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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 21, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today. former police officer derek chauvin is found guilty of the murder of george floyd in the us city of minneapolis last may. we the jury, in the above entitled matter, as to count one, unintentional second degree murder while committing a felony, find the defendant guilty. the family say the verdict is a "turning point in history" for america and justice has been done for their brother. today we are able to breathe again! yeah! all six premier league clubs pull out of the new european super league amid heavy criticism from all parts of the game.
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in the end the pressure proved too much. spurs say they regret the anxiety and upset, arsenal simply say sorry. whether the super league will happen at all is now in huge doubt. another twist in the battle of the caterpillar cakes. m&s bites back after aldi says it plans to revive its version of the colin cake in aid of charity. i'll find out who's winning the pr war. good morning. some of us starting with a fair bit of cloud and some spots of rain but most of us today will see some sunshine, and then the forecast is a dry one, with lengthy sunny spells. but cold by night. all of the details in ten minutes. it's wednesday, april 21st. our top story. one of america's most high—profile race trials has ended with the conviction of the white former police officer, derek chauvin, of the murder of george floyd. chauvin had been filmed kneeling on the neck of mr floyd,
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an african—american, for more than nine minutes during his arrest in the city last may. our us correspondent, lebo diseko, has sent this report from minnesota. there it is, there it is. a community awaits a verdict. we the jury, in the above entitled matter, as to count one, unintentional second—degree murder while committing a felony, find the defendant guilty. derek chauvin, convicted of two counts of murder, and one of manslaughter. the former policeman led from court in handcuffs. cheering it was a result many hadn't dared to believe was possible. in these types of cases, you know, justice has not gone in the way of victims when victims are african—americans at the hands of police. so, to hear that he was guilty on all three of the charges, itjust seemed like a dream. it's a beautiful day, it's a sad day because george floyd isn't here any more with us, but it's a beautiful day. because justice was served. mr floyd's family called it
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a victory for anyone who's ever been pinned down. because he showed me how to be strong. he showed me how to be respectful. he showed me how to speak my mind. i'm going to miss him but now i know he's in history. what a day to be a floyd, man. wow. it's ok. for two of the trial�*s earliest witnesses, the emotion of this moment was overwhelming. president biden paid tribute to them and all of those whose testimony led to this. but, he said outcomes like this one are still too rare. it was a murder in the full light of day, and it ripped the blinders off for the whole world to see. "i can't breathe. i can't breathe." those were george floyd's last words. we can't let those
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words die with him. this crime might never have come to trial had it not been for this community, who documented it. trauma collectively relived through the trial. but for now, some relief as people take in the victory. we got that justice, now we got that peace! many here believe that this is not a case of problems solved. rather, an opening for real change, when it comes to how black people are treated by police in america. let's get more now from lebo, who is at george floyd square in minneapolis. thank you so much for being with us again today. we saw a bit of it there in your report for the news, but how have people reacted to the verdict there in the last few hours? we were there at george floyd square when the verdict was read out and
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just before, there was a real sense of tension. we actually spent most of tension. we actually spent most of the day there and people were saying to us that they were worried, they were frightened, they were anxious, theyjust wouldn't they were frightened, they were anxious, they just wouldn't see justice served. so when the judge went in and thejury justice served. so when the judge went in and the jury went into read the verdict, we could see people all watching on their phones, and then the crowd just erupted with cheers as each counts was read out, guilty, guilty, and guilty. as i said in my report, there was also feeling that people told me they didn't want the world to think that this was overcome that the mountain has been climbed. this isjust a chip in basically the huge mountain of police brutality and racism, and the legacy that america has when it comes to these issues and there is a long way further to go. we'll be getting reaction to that story throughout the morning here on breakfast. we have a lot of interviews and
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guests and interviews lined up to talk about that story which broke about 10pm last night. plans for a european super league are unravelling after all six english football clubs decided to pull out, just days after the competition was announced. manchester city, chelsea, arsenal, liverpool, manchester united and tottenham have all now gone back their decision to take part after a huge backlash from all parts of the game. joe lynskey reports. football's great breakaway lasted less than 48 hours. amid rising anger in the game, all six english clubs lost their nerve. manchester city were first to formally pull out of the european super league. earlier their coach said a closed—shop competition had no integrity. it's not a sport when the relation between the effort and the success — the effort and reward — doesn't exist, don't exist. so it's not a sport. it's not a sport and it doesn't matter if you lose. chelsea fans heard their team would withdraw from
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outside stamford bridge. they'd gathered before a match to add their voice. and the fa says supporters have played their part. in a statement english football's governing body said it would like to thank the fans for their influential and unequivocal voice. it is a powerful reminder, they say, the game will always be for fans. the prime minister said the clubs' decisions were the right one. earlier, liverpool's players had shown what they thought on twitter. some, including jordan henderson, said, "we don't like it and we don't want it to happen." now the people in the game have got their way. don't forget, football players are fans. they've grown up being fans of football themselves, so they know what it feels like to be a fan, and they understand the connection between the players, the fans, the club. arsenal's statement said they'd made a mistake and they apologise for it. while spurs said they regret the
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anxiety and upset the move caused. at manchester united, ed woodward will leave his role as executive vice chairman at the end of the year — the club say, in a separate move. this has been a climb down from those at the top, but the rest of the game has been unified, and football remains open. joe lynskey, bbc news. sally, it has been a roller—coaster! it has been like a disaster movie, hasn't it? on almost every level. in terms of the fans reaction, how devastated so many of the fans were, in terms of, i think, the communication from the owners of the clubs that have been involved in this. ijust want clubs that have been involved in this. i just want to share with you a statement that has come from the european super league. we have heard a lot overnight and from the last few hours from the clubs themselves that have pulled out, we have heard a lot from the footballers who have
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reacted to all of this but this is from the european super league who have said, despite the english clubs forced to take such decisions due to the pressure put on them, we are convinced our proposal is fully in line with european law and regulations. given the current circumstances, we will reconsider the most appropriate steps to reshape the project, always having in mind our goals of offering the fans the best experience possible. according to them, as you can see, not everyone is out, it is the english pubs which are confirmed to be out at the moment, according to the —— the english clubs which are out, but for them it is not over, the european super league. in a few hours last night what happened when it all started to crumble, the first two clubs that we saw come out where chelsea and manchester city. there is a bit of debate over who went first. both of those clubs are essentially owned almost by countries, if you like, roman abramovich, sheikh mansoor,
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incredibly wealthy people. the clubs incredibly wealthy people. the clubs in at the start were owned by the american owners who wanted to push this through and didn't understand the significance of the change, maybe. it the significance of the change, ma be. . , , the significance of the change, ma be. , ._ the significance of the change, ma be. .,, , ., ., ., , ., maybe. it has been extraordinary to watch. we will _ maybe. it has been extraordinary to watch. we will continue _ maybe. it has been extraordinary to watch. we will continue to - maybe. it has been extraordinary to watch. we will continue to talk - watch. we will continue to talk about this and the fallout. there are a lot of big stories around today. the bbc has seen a series of texts in which the prime minister offers to fix tax rules on behalf of businessman sirjames dyson. in the messages, sent in march last year, borisjohnson assures sirjames that neither his singapore—based company, nor its senior employees would have to pay more uk tax if they were to make ventilators for the nhs. here's our political editor laura kuenssberg. who you know, notjust what you know can matter round here. but revelations about connections between government and business have raised eyebrows of late, and now it's conversations
