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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 14, 2020 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. restrictions in england which ban social gatherings of more than six people have come into effect. we've followed the rules, we have just been careful. and now i think we are being penalised because we are a big family. i don't think it's fair, to be honest with you. i think if they put things in proportion at the beginning, we wouldn't be having a second spout of it. similar restrictions are in place in scotland and wales, but with younger children exempt from the ‘rule of six'. do you support the new law, the rule of six, or will you'make your own deicsion as a former supreme court judge lord sumption told bbc radio this morning?
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japan has a new incoming prime minister, as the governing liberal democratic party elects yoshihide suga to replace shinzo abe. the prime minister's former top legal advisor says he's vote against a bill that would enable the government to break international law, by overriding parts of the brexit withdrawal agreement. a survey of 8,000 doctors in england suggests most believe there'll be a second peak of coronavirus cases within the next six months. high winds threaten to spread devastating wildfires even further across the west coast of the united states.
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social gatherings of more than six people will be banned in england from today following a steep rise in coronavirus cases. the new law will apply to people meeting in private homes — indoors and outdoors, and places like pubs and restaurants. there will be some exemptions — schools and workplaces. if you break the rules, you could be fined a £100, which would double with each offence. leigh milner has more. jenny and tom from lincolnshire have four children. today's changes mean they now won't be able to socialise together with other family or friends. i will no longer be able to see my mum and dad, we can't see my husband's brother and his wife so it willjust be the six of us, i guess. my parents are a massive support to me and i'll miss them terribly. so yeah, i think as a family we're all going to miss them very much until it's all over. i feel quite upset because as a family we've been very careful over the last six months. we've followed the rules, we've, as i say, just been careful and now i think we're being penalised because we're a big family.
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the changes in england, scotland and wales were announced last week in response to a rise in the number of cases of coronavirus. in england and scotland, the rule around social gatherings of six applies both indoors and outdoors, but in scotland, the six must be from two households only. and in wales, up to 30 people can still socialise outside. in scotland and wales, children under 12 and ii respectively aren't included, but they are in england. larger gatherings are still allowed in gyms, places of worship and at covid—secu re weddings and funerals. while in northern ireland, six people from two households can meet indoors and up to 15 people can gather outside. i don't know why they waited till monday, i think they should have enforced it straight away because now there's going to be a repercussion of all the get—togethers over the weekend. but yes, i do think it's essential. i don't think it's fair, to be honest with you. i think if they put things in proportion at the very beginning,
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then we would be having a second spout of this. you have to abide by the rules, because if we don't then we're not going to get on top of this, are we? for anyone who breaks the rules in england, you'll be fined £100. that will double every time you are caught up to a maximum of £3,200. leigh milner, bbc news. earlier i spoke to dr elisabetta groppelli, a virologist, and farooq, who lives in a household of six people. i think it's very difficult. we've been very careful at the last six months, following the rules. but it just seems the rules keep changing. there is no endgame in sight. after six months, you'd think they'd be better prepared. for us as a family of six, my wife and children,
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obviously that support structure just ourselves. it's hard for those with extended family. although there is such a high degree of scientific variance, it doesn't seem to stack up. particularly if you can go out and go to a restaurant, go to a pub, sit down and have a meal with more than six people. what you can do in a pub or restaurant, which would have to be covid secure, you give your name and address so they can trace you if needed and you can six with six people. but you would have to be separate from another table of six. that's the difference. when you're in your home, you are not following two metres, are you? we are sensible, if you are in your back garden, you are a metre apart. people know this is a terrible
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disease. nobody wants a second wave. we've got to be trusted enough. the point is, where does it end? where is the line, why not seven or eight? it'sjust a is the line, why not seven or eight? it's just a communication. is the line, why not seven or eight? it'sjust a communication. we are supposed to be a union, we have a difference in wales and scotland. there is no consistency. that is what devolution allows. let me ask dr elisabetta groppelli about that. why is it six? why that number? it's an interesting question, scientists and medical doctors have pointed out that we cannot find a source specifically that would support six, and not five or seven. however, the most important thing right now is that six has already been mentioned in the past few months. and because the uk government want to simplify the uk government want to simplify the message, they have kept the same numberand so the message, they have kept the same number and so six it is. obviously thatis number and so six it is. obviously that is because coronavirus cases are rising. as matt hancock, the
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health secretary for england, said last week, we hope to make this sacrifice now to get over this in the long term ? sacrifice now to get over this in the long term? absolutely, the situation in the uk is changing, and it is changing and other european countries and across the world. so it's very important now that as we go into what we already know is a critical part of the year, autumn and winter, when we know it is critical because of respiratory viruses, we set ourselves up in the best possible ways to also address the pandemic, under the new virus thatis the pandemic, under the new virus that is added on top of all other respiratory infections we already know are coming. and for viewers in the uk, at 2.30 this afternoon we are going to try to answer your questions. we'll be speaking to professor alan maryon—davis, professor of public health at kings college london and dr bharat pankhania an expert in communicable disease control. send your questions using the hashtag #bbcyourquestions or email us on yourquestions@bbc.co.uk
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eight in ten doctors believe the uk is heading for a second peak of coronavirus infections before spring — according to a survey by the british medical association. around 8,000 doctors and medical students in england were questioned — most said that a working test and trace system would be the best weapon to prevent a second wave. 0ur science correspondent, pallab ghosh, reports. the latest figures show that there are more than 3,300 new cases a day. in the bma survey, doctors said that it's not a matter of if there's going to be a second wave, but how large it's going to be. they say the main cause is likely to be a failure of the test and trace system and confusing public health messages. now is the time, every day counts, that we identify those who have the infection, identify contacts and isolate people. that is the way you will spread the infection. senior scientific advisors say that infection is also being spread because far too many people aren't isolating when they're asked to. a government spokesperson said it had made significant strides in stopping the spread of coronavirus.
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they added that nhs test and trace was testing hundreds of thousands of people every day. pallab ghosh, bbc news. the world health organization recorded a record one—day rise in the number of new coronavirus infections on sunday, with almost 308000 reported over 2a hours. he agency said that deaths rose by more than 5500 bringing the global total to 917000. )the biggest increases in infections were reportedin india, the us and brazil. according to the who, india reported 94,372 new cases on sunday,
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followed by the us with 45,523 and brazil with 43,718. worldwide there have been more than 28 million confirmed cases, half of which have been in the americas. countries across europe are recording a rising number of daily cases amid fears of a resurgence of the virus. local lockdowns have been imposed in the worst—affected regions, and there have been renewed appeals for people to wear face coverings and follow social distancing rules. israel has become the first country to impose a second national lockdown following an upsurge in cases. thousands of israelis protesting about the prime minister. but it is not just his corruption about the prime minister. but it is notjust his corruption trial, it is also the way he handled the coronavirus pandemic. confirmed infections are now 4000 a day in a population of 9 million, so he is reintroducing a national lockdown, the first country in the world to do so. the first country in the world to do so. translation: on thursday, they waved a red flag, hospital managers
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have warned us that death rates are forcing the application of immediate measures. some medical staff in hospitals are overwhelmed. that means a return to empty streets like these. no one allowed to go more than 500 metres from their home, outdoor groups limited to 20 people, and only ten indoors. schools and places of worship are shot, and that matters enormously. thejewish new year is starting on friday, normally a time when families get together. but this year, the synagogues will be empty. it's led the ultraorthodox housing minister to resign in protest. but it is not something the government wants to reintroduce, calculating it will cost the already recession hit economy $1.9 billion. the first rule of virus economics is that you must control the virus. you are never going to get on top of your economy and economic growth if the virus is out of control. the
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government says it has not lost control of the virus, even though it is the first country to abandon the juggfing is the first country to abandon the juggling act of keeping the economy going and protecting public health. cases here are rising again, and from monday new restrictions come into force banning social gatherings of more than six people in england, scotla nd of more than six people in england, scotland and wales. groups larger than six can be broken up by police, with fines of £100 for a first offence. the idea is to put off the rule breakers. which is why these health care workers in belgium took to the streets to voice their anger at those who flout the rules and make theirjobs harder. the latest figures from the world health 0rganization show a record one—day increase in confirmed infections, with 370,000 reported injust increase in confirmed infections, with 370,000 reported in just 24 hours, and deaths up by 5500, bringing the worldwide total to over
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900,000. the biggest increases are in the usa, india and brazil. more than half of the world's 28 million confirmed cases are now in the americas. infections around the world a re americas. infections around the world are rising again. governments are keen not to follow israel's deed. japan's governing party has elected yoshihide suga as its new leader, meaning he is almost certain to become the country's next prime minister. he replaces shinzo abe, who resigned as on health grounds. so what do we know about the man about to take onjapan's top job? yoshihide suga is a veteran politician who has served as chief cabinet secretary, and is concidered a close ally shinzo abe. while not considered the most energetic or passionate politician, he has a reputation of being very efficient and practical. one of his most prominent appearances recently was during the transition from past emperor akihito to the current one, naruhito in 2019.
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the bbc‘s tokyo correspondent, rupert wingfield—hayes told us what to expect from japan's new leader. well, he is saying we should expect more of the same because he has himself in running for this position over the last couple of weeks said that he intends to carry on prime minister shinzo abe's legacy for the duration of what should have been the rest of prime minister abe's term, until a year from now. so i think in policy terms, i think it's going to be much the same as we've seen over the last eight years. in terms of personality, i think these two men are very, very different. the prime minister shinzo abe is a very outgoing, charismatic politician who has made friends with donald trump and other leaders around the world, used his charm and his golf skills to win over the us president. mr suge is a very different character indeed. in fact most japanese people know him as the very stony faced,
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almost sullen—looking spokesman who has faced the tv cameras every day almost for the last nearly eight years, without showing any indication of having any charisma whatsoever. so, very, very different from mr abe but he does have a reputation of having an extreme work ethic, of being extremely disciplined. he is supposed to get up, we hear, at 5am every morning and supposedly does over 100 sit—ups before he sits down to read all the newspapers and all the government papers before breakfast. so he certainly has a strong work ethic. and i think many people feel like what japan needs right now with the covid—19 pandemic and the economic recession is a safe pair of hands, and that's what he represents. the headlines on bbc news... restrictions in england which ban social gatherings of more than six people have come into effect — with some exceptions. similar restrictions are in place in scotland and wales, but with younger children exempt from the rule of six.
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japan has a new incoming prime minister, as the governing liberal democratic party elects yoshihide suga to replace shinzo abe. the former prime minister david cameron has added his voice to those concerned about legislation which would enable the government to over—ride parts of the brexit withdrawal deal. it comes as borisjohnson's former attorney general, geoffrey cox, condemned the government's plans. in a newspaper article this morning, mr cox said going back on the deal would be "unconscionable". mps will vote on the legislation in the house of commons later today. let's talk to jonathan blake. the house of commons later today. let's talk tojonathan blake. so, the voices keep coming? yes, they
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do. two significant new voices explaining their criticism of the government's intentions this morning. former conservative prime minister david cameron, saying that he has misgivings about what the government is proposing, and that breaking international law and going against a treaty that you have signed up to as a country should only be something that is considered as an absolute last resort. he adds his voice to the former conservative prime ministersjohn his voice to the former conservative prime ministers john major and theresa may, along with former labour prime ministers tony blair and gordon brown. downing street will not be too worried about what those people have had to say, but perhaps in a slightly different category as the former conservative attorney general, who was in that role when the government withdrawal agreement, the brexit deal signed with the eu over the terms of our departure from the european union was being drawn up. he is someone who is a committed brexiteer. he
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says that what the covenant is planning is not only something they should not be doing, it is something they don't have to consider doing. —— the government. they don't have to consider doing. -- the government. i can't approve or endorse a situation where we go back on our word, given solemnly, not only by the british government but on the half of the british crown, also parliament, when we ratified this, unless extreme circumstances arrive involving a breach of duty of the good faith by the eu. in those circumstances there are lawful remedies open to us, and it is those we should take, rather than violating international law and a solemn treaty. to step back from the criticism for a second, what is being debated here is a bit of
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legislation that the government wa nts to legislation that the government wants to get through parliament, that it says is necessary to ensure free trade around the four nations of the uk in the future, once the uk has come to the end of the transition period that we are in with the eu, having left at the beginning of this year, which expires on december 31. it comes back to the key issue of what happens at the northern ireland border on the movement of goods between northern ireland and the rest of the uk. the government volko argues that the deal lacks clarity, and needs to act in domestic law to ensure that the eu couldn't in future simply make trades difficult 01’ even future simply make trades difficult or even put a block on the trade of goods between northern ireland and the rest of the uk in future. and the rest of the uk in future. and the policing minister, kit malthouse, has this morning been explaining why the government feels it needs to take this action.
