's levelling up agenda. we do not have the exact criteria for which schools will be chosen for the refurbishment, but borisjohnson suggesting it will be schools in comparatively deprived, rundown areas that will get the first of this money. meanwhile, the labour leader keir starmer has accused borisjohnson of leader keir starmer has accused boris johnson of a leader keir starmer has accused borisjohnson of a lack of leadership over schools and blamed borisjohnson for the
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leadership over schools and blamed boris johnson for the failure to send children back to school, saying they need to provide more classroom spaces, portakabins, using vacant council space. this is what he had to say this morning. we can work across party on this. getting children back into school is more important than scoring party political points. the government should have seen the problem coming the day they shut the schools. it is obvious the what the practical problems would be. we need to use libraries, community centres. had there been a plan in place the day schools were shut, i think we would have all children back in schools now. when we talk about schools going back in september and it being compulsory, does that mean social distancing measures in schools will go out the window? there is money
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being given to school for repairs, but no money being given forfinding extra things like space. what gavin williamson said this morning that the current maximum classroom size of 15, that will go and classes will be able to have 30 pupils, in other words, back to their former maximum size. that will enable many more pupils, all peoples, to go back into schools. in terms of social distancing measures, iam schools. in terms of social distancing measures, i am sure there will be a huge emphasis on cleanliness, hand washing. they may try to stagger arrival times, lunchtimes, playground times, to minimise contact between different classes. but it is going to be difficult when you think of secondary schools, because children in secondary schools, they go into different subject groups. they go into different options. they tend to
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be mixing much more. but we will get the details of how this is going to be managed later this week when we get that statement that gavin williamson has promised he will make in the comments. let's talk more about that funding that has been promised. luke sibieta is from the institue for fiscal studies and joins me now. how badly is the money needed, first of all? i am sure it will be very much welcomed by schools. it represents about a third of current plans of a 1.45 billion, and following past cuts of school spending, iam following past cuts of school spending, i am sure schools will have a project they can use the money for. there is also that billion pounds of extra money for school building programmes. this is pa rt school building programmes. this is part of a wider package of spending
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to boost infrastructure and try to get the economy going by creating jobs that way. what are your thoughts on that? i think it is a bit too early to judge the significance of the school building programme. we know 50 projects will start next year with that £1 billion of extra funding. but the government is year—on—year building schools. the tarmac by way of context, we know that capital spending on schools has fallen, and if all that extra money was allocated next year, that would be about 20% of that current level, so very significant. but it would only take capital spending back to where it was in 2015, so it probably will not reverse past cuts. and it is a 10—year plan. reverse past cuts. and it is a 10-year plan. absolutely. so i think it isa 10-year plan. absolutely. so i think it is a bit too early to judge now
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whether it is a significant ten year plan. we would have to make that judgment when we know what the government has planned for the next ten years. what about picking up the tab for this? clearly, this is going to bea tab for this? clearly, this is going to be a significant amount of funding, but normally capital spending is funded through borrowing given it is going to be future generations of children that would benefit from any future school building. there has obviously already been a huge stretch in government expenditure because of covid—19, because of the furlough programme. billions have been spent. can the government continue to stretch that borrowing? there is a lwa ys stretch that borrowing? there is always to be some kind of constraint on borrowing, but it is interesting how the language on borrowing has changed recently. given the furlough scheme, capitalspending changed recently. given the furlough scheme, capital spending doesn't sound all that significant any more given what we have already borrowed,
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so given what we have already borrowed, soido given what we have already borrowed, so i do think the language has changed quite a lot there. what about tax rises as well? there are some very about tax rises as well? there are some very difficult questions and policies are going to have to be done to put all this right in the long—term? done to put all this right in the long-term? absolutely. i think the government and the chancellor in particular have but a very hard job of balancing spending now for building projects that help the economy but also devising appropriate measures to help fill the gap in the long run. they will undoubtedly be a hole in the balance that needs to be filled, either by extra extra tax rises or lower spending. pubs and restaurants in the city of leicester in england may stay closed for two more weeks due to a surge in coronavirus cases. the city's mayor has said said the government has recommended current restrictions are maintained for a furtherfortnight, but have not advised a return to earlier lockdown measures. borisjohnson said ministers will keep a close eye on the situation in the city, and will imposes restrictions