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of the prime minister himself under the spotlight. last year, the prominent tory—backing businessman sirjames dyson wanted to help make desperately needed ventilators for the nhs. but his firm wrote to the government asking, if they did, would they have to pay any more tax? official queries and conversations like that are allowed, but the rules for ministers say they have to be transparent, and civil servants should be involved. but in a series of direct text messages between borisjohnson and sirjames, the prime minister promised, "i will fix it tomorrow." the prime minister then said "rishi" — the chancellor — "says it's fixed". pushed again by sirjames — who said in a long message, "i'm afraid we really need a response to our letter," — mrjohnson wrote, "i am first lord of the treasury, and you can take it that we are backing you to do what you need." the government told us, at the height of the pandemic, there were genuine fears that we would quickly run out of ventilators, leaving the nhs unable to treat patients and putting many lives at risk. as the public would expect, we did everything we could in extraordinary times. in the end, as he explained
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to the bbc recently, dyson's offer wasn't taken up. we did it. we got it working between four and six weeks in spite of changing the specification. we were ready to go, ready to produce it, we'd bought the components, and then the cabinet office said they didn't want it, they didn't need it. and in a statement, sirjames insisted that urgent correspondence was only about compliance with the rules as a50 dyson people in uk and singapore worked around the clock, seven days a week, to build potentially life—saving equipment at a time of dire need. he said his company gained no benefit from the project, which had cost it £20 million. but questions are likely to be raised again about whether contacts between politics and powerful businesses are just too close for comfort. laura kuenssberg, bbc news. it is 12 minutes past six, good morning. shall we see what carol has from us this morning? it is
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shall we see what carol has from us this morning?— this morning? it is thrust as far as i can this morning? it is thrust as far as i can see- — this morning? it is thrust as far as i can see- she _ this morning? it is thrust as far as i can see. she has _ this morning? it is thrust as far as i can see. she has been _ this morning? it is thrust as far as i can see. she has been on - this morning? it is thrust as far as i can see. she has been on the - this morning? it is thrust as far as i i can see. she has been on the farm but what is — i can see. she has been on the farm but what is coming _ i can see. she has been on the farm but what is coming -- _ i can see. she has been on the farm but what is coming -- it _ i can see. she has been on the farm but what is coming -- it is - i can see. she has been on the farm but what is coming -- it is frost - i can see. she has been on the farm but what is coming -- it is frost as l but what is coming —— it is frost as soon as i can see. there is an variety of weather this morning, it is —5 north scotland and in glasgow, plus five, so 10 degrees of temperature change in a short amount of space. the of temperature change in a short amount of space.— of temperature change in a short amount of space. the focus is mostly d for the amount of space. the focus is mostly dry for the rest _ amount of space. the focus is mostly dry for the rest of _ amount of space. the focus is mostly dry for the rest of the _ amount of space. the focus is mostly dry for the rest of the week _ amount of space. the focus is mostly dry for the rest of the week with - dry for the rest of the week with frosty nights. confusing if you are trying to put your plants out at the moment, minor in my kitchen and they look like triplets at the moment! we have a weak weather front which has been moving southwards across northern ireland, scotland and northern england. a murky start in kent and essex. northern ireland, scotland and england writing up with fairweather cloud. one or two showers in the south—west but this is where we will have the highest temperature. as we head onto the
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evening and overnight, under clear skies, temperatures will fall rapidly. she —— patchy mist and fog in the east midlands. and quite a widespread frost. any mist and fog will lift rapidly tomorrow, the temperature will go up. looking at a fair bit of sunshine tomorrow, breezy to the english channel and the south—west of england and southern counties, a bit more cloudy across the far north of scotland, which could produce the odd shower. foremost, it will be dry and we could hit 17 degrees in northern england or eastern scotland. after that, the weather remains fairly settled. currently, we have tomatoes in the kitchen so we are the same. mine are hue, kitchen so we are the same. mine are huge. about — kitchen so we are the same. mine are huge. about this _ kitchen so we are the same. mine are huge, about this hi! _ kitchen so we are the same. mine are huge, about this hi! mine _ kitchen so we are the same. mine are
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huge, about this hi! mine are - kitchen so we are the same. mine are huge, about this hi! mine are only - huge, about this hi! mine are only tin . i'm huge, about this hi! mine are only tiny- i'm not— huge, about this hi! mine are only tiny- i'm not in — huge, about this hi! mine are only tiny. i'm not in the _ huge, about this hi! mine are only tiny. i'm not in the tomato - huge, about this hi! mine are only tiny. i'm not in the tomato gang! l there 5 been an escalation of tensions in the now—infamous caterpillar cake wars. aldi and m&s have been trading blows on twitter over their rival creations. nina's taking a look for us this morning. if that cake for us? —— is that for us? he's not saying much this morning, colin! who would have guessed a story about a caterpillar—shaped cake would have such legs? stop it! i will try how a next time. -- harder— stop it! i will try how a next time. -- harder next — stop it! i will try how a next time. -- harder next time. _ the colin versus cuthbert conflict continues. colin's not saying much now but the two companies got into a twitter spat yesterday. this is quickly becoming a pr and a legalfight. a brief reminder in case you've been cocooned this week. m&s has brought legal action against aldi over their cake, cuthbert. they say it's a copycat version of their colin,
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to which they own the trademarks. that's despite there being a whole range of supermarket caterpillars out there. waitrose's cecil, sainsbury�*s wiggles, tesco's curly and asda's clyde. yesterday aldi announced they were bringing cuthbert back in aid of charity. they even suggested a truce to m&s saying the cakes could become "besties". but m&s bit back. they said they already raised money for charity with their cake and that aldi should find a new character instead, suggesting kevin the carrot cake. so, now we have a pr war on top of the legal row. danny is giggling! this is very serious! has m&s fallen into a trap by not backing a charity campaign? is aldi playing dirty? this is getting tasty. what marks & spencer's did wrong is they waited too - long to get involved, _ so when they tweeted a reply to aldi about the charity donation, - but mentioning kevin the carrot, the moment had already passed — other brands had already - jumped on the story, _ and people were already bored of it. aldi's brand sentiment over the weekend positively -
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so it has a big impact - on actual business, as well. so people were getting behind aldi, |and marks & spencer's played right| . into their hands by being silent, . which further deepens the aldi brand association with being a challenger i brand in the supermarket world. i m&s is not ready to back down. legal experts predict a court win, saying aldi's cake is just too similar in name and packaging. so similar that consumers could confuse the two. they haven't ruled out legal action against other supermarkets which have a similar design. aldi has been in similar rows before and may well say that customers are savvy enough to know the difference. but if they lose there could be big ramifications. what are your thoughts on this one? this isn't the only product where there are very similar. the reason they are taking all the to court is because the —— the reason they are
