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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 3, 2020 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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hello this is bbc news with joanna gosling. the headlines: john hume, the former sdlp leader in northern ireland and nobel peace prize winner, has died aged 83. a new test to detect coronavirus this is bbc news with and flu that can give results in 90 the latest headlines for viewers in the uk minutes is to be rolled out in the uk, with some care homes and around the world. having it available from next week. a new test to detect coronavirus eat out to help out — and flu that can give diners across the uk can enjoy results in 90 minutes — a discount of up to £10 per person is to be rolled out in the uk — from this morning in a bid to boost with some care homes having it the struggling hospitality sector. available from next week. this is a game changer, the sports retailer and gym group dw sports falls into administration, because the ability to do a test putting 1,700 jobs are at risk. injust over one hour, or 90 minutes, will make a massive difference to our nearly two years on from the collapse of genoa‘s morandi bridge, response to coronavirus. killing 43 people, the italian city you can contact us on any prepares to inaugurate its replacement. of today's stories — on twitter it's @bbccarrie — or hashtag #bbcyourquestions also this hour... in the last few minutes we've heard thatjohn hume — the former sdlp leader in northern ireland
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and nobel peace prize let‘s return to the northern irish winner, has died. politician and nobel peace prize winnerjohn hume, who has died at the age of 83. a bbc investigation finds the number of deaths an architect of the northern from coronavirus in iran is nearly ireland peace process, he was regarded as one of the most three times higher than important figures in recent the government claims. irish political history. earlier, we heard from the bbc‘s former ireland correspondent islamic state militants denis murray, who paid tribute in afghanistan say they're behind an attack on a prison in the city to the life ofjohn hume. in my opinion, he wasn‘tjust a of jalala bad that's left at least 20 dead — and hundreds of prisoners giant of irish politics, he was a trying to flee. nearly two years giant of irish politics, he was a giant of irish politics, he was a giant of uk politics and i think it on from the collapse of genoa's morandi bridge, was a giant of world politics, as killing 43 people, the italian city prepares well. as witnessed by his being to inaugurate its replacement. awarded the nobel peace prize jointly with david trimble. the thing aboutjohn hume that marked him out from other politicians was this, every other politician i think i have met thinks in terms of the next manifesto, the next election or the next parliamentary term or how they get over the next issue that hello and welcome if you re they get over the next issue that they are facing. john hume is the watching in the uk or only politician i met that thought around the world 7 and stay with us for the latest news and analysis in terms of five years or ten years, even 20 or 30 years. in some ways
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the department of health in the uk being such a political intellectual is promising new tests for coronavirus that can give in the long term didn‘t do his party a result in 90 minutes. as much good as it should have. but currently the majority of people as much good as it should have. but as well as being this wonderful deep awaiting tests have to wait two days to find out if they are infected thinking politician, as i say unlike with some tests taking longer. almost half a million of the new nearly every other politician i have "on the spot" tests will be made ever met, he could also slug it out available to uk care homes and nhs laboratories from next week. with the best of them. i have never millions more are due to be rolled out later in the year. seen him bested in debate. i chaired additionally, 5,000 a couple of studio debates way back dna test machines which analyse nose swabs in the 1980s between him and ian for coronavirus will be used in nhs hospitals from september. paisley, no mean debate himself as the uk government says the new tests will help distinguish i‘m sure everybody remembers, and between covid—i9 and other seasonal illnesses. john hume ran rings round him. i the health secretary matt hancock remember the leader of the alliance says the latest testing innovations will help "to break chains partiesjohn krishna of transmission quickly". remember the leader of the alliance parties john krishna in, john remember the leader of the alliance partiesjohn krishna in, john was pa rt as our correspondent partiesjohn krishna in, john was part ofan partiesjohn krishna in, john was part of an assembly there was at the charlotte gallagher reports. time. it was called the ruling devolution assembly. the unionists in the fight against coronavirus and stopping people passing it we re devolution assembly. the unionists on to others, testing is vital. were always smirking and saying there isjohn hume off to dublin to get as orders, or there he is a way but during the pandemic, to america to get his orders. at the
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the government has been repeatedly challenged about its capacity to do unionists never appreciated was he so, and was sometimes unable was giving dublin the instructions. to say precisely how many he was also the first irish people had been tested. politician to realise that america, just yesterday, officials admitted if you look for outside help, then there was a limited number the most powerful country notjust of test kits for care homes, in the world but in the meaning the july target to routinely english—speaking world could be there to help, too. i rememberjohn check all asymptomatic staff and residents has been pushed back to september. saying that the unionists had gone now the department of health has 12 rounds withjohn hume and never laid a glove on him, which was true. announced a deal with two companies his greatest contribution was this, based in oxford and london, to roll out kits that will provide and this is going to sound weird, but it is true, he is the first results in 90 minutes. almost half a million tests will be person and the only person he ever available from next week across adult care settings, define what the northern ireland and hospitals are expected problem was and is. he said it was to receive them from september. millions more of the tests will be three strands, relationships within northern ireland between protestants rolled out later in the year. and catholics, between belfast and meanwhile, 5000 dna machines, which analyse nose swabs, dublin, and the relationship between will provide 5.8 million tests the two capitals, london and dublin. in the coming months. the test is going to be similar the good friday agreement was done on that basis. it operates to this to the tests we've had already.
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day. i remember within a week of it is detecting the virus‘ nucleic them coming up with this definition acid, but whereas in the past tests have had to be done via a swab of the problem ian paisley accepted it and and that has to be sent of the problem ian paisley accepted itand said of the problem ian paisley accepted it and said that is the definition of the problem, we can all move to a laboratory, what we now have is a test which can be done forward on that basis. no other in the place where the unionist leader could be seem to sample is being taken. disagree with ian paisley. he is not the tests, which will go to pop—up only the man who in a big way helped labs, will also be able to detect common winter illnesses such to frame the solution, he is the guy as the flu. who defined the problem that they there's hopes more widespread we re who defined the problem that they were there to solve and you cannot testing could flag localised solve a political problem unless you outbreaks before they take hold have actually defined it. after and regional lockdowns have to be put in place. with concerns about an increase that, it was how do you keep a lid in cases in the winter, on the security and have fit for london, for dublin it was how do you and the strain that will place on the nhs, keep the rest of ireland out of it. there will be calls for even more testing across the uk. charlotte gallagher, bbc news. nobody had ever come up with this as we've heard, two companies definition. it has stood the test of are producing these new tests, one in oxford time. he was an extraordinary man in and the other in london. his ability to think like that and to ta ke earlier, i spoke to his ability to think like that and to take political risks. he was what‘s challenged by gerry adams in
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professor chris toumazou. about 1984 to set up at pan— it is a bit larger than nationalist front with sinn fein. of a printer cartridge. course, john hume could not possibly we decided you could either use do that so he described gerry adams as the monkey and that he ran to the a very small nasal swab, a paediatric swab, minimally organ grinder in the shape of the invasive, or now, we are testing the saliva swab. ira. he was brought after this room so the swab just goes in your mouth, summerfull of just a couple of swabs around various cells, then it goes into the orifice ira. he was brought after this room summer full of masked men ira. he was brought after this room summerfull of masked men in of the cartridge. military uniforms and he said, i‘m you then close the bung, not talking to you guys. one of the you pull out the swab, you close it, and then the viruses contained. studio debates that i chaired, ian paisley was very angry with him for meeting the ira. he said, ifjohn and just buy a simple movement does that, then i can possibly talk to him again. the first thing that of a little motor, in a little box, there is a little motor, john hume said was —— said was, if the first step is to actually deactivate the virus. if there is virus it ian paisley takes that attitude, he gets deactivated... will be a hypocrite. he shouted across the desk at him. it was very then, you extract from the rna difficult for ian paisley to come of the virus, purified dna. back from that. nobody really got john hume into a position where they
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and it is that purified dna could say you have gone too far with we are really interested in, republicans on one side were too far because that will then get spread with the brits on the other side. a over these little holes, remarkable balancing act. it has which are called wells, been evident for some years... he and these have a number of different covid detectors, it is has been declining for quite some time. everyone who lived in derry the chemistry, almost like the fish would be able to tell you that he was losing his powers for a bait looking for the fish to bite considerable length of time. my it, we have the bait thoughts are very much with his of the various genes of covid—i9, so, effectively, widow, pat, who is a really, really think of the dna as the fish, wonderful person. without whom i so when the fish is spread over expectjohn hume might not have been these wells, it will bite the success he was. on the bait identified and if it the bbc veteran ireland correspondent denis murray, talking to my colleague carrie gracie. bites on any one of those genes it means you have got covid—i9. obviously the fish are quite small. a tribute from the prime minister, borisjohnson. dna molecules are very small, so you have to amplify the fish, and that process is known as pcr, effectively you heat the double
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helix which separates the two strands, then you add some synthetic dna by cooling, you then heat and cool, and heat and cool, and each time you do that, you are amplifying the amount of dna. that makes the fish bigger to bite the effective bait. that is all done in this device not much bigger than a shoe box called the nudge box. once you have taken the sample, the sample goes into the nudge box. you can see it closes, and then, each of those heating and cooling episodes takes about 30 seconds, so that swipe takes just over one hour to amplify the dna, and once the dna is amplified it a bbc investigation has found gets sent to the hospital the number of deaths information system or goes directly from coronavirus in iran is nearly via phone or an ipad, three times higher than to the patient so that is not done the government there admits. in a laboratory, that is the key. almost 42,000 people have died with covid—19 symptoms, according to official medical it is all down to records passed to the bbc by a whistle—blower.
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miniaturisation and utility. iran s health ministry has the wonders of science, there. rejected this, insisting that the country s reports to the world health organization are accurate. a bbc investigation has found behrang tajdin from the bbc s the number of deaths from coronavirus in iran is nearly three times higher persian service has the story. than the government there claims. almost 42,000 people have died with covid—i9 symptoms — according to official medical groaning. gasping forair in records passed to the bbc the last hours of life. by a whistle—blower. this man became iran‘s first official coronavirus victim iran s health ministry has on the 19th of february. rejected this, insisting that the country s reports to the world health organization are accurate. his brothers, who are doctors, posted this video on social media. berang tarj dean from the bbc s persian service has the story. groaning. after that, officials were left with no choice but to admit that covid—19 was killing iranians. but it turns out his death from the virus was not iran‘s first. -- tajdin. gasping forair in the bbc has seen what appear the last hours of life. to be two official this man became iran's first government documents. official coronavirus victim they contain every hospital on the 19th of february. patient they think was infected his brothers were doctors, by covid—19 and all those and they posted this they suspect died video on social media. with the virus. after that, officials were left
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with no choice but to admit that covid—i9 was killing iranians. together, they show iran‘s but it turns out his death epidemic started earlier and was far deadlier from the virus was not iran's first. than the officials said it was. the bbc has seen what appear to be now we know the first death was actually a full month two official government documents. before officials came clean. they contain every hospital patient they think was infected by covid—i9 and all those they suspect the data suggests that, on some days in february and march, died with the virus. covid—19 deaths were more than ten times higher than what officials were announcing. together, they show iran's epidemic started earlier and was far deadlier than the official said it was. in total, 41,952 people have died in hospitals after the 20th ofjuly. now we know the first death was actually a full month before officials came clean. three times as many as the official death toll. the data suggests that, this figure puts iran amongst the five worst—hit on some days in february and march, countries in the world. covid—i9 deaths were more than ten times higher than what officials were announcing. this is an extraordinary leak. the files include a vast amount in total, 41,952 people have died of personal and medical details, names, addresses, in hospitals after the 20th ofjuly. phone numbers and whether they three times as many had a history of respiratory as the official death toll. or cardiac disease. this figure puts iran there are nearly half amongst the five worst—hit a million records listed
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countries in the world. in the two files. this is an extraordinary leak. and the bbc has made strenuous efforts to authenticate the data. the files include a vast amount the whistle—blower told us that of personal and medical details, passing on this information names, addresses, phone numbers was dangerous, but worth it. and whether they had a history of respiratory or cardiac disease. act or's voice: risking my life, i‘m sending you the lists there are nearly half a million of coronavirus infections and deaths in all the records listed in the two files. hospitals of the country. and the bbc has made strenuous i urge you to publish these figures as you see fit, efforts to authenticate the data. so we can save some patients‘ lives. why would iran cover up the whistle—blower told us that passing on this information the true scale of the outbreak? was dangerous but worth it. the pandemic started actor's voice: risking my life, in the run—up to parliamentary i'm sending you the lists elections in february. of coronavirus infections and deaths in all the hospitals of the country. it was only after those elections that iran started i urge you to publish these imposing some restrictions figures as you see fit, to stop the spread. so we can save some patients‘ lives. as the economy was already why would iran cover up the true in deep recession, the government let businesses scale of the outbreak? reopen in the spring. the pandemic started in the run—up to parliamentary the leaders of the islamic republic fear any sign elections in february. of weakness may be used by its enemies.