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if they are needed. we are concerned about leicester. we are concerned about any local outbreak. and i want to stress to people that we are not out of the woods yet. it is very important we are making these cautious, calibrated steps. we are opening as much of hospitality as we can onjuly the 4th. opening as much of the economy as we can. some things, alas, still remain, you know, closed until they can become covid—secure. but to make all that possible, we have to remain vigilant. we have to continue to do the basics, washing our hands, and all that. plus, we need to have local lockdowns and local whack—a—mole strategies where that is necessary. it has worked in places like weston—super—mare or where we have had outbreaks in gp surgeries in london. and that is the same approach we will bring to bear
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in leicester as well. some pupils have returned to schools in wales today for the first time since march. the hope is that all pupils will be able to have catch up meetings with their teachers over the next three to four weeks ahead of the september term. schools will have to stick to strict social distancing measures and limit numbers in a classroom at any given time. non—essential shops in scotland can open today if they have doors that open out onto the street. let's speak to michael apter, who has two independent greeting cards, stationery and gift shops called paper tiger. hejoins us from edinburgh. are you back open? we are. we opened this morning at 930. how is it going? it has been a very wet morning in edinburgh so it has been a little bit quiet but we have had a steady stream of customers in and i think virtually everyone who has
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come in has spent, so positive so far. what have you done to encourage people back in and to reassure people back in and to reassure people it is safe? we have rearranged the shop floor layout so we have a one—way system, we have got hand sanitiser and gloves, signage at the entrance area explaining what our procedure is. we have antibacterial wipes at virtually every point in the shop. beyond that, we are just 20 keep it as familiar as possible and maintain the customer service that we would normally deliver prior to covid—19. how tough has this time been for you? incredibly difficult in terms of the financial impact, that is huge. emotionally, this is my business. i have worked in this business. i have worked in this business for almost 23 years and to not be able to open the doors as a retailer is incredibly challenging.
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and then we have traded online successfully. we have seen growth in the online business during lockdown, but as we've open, we are at the end of the beginning and we are now into something completely new and different and how it plans out over the next few days and months, i wouldn't like to predict what happens in the next hour, never mind what happens in the next week!” imagine what you have been going through is exactly the same and similar people. you have been hit, it is difficult and faced with that at the same time you have got to be creative and positive in getting up and keeping going. it is really hard work. it is mentally exhausting. and it has been great in the last few days to bring the team back, get the shop ready. we have got people coming back on the part—time furlough scheme, which has been helpful in getting the business ready to trade. then we can manage our staffing levels as we move into
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the next phase, and hopefully we will be able to reach a level of trade where we have got everybody back doing their contracted hours by the time the scheme expires. you've mentioned is that so far everyone who has come through your doors today has spent money, and i wonder if people are mindful but actually it is important to come together and spend local and support local wherever you can? i hope so. that is kind of what we are relying on. the issues are, although we are open today, there are lots of other retailers that have not opened. high street chains are doing phase reopens, so street chains are doing phase reopens, so not all of their branches are open. people are opening later, changing their opening later, changing their opening hours. and there are issues with other sectors not reopening. every economy is an ecology. there are no salons opening, cafe is only doing takeaway, none of the bars and
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restau ra nts doing takeaway, none of the bars and restaurants are open. appointments driven businesses like dentists are closed as well. all of those factors would normally give us a healthy foot full and allow us to trade successfully, even on a wet monday morning in june, successfully, even on a wet monday morning injune, but they are not there. there is a handful of businesses open, and because of that, we have got a very long, slow return to normality. i don't think we will ever see the footfall that we will ever see the footfall that we we re we will ever see the footfall that we were enjoying prior to the lockdown. we do wish you the best. thank you forjoining us. officials in pakistan say four men, who attacked the country's stock exchange in karachi, have been killed. six other people are reported to have died in the assault. the militants threw grenades and opened fire as they tried to force their way into the stock exchange compound, which lies in a high security zone that also houses the head offices of many private banks. the police chief says all four of the attackers were killed and the situation is under control. clearance operations continue in the area.