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international treaties are as much about the spirit and the intent as they are about the letter of the law. and no—one, as i say, contemplated that the situation would occur. and i have yet to hear a compelling solution, if you like, to the practical issue that we are being faced with, that hopefully will never occur, but that may occur in the future, and why we shouldn't have an insurance policy for that. if it comes through in the debate this afternoon, then great. maybe we can resolve it through the standing resolution mechanism. but if we can't, we need to be able to protect the integrity of the united kingdom. so, a debate already raging about this legislation. it will get its first test in the house of commons later today. mps will start debating the legislation this afternoon and there will be a vote tonight. that isa there will be a vote tonight. that is a vote on the broad principles of the bill, not the nitty—gritty of the bill, not the nitty—gritty of the detail. so, the government is expected to win that comfortably. it
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it will be interesting to see how many conservative mps stand up and voice their concerns about what the government is trying to do. thank you very much. geoffrey cox was talking to times radio. earlier i spoke to sir desmond swayne, conservative mp for new forest west, who supports the government's bill. he explained why he feels this bill is necessary. an outrageous threat has been made, which could exclude trade from northern ireland, against existing treaty law, not least the act of union. if the government did not ta ke union. if the government did not take precautions against that possibility, it would be utterly negligent. so i think it's entirely appropriate that the government should arm itself with the powers just in case. not according to sir geoffrey cox, borisjohnson's just in case. not according to sir geoffrey cox, boris johnson's former top legal adviser. he says the uk is obliged to accept all of the ordinary unforeseeable consequences
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of the implications of the withdrawal agreement. it is unconscionable that this country, justly famous for its abiding of the rule of law, should act in such a way. that's nonsense, it was not a foreseen eventuality. he was there, during the withdrawal agreement at the top table with his legal brain? he is entitled to his opinion, but the reality is that this is a new interpretation that was threatened recently and not foreseen at the time. it would be utterly negligent ofa time. it would be utterly negligent of a government not to arm itself with the powers to deal with that situation, should it arise. but the bill itself preaches no international obligation of any sort. sorry, not according to the northern ireland secretary, a government minister who told parliament last week that this would break international law. yes, this did break international law in a
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specific way. and he was wrong to do so. the bill itself merely grants a power. it doesn't use that power. so. the bill itself merely grants a power. it doesn't use that powerlj am going to interrupt you, i do apologise, brandon lewis, the northern ireland secretary, he was not just busking, he northern ireland secretary, he was notjust busking, he was reading from a briefing paper given to him by number 10 or his own department. nevertheless, the bill itself does not break law. the bill gives the government powers to act in the event of certain circumstances. but the bill itself does not break any obligation. it cannot do so. it's impossible. the conservative mp sir bob neil is proposing a change — or an amendment to the bill. he says that some of the measures in this bill are unnecessary if there was a breach on either side of the withdrawal agreement, and the releva nt of the withdrawal agreement, and the relevant parts to the northern ireland protocol, there is already
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established, as geoffrey cox has pointed out, an arbitration mechanism that either side could rely on. the obvious proper first step would be to rely upon that. i think there is a much more proportionate means of dealing with it. that is why i am proposing that we do not bring into force the sections of the bill, don't start setting up nuclear triggers, if you like, until it is absolutely necessary. why track i did suggest the dispute resolution process to your colleague, said desmond swayne. he said, actually, what this new legislation is, the new bill, it is simply encase that doesn't work. it isa simply encase that doesn't work. it is a contingency. it would be negligent for the government not to come up with this? i'm not entirely convinced with that argument, but to meet them halfway i have proposed an amendment, if you are really convinced we might get to such a desperate state of affairs that the arbitration measures were not adequate, which could
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theoretically happen, 0k, not adequate, which could theoretically happen, ok, you can have these clauses in the bill, which is otherwise entirely reasonable and sensible, that these three clauses are a problem for it, you can have the clauses, but they shouldn't come into effect until parliament has specifically voted upon it. so they would not be on the statute. they would not have passed into legal effect until such a time as parliament approved them. how much support do you have for this?|j think much support do you have for this?” think we have a significant and growing amount of support. a lot of people from both sides of the old levon remain argument are concerned about this. because britain has a reputation for a country which stands by its word, we have a reputation as world leaders in upholding the rule of law. it would bea upholding the rule of law. it would be a bad look reputational, if we we re be a bad look reputational, if we were seen to preach that, other than in the most exceptional circumstances. and i don't think it would do very much good for our
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prospects of signing other important trade deals going forward. i think we have already seen that from some of the comments in washington. the embattled leader of belarus, alexander lu kashenko has arrived in southern russia for his first face to face meeting with president putin since mass protests broke out following disputed elections. there's speculation that russia will push for closer economic and political ties with belarus in exchange for its continued support. tens of thousands of people marched in the belarus capital minsk and other cities on sunday. mr lukashenko has characterised the protests as a threat to russia. mr putin has made clear that russian security forces are on standby to intervene if they get out of control. 0ur correspondent in minsk, jonah fisher, told me what kind of reception mr lukashenko might get in russia. well, he's going to sochi. this will be the first head to head, face—to—face meeting between president lu kashenko and president putin since the disputed election here in belarus in early august.
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they have had various conversations on the phone during that period, and there have been pretty intense exchanges of personnel coming between moscow and minsk during what has been a pretty unstable period in belarus. but president lukashenko is not going to sochi in a particularly strong position. as you mentioned yesterday, sunday, there was another very large demonstration here in the capital, minsk. another very explicit sign and indication that president lukashenko has lost the support of the people here in belarus, and will effectively be going to russia, to speak to president putin, and ask him to continue supporting him here in belarus, within a context of which everybody knows that president lukashenko is unpopular and in an extremely weak position. thousands of homes and some entire towns have been destroyed by the wildfires that have been raging in oregon, washington state and california —
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where president trump will meet emergency services workers later today. 0pponents have accused him of being in denial about climate change — after he said that wildfires sweeping through west coast states were caused by poorforest management. some of the biggest fires the west coast has ever witnessed, raging now for three weeks. the scale and sheer number of them pushing firefighters to their limits. high winds are now threatening to fan the flames even further. an eerie quiet has descended on berry creek in california where the fires have been extinguished, but it's still too dangerous for residents to return, theyjust have to wait out of town. but they are the lucky ones, some didn't get out alive. parts of oregon now have the worst air quality in the world. the route to safety was far from clear. the road and the whole mountainside through the canyon, all you could see is just flames
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and then it went black, grey and then white and itjust covered the whole sky. president trump will visit the area today with a row over the cause of the fires raging. he blames poorforest management, democrats say it's down to climate change. but for firefighters, the immediate concern is saving lives. simon jones, bbc news. representatives of the afghan government and the taliban are continuing peace talks in qatar. after the opening ceremony on saturday, the contact groups for both sides met on sunday to discuss the technical details of the negotiations ahead. speaking to our chief international correspondent lyse doucet, the head of the government delegation, dr abdullah abdullah, said the taliban should come to terms with the reality that afghanistan is becoming a diverse and freedom seeking society. when you look at the islamic republic of afg hanistan's delegation, the negotiating team or the delegation as a whole, you see
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the delegation as a whole, you see the diversity of afghanistan in it. it is important. that, in itself. does the other side recognise that afghanistan has changed in many ways ? afghanistan has changed in many ways? the younger generation, the civil society, the media, the vibrant private sector, all of that, freedoms, certain freedoms, freedom of speech. but, at the same time, we realise that there is no other way back, to put an end to war, and find a way to live together in peace. and fight for our ideas. your supporters and the president's supporters can't share power without arguing. yes, there are differences of opinion, there have been arguments at times but we have kept it peacefully. that is the point. do
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you share the fears of those who say that this is alljust mirage for the taliban, that the hard line taliban, including the commanders on the ground arejust including the commanders on the ground are just waiting for the remainder of the us forces nato forces to leave, and then they will march into kabul. some people may think that way. at the same time, i have no doubt in my mind that there will be a lot of a lot more people who will think let us put an end to the bloodshed. this is the moment that our people have reached to its limits, 42 years of war, misery, suffering, losses, this morning, i was watching tv, and i saw that camp in greece, where, the moria camp and
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i saw in greece, where, the moria camp and isaw an in greece, where, the moria camp and i saw an afghan family, which had lost everything, that everything was a few things, like simple place to stay together with the family, with very minimal, minimal things that you, you would need to survive. they even lost that, and that is the reality of life for afghans. and if you had to name one thing which is at the top of your worries as this new phase start, what is it?” at the top of your worries as this new phase start, what is it? i don't wa nt to new phase start, what is it? i don't want to see the people of afghanistan disappointed once again. let's return to our top story — and the new rule which makes it illegal to gather in a group of more than six people in england from today. similar measures are also in place in scotland, wales and northern ireland — all to stop the spread of coronavirus. graham satchell spent yesterday with some families who say the restriction is not as simple
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as it first sounds. a squirt of hand sanitiser and sunday morning football can start. we're in portsmouth following the netting family. dylan, who's nine, his brother devin, referee dad, pauland mum, donna. football is our life, really. and your boys love it? yes, absolutely. donna works for the nhs. as the number of cases start to rise again, she understands the need for the new rule of six but... it's also complicated because my children can come here and play football with theirfriends, which is obviously larger than a group of six. they go to cubs and swimming, again, larger groups of six. but we can't have both sets of grandparents round for dinner ‘cause that would make us bigger than six, but they can both come here and watch them play football. so, slightly confusing in that sense. yeah, does it make sense? no, not really.
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the rule of six is meant to make things easier and simpler, but it is kind of different depending on where you are in the uk. children under 11 and 12, for example, don't count towards the number six if you're in scotland or wales. if you're indoors or outdoors, it's slightly different, and then some things are exempt like schools, workplaces and organised sport like this. donna's parents are also confused by the inconsistencies in the new restrictions. i find it a bit strange we have different rules — england, scotland, wales. if we lived in scotland, it'd be different, we'd be able to see all the grandchildren together, but we don't, so we just have to do as we're told, really, don't we? i understand why they're doing it but obviously we all want to get back to normal. especially like dave said with the grandchildren and that, you want to be able to spend time with them all together but obviously we can't do that. the game is almost done but there's no rest for six—year—old devin, his day has just begun. he's off to his best friend
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noah's birthday party. again, a squirt of sanitiser, then it's lights, music and dance. this party was brought forward from october. the venue not certain they'll be able to stay open after the rule changes. as far as the rules on the government website and the risk assessments we've done, we've done everything we can do to open within social bubbles but it's a very grey area so at the moment we're still a little confused as to how we move forward. the party ends with more foam and it's not even lunchtime. the pub down the road, together, devin and noah's family are a group of eight so this will be the last sunday lunch together for the foreseeable future. devin's dad resigned to another change to their way of life. i have never understood why we'd have subtle changes and some
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of the difference in the rules, it is difficult to work out. this isn't something that we do too often so it won't affect everyday life so i guess either you find a way to manage it or don't do it, it is your choice. governments across the uk are clear, urgent action is necessary now to control the spread of the virus. the family will of course abide by the new rules but the mood here is a sceptical and slightly weary. graham satchell, bbc news, portsmouth. suzanne morrison argues 37—year—old john morrison is being denied critical home care that he is entitled to and fear he may be placed in a care home. let's hear the family's story.
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john has cerebral palsy which means he can't use his arms or leg, he his funding was withdrawn in 2009 because he no longer met the criteria for continuing health care, despite his condition remaining the same. fighting forjohn has nearly broke me. watching somebody disappear when you know that for simple amount of money, it can be stopped. it's depressing, it's demoralising, it encompasses every conversation i have with my lovely
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husband, or sometimes —— who sometimesjust husband, or sometimes —— who sometimes just turns off because he's heard what i've said so many times. you'd like to give up sometimes but i can't. because i won't. i won't give up. it's not what we do. a decade later and their battle for continuing health care fund has paid offn continuing health care fund has paid off n the last week, wiltshire clinical commissioning group has concluded thatjohn clinical commissioning group has concluded that john qualifies clinical commissioning group has concluded thatjohn qualifies for fully funned care. his parents say they now intend to claim £300,000 back from the nhs, having spent their own money on his care. it should be a happy outcome but despite that asking being reinstated, it again stopped when the care agency contract ended, after three months and it never started again. theyjoin us now in
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the hope of raising awareness of what we know is a problem faced by thousands of families across the country. good morning. hellojohn. how are you doing john? thanks for talking to us he says he's all right. what about you suzanne, how about you ? right. what about you suzanne, how about you? exhausted. we've worked now 299 days today, weave gone through lockdown, we've had no help at all, we've had to perform all physio, meet alljohn's needs, and... will you tell our audience what kind of carejohn needs on a day—to—day basis. what kind of carejohn needs on a day-to-day basis. john's got quadriplegic cerebral palsy which
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means he can't do anything, he has to be hoisted for everything, he can't repositions himself, he is at risk of pressure areas, he has to be toileted, bathed every day, and he's also nutritionally challenged so he is on supplements, he currently weighs 45 key lowe lows, 45.6 this week, he has been on supplements since 2016 and he has put on two kilos, people like john since 2016 and he has put on two kilos, people likejohn actually have very high metabolic rates, even though they look like they are not doing everything. so we have had to meet all the needs, and to keep him well. my husband and i have had to put off our own health issues, i've had to cancel, i have a ten millimetre kidney stone which i have had to try and work through the pain, and sort of, i have booked
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now, for an admission into our local hospital as a planned admission. so for you and your husband, this is really tough, isn't it. we are not wingers victoria, we just get on with it, and basically sort of, my lovely husband has a vascular problem with his leg, which means that his legs are swollen, and john woke us up this morning and we probably won't climb into bed until 11.30 tonight. you won the funding as we just saw in that clip, when you were last on our old programme, you were last on our old programme, you were last on our old programme, you were unhappy the care that was provided by the carers commissioned by officials in 2019. that contracted with terminated last november. you haven't had any funded ca re november. you haven't had any funded care since then. how are you going to get that changed? because you
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can't carry on like this. well, sort of, using the communities that are out there, there are thousands and thousands of people that i am speaking for today, notjust thousands of people that i am speaking for today, not justjohn, john is my concern, because he is my disabled person. but there are thousands of people in this country that barriers, unnecessary barriers are placed in front of you all the time, i had, iarranged an assessment by a care company five weeks ago, and then more barriers are put in your way. and, i don't know whether you can see this, this is the framework that the ccgs are supposed to work to. it is 167 pages, and... sorry to interwapiti sue stan, you have the money, they said they will pay for it, theyjust
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need to final the carers they haven't done anything, they have even used an excuse, my sadly my brother passed away injanuary, suddenly, but the day before he passed away, i left him with my mum, in the hospital, and i arranged to two assessment, i went to the corridor and arranged two companies to come and assessjohn. i'm available for all the assessment, john is available for all the assessments and it goes to the ccg and nothing. that is the recent one, you get nothing back. this is what they say, i got a statement. they say, this is bath and north east somerset, swindon and wiltshire ccg. that is the local commissioning health group. mr morrison's wellbeing and care has been our priority, we have worked actively with his family to assess and fund the right support. mr morrison has a right to confidentiality about as
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expect of care so we are not able to discuss care. we are committed to working with him and his family, to ensure he receives appropriate continuing health care support. now, i understand suzanne it costs round £18,000 a yearfor you to hire your own carerforjohn, despite £18,000 a yearfor you to hire your own carer forjohn, despite the fact he has this funding package from the officials. what will happen in two months' time when you say you will run out of money to hire your own carer, and if you still haven't got ca re rs carer, and if you still haven't got carers sorted out by the local health officials. all they keep suggesting victoria is i inform them injuly, my suggesting victoria is i inform them in july, my kidney suggesting victoria is i inform them injuly, my kidney stone was causing me pain, put him in a care home, july. hang on a minute. they suggested that you put him in a care home? during covid. what do you think about that? well, basically would you put somebody into a care home, currently with covid? no, i wouldn't, i wouldn't. home, currently with covid? no, i wouldn't, iwouldn't. but home, currently with covid? no, i wouldn't, i wouldn't. but what were your, what can you remember what
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your, what can you remember what your thoughts were, what your emotions were when that suggestion was made to you? i wasjust appalled. you know, he meets the, this, you fight for this wonderful word call eligibility, then the barrier, the next barriers get put into place and barriers keep get putting into place all the time. there is no reason and going, i found this today, it is a core principle that neither a ccg nor a local authority should unilaterally withdraw from an existing funding arrangement, without a joint reassessment of the individual, and without first consulting one another and the individual about the proposed change arrangement, therefore if will is a change it is essential alternative funding arrangements are agreed and put into effect before the withdrawal of existing funding. i understand. so... that is actually, that is
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actually from the national framework of the ccgs are supposed to work by. in case somebody from the local ccg is watching what would be your message to them finally, right now? john needs carers. john needs safe consistent well trained care. you know, sort of, you can't keep providing people with poor quality ca re providing people with poor quality care agency, who cannot meetjohn's needs. john actually had lots of things happen to him during that period, which were all reported. john was dropped off a toilet. hoisted inappropriately which meant he would have dropped five foot to the floor from a ceiling track and hoist, and, he suffered a drag lift which is an illegal move actually as designated by the royal college of nursing, a drag lift, which is common assault. that was why the
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ca re common assault. that was why the care company terminated their contract. because i made a complaint. and iv contract. because i made a complaint. and i vjust to round up finally, i have a statement from the organisation. they say we are an organisation. they say we are an organisation focussed on quantity care, we are confident in the abilitieses off off highly trained staff. the wellbeing of mr morrison was our priority while we provided support. we treat any complaint seriously we investigate thoroughly, which work with all relevant external parties and implement learnings from any incident. there we re learnings from any incident. there were no recommendations for improvements made to us from any agency relating to the time we provided support to mr morrison. suzanne, john, thank you for being with us this morning, you are definitely raising awareness, there will be many other families definitely raising awareness, there will be many otherfamilies in similar situations to yourself, and we will keep reporting on your case, until you get the help you need. thank you so much for talking to us again. thank you victoria.