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taking aldi to court, the packaging and the name are similar. you said you would know in a taste test because of the nature of the chocolate. i because of the nature of the chocolate-— because of the nature of the chocolate. ., ., ~ chocolate. i mean, i do feel like i have consumed _ chocolate. i mean, i do feel like i have consumed quite _ chocolate. i mean, i do feel like i have consumed quite a _ chocolate. i mean, i do feel like i have consumed quite a few - chocolate. i mean, i do feel like i have consumed quite a few cakes chocolate. i mean, i do feel like i - have consumed quite a few cakes over the years in the interests of research. the years in the interests of research-— the years in the interests of research. . , ., the years in the interests of research. ., , ., ., _ research. have you ever tried a baby colin that you _ research. have you ever tried a baby colin that you can _ research. have you ever tried a baby colin that you can do _ research. have you ever tried a baby colin that you can do in _ research. have you ever tried a baby colin that you can do in one? - research. have you ever tried a baby colin that you can do in one? they i colin that you can do in one? they are lovely. mil colin that you can do in one? they are lovely-— are lovely. all of the cakes i have tried, yes! _ are lovely. all of the cakes i have tried, yes! i— are lovely. all of the cakes i have tried, yes! iwill— are lovely. all of the cakes i have tried, yes! i will save _ are lovely. all of the cakes i have tried, yes! i will save you - are lovely. all of the cakes i have tried, yes! i will save you a - are lovely. all of the cakes i have tried, yes! i will save you a bit, i tried, yes! i will save you a bit, we have a _ tried, yes! i will save you a bit, we have a big _ tried, yes! i will save you a bit, we have a big team. _ tried, yes! i will save you a bit, we have a big team. what - tried, yes! i will save you a bit, we have a big team. what time tried, yes! i will save you a bit, - we have a big team. what time can we eat it? after— we have a big team. what time can we eat it? after 7am, _ we have a big team. what time can we eat it? after 7am, let's _ we have a big team. what time can we eat it? after 7am, let's stay _ eat it? after 7am, let's stay civilised! — civilised! we will be following this closely, particularly dan! let's take a look at today's papers. the washington post leads on the guilty verdict that was delivered in george floyd's murder trial in the us last night. we cannot show the pictures, unfortunately. the paper quotes george's family, who said they can "breathe again". and the minneapolis newspaper,
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the star tribune, reports the elation felt by the hundreds of people who gathered outside court to hear the verdict. meanwhile, the european super league features on most of today's front pages. the times' headline says the league "crumbles as clubs bow to fan fury". the daily mail describes the saga as football's civil war, and says the owners of the six clubs have been shamed by fans, politicians and players. this story has really dominated over the last 48 our is. everybody from football fans to the prime minister, talking about it. one of the potential areas of fallout is whether some of these american owners, this was discussed last night, might considertheir owners, this was discussed last night, might consider theirfuture night, might consider their future being night, might consider theirfuture being involved in these clubs. they have misread the situation so spectacularly and had to withdraw from the super league, where does it
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leave you in terms of being a club where you are employing the players and the manager and everybody turns against you and says what you want to do with the business of yours is wrong and you have to change your mind? it wrong and you have to change your mind? . , . wrong and you have to change your mind? .,, ., ., ., ., , . ~ mind? it was an extraordinary pack of cards. falling _ mind? it was an extraordinary pack of cards. falling over, _ mind? it was an extraordinary pack of cards. falling over, dominoes i of cards. falling over, dominoes falling over yesterday. let's have a look at this from the telegraph, dylan and his mother, this portrait had hung on his great—grandparents' all, it is a contemporary portrait of charles ii. he had been studying kings and queens, he fell in love with the painting that his mother had inherited from her grandparents and she had packed it away, thinking it was a reproduction but she took it was a reproduction but she took it to the repair shop, and it was
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restored. and it was dated, this is staggering, to 1660. what a wonderful story. staggering, to 1660. what a wonderfulstory. i staggering, to1660. what a wonderful story.— staggering, to 1660. what a wonderful story. staggering, to 1660. what a wonderfulsto . ., ., ,. ., wonderful story. i have a picture of an end terrace _ wonderful story. i have a picture of an end terrace in, _ wonderful story. i have a picture of an end terrace in, where _ wonderful story. i have a picture of an end terrace in, where is - wonderful story. i have a picture of an end terrace in, where is this, i l an end terrace in, where is this, i should have read this through! have a look. this is an the seller of a house, this is a lockdownjob, they have converted their basement into a pub. this isjust beneath have converted their basement into a pub. this is just beneath the floorboards. this is a regular looking into terrace. they have spent a couple of thousands of pounds doing it and they have cold it the krab arms. bar stool, piano, a project of watching the football, it has been looked at by estate agents, this is in bedford. £575,000, they say this period bay fronted end terrace has been improved by the current owners and is well presented throughout with a hidden gem in the basement. if you fancy a pub downstairs. i hidden gem in the basement. if you fancy a pub downstairs.— fancy a pub downstairs. i don't think it will —
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fancy a pub downstairs. i don't think it will be _ fancy a pub downstairs. i don't think it will be licensed! - fancy a pub downstairs. i don't think it will be licensed! just . fancy a pub downstairs. i don'tl think it will be licensed! just for ourself! think it will be licensed! just for yourself! go _ think it will be licensed! just for yourself! go to _ think it will be licensed! just for yourself! go to bedford! - finishing the yorkshire three peaks in under 12 hours is pretty difficult under normal conditions, but a group of firefighters will be taking on the challenge in full kit to raise awareness of motor neurone disease. one of the group is the brother—in—law of rob burrow, the former leeds rhinos player diagnosed with the disease in 2019. our reporter luxmy gopal is in north yorkshire to see them off this morning. good morning, everyone. we are not farfrom the good morning, everyone. we are not far from the base of this mountain looking resplendent, one of yorkshire's three peaks, and anyone who has challenge will tell you it is gruelling. just imagine doing it while wearing full firefighters kit. this is what the team from west yorkshire fire service behind me is planning to do, all to raise money for research into motor neurone disease. it has been inspired by the leeds rhinos legend rob burrow who
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has the edition which is currently incurable. the idea for the challenge came from one of the team, his brother—in—law, mark. what made you think of this idea? we his brother-in-law, mark. what made you think of this idea?— you think of this idea? we tried to do something _ you think of this idea? we tried to do something for— you think of this idea? we tried to do something for the _ you think of this idea? we tried to do something for the mnd - you think of this idea? we tried to - do something for the mnd association community and also for rob, who has been so inspirational in the last 1214 months making awareness of mnd. i know he is passionate keeping that in the forefront of people's mines so we are guys just wanted to do something help and continue with that, keeping it in the forefront of people's mind. rab that, keeping it in the forefront of people's mind-— that, keeping it in the forefront of people's mind. rob has a message which he has _ people's mind. rob has a message which he has recorded _ people's mind. rob has a message which he has recorded for- people's mind. rob has a message which he has recorded for you. -
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as well as that lovely message, he also popped by to give you some moral support yesterday, how important was that for you? that was secial, it important was that for you? that was special. it is — important was that for you? that was special, it is always _ important was that for you? that was special, it is always nice _ important was that for you? that was special, it is always nice to _ important was that for you? that was special, it is always nice to see - special, it is always nice to see him and really special of him to come through to the fai session yesterday and wish us all good luck for today. yesterday and wish us all good luck fortoday. —— yesterday and wish us all good luck for today. —— come through to the fire station. today when we are struggling a bit, we will think of rob and everyone else who has got mnd and think of those people, that is why we are doing it. let’s mnd and think of those people, that is why we are doing it.— is why we are doing it. let's speak to alex now- _ is why we are doing it. let's speak to alex now. what _ is why we are doing it. let's speak to alex now. what is _ is why we are doing it. let's speak to alex now. what is likely - is why we are doing it. let's speak to alex now. what is likely to - is why we are doing it. let's speak to alex now. what is likely to be l to alex now. what is likely to be the hardest part of the challenge? this kit is quite heavy. three stone in weight. — this kit is quite heavy. three stone in weight, just over 20 kilos. we are only— in weight, just over 20 kilos. we are only wearing it for about 20 minules— are only wearing it for about 20 minutes at— are only wearing it for about 20 minutes at a time so to wear it for 12 hours— minutes at a time so to wear it for 12 hours it — minutes at a time so to wear it for 12 hours it will start cutting in and rubbing at the back a little bit.