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let's talk to bbc urdu correspondent farhatjaved, who's in islamabad. it is all over, but tell us what happened, exactly. as we speak now, police and military forces have cleared the building after conducting a search in and around that building in the city of karachi. it happened earlier in the morning today, and at ten o'clock, for then armed with automatic rifles, grenade and some ammunition, they tried to enter the stock exchange building. they tried to enter the main compound where hundreds of officers of the financial institutions are located —— offices stop they tried to enter the compound, but police and paramilitary forces did stop them. the police have confirmed now that
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all the four men who attacked the building have been killed, and also those who were killed include one police officer and two private security guards who were on the date of this building. it is located on a high security zone in karachi. police say that they have found food items with the bodies of the attackers, which shows that they we re attackers, which shows that they were probably going to a long siege, had they been successful in entering the building. but they could not reach this compound. it is unclear what is the exact number of people who were in the compound at the time of this attack, but on any normal daily compound can host up to 8000 people. today, those who were in the building, they were evacuated from back doors. police say that they have started an inquiry and they are collecting evidence from the area. and the building has been cleared. a
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band of militants in... they have claimed responsivity.” band of militants in... they have claimed responsivity. i am so sorry to interrupt, but we are tight on time —— responsibility. we know the impact that covid—19 has had on people from ethnic minority backgrounds, with some being vulnerable physically and financially. the muslim community in the uk, has rallied around by raising zakat, that's the compulsory act of giving a proportion of one's wealth to charity. one organisation says requests for help have quadrupled as the bbc asian network's ankur desai reports. meet mohammed, he is a husband and father of two young children in the west midlands. and lockdown almost left him and his family shut out and on the streets. i was happy when my boss told me that you will be back after three weeks. but then he told me
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that they haven't got any confirmation from the government, so we will be closed for the next three months. after two weeks i was completely collapsed. even the food bank was closed, so i was in a desperate situation. british muslims have been one of the hardest—hit communities, notjust in terms of health issues, but finance too. those that are self—employed or working in the gig economy often wonder how they will feed their families. how many days did you go with no food? three days. 0n the third day i called the food bank and they said you can come this afternoon. i was crying as well. i don't know what to do. i told my wife, just feed the kids first and whatever is left we will do with that what we want to do. getting nowhere with universal credit applications, mohammed, for the first time, turned to charity. they paid my bills, two months' rent and council tax, and they gave me a little bit of money for my food and fuel
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and it was a very big help. mohammed, like many british muslims, sought help from the national zakat foundation. they have told us they have seen a quadrupling of requests forfinancial aid during the covid crisis. you have an office here. how many people roughly work here? about 25 people. before covid the charity would be dealing with just ten applications in a day. but during the crisis. at its peak we were receiving something in the region of 200 applications in a day. and that's just an indication of the desperation people find themselves in. zakat is basically a muslim wealth tax to help those in need. we have definitely seen a shift, in that we have seen more and more people are recognising the needs of their own communities and they may even know someone who is going through difficult times. they recognise that there is actually a need for zakat to be given locally. mohammed is now back on his feet and extremely grateful for the support he received. if i would be waiting for the government to give me,
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by the time they do my kids willdie, iwilldie, without food or anything and i will be outside on the street. ankur desai, bbc news, in walsall. you're watching bbc news. the uk government is expected to confirm today that travel corridors, also known as air bridges, will go ahead. it's the beginning of plans to relax restrictions on non—essential overseas travel in the uk. the final list of countries that uk residents be able to travel to — without having to quarantine — will be announced this week. from john lennon airport in liverpool — our business reporter nina warhust has been finding out what impact this will have on the tourism and airline industry. eerily quiet atjohn lennon airport as it has been for months now. you know, this time last year, they were seeing around half a million passengers coming through those doors every month. over the lockdown period, that has dropped to less than 1000. obviously here, like millions
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of people across the uk, they are desperate to hear what will happen when this traffic light system comes into place, which will allow free travel via a reciprocal agreement to certain countries. that will mean you will not have to quarantine when you get home. great news for travel companies like tui, lastminute.com, eurotunnel who announced their website crashed over the weekend because there is so much pent—up travel enthusiasm among consumers. great news as well for the chief executive of the airport, john irving. very good morning to you. just in a nutshell, what have the last few months been like? good morning. yes, it has been extremely challenging for us as an airport, as i am sure many businesses have seen since lockdown. we, as you said, went from, you know, full planes flying out in march to pretty much an effectively closed down airport for three months. we have maintained an operation of one flight a day, but that is against 80 to 100 a day in a normal experience. so it has been very challenging. obviously, our revenues have been turned off, in effect.