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bye. thanks john, take again. thank you victoria. bye. thanksjohn, take care. thanks suzanne. line of duty stars adrian dunbar and vicky mcclure say they're worried about those with dementia as we face further lockdowns and more restrictions. for both its an issue close to their heart. mr dunbar‘s 88—year—old mum has had dementia for seven and a half years and is in a care home in northern ireland. vicky mclure's bbc programme 0ur dementia choir showed how music could help and stimulate people with the condition — here she is introducing the singers at nottingham's royal concert hall last year. welcome to the royal concert hall. i knew i could rely on you. very nervous. it's been a great journey and i've made a lot of friends. but... idon't journey and i've made a lot of friends. but... i don't want to mess it up. i want to do itjust right, andl it up. i want to do itjust right, and i don't want to let everybody down. would further ado. nottingham
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may i introduce to you our choir, they are all living with dementia, but they wants to show you despite that today, they can achieve incredible things. 0ur choir. dementia choir, come on! cheering and applause this is bernard, here is maureen. there is maurice, he was the nottingham singing landlord. there is maurice, he was the nottingham singing landlord. earlier i spoke to both of them to find out more about why this issue is so important to them both. ness are the most vulnerable people in our society, and i remember right at the start of the pandemic, that we kind of lost sight of that and there was very low numbers here in northern ireland, and very few deaths and yet we kept testing, the workers, the nurses doctors rightly so but we forgot the care homes were sort of left behind and it is people moving in and out of the care homes who really need tested because the people in the care homes do have a lot of background health issues etc,
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so, i hope they are not left behind this time and i hope they are focussed upon at this point. vicky how would you say your friends the dementia choir have fared in the last few months? i actually reached out to everybody the other day and asked for their comments, majority of our choir aren't asked for their comments, majority of ourchoiraren't in asked for their comments, majority of our choir aren't in care homes, we have got some members in care homes, but, a lot of them are, some are living on their own, some people just need their friends and family, and that is their main source of ca re and that is their main source of care andl and that is their main source of care and i think that has been really difficult, because they have not had you know, the option to have people there and the restriction now where the six, trying to make that work is also going to be difficult, but, yeah, i mean i spoke to them andl but, yeah, i mean i spoke to them and i asked for some examples i have written down because i wanted to get it right. because it is from their words, just imsimple things like one way systems in the shop has been difficult. talking has declined their fizz exalt and mental health
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and maureen who we lost sadly, a couple of weeks ago, she didn't understand the virus and she kept trying to brush it off. it is very complicated, it is very complicated for us to understand, so for people living with dementia, it is a very very confusing time and they really need their friends and family round them. and they need the stimulus, everything starts to fail, if you are not being stimulated. my mother is in are not being stimulated. my mother isina are not being stimulated. my mother is in a care home, as you sayjust outside my home town, my sisters and the family gets to see, gets to see herand the family gets to see, gets to see her and talk to her, you know, at a distance, she can come out to the door, but, you know, all these people, they need stimulus autumn the time, otherwise all their faculties start to drift away. that is right. there are some care homes and vicky i take your point not eve ryo ne and vicky i take your point not everyone with kennel is a is in a ca re everyone with kennel is a is in a care home, if i can follow this threw with adrian for a moment, there are some care homes who you would argue rightly are stopping the
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visits again, the socially distanced visit, through plastic screens because of this rise in coronavirus cases, i wonder if you any in the name of infection control, that some o taken shall harm is being inflicted on some patients with dementia, adrian? well, yes, this is a trade off between, you know, really, the basic thing ofjust staying alive or a deterioration in the patient. it mean, you know, it's a terrible scenario for, you know, the people in the care homes, but the people in the care homes, but the staff in the care homes, i mean, a lot is resting on what they do now, how they respond themselves to it and we have to give them support, because they are the link between the people inside and the people outside, so, if we are going to close the care homes down, we have to support the staff who are, who are working in them, that is my opinion. this e—mailfrom this e—mail from rebecca says that her mum is, she is 93 with vascular
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dementia, rebecca says she lives in a care home in york, over the summer we have been able to do outside visits once a week, they have been challenging because my mum doesn't understand why we can't come to her room or giving her a hug. we are coming into autumn, these visits will stop. and as yet there is no plan for indoor visiting at her home. we bought her an ipad, but she is suspicious of using it, adds she can't properly understand how it works, my older brother and i have taken the decision to care for my younger brother with down's syndrome between us, as he would be isolated as well. i am a very positive person with good supportive friendships is andi with good supportive friendships is and i am naturally a problem solver but i feel let down by public services and our government. i know there are many other people facing these problems with less support than i have. please keep up your excellent reporting of the personal and social impact of the covid responses in this country.
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thank you rebecca. let's return to our top story — and the new rule which makes it illegal to gather in a group of more than six people in england from today. similar measures are also in place in scotland, wales and northern ireland — all to stop the spread of coronavirus. graham satchell spent yesterday with some families who say social distancing rules are very different, depending on what part of the uk you live. in general, though, everything is still based on that two metre rule. if you can, you have to stay that distance away from anyone you don't live with. in some places, like pubs, you can be a metre apart, if other measures are in place. those living alone could also form what is called a support bubble to make an extended group that is treated as one single household. in england and scotland, those bubbles can also include the children of single parents. in wales, the rules are different. up to four families of any size can combine in one giant support bubble. if you want to meet up with friends or relatives in a completely different household, then it all depends on where
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you meet, starting with outdoors. in england, the rules have now changed. the number of people who can meet in a park or back garden has been cut from 30 to six. that law will not apply to weddings, funerals or organised team sports. in scotland, the limit is now also six, from two households, but children aged 11 and under don't count in that total. in wales, the maximum number is being kept at 30. in northern ireland, it is 15 people outside. then there is indoors. if you want someone to come inside your house, the rules are again different in every part of the uk. in england the limit is now six people, including children, the same as it is outside. in scotland, six people can meet, but only from two households. children aged 11 and under don't count in that total. in wales it is also six, from one extended household group or bubble. children ten and under are not counted. northern ireland now has the strictest rules. it's six people from two households, including children. pubs, restaurants and shops
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will remain open, but people can only attend in those groups of six, and places of worship will also stay open. again, there is the same limit of six people in each group. those are the general rules, but then there are local lockdowns as well. those living in these areas may be subject to extra restrictions, which you can find online. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas hello. we are likely to see temperatures in the south east today up to 30 celsius — the first time we have seen 30 celsius in september since 2016. so the next few days, a brief spell of hot weather on the cards before things then turn cooler later on in the week. but what we've got, we've got this area of high pressure in charge. as that pushes its way eastwards,
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we are going to be drawing in our winds from a southerly direction, so these winds coming from france, where the heat has been building over recent days and continues to build. so those southerly winds bringing all that warm air across england and wales. scotland and northern ireland seeing more in the way of cloud today, a bit of patchy rain here and there, particularly in the west, but not the heavy rain we had in the north—west of scotland through the course of the weekend. so temperatures in the north under the cloud around about 19, possibly 20 degrees, but widely in the mid to high 20s across england and wales, 30 celsius possible somewhere in the south—east, and across east anglia too. so, heading into the evening hours, pretty hot end to the day for many. we still have the cloud across scotland and northern ireland, with a bit of patchy showery rain here and there overnight. further south, it remains dry through the night, could be the odd mist and fog patch around, and temperatures certainly remaining mild, in double figures to start your tuesday. so, tomorrow then, another hot day to come across england and wales, similar to what we're seeing on monday. again, a lot of sunshine, light southerly winds, a bit more cloud around some of the west coasts, the likes of cornwall, pembrokeshire, could be the odd shower here.
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northern ireland should see the cloud and the rain clearing, so brightening up here, but scotland will see further showers on and off through the day. not as heavy as the rain we had through the weekend, but a little bit warmer compared to today — about 22 degrees in belfast, again down towards the south—east, the high 20s, possibly 30 celsius. through the middle of the week things are gradually going to be cooling down. there will still be a lot of dry weather, with some sunny spells round. we have high pressure that will be building to the north of the uk this time, from midweek on wards. now that is going to be driving this fairly weak cold front gradually further south, introducing a northerly airflow, so particularly in the northern half of the uk wednesday does bring a cooler, fresher day. we are still keeping hold of that heat for southern england, wales, so temperatures here again in the mid 20s, whereas further north real change — only around about 13 celsius in aberdeen on wednesday. lots of dry weather as we look towards the end of the week too, and temperatures returning to something a bit more typical for the time of year, but still warm with some sunshine for many. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news withjoanna gosling — with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. restrictions in england which ban social gatherings of more than six people have come into effect. we've followed the rules, we have just been careful. and now i think we are being penalised because we are a big family. i don't think it's fair, to be honest with you. i think if they put things in proportion at the beginning, we wouldn't be having a second spout of it. similar restrictions are in place in scotland and wales, but with younger children exempt from the rule of six. japan has a new incoming prime minister, as the governing liberal democratic party elects yoshihide suga to replace shinzo abe. the prime minister's former top
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legal advisor accuses him of doing "unconscionable" damage to britain's international reputation with a bill to override key parts of the brexit withdrawal agreement. a survey of 8,000 doctors in england suggests most believe there will be a second peak of coronavirus cases within the next six months. high winds threaten to spread devastating wildfires even further across the west coast of the united states. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world — stay with us for the latest news and analysis from here and across the globe. social gatherings of more than six people are banned in england
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from today following a steep rise in coronavirus cases. the new law applies to people meeting in private homes — indoors and outdoors, and places like pubs and restaurants. there are some exemptions — schools and workplaces. if you break the rules, you could be fined £100 — which would double with each offence. leigh milner has more. jenny and tom from lincolnshire have four children. today's changes mean they now won't be able to socialise together with other family or friends. i will no longer be able to see my mum and dad, we can't see my husband's brother and his wife so it willjust be the six of us, i guess. my parents are a massive support to me and i'll miss them terribly. so, yeah, i think as a family we're all going to miss them very much until it's all over. i feel quite upset because as a family we've been very careful over the last six months.
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we've followed the rules, we've, as i say, just been careful and now i think we're being penalised because we're a big family. the changes in england, scotland and wales were announced last week in response to a rise in the number of cases of coronavirus. in england and scotland, the rule around social gatherings of six applies both indoors and outdoors, but in scotland, the six must be from two households only. and in wales, up to 30 people can still socialise outside. in scotland and wales, children under 12 and 11 respectively aren't included, but they are in england. larger gatherings are still allowed in gyms, places of worship and at covid—secu re weddings and funerals. while in northern ireland, six people from two households can meet indoors and up to 15 people can gather outside. i don't know why they waited till monday, i think they should have enforced it straightaway because now there's going to be a repercussion of all the get—togethers over the weekend. but yes, i do think it's essential. i don't think it's fair,
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to be honest with you. i think if they put things in proportion at the very beginning, then we wouldn't be having a second spout of this. you have to abide by the rules, because if we don't then we're not going to get on top of this, are we? for anyone who breaks the rules in england, you'll be fined £100. that will double every time you are caught up to a maximum of £3,200. leigh milner, bbc news. as we've just heard, some are calling for young chidren to be exempt from the news rules on gatherings in england as they are in scotland and wales. that might make it easier for those who live in homes of six or more people to meet others from outside their household. alison keen is a mum of four from newcastle under lyme — she lives in a household of six. shejoins me now. how will this impact you? quite a lot, because we were six. my sister
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and yourfamily can come lot, because we were six. my sister and your family can come over. lot, because we were six. my sister and yourfamily can come over. —— herfamily. my and yourfamily can come over. —— her family. my parents unfortunate live in birmingham so they are now subject to local lockdown. my children have just subject to local lockdown. my children havejust got subject to local lockdown. my children have just got back to school. socialising with their friends. we had promised that they could have friends round, now we can. how do you feel about it? -- now we can't. it makes me feel a little bad. promises to my children... at the same time, i get... i'd rather keep everybody safe. how were the kids about the? there where a lot of tears. my youngest now the things i hate him.