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it was only after those elections that iran started imposing some maybe that‘s why they hid restrictions to stop the spread. the true scale of the pandemic. behrang tajdin, bbc news. as the economy was already in deep recession, the government let businesses reopen in the spring. the sports retailer and gym group dw sports has said it‘s the leaders of the islamic republic going into administration fear any sign of weakness as a result of the pandemic. may be used by its enemies. 1,700 jobs are at risk. maybe that's why they hid the true andy verity is our scale of the pandemic. economics correspondent. behrang tajdin, bbc news. tell us more about what they are the northern irish politician, saying. well, it's pretty bleak and nobel peace prize winner, john hume, has died news. we did already here from dw at the age of 83. sports that it was planning to shut an architect of the northern ireland peace process, a third of its 75 stores. now they he was regarded as one of the most important figures in recent are saying they‘re going to shut all irish political history. we can speak now of them and put the business into to the former bbc ireland correspondent denis murray. administration. dw fitness owns 73 james and often they are accompanied it is wonderful to talk to you about by stores alongside. some of those this giant of the political scene, gems will stay open, the majority so for so long. in my opinion, he far at least, but 1700 jobs are
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wasn't just a giant threatened. dw has an interesting for so long. in my opinion, he wasn'tjust a giant of irish politics, he was a giant of uk history. it began as jjb sports back politics, he was a giant of uk politics, and i think he was a giant in the early 1970s, controlled and of world politics as well, as built by dave whelan, who owned witnessed by his being awarded the nobel peace prize jointly with david wigan athletic, which also u nfortu nately went into trimble. the thing aboutjohn hume administration a few months ago. for dave whelan, the founder of both of that marked him out from other these big enterprises, it must be politicians was this, every other quite a difficult time, also for the politicians was this, every other politician would think in terms of staff. the administrators are going the next manifesto, election or parliamentary term, or how they get to be appointed later today, we over the next issue is they are haven‘t heard you that will be. some facing. john hume is the only interesting comments from martin politician who thought in terms of long, the chief executive of dw five years or ten years, 20 or 30 sports, who assenting it is the government which has forged their yea rs. five years or ten years, 20 or 30 business to close. we are saying years. in some ways, being such a they were mandated by the government political intellectual, in the long to close down because they had high term, didn't do his party as much fixed costs and zero income, and it good as it should have. as well as was difficult to carry on with our business model with the limited being this wonderful, deep thinking support we have been able to gain, he says. in a way he is suggesting that either he wanted bigger support politician, unlike nearly every other politician i've ever met, he from the government, or without that
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support they exhausted all other could also slug it out with the best options and couldn‘t find a buyer, of them. i have never seen him then concluded it was better to save bested in debate. i chaired a couple of studio debates back in the 1980s what bits of the business remained between him and ian paisley, no mean viable than for the whole thing to go under. referring to high fixed debate himself as i'm sure everyone costs a nd go under. referring to high fixed costs and zero income being the reason why they are now in this remembers, and john hume ran rings position can apply to so many round him. i rememberthe leader of companies, cant it? is this likely the alliance party, in the 80s, who to be the start of things? that is was part of an assembly that was at just a worrying thing, yes. he says it is difficult for any business to the time called the ruling get through this kind of model with devolution assembly, and unionists high fixed costs and zero income we re devolution assembly, and unionists were always smirking and saying there isjohn hume off to dublin to without long—term damage. it is the get his orders, or there he is a way long term damage phrase which is to america to get his orders, but particularly worrying. the optimists have always wanted this to be a v the unionists never appreciated that shaped recovery, bounce back. that he was giving dublin the instructions! he was also the first phrase has been interwoven into a irish politician, i think, to lot of government announcements. less optimistic economists have been realise that america, if you look for outside help then the most warning of long—term damage. it powerful country not just in would be amazing if other retailers for outside help then the most powerful country notjust in the world but the english—speaking in the same position with the same world, could be there to help, t. i
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high costs, money going out and rememberjohn saying that the little money coming in for three or unionists had gone 12 rounds with four months, wouldn‘t have to do the same thing. there has been reopening john hume and they had never laid a glove on him, which was true, but and they can make some of their business is viable. the fitness his greatest contribution was this. it may sound weird but it is true. first branch of dw sports will stay he is the first, the only person who as it is, note plans to close them. it isa as it is, note plans to close them. only ever defined what the northern it is a worrying sign notjust for this particular sector of retail, ireland problem was and he said it but for the whole sector. thank you. was three strands, relationships within northern ireland between protesta nts a nd within northern ireland between protestants and catholics, between belfast and dublin and the rest of the headlines on bbc news: john hume, the former sdlp ireland as it were, and the leader in northern ireland and nobel peace prize winner, relationship between the two capitals, london and dublin. and the has died aged 83. a new test to detect coronavirus good friday agreement was done on and flu that can give results in 90 that basis, and it operates to this minutes is to be rolled out day. i remember within a week of him in the uk, with some care homes coming up with this definition of having it available from next week. the problem, ian paisley accepted it eat out to help out — and said that is the definition of diners across the uk can enjoy the problem, we can all move forward a discount of up to £10 per person on that basis and no other unionist from this morning in a bid to boost the struggling hospitality sector. leader could be seen to disagree with ian paisley, so he is not only the man who, in a very big way, help
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to frame the solution, he's the guy who helped define the problem that they were there to solve, and you cannot solve a political problem u nless cannot solve a political problem unless you have defined it. after hsbc has posted a 65% drop that it was to london, how do you in first—half pre—tax profits keep a lid on the security end of to $4.32 billion — that‘s almost a third of what it it, in dublin it was how do you keep made during the same time last year, it, in dublin it was how do you keep it out of the rest of ireland, to and is much worse than expected. europe‘s biggest bank has faced the catholics it was how to get a headwinds coming from every united ireland, to the protestants, direction in recent months. it was how do you maintain the firstly, the pandemic union? so nobody had ever come up and subsequent economic crisis has meant its needed to set aside huge with this definition and it has amounts of money in case people stood the test of time. he was an can t repay their loans. that came at the same time extraordinary man in his ability to as oil prices plummeted, think like that and take political which also exposed them risks. he was once challenged by to defaulting loans. gerry adams, in about 1984, i think, one failed oil trader defaulted on a loan to hsbc to the tune a long time ago, to set up a pan— of $600 million. and while the bank nationalist front with sinn fein. 0f is headquartered in london, most of its business is done in hong kong. coursejohn nationalist front with sinn fein. 0f course john hume could the ongoing political nationalist front with sinn fein. 0f coursejohn hume could not possibly do that so he described gerry adams instability in the city, coupled with covid lockdowns, has decimated a core source of revenue for the bank. as the monkey, and that he would rather meet the organ grinder in the shape of the ira, and he did, and he finally, its been caught up in the prolonged stand—off was brought off to this room full of between the us and china.
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lawmakers in washington have masked men in military uniforms and criticised the bank for backing beijing s new national security law he said you could be anybody, i'm for hong kong. not talking to you guys, so he won there s a risk it may that argument. 0ne not talking to you guys, so he won that argument. one of those studio for hong kong. debates i chaired, ian paisley was very angry with him for meeting the ira. he said ifjohn does that then michael hewson is chief markets analyst i can't possibly talk to him again. at cmc markets in london. he says the ceo, noel quinn, so we sat into the studio and john will be facing some tough choices. hume said if ian paisley takes that attitude, to use one of his own i think he could come under pressure favourite words, he will be a to accelerate these job losses. they‘ve already lost hypocrite, so he was shouting across 4,000 in this first half, the desk at him. so it was difficult which would suggest to me that this extra 31,000 could come an awful lot sooner rather than later. for ian paisley to come back from overall, i think in terms of its uk that. so nobody really gotjohn hume operation and its us operation, they could come under pressure into a position where they could say to compartmentalise further, particularly if china and us we have gone too far with the republicans on one side, or too far relations deteriorate. with the brits on the other. a so hsbc has a decision to make — remarkable balancing act. it has does it pivot to asia or does it pull away from its uk been evident for some years that he and us businesses? this is a story that could play out has been declining for quite a long quite a bit over the course of the next 12 to 18 months. time, i won't go into it but anyone who lived in derry would be able to
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tell you that he clearly was losing institutional racism may have contributed to the disproportionate impact of coronavirus among black his powers for a considerable length of time. can ijust say in case the and asian people in wales, including front linehealth workers. family are watching, my thoughts are with his widow, pat, who is a judge ray singh, who was asked to examine why ethnic minority communities are worse affected, wonderful person without whom, i told the bbc wales investigates suspectjohn huh might not have been programme coronavirus has the success he was. —— john hume. "exposed embedded racism". a union is now calling for a public enquiry to determine whether deaths those stories reflect a different could‘ve been avoided. moment, and some of our viewers will we need a public not have been adult at the time when enquiry, warts and all. we need to be prepared the good friday agreement was signed, but, going back to the risks to get uncomfortable. many people have lost loved ones, he took in a time of violence and mistrust, and a time when so many friends and colleagues. people just wouldn't talk to each we need to look at all of that other. it wasn'tjust people just wouldn't talk to each other. it wasn't just that. detail and until we actually get people just wouldn't talk to each other. it wasn'tjust that. it people just wouldn't talk to each other. it wasn't just that. it was definitely that. he was very good at fighting his own corner. he was very to a point where we are prepared to do that, how are we going to learn lessons going forward? proud of the social democratic and labour party. and he was a from today, diners across the uk will be able to enjoy a discount tremendous double act with seamus mallon, his deputy leader because of up to 50% off their bills.
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they were two size of the one coin, a great team together. seamus became the government scheme known as ‘eat out to help out‘ will be valid from mondays to wednesdays throughout august in an attempt slightly disillusioned atjohn‘s to boost the struggling effo rts slightly disillusioned atjohn‘s hospitality industry. efforts to make peace, that took our business correspondent ben thompson has been them far too close to sinn fein in in watford this morning. them far too close to sinn fein in the end, and it was to the electoral cost of the sdlp, who have had a the ‘eat out to help out‘ scheme is minor resurgence recently and they the latest plan from the chancellor have written, —— they have been to try to kick—start the economy. the id in its basic form is you will written off goodness knows how many times and they are still there, but get 50% off a meal if you eat out in john hume, in the 80s, in 1987—88, a resta u ra nt get 50% off a meal if you eat out in a restaurant on a monday, tuesday or he helped establish a dialogue wednesday. 72,000 firms have signed up wednesday. 72,000 firms have signed upfor wednesday. 72,000 firms have signed up for the scheme up and down the between the sdlp and sinn fein. they country and it is the government that will pay the other half of the we re between the sdlp and sinn fein. they were private meetings and papers we re were private meetings and papers were written and one of the sdlp bill, but what difference will it delegates told me at the last stage, make? and is it enough to save a that sinn fein were like a sect, struggling hospitality industry? with me is nick, the boss of this place. hello to agree —— to you. you they never spoke to anybody outside of their organisation so they were booted when anyone disagreed with have 160 of these places around the them, they had argued that the party country. what difference will this line among themselves, and therefore ‘eat out to help out‘ scheme made to that party line must be the truth. places like yours? i think it is a
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they couldn't write a position great initiative by the government. paper, they didn't know what it was. monday to wednesday, the quieter days of the week for the hospitality i remember gerry adams telling me it was difficult to lead a working sector, it will encourage more class party, not that they didn't people to come out and visitor have the ability, just not the experience, so in a way, the sdlp premises. we will be able to gifted sinn fein sort of the ability demonstrate how safe is a sector we have made eating and drinking across to ta ke gifted sinn fein sort of the ability to take minutes, as it were, how to runa the uk. so, if it is a monday, to take minutes, as it were, how to run a political party, how to meet people who disagree with you tuesday or wednesday, there are four profoundly. the sdlp would have been of us, we spend 100 points in a on the same board nationalist side as sinn fein, but it prepared sinn meal, there is a 20 point bottle of wine, how much will that cost you? fein to go into the bigger arena with governments initially, and then should you spend £100, you take off the £20 for one because that doesn‘t with governments initially, and then with unionist parties who disagreed with unionist parties who disagreed with him profoundly, to the point where sinn fein, as the second apply for alcoholic drinks. so £80. largest party in government at the then we take up half, that would be moment, as near as a whisker became the largest single party in the republic of ireland at the last £40, at to 20 points for the wine, election, and somewhat to the cost so it would be £60 in total. so the of the sdlp. i remember gerry fitt government pays for that. talk about the perception of people, what are was the first sdlp leader. somebody
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described it as he had the heart of they telling you and your bars and the sdlp, butjohn hume had its restaurants? our customers are head. john hume, after gerry behaving normally. they comment, jesus as they have done. there is retired, joan became quickly both perhaps a degree of nervousness when the heart and the head of the party we first opened, but the fact that we first opened, but the fact that we can demonstrate we have taken their very seriously, we have put ——john the heart and the head of the party —— john became. he the heart and the head of the party ——john became. he is still processes in place, listen to the enormously revered in derry and in government guidance, once they come back they realise it is normal. we the sdlp. that was my phone going are in the hospitality industry, we off, sorry about that! he still wa nt are in the hospitality industry, we want people to come out and enjoy themselves just as they did pre—lockdown. i think our customers enormously revered in derry and are doing that. do you worry when within the sdlp. can i take this further? i've seen a lot of british you see headlines about local lockdowns, about maybe in september and european prime ministers. and a and october when schools open, pubs few american presidents. and a few and october when schools open, pubs and bars might have to close. what senior american politicians as well, would that mean for hospitality?m and they have all been impressive in would that mean for hospitality?m would be a hammer blow if we had to their own way, but i don't think anybody, in my experience, and i'm close again. it has been hit very sure people would disagree with me, ha rd close again. it has been hit very hard during lockdown already. we employ over 3 million people in the i can't think of anyone in my sector and if we have to lockdown experience you had the political intellect ofjohn hume, you could
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again many more businesses would struggle. there are lots of say margaret thatcher who i'm met, businesses struggling as a result of the lockdown. talk of a second who had far more impact on her lockdown is terrifying. one for country and the world, but of course she did because she was prime minister, butjohn hume persuaded assault to watch. thank you, neck, the british government that the way to operate was to make friends with really good to see you. so nick the irish government, which they did explaining some of the implications of this, it is about task getting to through the anglo irish agreement in 1985. after that they were shouting feel confident enough to go out and spend on the high streets. quite at each other. he persuaded american clearly, one scheme that could help politicians, irish america, that the us clearly, one scheme that could help us do that, but big questions about future was not in providing money to what it means for all of us. we know pay for guns for the ira, the future that the economic growth relies on was in talking to the british and all of us feeling confident and safe irish governments, and unionist to again to go out and spend. see if he could help them. that the italian city of genoa is inaugurating its new bridge today, almost two years culminated with, on the day of the since the collapse of the previous one, which killed 43 people. good friday agreement, president the new structure is designed bill clinton actually found david by the well—known architect trimble personally and said are you renzo piano, who is from the city. an investigation into the cause having any problems, can i help in of the disaster is due to wrap up anyway? and that was all because of shortly, with a trial expected next year. john hume. it wasn't because of the from genoa, our italy unionists did. it was a small career correspondent mark lowen reports
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child singing. in some way, because it was only in an elegy for genoa‘s tragedy. ireland, in europe, but he was a marvellous parliamentarian, as well. the final piece by the renowned italian composer ennio moricone he was certainly nominated for the before he died last month, speech of the year in the house of written in memory of the 43 commons a couple of times, i'm not victims of the genoa bridge sure if he ever won it. he also used collapse two years ago. a requiem for one of the worst europe. the old eec was put together infrastructure disasters in modern italian history, because of the terrible conflicts in played to a city still in mourning. europe for centuries, culminating in the two world wars. he used to tell cymbals crash. a story about standing on a bridge at strasbourg with germany on one shouting. side and france on the other and 11:36am on the 14th of august, 2018, saying, this is how to do it. he a corroded cable—stay on the morandi bridge tears apart, bringing over 200 metres of it persuaded jacques delors in what had cascading to the ground. become the european union, and he said how can i help? he said set up drivers and residents crushed the funds to help the border by the icon of their city. communities. he managed to get everywhere. if he could have become the genoese architect renzo piano, leader of a country himself, he whose designs include the shard in london and paris‘ pompidou centre managed to persuade the leaders of recalls the old bridge every other country, the leaders of opening in 1967.