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and rubbing at the back a little bit it— and rubbing at the back a little hit it will— and rubbing at the back a little bit. it will probably be a bit of a long _ bit. it will probably be a bit of a long day— bit. it will probably be a bit of a long day but we are looking forward to it _ long day but we are looking forward to it |_ long day but we are looking forward to it. .., . long day but we are looking forward to it. . ., ., . ., long day but we are looking forward to it. .. ., . ., ., i. to it. i can imagine. what are you auoin to to it. i can imagine. what are you going to do _ to it. i can imagine. what are you going to do once _ to it. i can imagine. what are you going to do once you _ to it. i can imagine. what are you going to do once you complete i to it. i can imagine. what are you | going to do once you complete it? once we get back down, it will be a nice steady— once we get back down, it will be a nice steady drive home and a nice lon- nice steady drive home and a nice long hath. — nice steady drive home and a nice long hath. i— nice steady drive home and a nice long bath, i should think! just the ticket! and _ long bath, i should think! just the ticket! and finally, _ long bath, i should think! just the ticket! and finally, mark, - long bath, i should think! just the ticket! and finally, mark, the - ticket! and finally, mark, the territories as well, it is quite chilly at the moment but those territories will climb as you do —— those temperatures will climb. the breeze will those temperatures will climb. iie: breeze will probably those temperatures will climb. tie: breeze will probably call those temperatures will climb. ti2 breeze will probably call it down, hopefully, but these kits are very warm and are designed to protect us from fire, they do not let heat in or out so it shall be challenging. so you better get started, we will let you crack on and see you guys off. all the best, good luck and keep us posted. see you, bye—bye! and off they go, gosh, they are going to have a long day. a very
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good luck to them and hopefully we will be able to get an update later today or tomorrow. ellen; will be able to get an update later today or tomorrow.— will be able to get an update later today or tomorrow. very busy morning this morning- — today or tomorrow. very busy morning this morning- we _ today or tomorrow. very busy morning this morning. we are _ today or tomorrow. very busy morning this morning. we are looking - today or tomorrow. very busy morning this morning. we are looking at - today or tomorrow. very busy morning this morning. we are looking at a - this morning. we are looking at a number of stories which broke late last night. the first of those is the verdict the murder trial for george floyd, the officer involved, derek chauvin, was found guilty and we will be reacting through the morning. and also the story we have in talking about the last 48 hours, the collapse of the european super league. overthe the collapse of the european super league. over the course of a couple of hours last night, all six english teams involved pulled out and said they had rethought their initial decision. only one apollo —— apologise, arsenal, lots to talk about. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. health charities say expansion plans for london's ultra low emission zone should go even further. the current plan is to expand out to the north
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and south circular in october. older, more polluting vehicles will have to pay £12.50 a day. but the british lung foundation and asthma uk say expanding it to cover all of london would reduce illness amongst 360,000 people. londoners are being reminded to take up their covid vaccinations when offered. there are growing concerns around new variants, including the indian strain. the capital's director for public health says we mustn't be complacent. we certainly should be planning for a re—emergence of infection and we should be looking at everything we're doing now to reduce the likelihood and the severity of that third wave, and that includes all of us getting the vaccination when it's offered as we re—emerge from the lockdown to ensure that we continue to practise all of the prevention measures — hands, face, space. as we've been hearing, plans for a european super league which would have included three london teams have unravelled.
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all six english clubs are pulling out. arsenal said it had "made a mistake", tottenham's chairman said the club regretted the "anxiety and upset" caused. and chelsea confirmed they have "begun the formal procedures for withdrawal." then news just broke over there and the scenes were honestly amazing. i've never seen so muchjoy the scenes were honestly amazing. i've never seen so much joy and the scenes were honestly amazing. i've never seen so muchjoy and i think that's what football is about, so i am so happy we are saving the premier league and we are saving english football and i'm so happy about it. now combining art with a food shop... the design museum in kensington has reopened its store stocking essential goods — with packaging designed by artists. items available to buy include tinned kidney beans and washing—up liquid. let's take a look at the travel situation now.
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now the weather with elizabeth. hello, good morning. well, it's another dry day ahead, but it won't be feeling as warm as it was yesterday. having said that, it is a milder start to the morning for most of us — temperatures are in mid single figures. there's a bit of high cloud out there for a time, but that should break up, we'll see the sunshine come through. but there will be more fair—weather cloud building as we head through the late morning and into the afternoon. so it's set to cloud over at times, but still some bright and some sunny spells. it will stay dry with a noticeable north—easterly wind, and top temperatures lower than they were — between 12 and 14 degrees celsius, but maybe be 15 somewhere out towards the west. now, as we head through this evening and overnight, high pressure pressure builds in. the cloud is set to melt away, and in that colder air, temperatures will drop very close to freezing so there'll be a touch of frost into thursday morning. thursday and friday, plenty of sunshine, staying dry. dry, too, at the weekend with some sunny spells and temperatures building slightly. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour.
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now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. coming up on breakfast this morning... it's a red card for the european super league — after all six english clubs pulled out. we'll ask former liverpool player john barnes what the last 48 hours could mean for the future of football. we will also speak to the former chelsea striker chris sutton. "no pain, no gain" styles are out thanks to lockdown — and elasticated waists and jogging bottoms are in. trinny woodall will be showing us all how to pull—off fashion's new "comfy" look. and as mission impossible comes to yorkshire, we'll speak to the student who was revising when tom cruise landed his helicopter outside his window.