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how old is he? he is six. i have my mac you eight—year—old, nine—year—old and ten—year—old —— six—year—old. nine—year—old and ten—year—old —— six-year-old. would you like younger kids to be exempt like in scotland? i think would be clearer and fairer. it would be helpful. how have you explained it to the children? 0bviously they are old enough to have these conversations, but do they really understand it? my oldest to do. but the younger two definitely don't. theyjust think to do. but the younger two definitely don't. they just think we are changing the rules on them again. they were fine to start off
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with, because everybody was stuck at home. but now theyjust with, because everybody was stuck at home. but now they just see with, because everybody was stuck at home. but now theyjust see we've got friends that can socialise and we can't. am i right in thinking your sister has pure kids then use so she can see your parents? ie your children's grandparents? even within afamily children's grandparents? even within a family there are anomalies. how are you feeling about that? advantage does not tell my children and their cousins can see their grandparents. —— i just and their cousins can see their grandparents. —— ijust had to not tell them. do you feel like this is something you are willing to take for the greater good? definitely, for the greater good? definitely, for the greater good, yeah. i can suck it up and have my kids go "i hate you" for the short term if it
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means that the country is safe. yeah, ican. means that the country is safe. yeah, i can. when you say for the short—term, christmas is coming, how do you feel that? to my youngest i've had to say, well, santer has a special exemption because he was starting to stress that santa wasn't coming. butapart starting to stress that santa wasn't coming. but apart from that i think it is going to be a very small family christmas this year. lots being made of neighbours calling out neighbours who don't follow the rules. what do you think about that? if it is neighbours going, well, there are seven of them... yes, they are right. but they are being a bit picky. if there is a big group of say, ten or more, then they
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absolutely should be calling out on their neighbours who are clearly flouting the rules. really appreciate you talking to us. wish you all the best with everything and at least father christmas has got that exemption, which is good news. he does. thank you. eight in ten doctors believe the uk is heading for a second peak of coronavirus infections before spring — according to a survey by the british medical association. around 8000 doctors and medical students in england were questioned — most said that a working test and trace system would be the best weapon to prevent a second wave. 0ur science correspondent, pallab ghosh, reports. the latest figures show that there are more than 3,300 new cases a day. in the bma survey, doctors said that it's not a matter of if there's going to be a second wave, but how large it's going to be.
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they say the main cause is likely to be a failure of the test and trace system and confusing public health messages. now is the time, every day counts, that we identify those who have the infection, identify contacts and isolate people. that is the way you will spread the infection. senior scientific advisors say that infection is also being spread because far too many people aren't isolating when they're asked to. a government spokesperson said it had made significant strides in stopping the spread of coronavirus. they added that nhs test and trace was testing hundreds of thousands of people every day. pallab ghosh, bbc news. the world health organization recorded a record one—day rise in the number of new coronavirus infections on sunday, with almost 308,000 reported over 24 hours. the agency said that deaths rose by more than 5,500, bringing the global total to 917,000. the biggest increases in infections were reported in india, the us and brazil.
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according to the who, india reported 94,372 new cases on sunday, followed by the us with 45,523 and brazil with 43,718. worldwide there have been more than 28 million confirmed cases, half of which have been in the americas. countries across europe are recording a rising number of daily cases amid fears of a resurgence of the virus. spain has recorded more than 66,000 new cases in a week, with almost a third of them in the madrid region. across the continent, local lockdowns have been imposed in the worst—affected regions. israel is to become the first country in the world to re—impose a national lockdown. the tough new restrictions — to begin on friday — follow a sharp upsurge in coronavirus cases, as paul hawkins reports. thousands of israelis are protesting about their prime minister. and it's notjust his corruption trial. it is also the way he's handled
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the coronavirus pandemic. confirmed infections are now 4000 a day in a population of 9 million so he is reintroducing a national lockdown, the first country in the world to do so. translation: on thursday, they waved a red flag. health ministry executives and hospital managers have warned us that death rates are forcing the application of immediate measures. some medical staff and hospitals are overwhelmed. that means a return to empty streets like these. no—one allowed to go more than 500 metres from their home, outdoor groups are limited to 20 people, and only ten indoors. schools and places of worship shut. and that matters enormously. the jewish new year starts on friday, normally a time when families get together. but this year, the synagogues will be empty. it has led the ultra orthodox housing minister, yaakov litzman, to resign in protest but it's not something the government
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wants to reintroduce, calculating it will cost the already recession—hit economy $1.9 billion. the first rule of virus economics is that you must control the virus. you are never going to get on top of your economy and your economic growth if the virus is out of control. the government insists it has not lost control of the virus, even though it is the first country in the world to abandon the difficultjuggling act between keeping the economy open and protecting public health. that is still happening in countries like the uk which uses regional lockdowns. cases here however are rising again, meaning from monday, restrictions come into force banning social gatherings of more than six people in england, scotland and wales. groups larger than six can be broken up by police with fines of £100 for a first offence. the idea is to put off the rule breakers. which is why these health care workers in belgium took to the streets to voice their anger
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at those who flout the rules and make theirjobs harder. the latest figures from the world health organization show a record one—day increase in confirmed infections with 307,000 reported in just 24 hours. and deaths up by 5,500, bringing the worldwide total to over 900,000. the biggest increases are in the usa, india and brazil. more than half of the world's 28 million cases are now in the americas. infections around the world are rising again. governments are keen not to follow israel's lead. the bbc‘s yolande knell in jerusalem has more. israel had a very good performance early on in the pandemic, where it imposed tight border restrictions, also had a very effective track and trace system. that really all fell apart as many
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experts believe that schools and businesses were allowed to open too quickly. there was then a question about whether there should be in the red hot spots, the places of the highest incidence of coronavirus around the country, new restrictions put in place from last week. there was some local opposition to that — those locations were concentrated in arab—israeli parts of the country, and also with areas where there are a high number of people who are ultraorthodox. so now israel has had the cabinet voting on this second national lockdown, due to last for three weeks. it estimated it's going to cost the economyjust under $2 million. mr netanyahu said that he knew this would exact a heavy price on everyone and particularly with thejewish holidays coming up. he said this is not the kind of holiday we are used to. the start of the jewish new year, this is on the eve of the jewish new year, on friday, that the new restrictions will come into place. that means israelis will not be able to go more than 500 metres from their homes. they will be able to go to their workplaces,
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supermarkets will be open and some government offices on a very limited basis, but certainly all normal leisure activities will be closed and crucially, synagogues will be very heavily restricted because of rules on indoor gatherings. we are still getting details of the rules but basically, for prayers in synagogues, it will be depend on the number of cases that there are in the areas around the place of worship, but also the size of the building itself. japan's governing party has elected yoshihide suga as its new leader, meaning he is almost certain to become the country's next prime minister. he replaces shinzo abe, who resigned as on health grounds. so what do you need to know about the man about to take on japan's top job? yoshihide suga is a veteran politician who has served as chief cabinet secretary, and is concidered a close ally of shinzo abe. while not considered the most energetic or passionate politician, he has a reputation of being very
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efficient and practical. one of his most prominent appearances recently was during the transition from past emperor akihito to the current one, naruhito in 2019. the bbc‘s tokyo correspondent, rupert wingfield—hayes explained the result had been expected. the first thing to say is that no—one here in japan is surprised by today's result, that yoshihide suga is the new ldp chief. this is a deal that has been stitched—up in back rooms over the last two weeks by the major factions inside the ruling ldp. so why have they decided to choose mr suga ? first and foremost, for the last eight years, yoshihide suga has been prime minister abe's right—hand man, at the heart of government, much of the time running the government. so he has the experience and knowledge, he is a safe pair of hands. so what is mr suga like? he is not a barrel of laughs. if you watch any of his daily briefings with the japanese media, he shows not an iota of warmth or charisma.
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however, he has other attributes. he has a reputation for having an extreme work work ethic and of being very disciplined. he repeatedly gets up at 5am every day and does 100 sit—ups before breakfast. much is also being made of his back story. unlike prime minister abe and most ofjapan's recent prime ministers, he is not of a political dynasty, he is the son of a strawberry farmer. he worked in a factory to pay his way through university. he went into local politics and worked his way up. he didn't enter parliament until he was nearly 50 years old. his boosters say that gives him much more of a sense of the difficulties of life for ordinary japanese people than someone like mr abe. that will be a real advantage at a time and we are facing covid and an economic recession. the government's internal markets bill will be debated and voted on in the house of commons later today. 0ur reality check correpsondent chris morris has been looking
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at what it is and why it's proving controversial. the overall aim of this legislation is to ensure the uk internal market continues to function seamlessly once the uk has left the eu single market, and its shared rules and regulations. but it has created huge controversy. most obviously, when it comes to the northern ireland protocol, which was agreed by borisjohnson last year to avoid the return of a hard border with the republic of ireland. the protocol is part of the brexit withdrawal agreement, which took the uk out of the eu last january. but this new legislation gives ministers the power to ignore some of the legal obligations it contains: the need for businesses to complete export declaration forms, for example, when sending goods from northern ireland to great britain. and the need for the uk to inform the eu of any state aid decisions, government subsidies for business,
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that affect trade in northern ireland. the government admits that these new ministerial powers would break international law — but only, it says, in a "very specific and limited way." to protect british interests. a bill which gives ministers explicit permission to break the law, though, by ignoring a recently signed treaty in this way, is unprecedented. the eu calls it a "serious breach" of international law and says the legislation must be changed. a significant number of senior tories seem to agree, but the government says it won't budge. and if that's not enough for parliament to get its teeth into, there are massive rows looming about devolution. the internal market bill gives uk ministers power to spend money in policy areas that are the responsibility of the devolved governments in scotland, wales and northern ireland. the uk government says it new uk shared prosperity fund is good news.
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but when that money used to come from the eu, it was largely the devolved governments that decided how it was spent. now they're complaining of a power grab. another part of the bill says devolved governments will have to allow the sale of imported goods that the uk government has approved — even if scotland for example wants to introduce stricter rules on quality or standards of production. that's causing concern about what kind of trade deals the uk government might do in the future, and what kind of agricultural standards will be maintained. so this isn't just about the irish border. it's also about the strain that leaving the eu is putting on the uk's carefully crafted devolution settlement. some of the biggest challenges in the brexit process have been kicked repeatedly into the long grass over the last couple of years. but they can't be ignored any more.
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david cameron said breaking an international treaty with the last thing you should contemplate. earlier the attorney general condemned the plan sing going back on the day would be unconscionable. mps were put on the legislation in the house of commons later today. plenty of voices saying the government is doing the wrong thing. before the debate on this controversial legislation begins in parliament later this afternoon, there is already a debate happening in public, as you have been setting out, severalformer in public, as you have been setting out, several former conservative prime ministers have been criticising what the government is trying to do here and warning against it. sirjohn manager, theresa may, also former labour prime ministers tony blair and gordon brown —— sirjohn major.
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saying this is the wrong approach for the government to take on saying it will be potentially divisive and damage the uk's ability to perhaps reach a trade deal with the eu in the weeks and months to come, it may even damage the standing on the world stage. this morning a another former conservative prime minster david cameron has added his voice was slightly nuanced criticism about what the government strategy. passing an act of parliament and then going on to break an international treaty obligation is the very last thing you should contemplate. it should be an absolute final resort. i do have misgivings about what is being proposed. i would misgivings about what is being proposed. iwould make misgivings about what is being proposed. i would make this point. so for what has happened as the government has proposed a law that it might pass or might not pass or
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might use or might not use, depending on whether certain circumstances do or do not appear. of course, the bigger picture here is we are in a vital negotiation with the european union to get a deal and i think we have to keep that context, that big prize in mind and that's why i have perhaps held back from seeing more up till david cameron wading into the debate, urging people to see the big picture of the trade negotiations which are ongoing between the uk and the eu. he adds his voice to that list of former prime ministers who fall into the same category of having campaign to remain in the eu. his criticism of the government's actions here, downing street may argue, is less important. but they might take a different view hearing the words of former attorney general, he is a minister, and indeed taking that position of the government's top
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legal adviser under boris johnson. .. come out in no uncertain terms talking about what the government is trying to do and he explained speaking on the radio this morning it was something the government not only shouldn't be doing, but didn't need to do. what i can say, from my perspective, is that i simply cannot approve or endorse the situation in which we go back on our word, given solemnly, not only by the british government and on behalf of the british crown, but also by parliament when we ratified this in february. unless there are extreme circumstances which arise involving a breach of duty of the good faith by the eu. in those circumstances, there are then lawful remedies open to us and it is those we should take, rather than violating international law and a solemn duty. some grave words they are from the
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former attorney general. the government argues this is something ofa government argues this is something of a practical step and an insurance policy, which may never be needed and the policing minister was explaining more about the government's approach this morning. international treaties are as much about the spirit and the intent as they are about the letter of the law. no one contemplated that the situation would occur. i have yet to hear a compelling solution, if you like, to that practical issue that we are being faced with, that hopefully will never occur, but that may occur in the future and why we shouldn't have an insurance policy for that. if it comes to a debate this afternoon, great. maybe we can resolve it through the standing resolution mechanism, but if we can, we need to be able to protect the integrity of the united kingdom. the first parliamentary test for this controversial legislation in the house of commons later today. the
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bell‘s second reading, when mps will vote on the broad aims of the bill. not the nitty—gritty detail and that is about the government is expected to win and win come to play. it will be an indication to see how many conservative mps get to their feet and voice their concerns about what the government is doing here. how difficult it will be for ministers to get this legislation pass further down the line. thousands of homes and some entire towns have been destroyed by the wildfires that have been raging in oregon, washington state and california — where president trump will meet emergency services workers later today. 0pponents have accused him of being in denial about climate change — after he said that wildfires sweeping through west coast states were caused by poorforest management. simonjones reports some of the biggest fires the west coast has ever witnessed, raging now for three weeks. the scale and sheer number of them pushing firefighters to their limits.