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the european union, the united states, and the conservative party, morandi bridge was for me and michael portillo will tell you kind of a fantastic, brave example of engineering. this, the conservative party under margaret thatcher was inclined to everybody loved that bridge. just see it as a security problem and it was a culmination ofjohn everybody also was a bit frightened by the fragility of the bridge. hume and garret fitzgerald, the bridge should never collapse. irish prime minister, persuading margaret thatcher against her they don‘t have the right to collapse. piano‘s bridge echoes a ship instinct, that didn't happen very often with margaret thatcher, that sweeping across this port city. the way to solve the problem in sensors and robots northern ireland was to talk and to ensuring its safety. make friends with the irish 2,000 solar panels government, and once you do that, providing its energy. and a subject you're talking about this is my brother, roberto. samuele, my nephew. is northern ireland, without the anglo irish agreement in 1985, you and my sister—in—law. would not have had the good friday but it won‘t ease the pain here. agreement in 1998. it is a political george robbiano was due to celebrate his brother‘s birthday career with an outcome, i can't on that fateful day. think of anyone who made peace in his eight—year—old nephew his own country, with so many was the youngest victim. opposing forces, who were so i feel my heart, like, diametrically opposed. and the fact split in two, ok? and one part is missing. that northern ireland can do it, this new bridge isjust made i've been lucky, i have had the
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privilege of talking to students and with the blood of my brother, my nephew, and my sister and the other 40 persons would—be peacemakers and journalists that lost their lives. from lots of other countries where there are conflicts. the one thing and there‘s nothing to celebrate. you would say to them is, no matter the old bridge‘s maintenance company how different these conflicts are, and successive governments stand they are all different, there is no accused of years of neglect, despite warnings the conflict that is exactly the same, steel was corroding. but what you can say to people 71 people are being investigated, around the world is, if we can do it then anybody can do it, but the with a trial expected soon. truth is, we only did it because john hume had this vision and this translation: it‘s absolutely understandable that people want definition of the problem, and the justice and that they want it as fast as possible. i want to assure them that we‘re dog—eared determination to see it through as well. there are times doing our utmost to deliver it with all of the resources and latest when his own deputy leader was not technology we have, crazy about what he was doing in his for the sake of those who lost their families, talks with sinn fein but he had the homes, work, and for the whole determination to see this thing community of genoa. through, and did it. a wonderful the disaster shone a spotlight tribute. thank you so much, denis beyond the morandi bridge — on this country‘s ageing infrastructure. several other viaducts have collapsed over the years in italy murray, and a couple of other with its economic stagnation. significant tributes coming in, one but now it‘s hoped that the rebuilding, too, from former prime minister tony can have a wider impact to show that blair who said john hume was a political tighten, a visionary who new projects can go up quickly
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and efficiently here, refused to believe the future had to and to bring pride back be the same as the past. his to italian engineering. contribution to peace in northern italy is able to do this sort of thing. ireland was epic and he will rightly i don‘t understand why. be remembered for it. he was insistent it was possible. tireless in pursuit of it, and endlessly it would simply become possible. creative in seeking ways of making it happen. and with good fortune, mr a hole in the heart of this city has been filled, but it will take time to heal. mark lowen, bbc news, genoa. blair -- it happen. and with good fortune, mr blair —— it was good fortune that he was born on the island of ireland. 0ne was born on the island of ireland. one from the current irish foreign some news from the department for transport which are sent there are minister, simon coveney, he asked me no imminent plans to drop the travel quarantine for passengers arriving from spain? ‘s islands. it comes to... —— he has tweeted. after the spanish tourism minister earlier said that great britain could live its quarantine from the spanish islands later today. a tra nsfer spanish islands later today. a transfer correspondence as the uk government is looking at the idea of having travel corridors with low pat is the widow ofjohn hume. we risk regions, and the spanish islands could be the first to must move on. benefit from the policy if it is
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introduced. that is all from me for hsbc has posted a 65% drop in first—half pre—tax profits now. the one o‘clock news is coming up now. the one o‘clock news is coming to $4.32 billion — up in now. the one o‘clock news is coming upina now. the one o‘clock news is coming up in a few minutes. now it‘s time for a look that's almost a third of what it made during the same time last year, at the weather with louise lear. and is much worse than expected. europe's biggest bank has faced headwinds coming from every direction in recent months. hello, there. we are in a firstly — the pandemic roller—coaster ride of temperatures at the moment. last friday extreme and subsequent economic crisis has heat, this afternoon a bit subdued meant its needed to set aside huge for the early part of august with amounts of money in case people can t repay their loans. temperatures below where they should that came at the same time be. the heat is set to return later as oil prices plummeted — which also exposed them on in the week. we started off to defaulting loans. 0ne failed oil trader defaulted today, beautiful. lots of sunshine. on a loan to hsbc to the tune of $600 million. try to develop, and a few scattered and while the bank is showers. the cloud and showers out headquartered in london, to the west could drift further east much of its business through the day. they will be hit is done in hong kong. and miss, but if you catch one could the ongoing political instability in the city, coupled with covid lockdowns, be hefty. so sunny spells and has decimated a core source scattered showers. temperatures after the goal between 13 and 17 in of revenue for the bank. finally, its been caught up of revenue for the bank. the north, the highest value of 22 between the us and china.
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lawmakers in washington have in the south—east corner. the high criticised the bank for backing pressure that brought us this beijing s new national security law relatively quiet start is being for hong kong. squeezed out of the way as low there s a risk it may pressure m oves squeezed out of the way as low pressure moves on from the atlantic. for hong kong. plenty of isobars to the southern michael hewson is a chief analyst flank of that low. the winds will at cmc markets in london. strengthen, as well. not as cold as he says that the ceo of hsbc will be da rtford strengthen, as well. not as cold as dartford tuesday, but there will be raina run dartford tuesday, but there will be rain a run for south—west scotland, then that will push into northern ireland as we go through the under pressure. he will come under afternoon. the winds possibly pressure to accelerate. it means job strengthening to gale force at losses. they have lost 4000 in this times. further west, strengthening to gale force at times. furtherwest, north—west first half. that suggests the extra england, wales, light, drizzly new 31,000 could come a lot sooner rather than later. 0verall, century on. the south—east of england will get the best of the 31,000 could come a lot sooner ratherthan later. overall, in 31,000 could come a lot sooner rather than later. overall, in terms of its uk and us operations, they sunshine and warmth. the highest value zero 23, still a disappointing could come under pressure to compartmentalise further, 14 up to 17 if you are caught onto particularly if china— us relations the cloud and rain. although the low deteriorate further, so hsbc has a pressure is drifting off to scandinavia, we will see this trailing weather fronts which will decision to make, to either commit to asia or to pull away from its uk enhance the wetter weather on wednesday i had to the west. it is and us businesses. this story could play out quite a bit over the next also dragging up a south—westerly
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12-18 flow, so the air will be warmer. play out quite a bit over the next 12—18 months. although that weather front will residents of australia's become slowly weaker through the second largest city — melbourne — have started the working week with more sweeping restrictions afternoon and the rain light and imposed to tackle a surge showery, underneath the cloud in in coronavirus cases. windows temperatures perhaps we are a state of disaster has already been looking at mid to high teens, low declared in victoria. on sunday, a nightly curfew 20s, but for the south and east was imposed in melbourne, where it stays dry, we will drag up with further limits on freedom to leave home. after reporting 429 new daily cases, some warmth and temperatures the state premier daniel andrews responding, possibly high 20s by the outlined strict measures for businesses that will take effect middle of wednesday afternoon. that from midnight on wednesday. trend is set to continue, so if you don‘t like it too hot and humid, it retail will close, some looks as though temperatures in the manufacturing will close, some admin will close. south—east could be back to the mid—30s. these businesses, unless they have specific requirements to safely shut down on a slightly longer timeline, they will have to close by 11:59 on wednesday night. to give you the retail example, for instance, bunnings. bunnings will be — you'll no longer be able to go into a bunnings store, but you will be able to collect goods without making
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contact with anybody. so, some of those drive—through arrangements, similar arrangements for couriering things too. so, the home delivery model will be able to continue in a number of different retail sites, but retailer look very different than it has ever looked and that's critically important to have many, many people at home rather than at work and moving to and from work each and every day. abc radio's correspondent in melbourne is lisbeth gorr. she explained how people in the lockdowned city are coping with the new measures. i don't actually think it has kind of sunk in. we have only finished that dan andrews press conference, that dan andrews press conference, that little grab of audio that we john hume, one of the architects listen to, it is only 45 minutes of the northern ireland peace process, has died at the age of 83. press. i would listen to, it is only 45 minutes press. iwould imagine listen to, it is only 45 minutes press. i would imagine there are few tributes are paid to the man who was businesses that are reeling, although they have announced awarded the nobel peace prize — something like $600 million worth of after a life devoted to bringing of financial bolstering for the peace by making himself heard peace
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affected businesses, but as you you shot there, with rubber bullets and gas. the crowd was marching over there. heard, the only businesses that will the leaders were going be staying open our businesses like to speak to you. before we even got there, you opened fire. supermarkets, pharmacies, grocery we‘ll be looking back on the life of a man who dedicated his political stores, petrol stations and health life to finding peace in northern ireland. ca re stores, petrol stations and health care offerings. everyone else is also this lunchtime. going to be severely affected, some two tests for coronavirus and flu, which promise results in 90 minutes, are to be rolled out in hospitals, having to close down completely. he care homes and laboratories was talking about the hardware store in the uk as early as next week. eat out to help out — bunnings, which means that days out on the menu from today for people wanting to do home the government discount scheme to encourage people to visit restaurants, renovations and pick up hammers and cafes and pubs across the uk. tools, they will only be able to order online. in fact, australia post has been inundated with online orders. it is up something like 116% over the last couple of weeks. at least 20 people have been killed in a prolonged gun battle between security forces and islamic state militants in eastern afghanistan. the clash began on sunday after a car bomb exploded outside a prison in the city
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of jalalabad the authorities say prisoners, government personnel and three militants are among the dead. let's get the latest from our correspondent khalil noori in kabul. what is happening there? well, after almost 20 hours of the complex attack followed by a car bomb outside of jalalabad, there attack followed by a car bomb outside ofjalalabad, there was fire exchange between islamic state militants and forces. now it has been confirmed 21 people were killed, including a number of civilians and security forces and a few number of prisoners. there are at least 43 others who are wounded. the afghan army chief has left kabul
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to jalalabad to lead an operation against the militants who are taking possession of a residential building thereby to the prison. a number of them has managed to enter the building. some of us don't pay close attention to the movements between different groups in afghanistan in different groups in afghanistan in different places at different times. can you give us some context on the relationship at this point between the taliban, the afghan government and isis militants? right after the signing of the peace agreement between the us government and parliament in february in doha, there has been some progress for the peace talks between the afghan
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government and the taliban, though there has been deadly attacks on the increase and a number of violence in afghanistan. in the last three days, afghanistan. in the last three days, afghanistan witnessed a three—day ceasefire between afghan forces and the taliban. they are on eid festival days. taliban release 1000 of the afghan forces and prisoners who were held captive by the taliban. today, the afghan government is releasing a few number of taliban prisoners and the number reached 5100 taliban prisoners who had been released. taliban claims that they have left and they are now
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disconnected with other groups, like al-qaeda and isis militants. but a number of offshore is claimed they have some evidence taliban have got links with al-qaeda and isis militants in different parts of the country. thank you very much for explaining that to us. it's emerged that a woman who s alleged to have been raped by a conservative mp complained about his behaviour to the party's chief whip four months ago. the uk conservative mp and former minister — who hasn't been named — was arrested on saturday and then bailed by police investigating allegations of sexual offences and assault. it's now understood the chief whip, mark spencer, spoke with the complainant four months ago, but insists she didn't make an allegation of serious sexual assault. a spokesman for mr spencer has said he takes all allegations
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of harassment and abuse extremely seriously. earlier, i asked our political correspondent nick eardley, what the conservative party's response has been to these allegations, and the arrest. the conservative party says it takes all allegations of this nature extremely seriously. but at the moment, it is not removing the whip from this mp. there has been some criticism of that, quite frankly. the labour mpjess phillips says it sends the wrong message. there has also been some criticism from the lib dems leadership challenger layla moran. the argument the government is making is that it needs to wait until there has been a full police investigation into this. remember that somebody has been arrested but hasn't been charged yet. have a listen to the business minister, nadhim zahawi, this morning.
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this is a very serious allegations. there is a police investigation, charlie, taking place. i think it's only right that we wait for that investigation to conclude before you'll be hearing from the chief whip as to the action the conservative party will take. i think it is wrong to speculate before we see the police investigation completed. i think it's only right that we wait for that police investigation to be completed and then you'll be hearing from the chief whip. it would be completely wrong for me to speculate any further. so that is the view in government. the complainant is quoted in this morning's times saying she is devastated this person hasn't been removed from the party at the moment and she thinks it shows the party doesn't really care. as you were also mentioning, carrie, it has also emerged that the chief whip for the government, mark spencer, did speak to the complainant back on the 1st of april but he says that these allegations, these serious sexual allegations, were not made at the time. he advised her then that she could make a formal complaint to the relevant authorities.