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let's get you up to day and our ministry. what a day to be a day to be employed, the emotional reaction from george floyd's brothers after the guilty verdict of derek chauvin. the family has spent almost a year campaigning forjustice after the campaigning for justice after the killing campaigning forjustice after the killing of george, in case sparked worldwide protest against excessive police force. no we say, god, we need to justice. we police force. no we say, god, we need tojustice. we need it now. find need to 'ustice. we need it now. and he need to justice. we need it now. and he answered- — need tojustice. we need it now. fific he answered. 0h, need tojustice. we need it now. e'"ic he answered. oh, man. need tojustice. we need it now. el"ic he answered. oh, man. i'mjust grateful, you know? i'm grateful that my grandmother, my mother, my aunts, theyjust got to see this history made. i grateful my brother
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is not here, i'm grateful and i'm proud of him. i will salute him every day of my life, i will salute him. he showed me how to be strong. he showed me how to be respectful will stop he showed me how to speak my mind. i'm going to miss him but now! my mind. i'm going to miss him but now i know he is in history. what a day to be a so named george floyd, man. white that is reaction from the family. after the verdict kamala harris vowed to— harris vowed to introduce legislation _ harris vowed to introduce legislation in _ harris vowed to introduce legislation in george - harris vowed to introduce i legislation in george floyd's harris vowed to introduce - legislation in george floyd's name which would bolster.— legislation in george floyd's name which would bolster. america has a lona which would bolster. america has a long history — which would bolster. america has a long history of _ which would bolster. america has a long history of systemic _ which would bolster. america has a long history of systemic racism. i long history of systemic racism. black americans and black men in particular have been treated over the course of our history. black men
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are fathers and brothers and sons and friends and neighbours. their lives must be valued in our education system and our health care system, in our housing system, and our economic system, in our criminal justice system. in our nation. full stop. justice system. in our nation. full sto. . justice system. in our nation. full sto . _ ., ., , ,, justice system. in our nation. full sto. ., ,, . , stop. that was the us vice president kamala harris _ stop. that was the us vice president kamala harris was _ stop. that was the us vice president kamala harris was speaking - stop. that was the us vice president kamala harris was speaking last - kamala harris was speaking last night. we can now speak to ck hoffler, an attorney and president of the us national bar association. thank you for spending time with us on the present. take us back a few hours, give us an idea what you felt when you heard those verdicts being read out in court yesterday. absolutely, good morning. well, the first thing i felt was extreme
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relief. as president of the national bar association, and chair of reverend jesse jackson's organisation, we have been fighting a socialjustice organisation, we have been fighting a social justice fights for ever, it is a mission of our organisations. with the national bar association we represent over 65,000 mostly african—american lawyers. ben crump, come he is one of our members, a past president, so i felt a tremendous sense of relief because i felt that this was some measure of justice. we watched with bated breath the evidence of the day after day is almost 39 witnesses testify for the prosecution, laying out the case, a clear and convincing case that derek chauvin murdered george
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floyd and yet because of our system ofjustice floyd and yet because of our system of justice and floyd and yet because of our system ofjustice and because in this country as an african—american i knew what the odds were, what history have proven out in our country in terms of convicting police officers for brutality, for excessive use of force, and you history told us it was highly unlikely there would be a conviction. ifelt some unlikely there would be a conviction. i felt some type of anxiety waiting for the verdict but when it came i felt this sense of extreme relief, tremendous relief in knowing that this was the first step in a long journey towards healing and a long journey towards policing reform. real policing reform in the united states the. you reform. real policing reform in the united states the.— reform. real policing reform in the united states the. you talked about the ben united states the. you talked about the iten crump. _ united states the. you talked about the ben crump, the _ united states the. you talked about the ben crump, the floyd _ united states the. you talked about the ben crump, the floyd family i the ben crump, the floyd family lawyer, this is a turning point in history. we have heard from kamala harris, mentioning legislation coming down. do you feel that in line with what ben crump was saying, do you feel it is a turning point,
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things will change? i do you feel it is a turning point, things will change?— do you feel it is a turning point, things will change? i think it is a turnin: things will change? i think it is a turning point. — things will change? i think it is a turning point, things _ things will change? i think it is a turning point, things will - things will change? i think it is a turning point, things will change things will change? i think it is a l turning point, things will change if we continue to fight to make things change. things will not change because of this verdict alone. things will change because the george floyd justice in policing thatis george floyd justice in policing that is pending right now in congress, that was originally introduced, kamala harris mention that piece of legislation, which is a federal legislation that would cause a complete overall comprehensive overall of the policing reform in this country. policing measures. having to deal with, if you dissected what went wrong in the derek chauvin case, what went wrong in the case of breonna taylor, all of these cases where you see excessive use of force, you dissect them, this comprehensive bill will address all of those issues. that is the first step. the second is, because we have
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state here, and even though we have a federal legislation, if that is passed, we have to do on a state—by—state basis push policing reform. that is critically important as we saw, for instance, in the case of breonna taylor, in kentucky, part of breonna taylor, in kentucky, part of the civil settlement in the civil case was policing reform in that state. that was very important because we cannotjust stop at federal legislation because of the way this country is comprised. then we have to do a third thing. we have to make sure that within our localities, if there are these changes, that police officers are changed and our communities embrace this new legislation, so we have to keep fighting. it is a civil rights fight, socialjustice fights, but a fight, socialjustice fights, but a fight that is required and necessary for them to really be a change. i am optimistic and ijust for them to really be a change. i am optimistic and i just feel a change is coming, like my good friend ben crump said, this is a turning point and it is coming, provided we
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continue to push. i think there is momentum beginning in this country but we simply can't stop because right behind george floyd we have daunte wright, in the same community, killed while the prosecution was making its case. think of the irony of that. we are in the midst of a trial to bring justice to the murder of george floyd, another young black man, 20 years old, skilled and murdered in cold blood by a police officer who said she accidentally shot him —— a man was killed. she was going for her taser and took a gun, it is a non—credible story and she has been charged with second—degree manslaughter, which is one of the three charges that derek chauvin was charged with in the george floyd murder. we have a lot to go. i want to ask you — murder. we have a lot to go. i want to ask you about _ murder. we have a lot to go. i want to ask you about the _
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murder. we have a lot to go. i want to ask you about the importance - murder. we have a lot to go. i want to ask you about the importance of| to ask you about the importance of the video footage in all of this. there are a number of people who die in police custody across america every year. looking at the reaction to this verdict overnight and the number of people going back over what happened at the time and same, video footage not been around, this would simply be another death in police custody. part would simply be another death in police custody-— would simply be another death in police custody. part is correct but i don't police custody. part is correct but i don't agree _ police custody. part is correct but i don't agree entirely. _ police custody. part is correct but i don't agree entirely. there - police custody. part is correct but i don't agree entirely. there has. i don't agree entirely. there has been footage of police brutality and murder for a been footage of police brutality and murderfor a long time. it was a convergence of many factors. the single most important piece of evidence in the derek chauvin trial was that 90 minutes and 20 something —— about nine minutes 26 seconds. 4—mac protected witnesses testify. we had in fact witnesses, people who actually saw what happened. people who were related to george floyd that testified and made a compelling case. then you had medical experts, you had a pulmonologist, a medical
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examiner, other experts have put together the medicine, looking at what happened to george floyd's body. then you had law enforcement, which was employing. the police chief and rank and file members of the police department that said what derek chauvin did was in a deviation from the standard, was run from a professional and ethical standpoint and then you had the video. all of those things together, i believe, where the result, where resulting in the verdict. it wasn'tjust where the result, where resulting in the verdict. it wasn't just a where the result, where resulting in the verdict. it wasn'tjust a video, it was all of those things. i've got your excellent prosecutors that tried that case and left no stone unturned. they painted the picture, connected all the dots when the jury and i think all of that and the environment within which we are seeing this case. george floyd's murder ignited notjust in the us but worldwide. a movement where