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and we have a fairly fixed high cost base which we have had to manage extremely hard over this time using the furlough scheme, of course, from the government. but it has been a difficult time for us. also to think about planning for when this lockdown might ease for airports and travellers being one of the key challenges we have faced alongside our airline partners. you talk about planning being an issue and, at the moment, things aren't even crystal—clear, are they? we expect this announcement today on air corridors, but we won't necessarily get the specifics of where we can go to and when. yeah, i know, that's true. and planning is so important for us in the airline and airport industry. and the key is that people are confident and comfortable to travel. and we welcome this announcement and moving from a blanket approach to a risk—based approach i think is a sensible one. and we hope that there are many holiday destinations that we normal travel to injuly and august available for people to go to. will it be fun, though? because, for lots of people,
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the holiday starts when they walk through those doors. you know, you go for a drink, you take the kids for some food, you pick up some bits from the shops. are we going to be able to enjoy that? i think the key for us is to make sure that everyone feels comfortable, safe, and make sure we do everything we can from a safety point of view. so you will see differences as you walk into our airport. you will be wearing masks. we've got screens up and we'll have areas for social distancing which is very lucky for us both in security and in the check—in hall. i think when you walk into the departure lounge, it will be very much, you know, over time, business as usual, we hope, with more bars and restaurants and shops opening all the time. and we are here to get people to go on holiday, to be safe and secure as we do always, but we want people to enjoy themselves. and it will look slightly different. but we will do everything we can here at liverpooljohn lennon to make sure that experience is as good as it always was. that's what it's all about, isn't it? having a nice time but doing it safely. priti patel, the home secretary, warned yesterday it is not going to be as simple as packing your suitcase. these agreements have to be reached individually with individual countries,
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and that means there may be limits to your insurance policies. the advice at the moment is to wait for the full plans to emerge over this week before you book and take out your insurance policy. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise lear. hello there. a north—south divide with our weather story at the moment. the cloud, the wind and the rain that we saw for sunday, that is continuing across some parts of scotland, northern ireland and northern england. but the heavy rain will start to ease and become more showery into the afternoon. cloudy conditions across england and wales. the best of any breaks with some brief glimpses of sunshine to the south of the m4 corridor. but it stays pretty windy with it, particularly in the sharper showers. gusts in excess of 35, 40 miles an hour. and temperatures struggling a little. temperatures of 14 to 20 degrees. as we move through the evening and overnight, the low pressure drifts its way off into scandinavia.