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high winds are now threatening to fan the flames even further. an eerie quiet has descended on berry creek in california where the fires have been extinguished, but it's still too dangerous for residents to return, theyjust have to wait out of town. but they are the lucky ones, some didn't get out alive. parts of oregon now have the worst air quality in the world. the route to safety was far from clear. the road and the whole mountainside through the canyon, all you could see is just flames and then it went black, grey and then white and itjust covered the whole sky. president trump will visit the area today with a row over the cause of the fires raging. he blames poor forest management, democrats say it's down to climate change. but forfirefighters, the immediate concern is saving lives. simon jones, bbc news. the embattled leader of belarus, alexander lukashenko has
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arrived in southern russia for his first face to face meeting with president putin since mass protests broke out following disputed elections. there's speculation that russia will push for closer economic and political ties with belarus in exchange for its continued support. belarussian 0pposition leader sviatla na tsikhanouskaya said any such agreement would have no legalforce. tens of thousands of people marched in the belarus capital minsk and other cities on sunday. mr lukashenko has characterised the protests as a threat to russia. mr putin has made clear that russian security forces are on standby to intervene if they get out of control. 0ur correspondent in minskjonah fisher told me what kind of reception mr lukashenko might get in russia. well, he's going to sochi. this will be the first head—to—head, face—to—face meeting between president lu kashenko and president putin since the disputed election here in belarus in early august. they have had various conversations on the phone during that period, and there have been pretty intense
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exchanges of personnel coming between moscow and minsk during what has been a pretty unstable period in belarus. but president lukashenko is not going to sochi in a particularly strong position. as you mentioned yesterday, sunday, there was another very large demonstration here in the capital, minsk. another very explicit sign and indication that president lukashenko has lost the support of the people here in belarus, and will effectively be going to russia, to speak to president putin, and ask him to continue supporting him here in belarus, within a context of which everybody knows that president lukashenko is unpopular and in an extremely weak position. earlier borisjohnson's earlier boris johnson's former legal adviser x x attorney general spoke.
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0ne adviser x x attorney general spoke. one aspect that is concerning scotla nd one aspect that is concerning scotland and wales in particular is the impact on devolution. joining us now is the leader of the snp in westminster, ian black said. welcome. thank you forjoining us. what is the impact of the legislation and its effect on devolution? i was listening to that story on belarus. much more interesting discussing that today and saying lu kashenko interesting discussing that today and saying lukashenko should be going and we should have free and fair elections in that country. this bill has been brought forward, it is an embarrassment by breaking international obligations. you have seen comments from geoffrey cox this morning. there is a lack of trust in the uk's ability to abide by law and international obligations. as far as
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devolution is concerned, it is really important. the bill allows for the uk government to override the wishes of the scottish parliament in health, education, housing and transport. i had to say to the uk government, this is not a good look. we had a referendum in scotla nd good look. we had a referendum in scotland and three quarters voted for a scottish parliament. —— we have. we engage in discussions to decide what we do in these devolved areas. to see westminster can ride roughshod over it and make decisions in devolved areas is something that should not happen. there is a phrase used in the past, power devolved is power retained. nobody should speak to interfere with the powers of the scottish parliament in westminster, like borisjohnson scottish parliament in westminster, like boris johnson is scottish parliament in westminster, like borisjohnson is doing. a message to the people in scotland, if you want borisjohnson not message to the people in scotland, if you want boris johnson not to message to the people in scotland, if you want borisjohnson not to do that, and we have to complete the
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journey to independence. this has arisen because of potentially eu rules not being in place in a situation where previously before they came into place, governing issues like trade could devolution was not there. it is effectively based aa tidying up exercise to protect internal trade. that is bogus from them. we havejoint committees of all the devolved administrations with westminster. they have all signalled intent to agree framework agreements. we recognise there has to be cooperation within the borders of the united kingdom and had agreed to do that. rather than going down that road, they are taking a sledgehammer to devolution. it is notjust wales, to devolution. it is notjust wales, to scotland and northern ireland as well. it is no way to behave. in scotland, we have minimum pricing on
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alcohol, which was part of our strategy for alcohol misuse. we would have to seek the agreement of the uk authority that the parliament is willing to establish, answerable to westminster. it is unacceptable that the hands of the scottish parliament will be tied in this way. it is about services but we are worried about the effects of selling off the nhs. it is about tearing up the scotland act, ignoring the devolution settlement and over the heads of the people of scotland who had given bad debts to scottish parties to enact laws in domestic areas of health, housing and transport. the message to the people at home, if you really want to protect the scottish parliament and protect the scottish parliament and protect the scottish parliament and protect the things that have been good for the people of scotland, we need to make sure become an independent country within europe. it does not look like the bill will
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get voted down, there will be enough support for it. stop and think about what they are doing. this will be a defining moment. iwill say what they are doing. this will be a defining moment. i will say to the conservatives this will bring about the end of the union. not people supporting the snp supporting independence in the past will recognise this is a very real threat to democracy, it is a real threat to the devolution settlement and this will be the best recruiting sergeant for the cause of independence. we have seen poll after poll has indicated a majority. this will increase that type towards recognising that scotland's future will be as an independent member of the european union. representatives of the afghan government and the taliban are continuing peace talks in qatar. after the opening ceremony on saturday, the contact groups for both sides met on sunday
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to discuss the technical details of the negotiations ahead. speaking to our chief international correspondent lyse doucet, the head of the government delegation, dr abdullah abdullah, said the taliban should come to terms with the reality that afghanistan is becoming a diverse and freedom seeking society. when you look at the islamic republic of afghanistan delegation, their negotiating team of delegation asa their negotiating team of delegation as a whole can make you see diversity of afghanistan in it. it is important. that in itself. the other side recognises that afghanistan has changed in many ways, the younger generation, a society, media. —— as the society. certain freedoms, freedom of speech, all of that. at the same time we realise there is no other way than
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to put an end to war and to find a way to live together in peace and fight for our ideas. many afghans and others ask how hard it would be for afg ha ns to and others ask how hard it would be for afghans to share power with their taliban when your supporters and the president's supporters cannot share power without arguing. there are differences of opinion, there have been arguments at times but it is kept peaceful stuff that is the point. do you share fears with those who say it is all a mirage for the taliban. the headline taliban, including commanders on the ground, are waiting for the remainder of the us forces and nato forces to leave and then they will march into kabul. some will think that way. i have no doubt in my mind that way. i have no doubt in my mind that there will be a lot more people who will be thinking, let's put an
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end to the bloodshed. this will be a moment that our people have reached its limits full ——. 42 years of war, suffering, misery losses. this morning i was watching tv and i saw that camp in greece, and i saw an afg ha n that camp in greece, and i saw an afghan family, which had lost everything. that everything was a few things, like a simple place to stay together with the family, with minimal, minimal things stay together with the family, with minimal, minimalthings that stay together with the family, with minimal, minimal things that you would need to survive. they even lost that. that is the reality of life for afghans. if you had to name one thing, which is at the top of your worries as the new phase
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starts, what would it be?” your worries as the new phase starts, what would it be? i don't wa nt to starts, what would it be? i don't want to see the people of afghanistan disappointed once again. the greek prime minister says a permanent migrant reception centre will be built on the island of lesbos to replace the moria camp, which was destroyed by fire last week. the blaze left more than 12,000 asylum seekers without shelter. kathryn armstrong reports. settling into a new home. children and the elderly here on the greek island of lesbos among the first migrants to be given temporary shelter, after several nights of sleeping rough. just down the road, the remains of what was the overcrowded moria camp until it was gutted by fire nearly a week ago, forcing its 13,000 occupants to flee. the authorities say they hope to rehouse everyone within a week. the prime minister has promised a new facility, and says this is a good time for other european countries to help people find more permanent homes. translation: what happened in moria, which is a tragedy, must be seen as an opportunity.
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first of all, as an opportunity to reactivate europe in a direction of solidarity to greece, and to adopt a common immigration and asylum policy at a european commission level. for many migrants, the solution is simple. let them leave the island all together, and be resettled elsewhere. translation: we need help, from all the countries in europ. we want help not to stay here, here it is a prison. there is one camp, now they have made a new camp. all the people are coming to a prison, not a camp. some residents are also opposed to the idea of a new camp, saying it is too much of a burden for the small island. and then there is a growing threat of a serious coronavirus outbreak. 12 people entering the new camp tested positive for covid—19 on sunday. that is on top of the 35 whose test
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results came back positive on the day moria burned down, and were unable to be isolated. with food aid struggling to get in, and little progress being made in efforts to find a satisfactory long—term solution, the unrest on lesbos over the future of thousands is likely to continue. catherine armstrong, bbc news. restrictions in england which ban social gatherings of more than six people have come into effect. similar restrictions are in place in scotland and wales but with younger children exempt from the ‘rule of six'. japan has a new incoming prime minister, as the governing liberal democratic party elects yoshihide suga to replace shinzo abe.
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sta rs stars are blind of gt say they are worried about people with dementia. for both it is an issue close to their hearts. mr danmark‘s 88—year—old mother has had dementia for years. the programme are dementia choir shows how music can stimulate people with the condition. welcome to the royal concert hall. i knew i could rely on you. it has been a great journey knew i could rely on you. it has been a greatjourney and i had made a lot of friends. i do not want to mess it up, i want to do it right. i do not want to let everybody down. without further ado, may i introduce to you our choir. they are all living with dementia but they want
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to show you despite that they can all achieve incredible things. dementia choir, come on! here is maureen. that is morris. he was a nottingham singing landlord. these are the most vulnerable people in our society, and i remember right at the start of the pandemic, that we kind of lost sight of that and there was very low numbers here in northern ireland, and very few deaths and yet we kept testing, the workers, the nurses, doctors rightly so but we forgot the care homes were sort of left behind and it is people moving in and out of the care homes who really need tested because the people in the care homes do have a lot of background health issues etc, so, i hope they are not left behind this time and i hope they are focussed upon at this point. vicky, how would you say your friends the
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dementia choir have fared in the last few months? i actually reached out to everybody the other day and asked for their comments. the majority of our choir aren't in care homes, we have got some members in care homes, but, a lot of them are, some are living on their own, some people just need their friends and family, and that is their main source of care and i think that has been really difficult, because they have not had, you know, the option to have people there and the restriction now where the six, trying to make that work is also going to be difficult, but, yeah, i mean i spoke to them and i asked for some examples i have written down because i wanted to get it right. because it is from their words, just simple things like one way systems in the shop has been difficult. talking has declined, their physical and mental health and maureen who we lost sadly, a
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couple of weeks ago, she didn't understand the virus and she kept trying to brush it off. it is very complicated, it is very complicated for us to understand, so for people living with dementia, it is a very very confusing time and they really and they need the stimulus, everything starts to fail, if you are not being stimulated. my mother is in a care home, as you sayjust outside my home town, my sisters and the family gets to see, gets to see her and talk to her, you know, at a distance, she can come out to the door, but, you know, all these people, they need stimulus all the time, otherwise all their faculties start to drift away. that is right. there are some care homes and vicky i take your point not everyone with dementia is in a care home, if i can follow this threw with adrian for a moment, there are some care homes who you would argue rightly are stopping the visits again, the socially distanced visit, through plastic screens
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because of this rise in coronavirus cases. i wonder if you think in the name of infection control, that some o taken shall harm is being inflicted on some patients with dementia, adrian? well, yes, this is a trade—off between, you know, really, the basic thing ofjust staying alive or a deterioration in the patient. i mean, you know, it's a terrible scenario for, you know, the people in the care homes, but the staff in the care homes, i mean, a lot is resting on what they do now, how they respond themselves to it and we have to give them support, because they are the link between the people inside and the people outside, so, if we are going to close the care homes down, we have to support the staff who are, who are working in them, that is my opinion. a tory atory mp a tory mp has resigned his position asa a tory mp has resigned his position as a special envoy for the prime minister because of the internal market bill that is going to be
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debated by mps and voted on in the house of commons later. he has quit as per his twitter announcement. he has quit as special envoy on freedom of religion and police. that beliefs. he said it breaks universal commitments. as a former barrister values of respecting the rule of law and honouring 1's words are dear to me. he has added to his tweet his letter of resignation to the prime minister. so, that isjust letter of resignation to the prime minister. so, that is just three. some unhappiness as we have been reporting about this move by the government to introduce legislation to enable the government to override parts of the withdrawal agreement that was signed at the end of last year. that is the main news. going
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back to our main headline, the new covid will making it illegal to gather in a group bigger than six today. social distancing rules are different depending on what part of the uk you live. everything is based on the two metre rule. if you plan you have to stay that distance away from anyone you don't live with. in some places like pubs you can be a metre apart if other measures are in place. you can have a support bubble, which is treated as one single household. in england and scotla nd single household. in england and scotland those bubbles can also include the children of single pa rents. include the children of single parents. in wales the rules are different. up to four families of any size can combine in a giant support bubble. if you want to meet up support bubble. if you want to meet up with friends or relatives in a different household, it depends on where you meet, starting with
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outdoors. the number of people who can meet in a park or back garden has been cut from 30 to six. that law will not apply to weddings, funerals or organised team sports. in scotland the limit is also six from two households. children aged 11 and under do not count in that total. in wales the maximum number is being kept at 30, in northern ireland, it is 15 outside. then there is indoors. if you want someone to come inside your house the rules are different in every pa rt the rules are different in every part of the uk. in england the limit is six people, including children, the same as outside. in scotland, six people can meet but only from two households. children aged 11 and under do not count in that total. in wales, it is six from one extended household group or bubble. children ten and under are not counted.
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northern ireland has the strictest rules, six people from two households including children. pubs, restau ra nts a nd households including children. pubs, restaurants and shops will remain open but people can only attend in those groups of six. there is the same limit of six people in each group. those are the general rules but there are local locked arms as well. those living in these areas may be subject to extra restrictions, which you can find online. —— local lock times. keir starmer is isolating after a member of his family showed symptoms of possible covid—19. the quote from his spokesman this morning, he was advised to self—isolate after a member of his household shed possible symptoms of the coronavirus. that is something we have just heard about. —— showed.