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people said enough is enough. if something compelling and eerie about watching nine minutes and 29 seconds. not eight minutes and 46 seconds. not eight minutes and 46 seconds but nine minutes and 29 seconds but nine minutes and 29 seconds of a human being, a black man, being killed before our very eyes. ici< man, being killed before our very e es. y ., ~ man, being killed before our very e es. ., ~ y eyes. ck hoffler, thank you very much for your— eyes. ck hoffler, thank you very much for your insight _ eyes. ck hoffler, thank you very much for your insight and - eyes. ck hoffler, thank you very much for your insight and for. much for your insight and for staying up for us. if you're just switching on this morning, reacting to one of the huge stories that broke last night, the former police officer it derek chauvin being found guilty on all counts of the murder of george floyd. we will be talking about the impact of that through the programme, including speaking to a friend of his, as well. stay with us for that. so much happened overnight last night. it happened late last night that all six premier league clubs pulled out of the european super league. it has been hard to keep up but sally has been. aha, league. it has been hard to keep up but sally has been. b. lat
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league. it has been hard to keep up but sally has been.— but sally has been. a lot of people said it last night _ but sally has been. a lot of people said it last night but _ but sally has been. a lot of people said it last night but it _ but sally has been. a lot of people said it last night but it almost - but sally has been. a lot of people said it last night but it almost the l said it last night but it almost the line of duty drama. we had a little crumble, one brick in the wall went and eventually that's happened, all the english clubs. several other clubs are still saying they will take part in the european super league but you have to say fans have been key to this. fans have been vocal in their opposition of the european super league and there were protests at stamford bridge last night ahead of chelsea's game with brighton. chelsea legend petr cech, who now works for the club, came out to the gathered supporters to try and placate them and pleaded with them to disperse. from then on things developed rapidly. at 9pm, liverpool captain jordan henderson put out a tweet saying his side's "collective position" was that they did not want the super league to take place. all of his team—mates did the same thing. then, after manchester city became
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the first english club to confirm their intention to withdraw, the club's forward raheem sterling tweeted this... meanwhile, former manchester united gary neville, who has been vocal of his opposition of the super league throughout, posted this picture on social media as he celebrated the developments... let's get a fan's view on what has developed over the last 12 hours. chelsea supporter richard halejoins me now. lovely to see you. your reaction to the developments last night first of all. ~ , , , , ., all. well, very surprised at the seed it all. well, very surprised at the speed it all — all. well, very surprised at the speed it all happened - all. well, very surprised at the speed it all happened but - all. well, very surprised at the speed it all happened but not. speed it all happened but not surprising overall once you sort the reaction _ surprising overall once you sort the reaction of— surprising overall once you sort the reaction of fans all around the country. — reaction of fans all around the country, fans of the six teams and foothall— country, fans of the six teams and football fans generally. your country, fans of the six teams and football fans generally.— football fans generally. your club, chelsea, where _ football fans generally. your club, chelsea, where the _ football fans generally. your club, chelsea, where the first... - football fans generally. your club, chelsea, where the first... we - football fans generally. your club, i chelsea, where the first... we were the first to hear they were pulling out. manchester city were talking about it from early yesterday. how does that make you feel about your
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club at the moment? are you pleased they did that or do you feel conflicted because they were in it in the first place? aha, conflicted because they were in it in the first place?— in the first place? a bit of both, reall . in the first place? a bit of both, really. relief _ in the first place? a bit of both, really. relief that _ in the first place? a bit of both, really. relief that they - in the first place? a bit of both, really. relief that they have - in the first place? a bit of both, i really. relief that they have pulled out and _ really. relief that they have pulled out and that it looks like the whole league _ out and that it looks like the whole league will crumble, but disappointed that they were in it in the first— disappointed that they were in it in the first place. the way it was done — the first place. the way it was done so— the first place. the way it was done. so secretive. the timing of it with uefa's— done. so secretive. the timing of it with uefa's new competition being announced earlier in the week. my overriding — announced earlier in the week. my overriding feeling is how are they going _ overriding feeling is how are they going to — overriding feeling is how are they going to get the fans' trust back? that is— going to get the fans' trust back? that is a — going to get the fans' trust back? that is a really good point. on one hand lots of people this morning i celebrating what they are seeing is people power is the reaction was so extreme, but a lot of damage has been done. what is the first thing your club could do to maybe rebuild bridges? your club could do to maybe rebuild brides? ~ your club could do to maybe rebuild bfidres? ~ �* your club could do to maybe rebuild brides? ~ �* ., ., ,
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bridges? well... i'm glad that they took a lead — bridges? well... i'm glad that they took a lead in _ bridges? well... i'm glad that they took a lead in it. _ bridges? well... i'm glad that they took a lead in it. they _ bridges? well... i'm glad that they took a lead in it. they may - bridges? well... i'm glad that they took a lead in it. they may have i took a lead in it. they may have been _ took a lead in it. they may have been forced to do so, but looking at the league — been forced to do so, but looking at the league overall, it is basically being _ the league overall, it is basically being led — the league overall, it is basically being led by american bankers, so i believe. _ being led by american bankers, so i believe, and the two spanish clubs who are _ believe, and the two spanish clubs who are in — believe, and the two spanish clubs who are in big financial difficulty. ithink— who are in big financial difficulty. i think it — who are in big financial difficulty. i think it was away of making big money— i think it was away of making big money for— i think it was away of making big money for them to solve their financial— money for them to solve their financial issues. from chelsea's point _ financial issues. from chelsea's point of— financial issues. from chelsea's point of view, i think we are pretty stable _ point of view, i think we are pretty stable in_ point of view, i think we are pretty stable in that realm has been there for many— stable in that realm has been there for many years. same with manchester city. for many years. same with manchester city their _ for many years. same with manchester city. their owners, they are building _ city. their owners, they are building a _ city. their owners, they are building a big brand there. but some of the _ building a big brand there. but some of the other clubs, not necessarily english _ of the other clubs, not necessarily english ones, but they are looking at it as _ english ones, but they are looking at it as a _ english ones, but they are looking at it as a quick buck. long term it is going _ at it as a quick buck. long term it is going to — at it as a quick buck. long term it is going to be something that is talked _ is going to be something that is talked about for years and years. it has been _ talked about for years and years. it has been anyway, this has been talked _ has been anyway, this has been talked about over the last ten years — talked about over the last ten years. european league. looking at
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it in futurem — years. european league. looking at it in future... i'm not really sure what _ it in future... i'm not really sure what the — it in future... i'm not really sure what the club can do it because you tend to _ what the club can do it because you tend to look at it that whatever they— tend to look at it that whatever they say, — tend to look at it that whatever they say, you are a bit sceptical about— they say, you are a bit sceptical about it — they say, you are a bit sceptical about it. . , they say, you are a bit sceptical about it. ., , , ., they say, you are a bit sceptical about it. . , , ., ., about it. really interesting to hear our about it. really interesting to hear your thoughts. _ about it. really interesting to hear your thoughts, richard _ about it. really interesting to hear your thoughts, richard hale, - about it. really interesting to hear. your thoughts, richard hale, chelsea yourthoughts, richard hale, chelsea fan. thank you very much. i think you get a bit of a sense that the trust has been broken. what will happen next? all of those clubs, rebuild the trust with their supporters who have followed them maybe three generations of a family and as richard was saying, it comes down to money. all of those english clubs are out but barcelona, real madrid, they were desperate for this to happen because they are in such financial dire straits and looking forward you have to think, will these two spanish clubs exist in the way they do now in ten years if something doesn't change? it has been extraordinary to watch. thank you. we will see you later are