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a spokesman for the chief whip as well saying that he takes this really seriously. the mp in question is out on bail at the moment and is due to speak to the police again in mid—august. our top headline this morning is around testing. all kinds of problems for the government over the recent days in communicating messages in dealing with local lockdown but good news this morning on the coming availability of two very fast tests? yeah, absolutely. it is one of those things the government has always said it wanted was a speedy test, so if you are feeling sick, you can find out that day if you have the virus, potentially allowing you to go back to work, go back to school or go back to wider society if you test negative. one of the problem is that we have had over the last wee while is although the capacity to do tests
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has increased rapidly, it takes often two or three days to get the result. sometimes those results are inconclusive, so it can take up to a week to do a couple of results. so the hope in government is this is a game changer, that it allows them to test people a lot quicker. we have, of course, have some issues with tests in the past so as ever with these things, the proof will be in the pudding once we actually see how they work. but it all comes in the backdrop of a kind of strange situation today, where ministers are telling us all to go out and eat and to use this eat out to help 0ut scheme to help boost our local restaurants and cafes and pubs but, at the same time, there has been a notably more cautious approach from ministers over the last weeks also with the easing of restrictions being paused on friday with local restrictions being brought in in huge parts of the north of england. i think the government would say, look, if you go to a restaurant,
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it is supposed to be covid secure, there are mitigations in place to make sure things are safe but we are certainly at a complicated part of the messaging here, where we're all being urged to go out and spend money on to make sure that local businesses can survive but at the same time, there is real caution and real concern in government about the way the virus is spreading. that was nick eardley. one of the top doctors on the white house covid—19 task force has warned that the us has entered a new phase in its fight. deborah birx said the disease was now a greater threat than when the outbreak began, and cautioned people living in rural areas that they were not immune. the us has recorded more cases and more deaths than any other country. a brother and sister from philadelphia in the us are tackling the loneliness of the elderly in a unique way. hita gupta, who s 15, and her younger brother divit began
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sending hand—written notes, puzzles, and colouring books to residents of nursing homes across america when the pandemic hit in march. since then, the project called "brighten a day" has grown, and it could be making its way to care homes around the world. we can speak to the siblings now. hita and divit, thank you for joining us. thank you for having us. hita, can you explain how the idea began? i've been running my nonprofit, "brighten a day", since 2018, spreading joy to children in the hospital and nursing home residents, through cards and notes and i've also been volunteering at a retirement home since i was in ninth grade. a few months back, i was told by them that i could no longer visit because of covid. they had stopped
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allowing any visitors. so these seniors are not able to see any loved ones, which is causing a lot of feelings of isolation and loneliness, so i wanted to reach out and just lift their spirits, get their mind off of whatever was going on and also just keep them busy, which is why i started my project in early march. and tell us a bit more about the project, what did you send them? did you start by sending cards to people you knew in the senior home and then move onto other homes? yeah, we've started out with care packages, along with notes and now we've grown. divit, can i ask you how you got involved? my grandparents always tell me they feel very happy speaking to me. i understand loneliness and isolation ca re understand loneliness and isolation care home residents have to face which is why i started helping my
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sister. i send care packages, write notes and e—mails. sister. i send care packages, write notes and e-mails. wonderful. hita, do both of you kind of personalised the notes? are these written to individuals? yes... yes, we try to make them as fuller as love of his possible. we have volunteers doing inspiring quotes, some rightjokes, anything that will lift the seniors' spirits. i'm interested as well in the video calls. we here in the uk andi the video calls. we here in the uk and i know many other people around the world have been trying to reach out to elderly people in care homes but one of the difficulties sometimes with those in care homes or their own homes is technology. how are you overcoming that? yes, so we have also been donating devices to retirement homes to help seniors
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video chat with family and volunteers, because that is really the only way to stay connected right now, since they are not allowing in person visitations. we are also donating e—readers. person visitations. we are also donating e-readers. and divit, do you get a sense of the kind of value this is doing for people, to the elderly people you speak to, do they tell you what it means to them? yes, ijust want tell you what it means to them? yes, i just want the tell you what it means to them? yes, ijust want the seniors to know they are not alone and are not forgotten in this pandemic. we just want to spread joy. chuckles you obviously are spreading joy. hita, i'm interested as the older sibling here, how are you raising the money for this and how are you making time in your own lives for this? it sounds like a big project now. yes, it's been summer break for a while so we have had a lot more time to spend and work with
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volunteers, to organise activities. but yes, it's been interesting to spend time doing this. it's like a great experience, to see how easy it is to bring a smile to someone's face. and you are going more international now, i understand? yes, we are working with retirement homes in scotland, in canada we have multiple and we are also reaching seniors in lake india, australia, new zealand and a lot more countries. it's been wonderful to speak to both and i really hope your example will spark that idea for many young people across the world now. thank you. take care, good luck. once the epicentre of the pandemic, europe locked down for months to try and slow the spread of covid—19. now, as countries see new localised hotspots the challenge is to stop it fighting back ? without completely
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shutting down again. in the french seaside resort towns of biarritz and bayonne, masks are now mandatory ? and in biarritz ? even beaches are closed. jack kilbride reports. in this french seaside town, wearing a mask is mandatory. and from midnight on monday, biarritz and bayonne followed suit. for authorities, the goal is simple, stifle the resurgence in cases without having to go back into lockdown. but here, the move has had mixed reaction. translation: people respect it, it's well respected, but i think it's ridiculous. you walk around and you put on the mask, but when you sit down, you take it off. people are eating ice cream. i think it's a little ridiculous. translation: i think it's great because people are a little reckless. there are a lot of people, it's very crowded, and the mandatory wearing of masks is good, even at the market. if we'd wear it everywhere,
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it would be even better. and localised restrictions can be confusing. in some french belgian border towns, the rules even change as you walk down the street. translation: here, we are in france, and over there is belgian. here i can take off my mask outside, but in belgium i must wear it. the uk is also trying to suppress local hotspots. authorities in greater manchester declared a major incident on sunday to help agencies respond quickly and effectively to a surge in cases. and new restrictions in place there, among other regions, banned separate households from meeting each other at home. it's a strategy the government says it is ready to use again. we need to take decisive action. that's what the public expect, so we will be following the data, and if we see the rate of infection rising in further communities, then we will have to step in, as we have today. across the continent, a summer heatwave has enticed
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people out into the sun. but with a virus far from beaten, the hope is that these better times won't be short lived. jack kilbride, bbc news. all shops serving alcohol in the japanese capital tokyo have been asked to close at 10pm from monday because of coronavirus. bars, restaurants and karaoke halls that comply will receive nearly $2,000. tokyo's governor has said she may declare a new, city—wide state of emergency. the headlines on bbc news: a new test to detect coronavirus and flu that can give results in 90 minutes is to be rolled out in the uk, with some care homes having it available from next week. john hume, the former sdlp leader in northern ireland and nobel peace prize winner, has died aged 83. leaked iranian government documents seen by the bbc suggest that the number of coronavirus deaths there is nearly three times higher than officially reported.
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institutional racism may have contributed to the disproportionate impact of coronavirus among black and asian people in wales, including front line health workers. judge ray singh, who was asked to examine why ethnic minority communities are worse affected, told the bbc wales investigates programme coronavirus has "exposed embedded racism". a union's now calling for a public enquiry to determine whether deaths could've been avoided. i think we need a public inquiry. warts and all. we need to be prepared to get uncomfortable. many people have, you know, lost loved ones, friends and colleagues. we need to look at all of that detail and until we actually get to a point that we're prepared to do that, how are we going to learn
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lessons going forward? staying in the uk, and authorities in greater manchester are urging people not to be alarmed by the decision to declare a ‘major incident‘ in the area in response to a rise in the number of cases of coronavirus. the announcement last night came just days after the government announced tougher restrictions in the north—west of england. manchester city council has asked residents to stay calm, and said the measure will help various agencies to work together and draw on extra resources. and elsewhere in the uk, leicester s local lockdown has been partially lifted allowing some businesses — including restaurants and hairdressers — to re—open. the city had strict restrictions re—imposed at the end ofjune, shortly before the rest of england began to re—open its hospitality and service sectors. some tighter rules will remain in place in the centre of leicester. geeta pendse is in leicester. it‘s a big moment, particularly for the hospitality sector, as you mentioned. pubs, restaurants, bars
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and hairdressers can reopen for the first time since march. we‘ll also see the reopening of places like cinemas, museums, and religious ceremonies can take place within the guidelines. there are still some restrictions here, so leisure centres, gyms and swimming pools will not reopenjust yet, and different households are not allowed to meet indoors, or in the garden at all at the moment. but there is this general sense of easing, as you mentioned. it was five weeks ago when this localised lockdown happened in leicester and in some of the surrounding areas. the businesses i have spoken to this morning that will be reopening again for the first time, there is that mixture of apprehension but also excitement. i spoke to the mayor of leicester, sir peter soulsby, who said that he‘s pleased this day has arrived, but he was critical of the government. it has been very hard on leicester businesses, because we were promised at the outset by the health
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secretary that there would be proper compensation for our businesses. what we have had is a pittance compared with what is needed. a few hundred pounds per business. and they need much more than that. we are, obviously, as a city, going to have a major struggle now to catch up with the rest of the uk. we will do it but they haven't made it easy for us. the mayor of leicester there. so, a little way to go but there is genuinely a sense of relief that many people here will be able to experience some of the freedoms that have become the new normal elsewhere. microsoft says it‘s committed to buying the north american operations of the video—sharing app, tiktok, and wants to complete discussions with its chinese owners by the middle of next month. this comes as us secretary of state mike pompeo says the trump adminstration is just days away from announcing strong action against chinese software companies that it perceives as a security risk. the italian city of genoa
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is inaugurating its new bridge today, almost two years since the collapse of the previous one, which killed 43 people. the new structure is designed by the well—known architect renzo piano, who s from the city. from genoa, our italy correspondent mark lowen reports. child singing. an elegy for genoa‘s tragedy. the final piece by the renowned italian composer ennio moricone before he died last month, written in memory of the 43 victims of the genoa bridge collapse two years ago. a requiem for one of the worst infrastructure disasters in modern italian history, played to a city still in mourning. cymbals crash. shouting. 11:36am on the 14th of august, 2018, a corroded cable—stay
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on the morandi bridge tears apart, bringing over 200 metres of it cascading to the ground. drivers and residents crushed by the icon of their city. the genoese architect, renzo piano, whose designs include the shard in london and paris‘ pompidou centre, recalls the old bridge opening in 1967. morandi bridge was for me kind of a fantastic, brave example of engineering. everybody loved that bridge. everybody also was a bit frightened by the fragility of the bridge. bridge should never collapse. they don‘t have the right to collapse. piano‘s new bridge echoes a ship sweeping across this port city. sensors and robots ensuring its safety. 2000 solar panels providing its energy. this is my brother, roberto. samuele, my nephew. and my sister—in—law. but it won‘t ease the pain here.
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george robbiano was due to celebrate his brother‘s birthday on that fateful day. his eight—year—old nephew was the youngest victim. i feel my heart like, split in two, ok? and one part is missing. this new bridge isjust made with the blood of my brother, my nephew, and my sister and the other 40 persons that lost their lives. and there‘s nothing to celebrate. the old bridge‘s maintenance company and successive governments stand accused of years of neglect, despite warnings the steel was corroding. 71 people are being investigated, with a trial expected soon. translation: it's absolutely understandable that people want justice and that they want it as fast as possible. i want to assure them that we‘re doing our utmost to deliver it with all of the resources and latest technology we have, for the sake of those who lost their families, homes, work, and for the whole
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community of genoa. the disaster shone a spotlight beyond the morandi bridge — on this country‘s ageing infrastructure. several other viaducts have collapsed over the years in italy with its economic stagnation. but now it‘s hoped that the rebuilding, too, can have a wider impact, to show that new projects can go up quickly and efficiently here, and to bring pride back to italian engineering. italy is able to do this sort of thing. i don‘t understand why. it would simply become possible when you have a tragedy. a hole in the heart of this city has been filled, but it will take time to heal. mark lowen, bbc news, genoa. and tributes coming in tojohn hume, a driving force behind the irish peace process. he has died at the age of 83. the former british prime
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minister tony blair described him as a political titan who refuse to believe the future had to be the same as the past. mr trimble has also been paying tribute. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello there. a bit of a temperature turnaround on the way again this week. we start on a fairly cool note, for this stage in august anyway. temperatures usually should peak at around 23—24 celsius on an early august afternoon. this afternoon, about 21. but by friday, a surge of heat is back, for some of you at least. 35 could once again be achieved. that‘s on the back of those very hot conditions last friday. today, though, we have been sandwiched between weather systems. a little window ahead of cloud gathering into next week. a few showers dotted around during the afternoon. where you see the showers, they could be on the heavy side, particularly across parts of scotland, northern and eastern england. many, though, will spend if not all day dry, the bulk of the day dry with a bit more sunshine
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around than yesterday. winds light, as well, it‘s still going to feel nice enough when the sun is on your face. out of it, though, in cloudier moments and especially where the rain is falling, it will feel cool. now, as we go into this evening and overnight, a rather fresher night for england and wales under clearer skies but wind and rain set to spread its way across northern ireland later in the night and into western scotland, lifting temperatures here to take us into tuesday morning. it‘s this weather system here. notice high—pressure and low—pressure fairly close together. when they are closer together, the stronger the winds, they will touch gale force at times in northern and western areas in the second half of tuesday. rain at times to begin with across scotland and rain later again in northern ireland but wettest of all will be the south highlands. we‘ll see some patchy rain or drizzle with low cloud around the western coast of england and wales. but much of england and wales will be dry, the further south and east you are, the brighter and sunnier it will be, the lighter the winds will be and a little bit warmer, 23 or 24. sitting in the teens, though, in scotland, where that rain is relentless. the rain remains in place across western scotland through tuesday night. rain at times for northern ireland, some heavier bursts later.
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as we go into daytime on wednesday, it looks like we will gradually see some wetter weather return across wales, western england and western scotland. it means many eastern areas will stay dry, reasonably bright and getting warmer. temperatures more widely into the 20s, maybe the upper 20s for one or two. now, a lot of the rain will ease through thursday and friday. the capital city forecasts — to give you a flavour of things turning dry and incasingly sunny. winds falling lighter and it will turn warmer. there you go, confirmation for friday, 35 degrees possible in the south east corner, 30 as far north as yorkshire. warming upjust a little bit for scotland and northern ireland.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. john hume — the political leader regarded by many as the principal architect of peace in northern ireland, and winner of the nobel peace prize, has died. a new test to detect covid 19 and flu, that can give results in 90 minutes — is to be rolled out in the uk, with some care homes having it available from next week. more people are going to be able to get tested more quickly so we can find out where the viruses and tackle it and keep those rates of infection down. a bbc investigation finds the number of deaths from covid 19 in iran is nearly three times higher than the government claims.
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from this week — employers in england can insist staff return to the workplace — as long as sufficient safety measures are in place to guard against the spread of coronavirus. islamic state militants in afghanistan say they‘re behind an attack on a prison in the city of jalala bad that‘s left at least twenty dead — and hundreds of prisoners trying to flee. nearly two years on from the collapse of genoa‘s morandi bridge, killing 43 people, the italian city prepares to inaugurate its replacement. hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world ? and stay with us for the latest news and analysis from here and across the globe. the northern irish politician, and nobel peace prize winner,
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john hume, has died at the age of 83. an architect of the northern ireland peace process, he was regarded as one of the most important figures in recent irish political history. our ireland correspondent chris page looks back at his life. you shot them with rubber bullets and gas. the crowd was arching over there. john hume stood against violence for all of his life but he was never far from confrontation. he took on the army, the police, and the ira in his quest for a fair and peaceful northern ireland. there is not a single injustice in northern ireland today that justifies the taking of a single human life. if i were to lead a civil rights campaign in northern ireland today major target of that campaign would be the ira.