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we keep a fair amount of cloud around and a few scattered showers. weather conditions down into the south—west — damp and misty, murky. it is going to be a relatively mild start to tuesday. hopefully, a slightly quieter story. the best of the drier weather across southern england with our week ahead. please hello this is bbc news with joanna gosling. the headlines: the number of people to die with covid—19 worldwide passes half a million after more than 10 million global cases of the disease. tackling localised fare—ups. lockdown restrictions which are due to ease in england at the weekend may stay in place in the city of leicester for an extra fortnight because of a spike in cases there. a billion pounds promised to rebuild crumbling schools in england and millions more for repairs. borisjohnson says the pandemic gives an opportunity to do things better. further easing of restrictions across the rest of the uk as schools in wales and high street shops
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in scotland reopen. officials in pakistan say a group of four armed men, who stormed the stock exchange in karachi, have been killed. six other people are reported to have died in the attack. and air bridges or travel corridors to allow britons to go on holiday abroad are set to be confirmed by the government later today. we can go to edinburgh. the total number of deaths in scotland under that measurement remains at 2482. this is the fourth day in a row when no deaths of patients confirmed through a test have been recorded in scotland. two of these days have been at weekends and we know
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registration can be artificially low at weekends and we may see low deaths registered later this week. but there is no doubt these recent figures demonstrate beyond any doubt, how much progress scotland has made in tackling covid and that is down to the efforts and sacrifices of everyone across the country and i want to say a heartfelt thank you to those for that. it is a big challenge and it will depend on the efforts of all of us, is to continue that progress, while at the same time reopening more of our economy, restarting more public services and seeing more of ourfamily and public services and seeing more of our family and friends. of course, the tally of total deaths i have reported is a constant reminder and should continue to be a constant reminder of the human toll of this virus and why our efforts to contain, control and hopefully eliminate it are so important.
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everyone who has died due to this illness was a unique and irreplaceable individual, whose loss right now is a source of grief to many. i once again today to send my deepest condolences to everyone who has lost a loved one as a result of covid—19. let me express my thanks to health and care workers and all of our key workers. the progress we have made today is in no small part due to your dedication. the entire country is grateful to you for everything you have done and everything you have done and everything you continue to do. i have two key points i want to briefly update on. the first relates to public finances and the economy andi to public finances and the economy and i amjoined to public finances and the economy and i am joined by kate forbes, the finance secretary. i will return to this briefly at the end of my remarks, we are seeing the reopening of significant parts of the economy. this afternoon i will discuss how we
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continue that restart safely and sustainably at one of the government meetings with the scottish trades union congress. the scottish government has published a paper which puts forward some constructive proposals for how the uk, as a whole, can and needs to stimulate economic growth in a way that is both fair and sustainable. the paper proposes an £80 billion stimulus programme comparable in ambition to the one germany has recently adopted and it has a particular focus on investment and low carbon and digital infrastructure. proposals would provide an employment guarantee for young people. we are suggesting a temporary cut in vat to boost consumption, with a specially low rates for our hospitality and tourism sectors, because they have been particularly ha rd—hit tourism sectors, because they have been particularly hard—hit and are likely to be hit for even longer than some parts of our economy. alongside the uk proposals, we propose scotland should gain financial powers over burrowing so we can shape our financial powers over burrowing so we can shape our own response financial powers over burrowing so we can shape our own response to the economic implications of the
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pandemic. the economic crisis caused by covid—19 is undoubtedly the most serious of our lifetimes. the scottish government's proposals are ambitious, but practical and sustainable and we believe they would benefit, not only scotland, but the whole of the uk. central to them is the strong belief that the austerity mistake of the post—financial crash period must not be repeated and the debt must be managed over a longer time period. studio: we are leaving nicola sturgeon for the time being, you can see that on bbc one scotland and bbc scotland. we are going tojoin mark dra keford for announcing scotland. we are going tojoin mark drakeford for announcing a further easing of the lockdown in wales. everything i say today has to be placed in the context of the continued threat that coronavirus places here in wales and the way in
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which that virus continues to shape our lives. every day here in wales, people contract the disease, every day in wales we still have people dying as a result. whatever the message you may hear from elsewhere, i want you to know that your safety, that of your community remains the guiding light by which we make all the decisions that the welsh government makes for people in wales. and at the same time, each and every one of us goes on having a responsibility to do all the things that make a real difference to the spread of the virus and keep one another free of this deadly disease. we are already approaching the midpoint of the next 21 day review cycle of the coronavirus regulations. and over the course of this cycle, we are introducing a set