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social lives may look rather different for the foreseeable future. large parties and gatherings are banned from today. david sillitoe spent yesterday among operetta fans and their teddies. this is the world of teddies. is this his first trip to the opera? it is! he's been very excited all day, yes. does it have a name? bruno. we'd better start by explaining the teddies. this is grange park 0pera and a one—off performance of a socially distanced opera, which means there are big social distancing gaps in the audience. and so, to make it look less empty, they've been asked to bring a furry friend, or two, or three. i think it's fascinating to see grown men who normally run sort of multinational corporations carrying large teddies around. i never thought i'd get them to do it! it's the high point of my life!
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# i told the runners and the riders... but onstage, an opera, written during lockdown and designed to be performed with coronavirus restrictions. and it's the first time in months that the singers have seen an audience. so, everything has got these marks telling you exactly where you're allowed to stand, two metres spaces either side, you're only allowed to sing in that direction, no singing face—to—face. the whole thing has been devised and created with social distancing in mind. i deliberately designed it so that everybody would have two metres apart from one another around the table. one has to be just practical. at these times, one — art takes a back seat, sometimes. no singing face—to—face, no snogging — that is the other thing. those are the two things that you miss out on. but apart from that, i think it's ok. but this is just a one—off experiment — the economics just don't work for theatres — and with the new restrictions
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on get—togethers, this felt like a moment. this is my wife and this is my sister, and these are my friends. we're very sad about it. it will affect our life in terms of when we can see the family, because there's some of them who are already five in their family so we won't get to see the others, but i mean, you just make do, don't you, with these things? you have to! it feels a bit strange, in a way, that tomorrow it's going to be six and then today, we're in this big group, so... but the last hurrah in a way, so... a sunny afternoon of near normality. that's mommy, that's baby. but few were expecting to be back anytime soon. david sillito, bbc news, grange park 0pera, surrey. from empty supermarket shelves to "thank you nhs" banners and key workers wearing personal protective equipment, there are certain images which have come to define the experience
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of coronavirus in britain in the last six months. today the national portrait gallery in london is launching an online exhibition of photographs which — it hopes — capture the "resilience, bravery, humour and sadness" of britain under lockdown. it was the duchess of cambridge's idea and — as sarah campbell reports — it has already received the queen's approval. moments captured on camera during lockdown, every picture telling a story. titled "be safe, daddy," a cuddle between a father and daughter before his next working shift as a paramedic. loved ones separated by glass in "last precious moments." and "empty" — three—year—old leo's mother, who took the picture, said she experienced panic and a fear that this would be the new normal. this was a project initiated by the duchess of cambridge — herself a keen photographer — and she, along with four other judges, had the job of whittling the thousands of entries to just 100.
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i felt strongly that i really wanted to try and create a portrait of the nation, that sort of captures the fears and hopes and, you know, the feelings of the nation at this really extraordinary time. the images convey the difficulties faced by so many. kerry hales from bridge end, after three hours working in ppe, titled her portrait "this is what broken looks like." in "the first kiss," a father captures the moment his newborn son tries to kiss his mother, despite the plastic barrier. thejudging process itself was really interesting and very moving and obviously, going through those images and seeing all of these different stories — some of which are, you know, joyful and heart—warming, some of which are profoundly moving or even harrowing — it's something that i think has stayed with all of us. a rainbow playground at a school in norfolk. "short cut" features a tense diy haircut using dog clippers.
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and taken by big sister marcella, "home—schooling in dagenham." congratulating all those who submitted a portrait, the queen has said in a statement that she had been inspired to see how the photographs have captured the resilience of the british people at such a challenging time. sarah campbell, bbc news. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas we are likely to see temperatures in the south—east up to 30 celsius. the first time we have seen 30 celsius in september since 2016. so the next few days, a brief spell of hot weather on the cards before things then turn cooler later on in the week. but what we've got, we've got this area of high pressure in charge. as that pushes its way eastwards, we are going to be drawing in our winds from a southerly direction, so these winds coming from france, where the heat has been
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building over recent days and continues to build. so those southerly winds bringing all that warm air across england and wales. scotland and northern ireland seeing more in the way of cloud today, a bit of patchy rain here and there, particularly in the west, but not the heavy rain we had in the north—west of scotland through the course of the weekend. so temperatures in the north under the cloud around about 19, possibly 20 degrees, but widely in the mid to high 20s across england and wales, 30 celsius possible somewhere in the south—east, and across east anglia too. so, heading into the evening hours, pretty hot end to the day for many. we still have the cloud across scotland and northern ireland, with a bit of patchy showery rain here and there overnight. further south, it remains dry through the night, could be the odd mist and fog patch around, and temperatures certainly remaining mild, in double figures to start your tuesday. so, tomorrow then, another hot day to come across england and wales, similar to what we're seeing on monday. again, a lot of sunshine, light southerly winds, a bit more cloud around some of the west coasts, the likes of cornwall, pembrokeshire, could be the odd shower here. northern ireland should see the cloud and the rain clearing, so brightening up here, but scotland will see further showers on and off through the day. not as heavy as the rain we had through the weekend,
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but a little bit warmer compared to today — about 22 degrees in belfast, again down towards the south—east, the high 20s, possibly 30 celsius. through the middle of the week things are gradually going to be cooling down. there will still be a lot of dry weather, with some sunny spells round. we have high pressure that will be building to the north of the uk this time, from midweek on wards. now that is going to be driving this fairly weak cold front gradually further south, introducing a northerly airflow, so particularly in the northern half of the uk wednesday does bring a cooler, fresher day. we are still keeping hold of that heat for southern england, wales, so temperatures here again in the mid 20s, whereas further north real change — only around about 13 celsius in aberdeen on wednesday. lots of dry weather as we look towards the end of the week too, and temperatures returning to something a bit more typical for the time of year, but still warm with some sunshine for many. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... the premise are's special envoy has quit over the government's brexit bout she says it unilaterally breaks commitments. restrictions in england which ban social gatherings of more than six people have come into effect. we follow the rules, being careful and now we are being penalised because we are a big family.” and now we are being penalised because we are a big family. i don't think it's fair, to be honest with you. i think if they put things in
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proportion at the very beginning we would be having a second spout of it. similar restrictions are in place in scotland and wales , but with younger children exempt from the ‘rule of six'. a survey of 8,000 doctors in england suggests most believe there will be a second peak of coronavirus cases within the next six months. high winds threaten to spread devastating wildfires even further across the west coast of the united states. in the past ever a special envoy for freedom of religion and belief has resigned from the government over the controversial internal market bill. it comes as david cameron
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became the fourth former prime minister to criticise the bill. the internal market bill goes before mps later with the government calling it an insurance policy. any statement on his resignation he said... —— one. he said as an mp for ten yea rs —— one. he said as an mp for ten years and a former barrister, the values of honouring one's word is critical. another uncomfortable moment for the government. critical. another uncomfortable moment for the governmentm critical. another uncomfortable moment for the government. it is, rehman chisti is perhaps not someone most people will have heard of and as the prime minister's special envoy for freedom of religion or belief, he did not hold a ministerial role and was not a
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member of the government. nevertheless, he was someone the prime minister had chosen to promoting the uk's stance of religious tolerance internationally. so, not good to have him resigning from that role and, as you set out there, talking and quite strong terms against what the government trying to do. in the last hour he has tweeted a copy of his resignation letter. i'll read you a little of what he is had to say. that you can support the bill on a matter of principle, he has real concerns about the uk unilaterally breaking it's concerns about the uk unilaterally breaking its commitment under the withdrawal agreement and goes on to say feel strongly about keeping the commitments... if we keep our word we must honour it. with that statement and his intention not to support the bill, that brings around a dozen conservative mps that have expressed concerns about the bell.
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some may abstain and then try and amend it later on. there are names being added to that list steadily since the legislation was announced in the last few days or so. when mps debate that legislation later this afternoon, there may be some uncomfortable moments for the government and for the prime minister, one mp that won't be there for the debate, labour leader kier starmer. we have heard he is self isolating because a member of his household has symptoms of covid—19. what is the latest on that? yes, the labour leader is self isolating, as you say. his team are beenin isolating, as you say. his team are been in touch to say this morning he was advised after a moment of his
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household showed symptoms to self—isolate. a person is in a heady test and in line with the nhs guidelines were told he will separately while awaiting the results of the test and further advice from medical professionals. we understand he does not have any symptoms himself is taking this action to comply with the guidelines. it does mean, however, he won't be taking part in that debate in parliament later on when we would have expected to hear from him, as the leader of the 0pposition, voicing labour's concerns and, indeed, opposition to the bill the government is trying to put forward in current form. social gatherings of more than six people are banned in england from today following a steep rise in the number of covid—19 cases. the new law applies to people meeting in private homes — indoors and outdoors, and places like pubs and restaurants. there are some exemptions —
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schools and workplaces. if you break the rules, you could be fined a £100, which would double with each offence. lee milner has more. jenny and tom from lincolnshire have four children. today's changes mean they now won't be able to socialise together with other family or friends. i will no longer be able to see my mum and dad, we can't see my husband's brother and his wife so it willjust be the six of us, i guess. my parents are a massive support to me and i'll miss them terribly. so, yeah, i think as a family we're all going to miss them very much until it's all over. i feel quite upset because as a family we've been very careful over the last six months. we've followed the rules, we've, as i say, just been careful and now i think we're being penalised because we're a big family. the changes in england, scotland and wales were announced last week in response to a rise in the number of cases of coronavirus.
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in england and scotland, the rule around social gatherings of six applies both indoors and outdoors, but in scotland, the six must be from two households only. and in wales, up to 30 people can still socialise outside. in scotland and wales, children under 12 and 11 respectively aren't included, but they are in england. larger gatherings are still allowed in gyms, places of worship and at covid—secu re weddings and funerals. while in northern ireland, six people from two households can meet indoors and up to 15 people can gather outside. i don't know why they waited till monday, i think they should have enforced it straightaway because now there's going to be a repercussion of all the get—togethers over the weekend. but, yes, i do think it's essential. i don't think it's fair, to be honest with you. i think if they put things in proportion at the very beginning, then we wouldn't be having a second spout of this. you have to abide by the rules, because if we don't then we're not going to get on top of this, are we? for anyone who breaks the rules in england, you'll be fined £100. that will double every time you are caught up
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to a maximum of £3,200. leigh milner, bbc news. just to let you know that just after 2.30 we'll be answering all your questions on the new coronavirus rules. send your questions using the hashtag #bbcyourquestions or email us on yourquestions@bbc.co.uk a survey of 8,000 doctors in england suggests most believe there will be eight in ten doctors believe the uk is heading for a second peak of coronavirus infections before spring — according to a survey by the british medical association.
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around 8—thousand doctors and medical students in england were questioned — most said that a working test and trace system would be the best weapon to prevent a second wave. 0ur science correspondent, pallab ghosh, reports. the latest figures show that there are more than 3,300 new cases a day. in the bma survey, doctors said that it's not a matter of if there's going to be a second wave, but how large it's going to be. they say the main cause is likely to be a failure of the test and trace system and confusing public health messages. now is the time, every day counts, that we identify those who have the infection, identify contacts and isolate people. that is the way you will spread the infection. senior scientific advisors say that infection is also being spread because far too many people aren't isolating when they're asked to. a government spokesperson said it had made significant strides in stopping the spread of coronavirus. they added that nhs test and trace was testing hundreds of thousands of people every day. pallab ghosh, bbc news. israel is to become the first country in the world to re—impose a national lockdown. the tough new restrictions — to begin on friday — follow a sharp upsurge in coronavirus cases, as paul hawkins reports. thousands of israelis are protesting about their prime minister.
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and it's notjust his corruption trial. it is also the way he's handled the coronavirus pandemic. confirmed infections are now 4000 a day in a population of 9 million so he is reintroducing a national lockdown, the first country in the world to do so. translation: on thursday, they waved a red flag. health ministry executives and hospital managers have warned us that death rates are forcing the application of immediate measures. some medical staff and hospitals are overwhelmed. that means a return to empty streets like these. no—one allowed to go more than 500 metres from their home, outdoor groups are limited to 20 people, and only ten indoors. schools and places of worship shut. and that matters enormously. the jewish new year starts on friday, normally a time when families get together. but this year, the synagogues will be empty. it has led the ultra orthodox housing minister, yaakov litzman, to resign in protest but it's not
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something the government wants to reintroduce, calculating it will cost the already recession—hit economy $1.9 billion. the first rule of virus economics is that you must control the virus. you are never going to get on top of your economy and your economic growth if the virus is out of control. the government insists it has not lost control of the virus, even though it is the first country in the world to abandon the difficultjuggling act between keeping the economy open and protecting public health. that is still happening in countries like the uk which uses regional lockdowns. cases here however are rising again, meaning from monday, restrictions come into force banning social gatherings of more than six people in england, scotland and wales. groups larger than six can be broken up by police with fines of £100 for a first offence. the idea is to put off the rule breakers. which is why these health care
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workers in belgium took to the streets to voice their anger at those who flout the rules and make theirjobs harder. the latest figures from the world health organization show a record one—day increase in confirmed infections with 307,000 reported in just 24 hours. and deaths up by 5,500, bringing the worldwide total to over 900,000. the biggest increases are in the usa, india and brazil. more than half of the world's 28 million cases are now in the americas. infections around the world are rising again. governments are keen not to follow israel's lead. thousands of homes and some entire towns have been destroyed by the wildfires that have been raging in oregon, washington state and california — where president trump will meet emergency services workers later today. 0pponents have accused him of being in denial about climate change — after he said that wildfires sweeping through west coast states were caused by
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poorforest management. simonjones reports some of the biggest fires the west coast has ever witnessed, raging now for three weeks. the scale and sheer number of them pushing firefighters to their limits. high winds are now threatening to fan the flames even further. an eerie quiet has descended on berry creek in california where the fires have been extinguished, but it's still too dangerous for residents to return, theyjust have to wait out of town. but they are the lucky ones, some didn't get out alive. parts of oregon now have the worst air quality in the world. the route to safety was far from clear. the road and the whole mountainside through the canyon, all you could see is just flames and then it went black, grey and then white and itjust covered the whole sky. president trump will visit the area today with a row over the cause of the fires raging. he blames poor forest management, democrats say it's
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down to climate change. but forfirefighters, the immediate concern is saving lives. simon jones, bbc news. you're watching bbc news... the headlines on bbc news... conservative mp rehman chishti has quite over the government's new bill. labour leader sir keir starmer is self—isolating, his spokesman says, after a member of his household showed possible symptoms of coronavirus. restrictions in england which ban social gatherings of more than six people have come into effect — with some exceptions.