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originally, he had not intended to bea originally, he had not intended to be a politician. john hume train for the priesthood and then became a teacher. but his social conscience led him to campaign for housing rights for catholics in the 1960s. after the troubles broke out he and several others founded a new, nationalist political force. the social democratic and labour party. as sdlp leader he forged links around the world with the aim of ending the conflict at home. in the late 1980s he began talks with the sinn fein leader gerry adams. having a dialogue with the political wing of the ira was a huge risk and drew much angry criticism. butjohn hume helped to persuade republicans to call a ceasefire, the pathway he carved out led to the good friday agreement in 1998. today we can take a collective
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breath and begin to blow away, let‘s hope, the cobwebs of the past. the peace deal was a defining moment for northern ireland and forjohn hume. he was lauded as a visionary and hailed as a hero by pop stars and hailed as a hero by pop stars and by presidents. mr president and mrs clinton as you can see from the people of derry, you are very, very welcome here today. after he was awarded the nobel prize, john hume maintained his international friendships and statesman—like reputation but he gradually stepped down from his elected roles at stormont, westminster and brussels, as his health declined. in his later years health declined. in his later years he was always greeted with admiration when he appeared at events in his home city of derry.
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perhaps more than anyone else, john hume was recognised as the father of the peace process. john hume you aside at the age of 83. john hume you aside at the age of 83. tributes have been paid to the politician. the irish taoiseach michael martin said mr hume had transformed and remodelled politics in ireland. former uk prime minister — tony blair descirbed mr hume as a "political titan". saying he was "a visionary who refused to believe the future had to be the same as the past." he goes on to say "his contribution to peace in northern ireland was epic and he will rightly be remembered for it. former ulster unionist leader lord trimble — who was jointly awarded the nobel peace prize withjohn hume paid tribute saying — "he was a major contribution to politics in northern ireland and particularly to the process that gave us an agreement that we are still working our way through". and simon coveney — former deputy leader of fine gael party said "all of us should bow our heads in respect and thanks. what an extraordinary man, peacemaker, politician, leader, civil rights campaigner." we can speak now to our
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ireland correspondent, emma vardy. the tributes, mr, absolutely speak ofa man the tributes, mr, absolutely speak of a man who was one of the key architects of the northern ireland peace process and respected by all, having come through a time when firebrands dominated and finding a middle way had seemed impossible. absolutely. he is an iconic figure of northern ireland. seen by many as an absolute hero of the peace process , an absolute hero of the peace process, central to creating the conditions during some dark and violent times for northern ireland that paved the way for that good friday agreement in 1998. now, he was a continual advocate of peace. he missed no opportunity to speak out against the violence of the ira, a lwa ys out against the violence of the ira, always underlining his commitment to creating a united ireland through consent. you very much hated the violence of the ira, presented their
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actions while speaking on behalf of nationalist communities and being the rhythmic starting of his political career as a leading figure in the civil rights movement. in history, he has a place that will never be forgotten. bill clinton, the former us president called him the former us president called him the nelson mandela of northern ireland. his loss will be felt very deeply here today. he is an inspirational figure for many and i think your story will be told for many decades going forward. take us back to those times for those who perhaps were not born, i don‘t remember it. how much of a risk worth taking when he started out on the part that he went down? he took many risks. he was born in which are some of the most bitter conflicts during the troubles and in one area of the city when he became a figure one area of the city when he became afigure in one area of the city when he became a figure in the civil rights movement he witnessed first hand some of the earliest conflicts of the troubles and as the situation in northern ireland got progressively worse, that was when he decided to found the sdlp, seen as a more
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moderate alternative to sinn fein which back then was the political wing of the ira. and heated huge personal risks and engaging with secret dialogue with gerry adams of sinn fein, believing that dialogue with sinn fein at that time would help pave the way to political and democratic negotiations but he incurred the wrath of unionists, huge criticism for having been talking to sinn fein. a huge risk to himself but he had such a vision at that time that he believed that was the only way to bring sinn fein into the only way to bring sinn fein into the democratic process and to create the democratic process and to create the path to peace. and of course it was their secret talks which later wandered pave the way for the ira ceasefire. and years later, his effo rts ceasefire. and years later, his efforts were rewarded with the good friday agreement and power—sharing in northern and the peace that we have in northern ireland today. he will be very much remembered as a visionary who held onto that belief
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that peace was the right way to go through the very dark times of northern ireland. thank you, emma. another tribute to bring you from the irish president. he said thatjohn hume transformed and remodelled politics in ireland. he said all of those who sought and worked for peace on our island of ireland and in the hearts of all will have been deeply saddened by the passing ofjohn hume, nobel peace laureate and statesman. he has paid tribute to his personal bravery and leadership and steadfast belief in the principles of genuine democracy. he said his deep commitment to those values and his practical demonstration of tolerance and socialjustice practical demonstration of tolerance and social justice often practical demonstration of tolerance and socialjustice often times in the face of strong opposition and tangible threats to his person and his family asserted the fundamental principles of democracy. he says those who helped usher in a discourse that enabled a new era of civil rights and responsive government that few would have thought possible had placed generations in their debt and have been a source of hope.
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the department of health in the uk is promising new tests for coronavirus that can give a result in 90 minutes. currently the majority of people awaiting test results have to wait up to two days to find out if they are infected — with some taking longer. almost half a million of the new "on the spot" tests will be made available to uk care homes and nhs laboratories from next week. millions more are due to be rolled out later in the year. additionally 5,000 dna test machines which analyse nose swabs for coronavirus will be used in nhs hospitals from september the uk government says the new tests will help distinguish between covid—19 and other seasonal illnesses. the health secretary matt hancock says the latest testing innovations will help "to break chains of transmission quickly". as our correspondent charlotte gallagher reports. in the fight against coronavirus and stopping people passing it on to others, testing is vital. but during the pandemic, the government has been repeatedly
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challenged about its capacity to do so, and was sometimes unable to say precisely how many people had been tested. just yesterday, officials admitted there was a limited number of test kits for care homes, meaning the july target to routinely check all asymptomatic staff and residents has been pushed back to september. now the department of health has announced a deal with two companies based in oxford and london, to roll out kits that will provide results in 90 minutes. almost half a million tests will be available from next week across adult care settings, and hospitals are expected to receive them from september. millions more of the tests will be rolled out later in the year. meanwhile, 5000 dna machines, which analyse nose swabs, will provide 5.8 million tests in the coming months. the test is going to be similar
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to the tests we‘ve had already. it is detecting the virus‘ nucleic acid, but whereas in the past tests have had to be done via a swab and that has to be sent to a laboratory, what we now have is a test which can be done in the place where the sample is being taken. the tests, which will go to pop—up labs, will also be able to detect common winter illnesses such as the flu. there‘s hopes more widespread testing could flag localised outbreaks before they take hold and regional lockdowns have to be put in place. with concerns about an increase in cases in the winter, and the strain that will place on the nhs, there will be calls for even more testing across the uk. charlotte gallagher, bbc news. health secretary matt hancock has reacted to the news, saying the new technology will help boost testing capacity this is a big step forward in terms
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of how quickly we are going to be able to get tests turned around and also how widespread we can make b tests. we a re also how widespread we can make b tests. we are on track to deliver have a million tests a day by the end of october but new technologies like these two will help us to accelerate that and what that means, in real life, is that more people are going to be able to get tested, more quickly. so we can find out where the viruses and tackle it and keep those rates of infection down. these technologies which deliver these rapid turnaround tests will mean that we can expand testing capacity further and enter settings where, for instance, in schools we have currently survey testing so we have currently survey testing so we have some testing. that would be able to be expanded but also looking ata able to be expanded but also looking at a cross community where we want to test people who don‘t have symptoms to find out where the viruses. so, new technologies like this are incredibly important. we are expanding the testing capacity
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all the time. we are on target to meet the goal of happy mainly by the end of october and these new technologies will really help us ta ke technologies will really help us take that forward. a bbc investigation has found the number of deaths from coronavirus in iran is nearly three times higher than the government there claims. the first recorded death occurred on 22 january according to leaked medical records. that‘s almost a month before the first official case was reported. the documents show that on some days the actual numbers of deaths was ten times higher then the officalfigure. in all, the data shows deaths were undercounted by more than 27,000 up to 20th july. iran s health ministry has rejected this, insisting that the country‘s reports to the world health organization are accurate. behrang tajdin from the bbc‘s persian service has the story. groaning. gasping forair in the last hours of life. this man became iran‘s first official coronavirus victim on the 19th of february.
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his brothers were doctors, and they posted this video on social media. after that, officials were left with no choice but to admit that covid—19 was killing iranians. but it turns out his death from the virus was not iran‘s first. the bbc has seen what appear to be two official government documents. they contain every hospital patient they think was infected by covid—19 and all those they suspect died with the virus. together, they show iran‘s epidemic started earlier and was far deadlier than the official said it was. now we know the first death was actually a full month before officials came clean. the data suggests that, on some days in february and march, covid—19 deaths were more than ten times higher than what officials were announcing. in total, 41,952 people have died
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in hospitals after the 20th ofjuly. three times as many as the official death toll. this figure puts iran amongst the five worst—hit countries in the world. this is an extraordinary leak. the files include a vast amount of personal and medical details, names, addresses, phone numbers and whether they had a history of respiratory or cardiac disease. there are nearly half a million records listed in the two files. and the bbc has made strenuous efforts to authenticate the data. the whistle—blower told us that passing on this information was dangerous but worth it. actor‘s voice: risking my life, i‘m sending you the lists of coronavirus infections and deaths in all the hospitals of the country. i urge you to publish these figures as you see fit,
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so we can save some patients‘ lives. why would iran cover up the true scale of the outbreak? the pandemic started in the run—up to parliamentary elections in february. it was only after those elections that iran started imposing some restrictions to stop the spread. as the economy was already in deep recession, the government let businesses reopen in the spring. the leaders of the islamic republic fear any sign of weakness may be used by its enemies. maybe that‘s why they hid the true scale of the pandemic. behrang tajdin, bbc news. hsbc has posted a 65 percent drop in first—half pre—tax profits to 4.32 billion dollars — that‘s almost a third of what it made during the same time last year, and is much worse than expected. europe‘s biggest bank has faced headwinds coming from every direction in recent months.
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firstly — the pandemic and subsequent economic crisis has meant it‘s needed to set aside huge amounts of money in case people can‘t repay their loans. that came at the same time as oil prices plummeted — which also exposed them to defaulting loans. one failed oil trader defaulted on a loan to hsbc to the tune of 600 million dollars. and while the bank is headquartered in london, most of its business is done in hong kong. the ongoing political instability in the city, coupled with covid lockdowns, has decimated a core source of revenue for the bank. finally — it‘s been caught up in the prolonged standoff between the us and china. lawmakers in washington have criticised the bank for backing beijing‘s new national security law for hong kong. there‘s a risk it may even face sanctions. michael hewson is chief markets analyst at cmc markets in london. he says the ceo, noel quinn, will be facing some tough choices. i think he could come under pressure to accelerate these job losses. they have already lost 4000 in this first half which would suggest to me
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that this extra 31,000 could come an awful lot sooner rather than later. overall, i think in terms of its uk operation and its us operation, they could come under pressure to compartmentalise them further, particularly if china and us relations deteriorate. so i think hsbc has a decision to make, does it pivot to asia, or does it pull away from its uk and us businesses? so, this is a story that could play out quite a bit over the next 12 to 18 months. residents of australia‘s second largest city — melbourne — have started the working week with more sweeping restrictions imposed to tackle a surge in coronavirus cases. a state of disaster has already been declared in the state of victoria. on sunday, a nightly curfew was imposed in melbourne, with further limits on freedom to leave home. after reporting 429 new daily cases, the state premier daniel andrews outlined strict measures for businesses that will take effect
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from midnight on wednesday. retail will close, some manufacturing will close, some admin will close. these businesses, unless they have specific requirements to safely shut down on a slightly longer time line, they will have to close by 11:59 on wednesday night. to give you the retail example, for instance, bunnings. bunnings will be — you‘ll no longer be able to go into a bunnings store, but you will be able to collect goods without making contact with anybody. so, some of those drive—through arrangements, similar arrangements for couriering things too. so, the home delivery model will be able to continue in a number of different retail sites, but retailer look very different than it has ever looked and that‘s critically important to have many, many people are rather than at work and moving to and from work each and every day.
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abc radio‘s correspondent in melbourne is lisbeth gorr. she explained how people in the lockdowned city are reacting to the new measures. i don‘t actually think it has kind of sunk in. we have only finished that dan andrews press conference, that little grab of audio that we listen to, it is only 45 minutes press. i would imagine there are few businesses that are reeling, although they have announced something like $600 million worth of of financial bolstering for the affected businesses, but as you heard, the only businesses that will be staying open our businesses like supermarkets, pharmacies, grocery stores, petrol stations and health care offerings. everyone else is going to be severely affected, some having to close down completely. he was talking about the hardware store bunnings, which means that
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days out for people wanting to do home renovations and pick up hammers and tools, they will only be able to order online. in fact, australia post has been inundated with online orders. it is up something like 116% over the last couple of weeks. from this week, employers can insist that staff return to the workplace in england — as long as sufficient safety measures are in place to guard against the spread of coronavirus. it marks a shift from previous government advice, telling people to work from home if possible. jayne mccubbin reports. manchester is welcoming workers back just as the covid 19 spike sends a different message. ifi different message. if i have to, i have no choice, really. after four months and locked in with a health conditionjane has just gone back to work as a cleaner.
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iama bit just gone back to work as a cleaner. i am a bit concerned, actually. they are saying i cannot meet up with family, they cannot come into my house, but i can still go to work with people i don‘t know. i consider going to a pub. do feel safe going to power the rhythmic work? no. i don‘t stay working, then? it isa no. i don‘t stay working, then? it is a case of, i have to. you have to go to work. this is one of the biggest letting agents in the country and they look after 40,000 office desks. only 20% of them are today in use. quite surprised it has been 20% for derby but would come back quicker and sooner than they have done. are you worried? as long as we continue to reiterate the message that we have a covid secure spaces which we have been doing, we are really hopeful that people will continue to gradually return to the workplace. we wa nt workplace. we want people to feel safe and secure. i have just we want people to feel safe and secure. i havejust spoken we want people to feel safe and secure. i have just spoken to the health and safety executive who had a head office not farfrom here in
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the north—west. and they say they don‘t expect any change from monday. they are still operating on a skeleton staff and they will continue to do so. what message does that send out? well, we've been probably the wrong man because what we need get people back into the cities and towns. sue benn work for the gravetye manor hotel in gravesend — today is her first day back in four months. thank you forjoining us. how do you feel about being back? actually, now i am back i am really pleased. it has been a long four months at home. being back, how different does it feel there? very different. we are only running at 50% occupancy so we have not got all of our rooms occupied and we are not using the restau ra nt occupied and we are not using the restaurant as much for lunch and dinner reservations. it is mainly only residents of it is very quiet compared to what it normally is so it is all very different to when i left it in march.