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not sure we have had the last. we are speaking to the culture minister later on. oliver dowden will be here at 7:30am. lots to talk to him about. one of those issues is what sally has been talking about, the european super league, because there was a roundtable discussion about it yesterday and promise of legislation if things didn't change.— if things didn't change. carol... i thou~ht if things didn't change. carol... i thought the _ if things didn't change. carol... i thought the colt _ if things didn't change. carol... i thought the colt had _ if things didn't change. carol... i thought the colt had gone - if things didn't change. carol... i thought the colt had gone but i thought the colt had gone but clearly not! it thought the colt had gone but clearly not!— thought the colt had gone but clearl not! ., , �* .,. clearly not! it hasn't. in fact, we were talking _ clearly not! it hasn't. in fact, we were talking about _ clearly not! it hasn't. in fact, we were talking about frost - clearly not! it hasn't. in fact, we were talking about frost earlierl clearly not! it hasn't. in fact, we i were talking about frost earlier and i clearly not! it hasn't. in fact, we i were talking about frost earlier and were talking about frost earlier and we have _ were talking about frost earlier and we have had more frosty nights than expected _ we have had more frosty nights than expected during the month of april. to give _ expected during the month of april. to give you — expected during the month of april. to give you an idea in aviemore we have _ to give you an idea in aviemore we have had _ to give you an idea in aviemore we have had 16 — to give you an idea in aviemore we have had 16 nights of thrust during the whole — have had 16 nights of thrust during the whole of april. we would expect ei-ht the whole of april. we would expect eight nights. in perth and thirsk, 15 and _ eight nights. in perth and thirsk, 15 and i6— eight nights. in perth and thirsk, 15 and 16 when we expect just over four~ _ 15 and16 when we expect just over four~ in— 15 and 16 when we expect just over four. in brecon, we would expect six at this— four. in brecon, we would expect six at this time — four. in brecon, we would expect six at this time of year. in wallingford we would — at this time of year. in wallingford we would expectjust at this time of year. in wallingford we would expect just over four, at this time of year. in wallingford we would expectjust over four, as well, _ we would expectjust over four, as well, but — we would expectjust over four, as well, but we have 30. there is
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likely— well, but we have 30. there is likely to — well, but we have 30. there is likely to be more thrust before the end of— likely to be more thrust before the end of april by night. for the rest of the _ end of april by night. for the rest of the week, staying mostly dry. an early _ of the week, staying mostly dry. an early start _ of the week, staying mostly dry. an early start to the day in the south—eastern quarter. some dense fo- south—eastern quarter. some dense fog across _ south—eastern quarter. some dense fog across parts of kent and essex and also _ fog across parts of kent and essex and also a — fog across parts of kent and essex and also a weak weather front sinking — and also a weak weather front sinking south with its cloud and patchy— sinking south with its cloud and patchy rain. northern ireland, northern— patchy rain. northern ireland, northern england and scotland, where we have _ northern england and scotland, where we have the _ northern england and scotland, where we have the cloud, it will brighten up we have the cloud, it will brighten up and _ we have the cloud, it will brighten up and we — we have the cloud, it will brighten up and we will see some sunshine. after— up and we will see some sunshine. after a _ up and we will see some sunshine. after a cold — up and we will see some sunshine. after a cold start, which is picking up, 14— after a cold start, which is picking up. 14 in— after a cold start, which is picking up, 14 in glasgow, 15 in liverpool, but the _ up, 14 in glasgow, 15 in liverpool, but the highest temperatures likely in the _ but the highest temperatures likely in the south—west, cardiff and plymouth, seeing 16 degrees. through the evening and overnight, the skies were clear— the evening and overnight, the skies were clear quite readily, a widespread frost. we could see mist and fog _ widespread frost. we could see mist and fog patches forming across the east midlands, parts of eastern england — east midlands, parts of eastern england. but look at the temperatures. that tells you alone it is going — temperatures. that tells you alone it is going to be a frosty night. a frosty— it is going to be a frosty night. a frosty start — it is going to be a frosty night. a frosty start to the day tomorrow with a _ frosty start to the day tomorrow with a lot — frosty start to the day tomorrow with a lot of sunshine. mist and fog forming _ with a lot of sunshine. mist and fog forming overnight will lift quickly. it forming overnight will lift quickly. it will _ forming overnight will lift quickly.
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it will be — forming overnight will lift quickly. it will be breezy across southern counties, — it will be breezy across southern counties, english channel, to the south—west of england. at times, a bit more _ south—west of england. at times, a bit more cloud, toppling over the final of— bit more cloud, toppling over the final of scotland. here there will be one _ final of scotland. here there will be one or— final of scotland. here there will be one or two showers. temperatures could _ be one or two showers. temperatures could get— be one or two showers. temperatures could get as _ be one or two showers. temperatures could get as high as 70 degrees for parts _ could get as high as 70 degrees for parts of— could get as high as 70 degrees for parts of eastern scotland and northern _ parts of eastern scotland and northern england, but still cooler along _ northern england, but still cooler along the — northern england, but still cooler along the north sea coastline so we're _ along the north sea coastline so we're not — along the north sea coastline so we're not done just yet with overnight frost if you are hoping to -et overnight frost if you are hoping to get your— overnight frost if you are hoping to get your plants outside.— get your plants outside. thank you for the morning. _ get your plants outside. thank you for the morning. i _ get your plants outside. thank you for the morning. i do _ get your plants outside. thank you for the morning. i do appreciate i get your plants outside. thank you j for the morning. i do appreciate it. there was tomato news earlier. you have tomatoes in your kitchen? excellent. another tomato update later. borisjohnson has announced the creation of a new task force looking into antiviral medicines for covid—19. it's been set up to look into at—home treatments that could speed up recovery and reduce the risk of spreading the virus. dr rosemary leonard is our gp this morning and joins us from south london. thank you so much forjoining us.
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tell us, what are antivirals, how do they work and how might we be given them? , ., . , ., ., ., them? they are medicines that work a . ainst them? they are medicines that work against viruses _ them? they are medicines that work against viruses in _ them? they are medicines that work against viruses in the _ them? they are medicines that work against viruses in the same - them? they are medicines that work against viruses in the same way - them? they are medicines that work against viruses in the same way that| against viruses in the same way that antibiotics work against bacteria but, sadly, because of the way viruses behave in our body, the viruses behave in our body, the viruses go into ourselves and multiply within the cells, it is difficult to develop antiviral drugs without harming the body which is why there are so few of them. we do have antiviral play will that work against the herpes virus and we also now have antivirals that work against the virus that causes aids. we have one that doesn't work well against the flu virus and certainly against the flu virus and certainly against covid—19 that haven't been any specific antiviral drugs so it is great news that money is being poured into the development of antivirals and there are some in the
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pipeline undergoing clinical trials and showing promise. ii pipeline undergoing clinical trials and showing promise.— pipeline undergoing clinical trials and showing promise. if you have covid-19 you _ and showing promise. if you have covid-19 you would _ and showing promise. if you have covid-19 you would take - and showing promise. if you have covid-19 you would take them i and showing promise. if you have covid-19 you would take them at | and showing promise. if you have - covid-19 you would take them at home covid—19 you would take them at home and that would take pressure off people like you yes. the idea is that there are several routes. if you test positive that you could be given antiviral you test positive that you could be given antivira— given antiviral drugs to hopefully sto the given antiviral drugs to hopefully stop the virus — given antiviral drugs to hopefully stop the virus invading _ given antiviral drugs to hopefully stop the virus invading the - given antiviral drugs to hopefullyj stop the virus invading the body, stop the virus invading the body, stop the virus invading the body, stop the inflammatory response to the virus. there are also possibilities of giving drugs where if you have been in contact or could be in contact with someone who had had covid—19 you take a drug to stop yourself becoming infected. something minor, fairly straightforward. it could be a nasal spray or a mouthwash even as we know that a lot of the viral load with covid—19 occurs in the upper air rate and the mouth. covid-19 occurs in the upper air rate and the mouth.— covid-19 occurs in the upper air rate and the mouth. briefly, we know the johnson — rate and the mouth. briefly, we know the johnson 8r— rate and the mouth. briefly, we know the johnson & johnson _ rate and the mouth. briefly, we know the johnson & johnson or _ rate and the mouth. briefly, we know the johnson & johnson orjanssen - the johnson & johnson orjanssen vaccine, thejohnson &johnson orjanssen vaccine, the ema has found a possible link to a very rare cases
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of blood clots. what can you tell us about that? we have talked in relation to the vaccines about this. the thing is that the covid—19 virus itself causes a lot of clotting problems within the blood. using a portion of the virus, it does seem to be in very rare instances it can trigger an immune response which leads to abnormal clocks and clotting abnormal clots. the risk is far lower than it is with the disease itself. that is the most important thing to remember. thank ou ve important thing to remember. thank you very much _ important thing to remember. thank you very much for — important thing to remember. thank you very much for the _ important thing to remember. thank you very much for the appointment, as ever. . , . , you very much for the appointment, asever. ., , ., , , �*, as ever. that is many people's favourite _ as ever. that is many people's favourite part _ as ever. that is many people's favourite part of _ as ever. that is many people's favourite part of the _ as ever. that is many people's favourite part of the day - as ever. that is many people's favourite part of the day when | as ever. that is many people's i favourite part of the day when we have our gp on in the morning. for many of us, lockdown may have felt like a fashion—free zone of pyjamas, joggers and hoodies. but according to those in the know, it's inspired a clothing revolution which could be here to stay.