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we are expecting to cross to nicola sturgeon shortly. gps in england are being told they must make sure patients can be seen face—to—face when necessary. nhs england has written to all practices to remind them of the guidance after more than half of gp consultations from march tojuly were done by phone or video call. in response the royal college of gps said it was "an insult" to imply that doctors are not doing theirjobs properly. let's cross to edinburgh — where nicola sturgeon is giving an update on the coronavirus in scotland. i'm going to start with the usual run—through of covid statistics, but there is an important context to today's figures which i will immediately have to attach to them.
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an additional 70 positive cases were confirmed yesterday, that represents 2.796 confirmed yesterday, that represents 2.7% of people newly tested and reported yesterday and takes the total number of cases to 22,749. let me give the context immediately. today's numbers, but the overall result is reported to the uk wide system and the number of positive cases, are lower than they have been in recent days and we believe they are not yet complete. we understand that other parts of the uk are experiencing similar issues this morning and we are seeking to resolve these urgently. however, it is important that i am frank that we now have a very serious concern that the backlog of test results being faced by the uk lab network, which the glasgow lighthouse lab is part of, are starting to impact on the reporting of scottish results. we have been raising these concerns with the uk government in recent
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days. 0ver with the uk government in recent days. over the weekend the health secretary managed to resist a move to limit access to testing slots, mobile testing units and regional testing centres, however this apparent delay in turnaround is causing us apparent delay in turnaround is causing us concern apparent delay in turnaround is causing us concern and therefore we will be seeking to escalate these discussions with the uk government over the course of today. let me stress that we are keen, very keen to play our full part in addressing theseissues to play our full part in addressing these issues and finding solutions to them urgently, but we need the uk government to share the full scale and nature of the issues they are facing and the impact that they are having on scotland in order that we can collectively and very quickly find solutions. we will give an update, including any changes to today's figures, as soon as possible. i can also confirm that 264 patients are currently in hospital were confirmed covid, five more than yesterday and seven people are in intensive care, the same numbers yesterday. i can confirm in
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the past 24 hours no deaths were registered patients who first tested positive over the previous 28 days and throws a number of deaths under this measurement is still 2499. —— the total number. it is worth reflecting on the sad fact there was exactly six months ago yesterday first death from covid was confirmed in scotland. that debt and each and every one we've seen since then has been a source of grief and heartbreak to families across the country —— that death. i want to pass on my condolences to everyone that has lost someone. i am joined today by the health secretary and the chief medical officer and we will all take questions shortly, but first of all, i want to focus on the continued numbers of cases... the continuing high number of cases we have seen over the weekend, and therefore, the vital importance of therefore, the vital importance of
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the new rules that are coming into force in scotland today. however, let me start with a thank you. more than 900,000 people have now downloaded the new protect scotland contact tracing app. as you will recall we lunch that last week and that allows people to receive an automatic notification if someone they have been in close contact with gets covid. you are not told the name of the close contact but you do get a notification to gather information and links to advice on self isolation. 900,000 downloads is a really important milestone. it is already enough for the app, we think, to really make a difference. but it stands to reason that the app will make more of a difference, the more people who use it. i would encourage everybody across scotland who hasn't yet done so to download the app and also to encourage friends and family to do so. we are especially keen to encourage uptake amongst students who are starting at
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university or college this week and who are perhaps, especially likely to be coming into contact with new people whose names and contact details they might not yet have. if you work any further and higher education sector or have children or relatives starting the new term, please encourage them to download the app. fundamentally we want as many people as we can across the country is possible to download and use it. downloading it is very straightforward, it takes less than two minutes to do. you can find the ad by visiting the protect scott, protect dots, website which will see in front of us two on the app store or google play. the app is enormous and helps to keep you and the community safe —— anonymous. figures over the weekend
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reinforced again that scotland, like many countries across europe, is currently in a precarious situation. 0n currently in a precarious situation. on saturday we had 221 cases reported. yesterday we had 244. the percentage of people testing positive has also been increasing. yesterday was about 3%. just three weeks ago it was consistently around or below 1%. we know that we've seen a significant rise in cases in recent days in lanarkshire, which emphasises the importance of the decision announced on friday to restrict private indoor gatherings across north and south lanarkshire, so if you live in either of these council areas you should not at this stage be visiting any other households at all. the restrictions for north and south lanarkshire are of course the same as the ones that we re of course the same as the ones that were already in place in greater glasgow, glasgow city, premature,
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distributor, east dunbartonshire and west dunbartonshire —— renfrewshire, east renfrewshire. there will be a meeting later today to discuss the up meeting later today to discuss the up to date position in greater glasgow and clyde. the low numbers in lanarkshire and greater glasgow and clyde have been of particular concern. most parts of scotland have seen a rise in cases in recent weeks. as i indicated scotland is not unique in this regard, many countries across europe are seeing similar. the transmission is higher than we can be comfortable with and that's the case the country. the wider international picture is also a concern, many countries in europe are seeing an increase... globally the world health organization reported that yesterday saw a record number of new covid cases around the
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world. all of that helps to explain why we took the decision to change the nationwide rules on meeting up with other households. we believe that we need to act now, to act quickly to reduce the chances of an even greater increase in cases later in the autumn and as we go into winter. from today onwards, a maximum of six people from a maximum of two households are now permitted to meet together. that rule applies outdoors, including in private gardens as well as indoors. i indoors we mean people because my own homes, but also pubs and restau ra nts own homes, but also pubs and restaurants as well. children under the age of 12 don't count towards the age of 12 don't count towards the limit of six, but they do count towards the limit of two households. we were looking at whether it would be possible to exclude some children, we were poor back on that
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when possible. it is worth stressing that a meeting of three people would be possible if they all come from different households. i'm aware this restriction is a religious one, but restricting the number of households who can me is important in reducing transmission rates. the virus wants to find new households to infect, so we have to do what we can to limit the opportunities it has to do that. two additional measures also take effect from today. they take effect in hospitality setting such as pubs, cabbies and restaurants. firstly, it is now mandatory for customers in those settings to wear face coverings when they are not eating ordrinking. coverings when they are not eating or drinking. for example, when you go into the premises and go to your table, or when you stand up to move around to the bathroom, for example. from today, staff who work in hospitality premises, with some limited exceptions, must wearface coverings as well. that has been
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engaging so far, it is now as of the date mandatory. —— engaging so far. these changes are not welcome for any of us, but the number of new cases we saw over the weekend and the number of new cases we have seen in the past couple of weeks emphasise again why we need to act firmly now. new cases in scotland have been more than trebling every three weeks in the last few weeks. that pattern is not sustainable as we move further into autumn and then into winter. if we all act collectively now, our hope is that we can stem the increase. please, i'm asking everybody to stick to these new reels of six people in two households, is a necessary way of stemming the spread of the virus. —— new rules. i'm also asking everybody to download the projects: app if you haven't already done so, a very simple but powerful way of helping
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keep the country safe. the advice is encapsulated in the fa cts . the advice is encapsulated in the facts. five rules. these can help us keep the virus under control. please remember f to wear face coverings enclose spaces, a “— remember f to wear face coverings enclose spaces, a —— avoid crowded places, see —— clean your hands regularly and clean any hard surfaces you're touching, tea —— keep a two metre distance and s —— book a test and selflessly if you have symptoms. if 0liver stick to these —— all of us stick to these and work together we can work to get
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and work together we can work to get a virus under control again. it is worth remembering at the six—month point into this pandemic, as the deputy chief medical officer said on friday, it won't last forever, but while we are in this we must all act collectively to keep ourselves, each other, the health service safe and ultimately to save lives. we are still in this together and it is only by working together that we will get through it. my thanks to all of you forjoining us today and we will now, as usual, take questions from the journalists. i will firstly to bbc scotland. first minister, are we already seeing an impact on the nhs of this new rise in cases? for example, in glasgow we know some patients have had letters saying their appointments for routine outpatient appointments are being cancelled because of an expected rise in demand over the coming weeks. i guess is you're saying about the percentages, the
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date is quite difficult to get an accurate picture, but how worried you working close to the 5% figure that the who says is an indication in paris is once again out of control and there is widespread community transmission ongoing? —— by this. —— virus. community transmission ongoing? —— by this. -- virus. while saying that, what we have been doing for some time is taking steps to re—mobilise the health service while also making sure we are ready for whatever eventuality we face over the winter months... we don't yet... we have seen in the last couple of weeks a small increase in hospital admissions. we are not yet seeing a substantial increase in hospital admissions, but we can't be complacent about that. some other countries that are perhaps a bit ahead of us in this more recent increase in cases are now seeing a more substantial increase in hospital admissions and sadly in deaths. we must be very cautious about that and not become
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complacent, because we are not yet seeing those other indicators go in the wrong direction. if we act now to keep the rising cases under control, we hope we can keep these other indicators under control as well. finally, for me on the percentage positive, given a very strong caveat today's numbers and opposite we will update that later on, but if i can perhaps refer more firmly to yesterday's numbers, which we saw 244 cases reported yesterday and that was 3.7% positivity rate, 3.7 of those people who had been newly tested. clearly that is a big increase on the percentage positive that we been seeing recently and therefore we will be monitoring that is we are monitoring everything closely in the days to come. we want to keep it below 5%, but again, if we look at france, the last few days there positivity rate is gone over
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596. there positivity rate is gone over 5%. we have to look at everything in the round, but it is another reminder we are any more precarious position as we go into winter than we have been over the latter part of the summer and it underlines the need for us all to pay attention to the rules and abide by all of these rules so that we keep this under control and continue to bear down on it, rather than allow it to grow even further. that is nicola sturgeon with the daily covid update. she said she was concerned about the backlog of tests starting to impact on the number of cases being reported. she said that was something she would be discussing with the government. we have had breaking news aboutjob losses at london city airport. it is cutting 239 jobs as part of crucial
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restructuring plans. the airport was closed for three months from 25th of march due to covid—19. that had a big impact financially in the airport. the proposals mean 35% of jobs could be cut across the airport. a consultation has begun with staff i have a ways to reduce costs, including voluntary redundancy. some breaking news about an accident which has involved a lorry colliding into a house in kent. we are getting reports, various reports coming through. there has been a police statement saying a man has died and several other people injured in a collision in kid break. police called just after 8a m in kid break. police called just after 8am this morning to a road traffic collision involving multiple vehicles and a building. 0ther says are at the scene. at this time we
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are at the scene. at this time we are aware of a number of people being injured, one man has been declared dead at the scene and work is ongoing to trace his next of kin. an 11—year—old child has been taken to hospital. their condition has been assessed as life—threatening. police say they are awaiting an update on their conditions. the public is asked to avoid the area and enquiries are ongoing to establish the circumstances. that sounds like a really nasty collision that has happened in kidbrook. we will keep you updated on that. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas hello. there's a late taste of summer warmth on the cards for many of us over the next couple of days,
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particularly across england and wales — the heat is really going to be building. a fairly brief hot spell though — from midweek it will turn cooler and fresher, but today across england and wales lots of sunshine, a light southerly wind, and in the warmest spots temperatures getting up to possibly 30 degrees for the south—east of england and east anglia too, but widely in the mid to high 20s. cloudier for scotland and northern ireland, temperatures here about 18 or 19, and there will be more rain at times pushing into western parts of northern ireland, north—west scotland. that's lingering as we head into the evening and tonight too. further south it remains dry overnight, mild where ever you are, but there could be some mist and fog patches forming in sheltered parts of england and wales. through the day tomorrow we still have the cloud across parts of scotland. it should brighten up in northern ireland later on, a bit of patchy rain for scotland too, but much of england and wales dry again, and we could see those temperatures up to round 30 degrees again. and we could see those temperatures bye— bye. and we could see those temperatures hello. and we could see those temperatures this is bbc news. and we could see those temperatures the headlines... and we could see those temperatures conservative mp rehman chishti has quit as the prime minister's special envoy on freedom of religion and belief, over the government's proposed brexit bill, which he said "unilaterally" breaks the uk's legal commitments.
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labour leader sir keir starmer has been advised to self—isolate, his spokesman says, after a member of his household showed possible symptoms of coronavirus. restrictions in england which ban social gatherings of more than six people have come into effect. similar restrictions are in place in scotland and wales but with younger children exempt from the "rule of six." the prime minister's former top legal advisor accuses him of doing "unconscionable" damage to britain's international reputation with a bill to override key parts of the brexit withdrawal agreement. a british medical association survey of 8,000 doctors in england suggests most believe there'll be a second peak of coronavirus cases within the next six months. high winds threaten to spread devastating wildfires even further across the west coast of the united states.