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is it filtered at 50% occupancy? in the moment, yes. for the bedrooms and restaurant, yes. we have a lot of interest of people wanting to come back because we are a fantastic hotel and people want to come for the dining experience because it is michelin starred so they wanted to be here. so, yes, at the moment we are fully booked for lunch right through to the end of september. and what about the hotel rooms? because some hotels are saying actually, if you want to a state occasion in the months ahead and even into necks are you actually need to start booking now because people are thinking longer term about how is going to be impacting on us? most definitely. we have only got 17 rooms here, we are very small. they are only maximising ten of those at the moment a living room is fallow either side to make sure we can do deep cleans. we are getting up very quickly so at the moment you are looking at september and october and we are getting busier every day now. some of the restrictions have been
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lessened. being off forfour lessened. being off for four months, lessened. being off forfour months, as lessened. being off for four months, as you say, is a long time to be out of summerand say, is a long time to be out of summer and then going back can be very daunting particularly going back into somewhere so changed. what have you experienced over these months and how are you feeling now about what has happened? yes, obviously it is so different. it is like a parallel universe. wearing masks and making sure that you are using the antibacterial clea nser you are using the antibacterial cleanser all the time so it is very strange that you still have to be supportive of the gas and make them feel they don‘t need to worry about anything. we are covering everything andi anything. we are covering everything and i have just learned, anything. we are covering everything and i havejust learned, really, being away, how much i miss it and rediscovering things i never did before. it has been quite good but also quite a challenging time. in terms of social distancing, mass squaring, sanitising, what is it like for summing with maximum coming to stay at the hotel? it is very easy for them. we are
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doing all of the necessary cleaning within the rooms and we have hand sanitiser everywhere. we do ask them to bring masks and if they prefer to use their own, but we also had them in the room so every room on arrival they are already in there for them and we have changed the way that we are servicing the rooms and how we approach taking luggage, we only go up approach taking luggage, we only go up if they invite us and going separately with masks and gloves on and then they go in after us once we have vacated. it is all change but we arejust have vacated. it is all change but we are just making it, have vacated. it is all change but we arejust making it, you know, the process as easy as possible not only by the guests but also for the staff as well. thank you forjoining us. you are welcome. thank you. thank you. at least 20 people have been killed in a prolonged gun battle between security forces and islamic state militants in eastern afghanistan. the clash began on sunday after a car bomb exploded outside a prison in the city ofjalalabad. a spokesperson for the defense ministry said the prison is now under the control of afghan forces and all five militants
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have been killed. two us astronauts "splashed down" in the gulf of mexico last night — nine weeks after they set off to the international space station on a rocket provided by the commercial firm, space x. the company — owned by the technology billionaire elon musk — will now start charging nasa for a so—called "astronaut taxi service". our science correspondent rebecca morelle reports. 200 metres. we are braced for splashdown. mission control: copy. brace for splashdown. history in the making as the dragon capsule returns home. we have visual confirmation for splashdown. applause. the first private spacecraft to bring astronauts back to earth. dragon, spacex. separation confirmed. their journey began from the international space station. the spacecraft is owned by us company spacex. inside, nasa‘s bob behnken and doug hurley are at the controls. as they hurtled through the earth‘s atmosphere, a heat shield protected
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them as temperatures reached up to 2000 degrees celsius. then, at last, a glimpse from the earth. we are visual on four chutes out. parachutes slow the rapid descent before splashdown. splashdown! this move to the commercial sector marks a major change. with the spacex reusable rockets and capsules, the cost of space flight is coming down. racing to the scene, the recovery vessel. local boats have come to take a look too. the scorched capsule is hoisted on board. there is a slight delay as noxious fumes from the landing are cleared. the hatch is now open. then, at last, the first breath of fresh air for two months, both astronauts now out and ready to head home to see their families. it is the end of their mission, but a new era in commercial space
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flight is just beginning. this has been a, quite an odyssey, the last five, six, seven, eight years — five years since bob and i started working on this programme. and to be where we are now, the first crewed flight of dragon, is just unbelievable. there‘s something special about having that capability to launch and bring your own astronauts home, and we went through a lot of years without that capability and i think we are both super, super proud to have beenjust a small part of the team that accomplished bringing those space flights back to the florida coast and bringing that capability back to america. rebecca morelle, bbc news. hello, this is bbc news with joanna gosling. the headlines... john hume — the former sdlp leader in northern ireland and nobel
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peace prize winner has died — aged 83. a new test to detect coronavirus and flu that can give results in 90 minutes is to be rolled out in the uk, with some care homes having it available from next week. leaked iranian government documents seen by the bbc suggest that the number of coronavirus deaths there is nearly three times higher than officially reported. islamic state militants in afghanistan say they‘re behind an attack on a prison in the city of jalala bad that‘s left at least 20 dead — and hundreds of prisoners trying to flee. nearly two years on from the collapse of genoa‘s morandi bridge, killing 43 people, the italian city prepares to inaugurate its replacement. here in the uk, it‘s emerged that a woman who‘s alleged to have been raped by a conservative mp complained about his behaviour to the party‘s chief whip four months ago. the conservative mp
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and former minister — who hasn‘t been named — was arrested on saturday and then bailed by police investigating allegations of sexual offences and assault. it‘s now understood the chief whip, mark spencer, spoke with the complainant four months ago — but insists she didn‘t make an allegation of serious sexual assault. a spokesman for mr spencer has said he takes all allegations of harassment and abuse extremely seriously. i asked our political correspondent nick eardley, what the conservative party‘s response has been to these allegations, and the arrest. the conservative party says it takes all allegations of this nature extremely seriously. but at the moment, it is not removing the whip from this mp. there has been some criticism of that, quite frankly. the labour mpjess phillips says it sends the wrong message.
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there has also been some criticism from the lib dem leadership challenger layla moran. the argument the government is making is that it needs to wait until there has been a full police investigation into this. remember that somebody has been arrested but hasn‘t been charged yet. have a listen to the business minister, nadhim zahawi, this morning. this is a really serious allegation. there is a police investigation. sometimes with these things, when we then find out the details after an investigation has concluded, people begin to understand why the conservative party, the chief whip, has taken decisions the way he has taken those decisions. i think it's only right that we wait for that police investigation to be completed and then you'll be hearing from the chief whip. it would be completely wrong for me to speculate any further. so that is the view in government. the complainant is quoted in this morning‘s times saying she is devastated this person hasn‘t been removed from the party at the moment and she thinks it shows the party doesn‘t really care. as you were also mentioning,
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carrie, it has also emerged that the chief whip for the government, mark spencer, did speak to the complainant back on the 1st of april but he says that these allegations, these serious sexual allegations, were not made at the time. he advised her then that she could make a formal complaint to the relevant authorities. a spokesman for the chief whip as well saying that he takes this really seriously. the mp in question is out on bail at the moment and is due to speak to the police again in mid—august. once the epicentre of the pandemic, europe locked down for months to try and slow the spread of covid—19. now, as countries see new localised hotspots, the challenge is to stop a resurgence of the virus without shutting whole economies down. in the french seaside resort towns of biarritz and bayonne, masks are now mandatory ? and in biarritz ? even beaches are closed.
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jack kilbride reports. in this french seaside town, wearing a mask is mandatory. and from midnight on monday, biarritz and bayonne followed suit. for authorities, the goal is simple, stifle the resurgence in cases without having to go back into lockdown. but here, the move has had mixed reaction. translation: people respect it, it‘s well respected, but i think it‘s ridiculous. you walk around and you put on the mask, but when you sit down, you take it off. people are eating ice cream. i think it‘s a little ridiculous. translation: i think it's great because people are a little reckless. there are a lot of people, it's very crowded, and the mandatory wearing of masks is good, even at the market. if we'd wear it everywhere, it would be even better. and localised restrictions can be confusing. in some french belgian border towns, the rules even change as you walk down the street.
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translation: here, we are in france, and over there is belgian. here i can take off my mask outside, but in belgium i must wear it. the uk is also trying to suppress local hotspots. authorities in greater manchester declared a major incident on sunday to help agencies respond quickly and effectively to a surge in cases. and new restrictions in place there, among other regions, banned separate households from meeting each other at home. it‘s a strategy the government says it is ready to use again. we need to take decisive action. that‘s what the public expect, so we will be following the data, and if we see the rate of infection rising in further communities, then we will have to step in, as we have today. across the continent, a summer heatwave has enticed people out into the sun. but with a virus far from beaten, the hope is that these better times won‘t be short lived. jack kilbride, bbc news.
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one of the top doctors on the white house covid—19 task force has warned that the us has entered a new phase in its fight against the virus. deborah birx said the disease was now a greater threat than when the outbreak began and cautioned people living in rural areas that they were not immune. the us has recorded more cases and deaths than any other country. let‘s return to the death ofjohn hume, former sdlp leader and nobel peace prize winner. the former prime minister sirjohn major has released this statement saying : "john hume was an advocate for peace in northern ireland for the greater "few others invested such time and energy to this search and few sought to change entrenched attitudes
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i‘m joined now by lord alderdice, former leader of nothern ireland‘s cross community alliance party and now a liberal democrat peer. he was also the first speaker of the northern ireland assembly from 1998 to 2004. many tributes. he was described as a warriorfor peace. how many tributes. he was described as a warrior for peace. how would you describe in? he was quite an extraordinary man, very determined, very patriotic for ireland but not ina very patriotic for ireland but not in a sense that set him against others in other countries or with others in other countries or with other political perspectives. i see him very much in the tradition of gandhi and martin luther king junior and mandela, but he did notjust follow in their line, he also added understandings and ideas and developments as his own as how you bring peace in without yourself
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resorting to violence. it was not a lwa ys resorting to violence. it was not always at all easy. now people at resorting to violence. it was not alwa praise l easy. now people at resorting to violence. it was not alwa praise him, i. now people at resorting to violence. it was not alwa praise him, many' people at resorting to violence. it was not alwa praise him, many ofeople at resorting to violence. it was not alwa praise him, many of us, e at resorting to violence. it was not alwa praise him, many of us, myself back praise him, many of us, myself included, were sometimes critical of his approach, but he was very determined and in the end the legacy that he leaves behind is a very rich one, just in terms of his achievements in ireland but also ideas and approaches which are applicable also. and you say you we re applicable also. and you say you were amongst those who were critical at the time of some of the approaches he took and now we hear yourfulsome praise for approaches he took and now we hear your fulsome praise for him and acknowledgement of what he did. it is another sign of quite how extraordinary his achievement was, it was a time of immense division and he managed to bring people with him. he rang him alongside gandhi, martin luther king, nelson mandela. but was it in him that enabled him to do that. that is hard to say, he
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was a man of profound conviction, religious conviction, political conviction and devoted to people. i will give you an example, i remember a meeting that the form of us did, we would get together during the talks process away from other party members and governments and so on andi members and governments and so on and i remember one occasion we got together like this, during some early talks and he said, i have thought about the situation and they will have to talk to the republicans forced a band i looked around at a gym berliner and the blood drained from his face, he said, that‘s it, it is all over then. by which he meant, john would talk to republicans and engage with them, so him and ian could not engage with them. and i was left wondering what is possible because in those days without the only way of achieving peace would to bring together the broad centre and marginalised people
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on the extremes. he came to the view that that simply would not work and it had to be inclusive. that was a huge change which i think all of us including his own party find difficult to make but made it was and the peace process came from that recognition. it has been said you can see the dots, join the dots, but you can‘t see the way ahead when you are there. did you believe that the time it would end up the way that it did? i did not. i obviously hope we would find peace and there would be a stable reconciled society, but whenjohn went down that particular route, i went along with him, but very, very different reason, not because i believed it would leave to a result, but there was no prospect of power sharing ifjohn would not be involved. so ifjohn was going down that road, those that wanted to see peace had to follow it, either
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to tested to destruction in which case jan would come back to the previous way of understanding things, or we would find he was right and there was another way of doing things and it was possible, in which case that was wonderful. initially i did not go along the analysis that he had devised because i believed it was right but because i believed it was right but because i believe there was not any political alternative. in the end something new emerged from all of doing things and it was possible, in which case that was wonderful. initially i did not go along the analysis that he had devised because i believed it was right but because i believed it was right but because i believe there was not any political alternative. in the end something new emerged from all that. peace required so many to be involved and buy into it, but if he had not been there, what it hath began? how important a figure was he? he was regarded by many as the principal architect. it is difficult to see how there would have been a kind of outcome that we had without john as a liberal, i believe
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individuals do make a difference, not always a good difference, not a lwa ys not always a good difference, not always an arms difference, thatjohn made a difference. he made a difference at that time and during the process and in the history and future of ireland. i think the people in the future welcome to realise that he developed ideas applicable to other situations of conflict. i think he had an extraordinary impact and i think it is something not at all clear that we would have got there in our lifetime without the courage and dynamism. john would have said that he didn‘t do it on his own, he had remarkable personal and political support from his wife, a remarkable woman, and she stuck with encouraging him, facilitating him when things were very difficult and other friends and colleagues who we re other friends and colleagues who were not all persuaded of all of his ideas, but went along with it, people like seamus mallon, eddie
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mcgrady and some people who are still alive, others who worked with him within the sdlp and others in other parties as well whose name are well known, but john other parties as well whose name are well known, butjohn was a singular, a leader, did he make a massive difference? absolutely. would it have happened without him?|j difference? absolutely. would it have happened without him? i doubt it. so much pressure on one individual. did he carry it lately? —— lately? individual. did he carry it lately? -- lately? we often talked about how difficult it was, but he would sometimes come and say to me how depressed he was about how things were, how difficult he found the whole business. it was not easy, required courage and extraordinary stick ability, even when you didn‘t feel about it, when you are not sure whether the hope was well—founded. he stuck with it and it was very
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tough, it was difficult, there were threats and all of these kinds of things in northern irish politics we got used to, but it was —— he was quite an emotional man, he didn‘t wear them on his sleeve, but he felt for people and the situation and he got down about it from time to time but he stuck with it and that is a measure of the man. courage is when you find it extremely difficult and you find it extremely difficult and you stick with it. and when it was done, what was your first conversation with him? how was he then? we were all exhausted as well as over the moon. i guess you talk about the good friday agreement, none of us had had much sleep and we had been working hard, the whole thing looked like it might fold and thenit thing looked like it might fold and then it suddenly we had this breakthrough and we knew in our hearts that it was a breakthrough and it would not be the end of the problem, but there was a tremendous
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feeling of enthusiasm and invigoration. without the momentum is so great it would carry us through and it wasn‘t the situation, all sorts of problems emerged subsequently but he played his role in dealing with that. that was quite difficult because with his role in the european parliament, he was not able to take a position as deputy first minister and maybe that is not what he would have wanted to do anyway, but he would have to pass that onto seamus mallon who was a figure as well. sojohn had quite a difficult roles to play and his relationship with gerry adams was hugely important and the american side of things, a relationship with the so—called format horseman and bill clinton, with albert reynolds and his colleagues in the republic of ireland and with british politicians, with tony blair, john major. he had a remarkable network
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that he kept going. he was always on the move and keeping in touch with people and thinking about how we can get through the next thing. and although all of us gave ourselves a few days grace after the signing of the agreement, i think it was shortly after that that all this began to realise that all the problems had to be worked on and he did continue to work with them. problems had to be worked on and he did continue to work with themm is wonderful to talk to you, to hear your reminiscences of such a key time and a time when he was such a key figure. remembering john hume who has died at the age of 83. thank you. the headlines on bbc news: john hume, the former sdlp leader in northern ireland and nobel peace prize winner, has died aged 83. a new test to detect coronavirus and flu that can give results in 90 minutes is to be rolled out in the uk — with some care homes having it available from next week. leaked iranian government documents seen by the bbc suggest that the number of coronavirus deaths there is nearly three times higher than officially reported.