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of changes to the restrictions in a step—by—step way which moves us firmly into the amber phase and ta kes firmly into the amber phase and takes advantage of the current headroom we have. last monday, nonessential retail shops opened in wales. this monday, pupils are returning to school to check in, catch up and prepare for the summer. next monday, if the conditions remain favourable, we will lift the requirement to stay local. in the welsh government, we have been working hard over the last few days on the concept of enabling two households to come together, to join and to form one extended household. and this can allow families and close friends who have been separated by the coronavirus pandemic over the last few months, to reconnect with one another and to enjoy one another‘s company again
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indoors. our aim has enjoy one another‘s company again indoors. 0uraim has been enjoy one another‘s company again indoors. our aim has been to introduce this in a way which is as safe as possible, as fair as possible and as simple as possible. and we have now reached the stage where, provided the situation remains favourable this time next week, we will be able to lift the stay local requirement and at the same time, we will be able to make changes to the rules to allow people from two separate households to form one exclusive, extended household. and that would come into being from monday the 6th ofjuly. and as i have said, we try to follow the simplest form of this concept
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possible. we have looked carefully at how it is being done elsewhere in the united kingdom and around the world, drawing heavily, for example, on the experience in new zealand. what we are proposing in wales is we will make sure all households are included. there will be no difference in the size of the two households you can bejoined households you can be joined with and you will be able to travel from the 6th of july and you will be able to travel from the 6th ofjuly to join your extended household. but although it is simple, there still has to be some rules. any one person will only be able to join one extended household. only people living in the same two households which form it canjoint that same two households which form it can joint that extended household. the extended household must contain the same people for the foreseeable future, there cannot be any tra nsfers future, there cannot be any transfers or chopping and changing. and if anyone in an extended
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household develops symptoms of coronavirus then that entire extended household will need to self—isolate. and for this reason, we think it is important for the extended household to keep records, to help with a contact tracing in cases where someone to help with a contact tracing in cases where someone in that extended household tests positive for coronavirus. we will provide a simple form on our website for anyone to use to keep that record. so if someone does test positive, our test, trace and protect system will swing into action and having that information ready, accessible and with all the necessary detail, will be very important to allow that system to get into action as fast as possible. now, by creating extended
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households, we will enable many families to be reunited for the first time since march. grandparents will be able to see and hold their grandchildren again. it will help support many working parents with informal childcare over the weeks ahead. and it will also offer important support to those who are caring alone for others. but because any one of us will only be able to belong to one extended household, this will mean making choices. and in some cases, especially in larger families, these choices will be difficult. but because the virus is still with us, we all have to face making these choices together. and we are making this announcement today, a week before these changes will be introduced in order to give
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families and individuals a chance to think about this carefully, to discuss it with other family members and to come to that decision. and in having those conversations and doing that thinking, ouradvice having those conversations and doing that thinking, our advice to people is to think carefully about who most need support. some households may need support. some households may need more help than others, they may have greater needs and that is something to think about. think about the risks. people who are shielded are included in this announcement today, but extended households bring additional risks and bring those risks to people who are particularly vulnerable and that is something important to think about. think about the consequences, if anyone in the extended household becomes ill, everyone will have to self—isolate for 14 days. and for
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some people, this will have a greater impact than for others and that needs to be thought about carefully as well. and finally, think carefully about who you are joining with. once the extended household is formed, it cannot be changed and you won't be able to substitute members. this few days ahead before these changes are introduced is an opportunity for you to have those conversations with others in your wider family, to have those conversations with others in your widerfamily, to make that decision about which two households will form this exclusive, extended household. now, all this depends about the state of the virus by the end of this week of course. and at the end of the week, we will