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let's return to our top story, and the new rule which makes it illegal to gather in a group of more than six people in england from today. similar measures are also in place in scotland, wales and northern ireland, all to stop the spread of coronavirus. graham satchell spent yesterday with some families, who say the restriction is not as simple as it first sounds. asquirt of a squirt of hand sanitiser and sunday morning football can start. football is our life. annual boys love it? absolutely. as the number of cases starts to rise again she understands the need for the new rule of six. it is complicated
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because my children can come here and played football with their friends. they go to curbs and swimming, again larger groups of six but i could not have both sets of grandparents around for dinner because that could make us bigger than six but they can come here to watch them play football. slightly confusing in that sense. does it make sense? no, not really. the rule of six is meant to make things easier and simpler. children under 11 and 12 do not count in scotla nd under 11 and 12 do not count in scotland and wales. some things are com pletely scotland and wales. some things are completely exempt midnight schools, workplaces and organised sport like this. donna's parents are also confused by the inconsistencies in the new restrictions. i find it strange we have different rules. if we lived in scotland at would be
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different, we could see all the grandchildren to but we do not, so we just have to do is we are told really. i understand why br doing it but we want to get back to normal, especially with the grandchildren. we want to spend time with them altogether, but obviously we cannot do that. the game is almost done but no rest for this six—year—old hisday has just no rest for this six—year—old hisday hasjust begun. no rest for this six—year—old hisday has just begun. he no rest for this six—year—old hisday hasjust begun. he is off to his best friend's never birthday party. —— noah. this party was brought forward from october, the venue not certain they can stay open after the rule changes. as far as the guidelines on the government website at the moment and all the risk assessments we had done, we have
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done everything we possibly can duty openin done everything we possibly can duty open in social bubbles but it is a very grey area. we are uncertain as to how to move forward. the party ends with fame and it is not even lunchtime. together devon and noah's family area lunchtime. together devon and noah's family are a group of eight, so this'll be the sunday lunch together for a time. i have never understood why we have these changes. some of the differences in the rules, it is difficult to work out why. this is not something we did too often, so it will not affect everyday life. either we find a way to manage it or do not do it. governments across the uk are clear, urgent action is necessary now to control the spread of the virus. the move here is sceptical and slightly weary.
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japan's governing party has elected its new leader. he replaces shinzo abe. he is a veteran politician who served as chief cabinet secretary and is considered a close ally. not considered the most energetic or passionate politician, he has a reputation of being very efficient and practical. the bbc‘s tokyo correspondent reports.
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this deal has been stitched up. why had they decided to cheers mr shinzo mrsuga? had they decided to cheers mr shinzo mr suga? much of the time he was running the government. he has experience and knowledge, he is a safe pair of hands. what is he like? he is not a barrel of laughs. if you watch his daily briefings, he shows not an iota of warmth or charisma. he has other attributes, a reputation for having an extreme work ethic and having an extreme work ethic and having an extreme work ethic and having a lot of discipline. much is being made of his back story. unlike prime minister shinzo abe, he is not the scion of a political dynasty, he is the son of a strawberry farmer.
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he worked in a factory to pay his way through university. he went into local politics and worked his way up. his visitors say that gives him much more of a sense of the difficulties of life for ordinary japanese people. there will be a real disadvantage at a time when we are facing coronavirus and an economic recession. the greek prime minister says a permanent migrant reception centre will be built on the island of lesbos to replace the moria camp, which was destroyed by fire last week. the blaze left more than 12,000 asylum seekers without shelter. kathryn armstrong reports. settling into a new home. children and the elderly here on the greek island of lesbos among the first migrants to be given temporary shelter, after several nights of sleeping rough. just down the road, the remains of what was the overcrowded moria camp until it was gutted by fire nearly a week ago, forcing
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its 13,000 occupants to flee. the authorities say they hope to rehouse everyone within a week. the prime minister has promised a new facility, and says this is a good time for other european countries to help people find more permanent homes. translation: what happened in moria, which is a tragedy, must be seen as an opportunity. first of all, as an opportunity to reactivate europe in a direction of solidarity to greece, and to adopt a common immigration and asylum policy at a european commission level. for many migrants, the solution is simple. let them leave the island all together, and be resettled elsewhere. translation: we need help, from all the countries in europ. we want help not to stay here, here it is a prison. there is one camp, now they have made a new camp. all the people are coming to a prison, not a camp. some residents are also opposed
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to the idea of a new camp, saying it is too much of a burden for the small island. and then there is a growing threat of a serious coronavirus outbreak. 12 people entering the new camp tested positive for covid—19 on sunday. that is on top of the 35 whose test results came back positive on the day moria burned down, and were unable to be isolated. with food aid struggling to get in, and little progress being made in efforts to find a satisfactory long—term solution, the unrest on lesbos over the future of thousands is likely to continue. catherine armstrong, bbc news. representatives of the afghan government and the taliban are continuing peace talks in qatar. after the opening ceremony on saturday, the contact groups for both sides met on sunday to discuss the technical details
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of the negotiations ahead. speaking to our chief international correspondent lyse doucet, the head of the government delegation, dr abdullah abdullah, said the taliban should come to terms with the reality that afghanistan is becoming a diverse and freedom seeking society. when you look at the islamic republic of afg hanistan's delegation, the negotiating team or the delegation as a whole, you see the diversity of afghanistan in it. it is important. that, in itself. does the other side recognise that afghanistan has changed in many ways? the younger generation, the civil society, the media, the vibrant private sector, all of that, freedoms, certain freedoms, freedom of speech. but, at the same time, we realise that there is no other way back, to put an end to war, and find a way to live together in peace. and fight for our ideas.
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many afghans and others ask how hard it will be for afghans to share power with the taliban when your supporters and the president's supporters and the president's supporters cannot even share power without arguing. yes, there are differences of opinion. there have been arguments at times that we have kept it peaceful. do you share the fears of those who say it is all just a mirage for the taliban, the hardline taliban on the ground is waiting for the remainder of the us forces, nato forces to leave and then they will march into kabul. some people may think that way. i have no doubt in my mind that there will be a lot more people who will be thinking, let's put an end to the bloodshed. this is the moment that our people have reached. 42 years of
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war, misery, suffering losses. this morning, i was watching tv and i saw that camp in greece where, moria camp andi that camp in greece where, moria camp and i saw an afghan family that lost everything. that everything was a view of things, like a simple place to stay together with a family, with minimal, minimalthings that you would need to survive. they even last that. that is the reality of life for afghans. if you had to name one thing at the top of your worries as the new phase starts, what is it? i don't want to see the people of afghanistan disappointed
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once again. the headlines on bbc news... conservative mp rehman chishti has quit as the prime minister's special envoy on freedom of religion and belief, over the government's proposed brexit bill — which he said "unilaterally" breaks the uk's legal commitments. labour leader sir keir starmer has been advised to self—isolate, his spokesman says, after a member of his household showed possible symptoms of coronavirus. restrictions in england which ban social gatherings of more than six people have come into effect, with some exceptions. the embattled leader of belarus, alexander lu kashenko, has arrived in southern russia for his first face to face meeting with president putin since mass protests broke out following disputed elections. there's speculation that russia will push for closer economic and political ties with belarus in exchange for its continued support. bela russsian 0pposition leader svetlana tikhankaya said any such agreement would have no legalforce.
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tens of thousands of people marched in the belarus capital minsk and other cities on sunday. mr lukashenko has characterised the protests as a threat to russia. mr putin has made clear that russian security forces are on standby to intervene if they get out of control. 0ur correspondent in minskjonah fisher told me what kind of reception mr lukashenko might get in russia. he is going to sochi, this will be the first had to head, between president lukashenko and president putin since the disputed election in early august. they have had various conversations on the phone during that period and they have had pretty intense exchanges are personnel between moscow and minsk during an u nsta ble between moscow and minsk during an unstable period. president lukashenko is unstable period. president lu kashenko is not unstable period. president lukashenko is not going to such in a particularly strong position. 0n
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sunday there was another very large demonstration here in the capital, minsk. another explicit sign and indication that president lukashenko has lost the support of the people here in belarus. he will effectively be going to russia to speak to president putin and asking him to continue supporting him here in belarus within a context in which eve ryo ne belarus within a context in which everyone knows that president lukashenko is unpopular and is in an extremely weak position. stars of the hit bbc crime drama ‘line of duty‘, adrian dunbar and vicky mcclure, say they re worried about those with dementia as britain faces further lockdowns and more restrictions. for both, its an issue close to their heart. mr dunbar 5 88—year—old mum has had dementia for 7.5 years and is in a care home in northern ireland. vicky mclure 5 bbc programme 0ur dementia choir showed how music could help and stimulate people with the condition. here she is introducing the singers at nottingham's royal concert hall last year.
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welcome to the royal concert hall. i knew i could rely on you. very nervous. it has been a greatjourney, and i've made a lot of friends. but i don't want to mess it up, i want to do itjust right, and i don't want to let everybody down. without further ado, nottingham, may i introduce to you your choir? they are all living with dementia, but they want to show you despite that today, they can achieve incredible things. 0ur choir, dementia acquire, come on! cheering this is bernard. here is maureen. there is maurice. earlier my colleague victoria derbyshire spoke to both of them to find out more about why this issue is so important to them both.
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these are the most vulnerable people in our society. i remember at the start of the pandemic that we kind of lost sight of that, there were very low numbers here in northern ireland, very few deaths, yet we kept testing the workers, nurses, doctors, quite rightly so, but we forgot, the care homes were sort of left behind, and people moving in and out of the care homes who really need tested because the people in the care homes do have a lot of background health issues, etc, so i hope they are not left behind this time and i hope they are focused on at this point. and vicky, how would you say your friends from the dementia choir have fared in the last few months? i reached out to everybody the other day, and asked for their comments. the majority of our acquire are not in care homes, a lot of them are living on their own, some peoplejust need their friends and family, and that is their main
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source of care. that has been really difficult because they have not had the option to have people there and the restrictions now with the six, trying to make that work is going to be difficult, but i spoke to them and i did ask them for some examples that i've written down here just because i wanted to get it right, because it is from their words. just simple things like one—way systems in the shops has been difficult, talking has declined, their physical and mental health, and even maureen, who we sadly lost a couple of weeks ago, she did not understand the virus and she kept trying to brush it off. it's very complicated, it is very complicated for us to understand. so for people living with dementia, it is a very confusing time, and they really need their friends and family around them. and they need the stimulus, because if you are not being stimulated all the time... my mother is in a care home, as you said, just outside my home town of enniskillen,
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my sisters get to see her and talk to her, you know, at a distance, you can come up to the door, but, you know, all these people, they need stimulus all the time, otherwise all the faculties start to drift away. that's exactly right, and there are some care homes, and vicky, i take your point that not everyone with dementia is in a care home, but if i canjust follow this through with adrian for a moment, there are some care homes who you would argue, quite rightly, are now stopping the visits again, the socially distanced visits, because of this rise in coronavirus cases. but i wonder if you think in the name of infection control, that some potential harm is being inflicted on some patients with dementia, adrian? yes, obviously, this is a trade—off between really basic thing of just staying alive, or a deterioration in the patient. you know, it's a terrible scenario for the people in the care homes,
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but the staff in the care homes, i mean, a lot is resting on what they do now, how they respond themselves to it, and we have to give them some help because they are the link between people inside and the people outside, so if we are going to close the care homes down, we have to support the staff who are working in them, that's my opinion. from empty supermarket shelves to "thank you nhs" banners and key workers wearing personal protective equipment — there are certain images which have come to define the experience of coronavirus in the last six months. today the national portrait gallery is launching an online exhibition of photographs which — it hopes — capture the "resilience, bravery, humour and sadness" of britain under lockdown. it was the duchess of cambridge's idea and — as sarah campbell reports — it has already received the queen's approval. moments captured on camera during lockdown, every picture
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telling a story. titled be safe, daddy, a cuddle between a father and daughter before his next working shift as a paramedic. loved ones are separated by glass in last precious moments. and empty — 3—year—old leo's mother, who took the picture, said she experienced panic and a fear that this would be the new normal. this was a project initiated by the duchess of cambridge — herself a keen photographer — and she, along with four other judges, have the job of whittling the thousands of entries to just 100. i felt strongly that i really wanted to try and create a portrait of the nation, that sort of captures the fears and hopes and, you know, the feelings of the nation at this really extraordinary time. the images convey the difficulties faced by so many. kerry hales from bridge end, after three hours working in ppe, titled her portrait this is what broken looks like. in the first kiss, a father captures
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the moment his newborn son tries to kiss his mother, despite the plastic barrier. thejudging process itself was really interesting and very moving and obviously, going through those images and seeing all of these different stories — some of which are, you know, joyful and heart—warming, some of which are profoundly moving or even harrowing — it's something that i think has stayed with all of us. a rainbow playground at a school in norfolk. short cut features a tense diy haircut using dog clippers. and taken by big sister marcella, home—schooling in dagenham. congratulating all those who submitted a portrait, the queen has said in a statement that she had been inspired to see how the photographs have captured the resilience of the british people at such a challenging time. sarah campbell, bbc news.
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now it's time for a look at the weather. has been a late burst of summer heat in many parts of the country. it will stay largely dry this week. after a very warm start, things will turn significantly cooler from mid week onwards. this is the satellite picture. a lot of rain in the north west of scotland. flooding in the north—west highlands. many places where dry put up with high pressure over the continent we are feeding the wind is up from the south. it is lifting temperatures into the high 20s, close to 30. cooler in scotland and northern ireland. this evening and northern ireland. this evening and tonight the reign of anything will pop up a bit heavy bursts here and there. the odd shower creeping into pembrokeshire and fog patches in central, eastern and southern
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parts of england. any early fog in the south were cleared quickly. for many a sunny day. more cloud will creep in from the south—west. some outbreaks of rain across parts of northern scotland. the odd sharp shower in the south of scotland. the odd shower on the north sea coasts, turning things grey and murky. warmer than today across southern scotland. northern ireland 21, 22. it could get to 30 across east anglia but a shift in the weather pattern on wednesday. this will change the wind direction. no more families, instead we get a northerly wind which will feed much cooler air across the british isles. mostly try on wednesday. a week weather front bringing cloud and some spots of rain. to the north we will feel the
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effects of cooler air. 17 in hull. a bit warmer in the south. not the high temperatures we have seen for the beginning of the week. at the end of the weekly will stick with the cooler feel, particularly in the north. temperatures bounce back in the south but not the summer heat we have right now.
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time for the rule of six — new restrictions come into force as the number of coronavirus cases continue to rise. the new regulations ban social gatherings of more than six people in england with similar restrictions elsewhere. more and more people say they're struggling to get tested. the heath secretary says the issues are being dealt with. if you have symptoms, come forward and get a test. we are dealing with the problem of people having to travel too far, and we are putting in the extra resources to deal with that. we'll talk to our heath editor shortly. the other news this lunchtime... mps prepare to debate the bill which would allow the government to break international law, as it seeks the power to override part of the brexit treaty signed with brussels. the inquiry into the manchester arena bombing hears personal tributes from the relatives
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of the 22 people who died.

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