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the department of health in the uk is promising new tests for coronavirus that can give a result in 90 minutes. currently the majority of people awaiting test results have to wait up to two days to find out if they are infected. with some taking longer. joining me now isjon deeks, professor of biostatistics at the university of birmingham, he is also leading a team which evaluates tests of this sort. thank you forjoining us. how much ofa game thank you forjoining us. how much of a game changer do you think this could be? i think it is very important that we speed up the way in which test results can get back to participants and one way is by using tests of this type which will give results very quickly. it depends on the whole process, though, whether these samples need to be transported and prepared before the test can be used and the
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results getting back to the patients. so it is notjust the speed of the test but it is the speed of the test but it is the speed of the whole process we need to be aware of when we are looking at tests like these. could the speed mean lower reliability? quite often they do. these are using miniaturised technologies than the laboratory process being used up till now and quite often we see some decline in performance when we see tests put in small platforms like the ones being talked about right now. it is really important that we get good data to understand if there are compromises in accuracy with having a higher speed test. and as things stand, the current testing is not completely reliable full stop tell us what the understanding now is of the reliability of the tests we have. we are talking about the tests by the virus, not for the antibodies, and they are all based
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on taking swab samples and a lot of the problems we have are due to the swa b the problems we have are due to the swab not collecting material which has the virus on it and that can be done for a couple of reasons for step one is that it is done at the wrong time, that people have a short infectious period and you need to be able to detect the virus in that time period and also the swab technique is not good enough, doesn‘t actually go for enough back. the same problems will apply for these tests because they are being used as swabs as well. they may be used as swabs as well. they may be used on saliva samples which would bea used on saliva samples which would be a lot more desirable, a lot more are tolerable than having a swab sample taken and if that is shown to work well, that would be a big improvement to this. the current test, if you have a viral matter on the swab it is very good but it has to do with whether we get these swapping are done correctly. and how much of a problem is that a lack of
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reliability where the sample has not been properly taken? you will end up with people thinking they don‘t need to isolate any more because they do not pose a risk. absolutely and lots of countries are saying if you get a negative swab you should be retested a few days later. that is not part of our strategy is in the uk but it exactly for the reason we do expect some people to be tested later. if you don‘t have symptoms and you are pa rt you don‘t have symptoms and you are part of a track and trace programme then that could be something that needs to be done, to have a second test. the figures are quite difficult to get your hands on in terms of what the number of cases are that get mist and we have seen figures up to 30% being missed, perhaps a bit less than that. it depends on how well the swapping is being done. temper from birmingham university. thank you very much.
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the italian city of genoa will officially open its new bridge today, almost two years since the collapse of the previous one, which killed 43 people. the new structure is designed by the well—known architect renzo piano, who s from the city. an investigation into the cause of the disaster is due to wrap up shortly, with a trial expected next year. from genoa, our italy correspondent mark lowen reports child singing. an elegy for genoa‘s tragedy. the final piece by the renowned italian composer ennio moricone before he died last month, written in memory of the 43 victims of the genoa bridge collapse two years ago. a requiem for one of the worst infrastructure disasters in modern italian history, played to a city still in mourning. cymbals crash shouting 11:36am on the 14th of august, 2018, a corroded cable—stay
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on the morandi bridge tears apart, bringing over 200 metres of it cascading to the ground. drivers and residents crushed by the icon of their city. the genoese architect, renzo piano, whose designs include the shard in london and paris‘ pompidou centre, recalls the old bridge opening in 1967. morandi bridge was for me kind of a fantastic, brave example of engineering. everybody loved that bridge. everybody also was a bit frightened by the fragility of the bridge. bridge should never collapse. they don‘t have the right to collapse. piano‘s new bridge echoes a ship sweeping across this port city. sensors and robots ensuring its safety. 2000 solar panels providing its energy. this is my brother, roberto. samuele, my nephew. and my sister—in—law. but it won‘t ease the pain here.
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georgio robbiano was due to celebrate his brother‘s birthday on that fateful day. his eight—year—old nephew was the youngest victim. i feel my heart like, split in two, ok? and one part is missing. this new bridge isjust made with the blood of my brother, my nephew, and my sister and the other 40 persons that lost their lives. and there‘s nothing to celebrate. the old bridge‘s maintenance company and successive governments stand accused of years of neglect, despite warnings the steel was corroding. 71 people are being investigated, with a trial expected soon. translation: it's absolutely understandable that people want justice and that they want it as fast as possible. i want to assure them that we‘re doing our utmost to deliver it with all of the resources and latest technology we have,
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for the sake of those who lost their families, homes, work, and for the whole community of genoa. the disaster shone a spotlight beyond the morandi bridge — on this country‘s ageing infrastructure. several other viaducts have collapsed over the years in italy with its economic stagnation. but now it‘s hoped that the rebuilding, too, can have a wider impact, to show that new projects can go up quickly and efficiently here, and to bring pride back to italian engineering. italy is able to do this sort of thing. i don‘t understand why. it would simply become possible when you have a tragedy. a hole in the heart of this city has been filled, but it will take time to heal. mark lowen, bbc news, genoa. all shops serving alcohol in the japanese capital tokyo have been asked to close at 10pm from monday because of coronavirus. bars, restaurants and karaoke halls that comply will receive nearly
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$2000. tokyo‘s governor has said she may declare a new, city—wide state of emergency. now it‘s time for a look at the weather. hello there. a bit of a temperature turnaround on the way again this week. we start on a fairly cool note, for this stage in august anyway. temperatures usually should peak at around 23—24 celsius on an early august afternoon. this afternoon, about 21. but by friday, a surge of heat is back, for some of you at least. 35 could once again be achieved. that‘s on the back of those very hot conditions last friday. today, though, we have been sandwiched between weather systems. a little window ahead of cloud gathering into next week. a few showers dotted around during the afternoon. where you see the showers, they could be on the heavy side, particularly across parts of scotland, northern and eastern england. many, though, will spend if not all day dry, the bulk of the day dry with a bit more sunshine around than yesterday. winds light, as well,
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it‘s still going to feel nice enough when the sun is on your face. out of it, though, in cloudier moments and especially where the rain is falling, it will feel cool. now, as we go into this evening and overnight, a rather fresher night for england and wales under clearer skies but wind and rain set to spread its way across northern ireland later in the night and into western scotland, lifting temperatures here to take us into tuesday morning. it‘s this weather system here. notice high—pressure and low—pressure fairly close together. when they are closer together, the stronger the winds, they will touch gale force at times in northern and western areas in the second half of tuesday. rain at times to begin with across scotland and rain later again in northern ireland but wettest of all will be the south highlands. we‘ll see some patchy rain or drizzle with low cloud around the western coast of england and wales. but much of england and wales will be dry, the further south and east you are, the brighter and sunnier it will be, the lighter the winds will be and a little bit warmer, 23 or 24. sitting in the teens, though, in scotland, where that rain is relentless. the rain remains in place across western scotland through tuesday night.
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rain at times for northern ireland, some heavier bursts later. as we go into daytime on wednesday, it looks like we will gradually see some wetter weather return across wales, western england and western scotland. it means many eastern areas will stay dry, reasonably bright and getting warmer. temperatures more widely into the 20s, maybe the upper 20s for one or two. now, a lot of the rain will ease through thursday and friday. the capital city forecasts — to give you a flavour of things turning dry and increasingly sunny. winds falling lighter and it will turn warmer. there you go, confirmation for friday, 35 degrees possible in the south east corner, 30 as far north as yorkshire. warming upjust a little bit for scotland and northern ireland.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: john hume — the political leader regarded by many as the principal architect of peace in northern ireland, and winner of the nobel peace prize, has died. a new test to detect covid 19 and flu, that can give results in 90 minutes — is to be rolled out in the uk, with some care homes having it available from next week. more people are going to be able to get tested more quickly so we can find out where the viruses and tackle it and keep those rates of infection down. eat out to help out: diners across the uk can enjoy a discount of up to 50 per cent off their bills from this morning — in a bid to boost the struggling hospitality sector. the sports retailer and gym
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group dw sports falls into administration putting 1700 jobs are at risk. nearly two years on from the collapse of genoa‘s morandi bridge, killing 43 people, the italian city prepares to inaugurate its replacement. tributes have been paid to the northern irish politician, and nobel peace prize winner, john hume, who has died at the age of 83. an architect of the northern ireland peace process, he was regarded as one of the most important figures in recent irish political history. our ireland correspondent chris page looks back at his life.
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john hume stood against violence for all of his life but he was never far from confrontation. he took on the army, the police, and the ira, in his quest for a fair and peaceful northern ireland. there is not a single injustice in northern ireland today that justifies the taking of a single human life. if i were to lead a civil rights campaign in northern ireland today major target of that campaign would be the ira. originally, he had not intended to be a politician. john hume trained for the priesthood and then became a teacher. for housing and employment rights for catholics in the 1960s. after the troubles broke out he and several others founded a new, nationalist political force. the social democratic
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and labour party. as sdlp leader he forged links around the world with the aim of ending the conflict at home. in the late 1980s he began talks with the sinn fein leader gerry adams. having a dialogue with the political wing of the ira was a huge risk and drew much angry criticism. butjohn hume helped to persuade republicans to call a ceasefire, the pathway he carved out led to the good friday agreement in 1998. today we can take a collective breath and begin to blow away, let‘s hope, the cobwebs of the past. the peace deal was a defining moment for northern ireland and forjohn hume. he was lauded as a visionary and hailed as a hero by pop stars and by presidents.
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mr president and mrs clinton as you can see from the people of derry, you are very, very welcome here today. after he was awarded the nobel prize, john hume maintained his international friendships and statesman—like reputation but he gradually stepped down from his elected roles at stormont, westminster and brussels, as his health declined. in his later years he was always greeted with admiration when he appeared at events in his home city of derry. perhaps more than anyone else, john hume was recognised as the father of the peace process. tributes have been pouring in forjohn hume. the irish taoiseach michael martin said mr hume had transformed and remodelled politics in ireland former uk prime minister — tony blair descirbed mr hume as a "political titan". saying he was "a visionary who refused to believe the future had to be the same as the past."