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review the evidence about the state of coronavirus and community transmission rates across wales, including the results from the two outbreaks we know have happened in the north of wales. we hope we will be able to lift the restrictions on staying local and introduce the new arrangements to create exclusive, extended households from the 6th of july and i will confirm the final position on friday of this week. but to end where i began, coronavirus has not gone away. it has not gone away in wales and we know from exa m ples away in wales and we know from examples around the world, that countries are having to reintroduce restrictions to control an increase in cases and everything we are doing in wales, in our careful, cautious, step—by—step approach is to avoid the need to do that here. and that isa the need to do that here. and that is a shared responsibility for us all, to do everything we can to
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control the spread of this virus and to keep wales safe. happy now to ta ke to keep wales safe. happy now to take some questions and today the first question is from adrian masters at itv wales. thank you, first minister. that will be very welcome announcement to a lot people. when you signalled he would be making this announcement on friday, you also signalled you will be making an announcement for people within the hospitality industry and restaurants and they would be talks and work going on over the weekend, yet you have mentioned nothing about that today, can you explain what has happened, what has gone wrong and whether there will be any news for people in that industry? nothing has gone wrong because the work has continued over the weekend, as i
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said. i hope these are productive and profitable discussions with the sector about how it can safely reopen in the outdoors and with the mitigating measures that will need to be in place to allow that to happen safely, we are getting to the point now where we have a definitive list of the measures that the sector is proposing and we will now need to put that to the chief medical officer and those who advise us on the science of coronavirus, to get their view as to whether or not the proposals amount to a safe reopening that could be recommended. we will continue to have that conversation over the next couple of days, as soon as over the next couple of days, as soon as it is concluded, we will make an announcement. butjust as i have said all along, we do things in a way where we plan first and make the announcement after the planning has happened. we will continue to do
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that as far as outdoor hospitality is concerned, but it is coming to a conclusion. thank you, if i is concerned, but it is coming to a conclusion. thank you, ifi could turn to the situation at the local health board which we have been reporting on about a settlement that the former chief executive, and the reason i am asking is it is reported that pay—out, where necessary is approved by the welsh government, given the systemic failures and the deaths of babies at the health board, why did the welsh government approved that payment, even in part? just to be clear ministers play no pa rt just to be clear ministers play no part in his decisions, the decisions are made according to a set of rules and it is up to the local health board to do the negotiations and come to a settlement and the chief executive of nhs wales has a role to play in the rule book in giving final confirmation. that is what has in this case. adrian, thank you.
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over to james williams at bbc wales. thank you very much, can have the answers in welsh and english please? he made another announcement for this three week period today, which basically means a complete change of strategy. you are turning a lot of taps on at the same time within this review period, isn't the danger that if there is a flare—up with too many taps going on at the same time, you will not know the source of an outbreak to be able to potentially reintroduce lockdown measures? we wonder if you can give any indications to parents, pupils, to teachers of the plan for schools in september? i don't think the strategy has changed, james. we continue to do things step—by—step. so we are making changes during this three week period, but we are doing
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it monday, by monday, by monday in that step and we will be able to make a connection between cause and effect if there were to be any flare—ups as a result to changes made. we make the changes on the basis of advice on the advice always is that these steps are proportionate and shouldn't lead to a further acceleration in the spread of coronavirus. but the reason we do it in the way that we do, in that careful step—by—step way is precisely in order to allow us to track the impact of different steps introduced on different dates. i think that is a distinguishing feature of the way we have done things in wales. 0n schools, one of the reasons why we were keen to get schools back injune, as well as offering, most importantly, children an opportunity to check in, to catch
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up an opportunity to check in, to catch up and prepare for the summer is in order to learn from this experience in order to prepare for september and we will learn a lot over the next couple of weeks. a lot of practical things, a lot of things that work and a lot of things that need to be fine tuned. the education minister will have more things to say before the end of the school term about september. schools have been open half a day and it is too early to draw any conclusions, but we will use this experience with teachers, parents and other staff to make sure we have the best possible plan for september. he speaks welsh.