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adding "his contribution to peace in northern ireland was epic and he will rightly be remembered for it." former ulster unionist leader lord trimble — who was jointly awarded the nobel peace prize withjohn hume paid tribute saying — "he was a major contribution to politics in northern ireland and particularly to the process that through." simon coveney — deputy leader of fine gael party said "all of us should bow our heads in respect and thanks. what an extraordinary man, peacemaker, politician, leader, civil rights campaigner." and former prime minister — sirjohn major paid tribute tojohn hume‘s drive for peace — saying "few others invested such time and energy to this search, fierce determination." let‘s speak to jonathan powell who was tony blair‘s chief of staff and helped negotiate the good friday agreement. thank agreement. you forjoining us. what thank you forjoining us. what are your particular memories of him on this day? i think the most
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striking thing was his bravery. he was brave going into the civil rights movement and taking part in those matches. he was brave in standing up to the ira despite living in a bombed site in derry and denouncing violence consistently and he was brave reaching out to gerry adams to make peace and was denounced when his secret meetings we re denounced when his secret meetings were found out. but he actually led to the first ira ceasefire and the good friday agreement so he deserves the nobel peace prize. bringing together people with such divergent and entrenched views is no mean feat. how was he when you dealt with him? how did that ability come across? he was very, very persistent. he would get you in the corridors, get you forever he could, trying to push forward to get a piece. he was determined to end violence are determined to end violence are determined to end violence are determined to get to a peaceful and
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equal settlement in northern ireland andi equal settlement in northern ireland and i really think it was an extraordinary achievement so he could be harassing you but he was right to do that. he was right to reach out to the ira when he did. he was right to push for peace and stand up against violence and he created a space for the good friday agreement. it would not have been possible. and in doing so he actually sacrificed his political future and that of the sdlp because sinn fein took from them as the majority catholic party so it was a selfless action. he was almost a quiet character in the context of a time when there we re the context of a time when there were some really loud and pretty vibrant characters. did everyone have a reverence for him. people we re have a reverence for him. people were disagreeing with him at the time but he did take people? he was certainly seen as an modern day seen by many international leaders. in the united states he was
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remarkable in turning americans again supporting the ira financially. and in europe also he was seen as a giant. but at home, i think sometimes he turned people the wrong way. it was seamus mallon who became the first minister rather thanjohn became the first minister rather than john hume when became the first minister rather thanjohn hume when the institutions we re thanjohn hume when the institutions were set up. sometimes you‘ve upped people up the wrong way but that was partly because he was so determined to get to peace. so insistent in his pursuit of a tent that is really a remarkable achievement. your old boss tony blair has written a lovely tribute to him today, as have many others. he says he was a remarkable combination of an open mind to the wild and practical politics. in any place, and any party, anywhere, he would have stood tall. it was good fortune he was born on the island of ireland. at the time, was there an awareness of seeing that? oh, yes. there really was. john
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major also issued a very nice him. during that period ofjohn major, if we had not had john hume meeting gerry adams secretly and being found out we would not have got to the downing street declaration in 1993 and then the ira ceasefire in 1994 so he was already clear that he was a giant of the peace process. he had taken very big personal risks politically and in terms of his life. and they paid off in the end. it started life as a teacher but he went into politics because of his beliefs and pursued them doggedly. and they paid off in the end and that does not often happen in politics. you were in politics at that extraordinary time and it must feel like such a privilege to have been involved. what do you take from it? working alongside people who are individuals, humans, but have transformed the landscape? yes. people sometimes forget that leaders are humans and they expect them to be superhuman and they are not. they are very human in every way but it is when a human likejohn
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hume is determined to get the right thing done, to end violence, to get to get justice thing done, to end violence, to get to getjustice to catholics in northern ireland. he just to getjustice to catholics in northern ireland. hejust keeps at it and demonstrate that it can be done. you can be an ordinary human being but by pursuing these aims and sticking to them and having that courage you can make things happen. but we were lucky in northern ireland have leaders of considerable colour did at that period. we had ian paisley who played a part in stopping the troubles and bringing about peace. and we had gerry adams and martin mcguinness both of whom we re and martin mcguinness both of whom were risking their lives as well as their political futures. were risking their lives as well as their politicalfutures. i were risking their lives as well as their political futures. i think we we re very their political futures. i think we were very lucky to have that calibre of political leader at that time. were very lucky to have that calibre of political leader at that timelj do not think peace would have been possible without them all. good to talk to you. thank you very much indeed. thank you. the department of health is promising new tests for coronavirus that can give a result in 90 minutes. currently, the majority of people awaiting test results have to wait up to two days to find out if they are infected, with some taking longer. almost half—a—million
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of the new "on—the—spot" tests will be made available to uk care homes and nhs laboratories from next week. millions more are due to be rolled out later in the year. additionally, 5,000 dna test machines which analyse nose swabs for coronavirus will be used in nhs hospitals from september. the government says the new tests will help distinguish between covid—19 and other seasonal illnesses. the health secretary, matt hancock, says the latest testing innovations will help "to break chains of transmission quickly". this is a big step forward in terms of how quickly we are going to be able to get tests turned around and also how widespread we can make the tests. we a re also how widespread we can make the tests. we are on track to deliver have a million tests a day by the end of october. but new technologies like these two will help us to accelerate that and what that means in real life is that more people are going to be able to get tested, more quickly, so we can find out where
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the viruses and tackle it and keep those rates of infection down. these technologies which deliver these rapid turnaround tests will mean that we can expand testing capacity further. and into settings where, for instance, in schools we have currently survey testing so we have some testing. that would be able to be expanded but also looking across the community where we want to test people who don‘t have symptoms to find out where the virus is. so, new technologies like these are incredibly important. we are expanding the testing capacity all the time. we are on target to meet our goal of have a million by the end of october and these new technologies will really help us ta ke technologies will really help us take that forward. from today, diners across the uk will be able to enjoy a discount of up to 50 % off their bills. the government scheme known as ‘eat out to help out‘ will be valid from mondays to wednesdays throughout august in an attempt to boost the struggling hospitality industry. andrea rasca is the chief executive of mercato metropolitano —
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which runs two food markets with independent traders in london. hejoins me now from berlin. welcome. thank you forjoining us. what impact do you think this might have on your business? thank you very much for having me. it is going to have, hopefully, quite a good impact. it is necessary now to give back a little bit of trust to people, to make them feel they can still go out with all the precautions but also with good savings in their pockets. this is very important. we have been dealing with this for the last three years because we implemented, three years ago, a £5 lunch deal with all of our trading partners for our people, for our visitors. how has business been since you reopened after the lockdown? we could see two different
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realities. our market in elephant and castle went back almost as usual. it was like before coronavirus because it is the biggest place, a lot of open air and we have been there for more than three years. we have been working with the community. we never close, we kept on engaging with communities. so we are almost back normal, actually, so it is wonderful. in mayfair, we have been discussing what to do because mayfair itself in the centre of the city is empty. so we decided to create a new beautiful garden. and we dedicated it to the community so we dedicated it to the community so we created another space for them and opened a new beautiful garden for all of them and people are appreciating it. the community is appreciating it. the community is appreciating it. the open air parties obviously a really important factor in getting people comfortable to come back. that is weather
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dependent and seasonal as well. are you worried about how things will be when there is elements change? not that much for two reasons. first of all, we are very happy to be in the uk where people do not feel i so much on weather. in italy it would be different and people would not go out if there was a little bit of rain. on the other side, the fact that we have a big factory in elephant and castle, even if you are inside you feel the space around you because it is a huge space, 5000 square metres. we left a lot of space for the people to walk around and we controlled the number of people who can enter. so i am not worried, to tell you the truth. and ijust worried, to tell you the truth. and i just would like the worried, to tell you the truth. and ijust would like the centre of the to go back to normal. that is very important. we are working with
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mayfair to try to achieve that. thank you very much forjoining us. the headlines on bbc news: john hume, the former sdlp leader in northern ireland and nobel peace prize winner, has died aged 83. scotland‘s first minister, nicola sturgeon, is holding a virtual coronavirus briefing. let‘s listen in. six are in greater glasgow and clyde and one is in lothian. i can also report that a total of 265 patients are currently in hospital, confirmed with the virus. that is the same number as yesterday. a total of three people last night were in intensive care with confirmed covid which is also the same as yesterday. finally, i am very glad and relieved to say that yet again, during the past 24 hours, no deaths were registered of a patient confirmed through a test in the previous 28 days has having covid. so the total number of deaths under this
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measurement remains at 2491. although we are now reporting fewer deaths on a daily basis, that total does remind us of the impact that this virus has had on families across the country and i want to come again, to extend my condolences to everybody who has suffered loss and, as always, let me thank our health and care workers for the extraordinary work that they have done and continue to do. there are three points i want to cover today. we have had, over the weekend, as you may have seen in the media, a number of small outbreaks. relatively no numbers come across the country. but the most significant of these is the cluster thatis significant of these is the cluster that is currently being dealt with in aberdeen. i can confirm that, as of now, 13 positive cases have been associated with this cluster although, of course, that number may yet rise. each of the cases so far is linked to the hawthorns bar in aberdeen and i want to thank that
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business for acting swiftly and for cooperating fully with the guidance and procedures to contain the cluster. an incident management team led by nhs grampian met over the weekend and is working with the scottish government, health protection scotland and local environmental health team is to trace contacts, inspect premises and to do everything necessary and possible to minimise unwed transmission. i am very grateful for their efforts. we will, of course, provide more details as and when they become available. we have seen a view of these clusters now and u nfortu nately a view of these clusters now and unfortunately it is very likely that we will see more of them in the weeks ahead. this particular cluster in aberdeen is, if i am honest, exactly what we feared when we reopened hospitality. and it is what i was talking about last week when i urged people to think carefully about just how urged people to think carefully aboutjust how often you need to go toa pub aboutjust how often you need to go to a pub or aboutjust how often you need to go toa pub ora aboutjust how often you need to go to a pub or a restaurant right now. and also about the care you should be taking while you are there. of course, it is notjust this incident in aberdeen. across the country and
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across social media we are seeing of people and it is like the younger people, gathering together with little or no physical distancing in place. i‘ve seen pictures on social media over this weekend that, not to put too fine a point on it, made me wa nt to put too fine a point on it, made me want to cry, looking at them. i know what a hard slog it is every single day right now to try to keep this virus under control. that is a hard slog by people he had the scottish government but even more so, people working in test and protect and in our local public health teams across the country. it is a hard slog by the country. it is a hard slog by the many businesses doing the right thing and of course, members of the public to continue to make very hard sacrifices right now. but every time one person throws caution to the wind and flout the rules, the reality is they put all others at risk and they make the job of everybody working to try to control this virus that much harder. so i know this year has been really
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difficult, the most difficult most of us can ever remember. i know people have missed socialising and i know that as we exit lockdown in a summer when we can truly travel, things can get frustrating. but i urge all of you to please follow the rules. notjust for yourself, although it is for your own health and well—being. but it is also about your friends, but members of your family. and also about the good of the country and the economy overall so that we don‘t have to put restrictions on hospitality back in place. because, be in no doubt, if we have to do that, we will. because we have to do that, we will. because we will have no choice. the test and protect system is there to ensure that when these kinds of incidences do occur they can be contained. and all the evidence so far suggest that this system is working well. it is a bit like fighting forest fires. it ta kes bit like fighting forest fires. it takes enormous effort and enormous resource and it is always a race against time. so we all need to
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help. test and protect is at its most effective when incidents like the one we‘re seeing an right now are kept at a minimum. the one we‘re seeing an right now are kept ata minimum. all the one we‘re seeing an right now are kept at a minimum. all others next to —— need to continue to reduce the risk of transmission by denying this virus the opportunities to spread. i appeal to everybody. be careful. remember to physically distance. i know it is really hard and it is the easiest thing in the world to forget but remember to keep that distance. wash your hands and surfaces. where face coverings. comply with all of the different elements of the campaign. because it is by doing these things that we give ourselves the best possible chance of keeping prevalence of the virus low and it is also how we best support test and protect local public health teams and give them best chance of containing outbreaks as and when they happen. of course, when we do have outbreaks it is important that we try to learn lessons from them and that is releva nt to lessons from them and that is relevant to the second point i want to touch on. the scottish government has today published new guidance for
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coal and contact centres. you will remember that a couple of people there was an outbreak late to our call centre in lanarkshire. that centre was involved in essential activity and throughout the pandemic centres undertaking essential work have been able to stay open. the staff at the centres have, amongst other things, enable the work of the emergency services to continue. they have help support businesses and keep the lights on and the inter—networking and they had provided financial and emotional advice to those who need it most so i want to take the opportunity to thank all of those involved in that important work. i also want to take the opportunity to bang although still waiting their workplace to open. non—essential, and contact centre premises are due to remain closed until at least the 14th of september and we are continuing to advise people to work from home wherever possible. i know that makes things tough and i really appreciate the patience of all of you who are
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in that situation and the sacrifices that you are making. the guidance we are publishing today will help to ensure that, both now and in the future, contact and call centres can operate safely. it has been produced in consultation with employers and trade unions and it takes account of the latest scientific evidence as well as experiences like the outbreak in lanarkshire. the guidance provides important advice on things like physical distancing, cleaning and hand hygiene and it should further reduce the risk of transmission in the workplace. the final issue i want to talk about today relates to the reopening of schools next week. we know that the move for children from nursery to primary school can be a big step. and for parents and carers that move also involves additional costs for things like school uniform, shoes, school bags and books. last year the scottish government established the school age payment to help with those kinds of costs. it is part of
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the best start grant and it provides eligible parents or carers with a one—off payment of £250. it is aimed at people who currently receive certain benefits or tax credits and it will be available to parents or ca re rs it will be available to parents or carers of a child born between the 1st of march 2015 and the 29th of february 2016. it is important to know you don‘t need to take up a school place to get the money. those who are home—schooling or have deferred their child was maxed out they can still apply. so if you think you might be eligible please go to the website. alternatively, you can call oh 801 822222 and go to the website. alternatively, you can call oh 801822222 and speak to an adviser. we will make sure there‘s details are posted on the twitter feed later today. if you are eligible for the best start grant you might also be entitled to free school meals are a clothing brand
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and you can apply for these by contacting your local authority. the basic point here is that there is help out there if you need it and the school age payment is an important example of that. last year it benefited more than 18,000 families and i hope that this year ata families and i hope that this year at a really tough time for many people it will provide even more households with that little bit extra support. i am going to hand onto the health secretary in a moment and then the chief nursing officer but i want to end, as i usually do, by reminding you once again of facts. these are the five key things all of us must remember in absolutely everything we do. face coverings must be one in enclosed spaces such as shops and public transport. avoid crowded places, clea n transport. avoid crowded places, clean your hands on hard surfaces regularly. two metre distancing. self—isolate and book a test if you have symptoms. following this
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advice, is actually more important now than it has ever been because every step out of luck can we take the more opportunities we give the virus to spread so we have to be extra careful and extra vigilant. every day we see the evidence of what can happen if the virus gets out of control around the world right now, across europe and parts of england we are seeing significant flare ups and in many places restrictions are having to be be imposed. none of us want to see that here in scotland. i certainly don‘t. incidents like the one in aberdeen, though, remind us how fragile things are right now and underlines while all of us need to stick to these rules and if we do that we will all play a part in continuing to suppress this virus and we can then ensure that further than having to go into reverse we can continue to move in the right direction out of lockdown. so my thanks to everybody for your cooperation and compliance and please, as i said on friday, just pause and think about how you are behaving in your own lives and if you have let their standards
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slip, which would be, i guess, not surprising, then please take this opportunity to tighten up because lives really do depend on it and we have all got a part to play. we are going to leave everything now from nicola sturgeon announcing 18 new cases confirmed in scotland. no deaths have been reported. it follows on from 31 new cases of covid 19 announced yesterday which was the biggest dailyjump for two months and of those, 13 came for a new cluster of cases in aberdeen. a woman who s alleged to have been raped by a conservative mp complained about his behaviour to the party‘s chief whip four months ago. the conservative mp and former minister — who hasn‘t been named — was arrested on saturday and then bailed by police investigating allegations of sexual offences and assault. it‘s now understood the chief whip, mark spencer, spoke with the complainant four months ago ? but insists she didn‘t make an allegation of serious sexual assault. here he is speaking earlier.
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there are very serious allegations and we take those allegations very seriously. it is down to the police to do that thorough investigation, not for the whip‘s office to investigate this alleged climb as is for the police and authorities to do that. when they come to a conclusion we can assess where we are. we have got to bear in mind the victim. we don‘t want to identify the victim, the same time. so i have nothing to add at this stage but thank you very much. pleasantly warm when you get the sunshine at times today. particularly where you see the showers things can feel on the cool side. showers likely in scotland and ireland and northern and eastern parts of england. most of you will spend the fog if not all of the day dry. and temperature 17—22. when the sun is on yourface it dry. and temperature 17—22. when the sun is on your face it actually feels quite nice but it isn‘t those
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cloudier men as it will feel cool. in the sun goes up because tonight a rather chilly night for england and wales where skies are clear as but across scotland and northern ireland gathering clouds, wind and also rain will left to leave us back into double figures as we go into tuesday morning. they ireland under wet day across the western highlands of scotla nd across the western highlands of scotland is at times elsewhere. patchy rain and drizzle of long the delay by western parts of england and wales. dry and bright the further south and you go. temperatures are on the right foot of the wet and windy weather hangs around as we go into wednesday. a bit of a disturbed middle part of 02:29:35,098 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 the week but to return later on.
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