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i want to talk about the speed at which coronavirus tests are being processed, to show the numbers are going in the wrong direction and have done for awhile. what practical things are you going to to reverse that decline and what kind of timetables will be looking at? we spoke about this at the start of june and yet since then they have continued to go in the wrong direction? james, there is more than one way of looking at this. in the week when the percentage of tests returned within 24 hours was at its
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height, somewhere between 200 and 300 tests were turned round in 24 hours. the week when the percentage of tests returned in 24 hours was at its least, we were returning 1700 tests within 24 hours. so the percentages are somewhat misleading, because as you increase the number of tests coming into the system you can have a falling percentage and rising numbers at the same time. we are turning around 1700 tests within 24 hours in the last week, for which i have the full figures and that is a lot more than we were doing in the week when the percentage appeared to be the best. nevertheless, we want to have more tests completed within 24 hours and there are practical things we are doing. things like making sure that the number of times in the day that careers collect tests a nd in the day that careers collect tests and take them to the labs is increased, so there isn't such a gap between the test being carried out and it arriving. the technique labs are thinking of to try and improve turnaround times as well, we have
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very good turnaround times indeed in the two outbreaks in north wales and that will feed into the figures for the weeks ahead. the health minister andi the weeks ahead. the health minister and i both want to see the percentage improve as quickly as we are able to do it. but the number of tests that are being completed within 24 hours is hugely greater thanit within 24 hours is hugely greater than it was at the start of this process with the percentage appeared to be better. he speaks welsh. studio: mark drakeford announcing that from the 6th ofjuly, people
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from two separate households will be able tojoin from two separate households will be able to join together to form an extended and exclusive household. and on the same day ministers want to lift the stay local requirement if cases of covid—19 continue to decline across the country. he said a single, extended household will enable families to be reunited and it will help to support working pa rents it will help to support working parents with informal childcare over the summer months as more businesses reopened their doors and return to formalised working arrangements. there is much more on that and the latest developments on the one o'clock news coming up with simon mccoy. now let's get the weather with louise. i will see the same time tomorrow, goodbye. hello there. there was cloud, wind and rain on offer over the weekend, whether you wanted it or not. that area of low pressure, well, you can see it, this base, a swirl of cloud across the north. it's anchored itself to the north of the country and it's still producing some rain. it will gradually drift off to scandinavia and then another weather front is going to replace it
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across central and southern parts of england and wales. so we've still got some rain around, some of it quite heavy across parts of scotland, northern ireland and north west england, so weather warnings remain in force. that rain should start to turn a little more showery into the afternoon and further south, there is going to be quite a lot of cloud around. the best of the breaks perhaps to the south of the m4 corridor, they'll be fleeting glimpses of sunshine. and just to add insult to injury, those blustery winds continue, gusts in excess of 35 miles an hour. so that's going to make it feel a little cool, 15—19 degrees. those temperatures down and where they should be, really, for the time of year. the low will start to ease away. we keep a few scattered showers through the night and quite a lot of cloud generally. temperatures are going to hold up into double figures and we start off tomorrow on a cloudy, dull note. that next frontal system pushing into the south—west. we're not expecting too much in the way of rain from it but it will nevertheless bring quite a lot of cloud, it's also going to bring bits and pieces of drizzle as well.
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so a misty, murky start, particularly across those exposed coasts, that drizzly rain drifting east. but, on tuesday, there is a greater chance of seeing more sunshine across scotland and northern ireland with a scattering of showers but the sun's pretty strong and if you get some coming through, temperatures will peak at 20 degrees. now, that weather front may well just continue to bring a little bit of cloud and rain across southern fringes first thing on wednesday morning. that's subject to change, you might need to keep abreast of the forecast for that one. but as it clears off into the near continent, wednesday is the day of sunny spells and scattered showers but they winds swing round to more of a northerly, so across scotland and north—east england, it could be a slightly cooler feel to the day. temperatures only around 14 degrees. into the south—east, we should see 21. but then on thursday, a brief ridge of high pressure builds. the best day of the week is likely to be thursday, before another low pressure system starts to move in for the weekend. so, drier and brighter on thursday, more wind and rain for the weekend.
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the city could be the first in the uk to have restrictions extended for an extra two weeks. it follows a spike in cases in the area in the last fortnight. we have to remain vigilant. we have to continue to do the basics, washing our hands and all that, plus we need to have local lockdowns and local whack—a—mole strategies where that's necessary. we'll be live in leicester with our health editor shortly. also this lunchtime... spending on infrastructure — the government plans to spend £1 billion on schools in england over the next decade. further easing of restrictions across the rest of the uk as schools in wales and high street shops in scotland reopen. planning to get away? the government prepares to give more details on where we can go

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