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gone is the no—pain—no—gain fashion of old. instead, the new look on the high street is based on one thing over everything else — comfort. breakfast�*s jayne mccubbin has been finding out more. fashion plus lockdown equals...? i was wearing only pyjamas! i've been wearing pyjamas... that's it? ..for over 12 months. a lot of pyjamas. you'll see a lot of people wearing pyjamas in town. joggers...and hoodies. that's it? and that's it. it's fair to say we haven't been living our best fashion lives in the last 12 months. but lockdown has created a new fashion buzz, and — brace yourself — it's all about comfort. meet leanne — scouse fashionista, influencer dj and all—round girl about town. we spent so much of our lives before covid worrying
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about fitting into tightjeans, lying on the floor, pulling them up, buttoning them up. now we're all about comfort. i have poshjoggers, which is a matching jogging suit. little bit of a shoulder out. some nice high wedges, big earrings... but everything stretches, everything's cosy, nothing needs ironing! who needs to do that after 12 months being stuck in the house? i like it. i like the sound of this. fashion has never really been for the faint—hearted — all pain, no gain. lockdown has changed all that and, some say, for good. one look at the huge queues waiting to buy, buy, buy tell us we need ideas, ideas, ideas. and lockdown has told designers rachel and joanne all they need to know. comfort. that's it. all the way. i think so.
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so obviously nothing too structured, nothing too fitted. are we talking elasticated waist? yes. so, yeah, we've got a drawstring waist, but i don't want to go for a meal now and have to open my top button. you know, or go home and you've got lacerations from where yourjeans have been too tight! no, i'm not doing it. we just realised that we wanted to be comfortable, but still look nice, as well. you want evidence of this new trend? you got it. on asos, sales of relax skaterjeans have massively overtaken sales of skinny styles. sales of tracksuit bottoms at net—a—porter have exploded. while m&s saw athleisure sales go through the roof during the pandemic. and this isn'tjust about the ladies — oh, no! # my darling, i... # can't get enough of your love, babe. if you'd have asked ben what he associated elastic bands with a few years ago, he would have said... terry wogan would have been a man who'd wear elasticated pants. very comfortable. but now he's turned
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comfort into business in the finest italian cottons. to some extent, all of us have become hooked on comfort. we've started selling a hybrid trouser, but it's made with a nice italian stretch cotton, and we've trimmed it with an elasticated waistband and a drawstring so you've got that extra level of comfort — and those have been selling like hotca kes. so in the last four or five weeks, we've seen a 300% increase in the sales of that hybrid trouser — that work—jogger, if you like. behold the work—jogger — modelled by freddie. mm, comfy. so let's head to liverpool to meet the new fashionistas hooked on comfort. katie, this seems like a perfect example of lockdown fashion. yeah. look at this stretch on that! leatherjoggies. it's like an elasticated waist? elasticated waist! it's all about the comfy look. yeah. i have, like, five of the same joggers, but different colours —
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like, ten of the same tops. lose the high heels, just get your comfies on. so remember — comfy plus stretchy equals fashion. there's no going back. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. imean... i mean... hopefully there is no going back. ithink i mean... hopefully there is no going back. i think it is rather lovely. i going back. i think it is rather lovel . . , going back. i think it is rather lovel . ., , ., .y ,, going back. i think it is rather lovel . ., , ., .y ., lovely. i have been at lucy qc. lets us know how _ lovely. i have been at lucy qc. lets us know how you — lovely. i have been at lucy qc. lets us know how you are _ lovely. i have been at lucy qc. lets us know how you are approaching . us know how you are approaching things. some people have said they spent a whole year in their pyjamas. send your pictures, we would love to see them. ii send your pictures, we would love to see them. , ., ., ., ., see them. if you have done for the elasticated — see them. if you have done for the elasticated waist _ see them. if you have done for the elasticated waist line, _ see them. if you have done for the elasticated waist line, share - see them. if you have done for the elasticated waist line, share it - elasticated waist line, share it with us. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. health charities say expansion plans for london's ultra low emission zone should go even further. the current plan is to expand to the north and south
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circular in october. older more polluting vehicles will have to pay £12.50 a day. but the british lung foundation and asthma uk say expanding it to cover all of london would reduce illness amongst 360,000 people. londoners are being reminded to take up their covid vaccinations when offered. there are growing concerns around new variants, including the indian strain. the capital's director for public health says we mustn't be complacent. we certainly should be planning for the emergence of infection and we should be looking at everything that we do now to reduce the likelihood and the severity of that third wave, and that includes all of us getting the vaccination when it's offered as we re—emerge from the lockdown to ensure that we continue to practise all of the prevention measures — hands, face, space, getting fresh air and getting tested regularly. as we've been hearing, plans for a european super league which would have included three london teams have unraveled. all six english clubs are pulling out.
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arsenal said it had "made a mistake", tottenham's chairman said the club regretted the "anxiety and upset" caused. and chelsea confirmed they have "begun the formal procedures" for withdrawal. the news just broke over there and the scenes were honestly amazing. i've never seen so much joy and i think that's what football is about, so i am so happy we are saving the premier league and we are saving english football and i'm so happy about it. now, combining art with a food shop. the design museum in kensington has reopened its store stocking essential goods with packaging designed by artists. items available to buy include tinned kidney beans and washing up liquid. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes there are severe delays on the bakerloo line, otherwise all good. turning to the roads the a4 is closed eastbound from north end road to warwick road for emergency repairs. finally the m25 has one lane blocked clockwise after junction five, there's a broken down car.
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now the weather with elizabeth. hello, good morning. well, it's another dry day ahead, but it won't be feeling as warm as it was yesterday. having said that, it is a milder start to the morning for most of us — temperatures are in mid single figures. there's a bit of high cloud out there for a time, but that should break up, we'll see the sunshine come through. but there will be more fair—weather cloud building as we head through the late morning and into the afternoon. so it's set to cloud over at times, but still some bright and some sunny spells. it will stay dry with a noticeable north—easterly wind, and top temperatures lower than they were — between 12 and 14 degrees celsius, but maybe be 15 somewhere out towards the west. now, as we head through this evening and overnight, high pressure pressure builds in. the cloud is set to melt away, and in that colder air, temperatures will drop very close to freezing so there'll be a touch of frost into thursday morning. thursday and friday, plenty of sunshine, staying dry. dry, too, at the weekend with some sunny spells and temperatures building slightly. i'm back with the latest from bbc
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london in half an hour. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today. justice for george floyd. former police officer derek chauvin is found guilty of his murder. we the jury, in the above entitled matter, as to count one, unintentional second degree murder while committing a felony, find the defendant guilty. the family say the verdict is a "turning point in history" for america and justice has been done for their brother. what a day to be a floyd, man. wow. president biden promises to do more to deal with systemic racism, he says chauvin's conviction is just the start. "i can't breathe. i can't breathe". those were george
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floyd's last words. we can't let those words die with him. european super leave. all six premier league clubs pull out of the proposed tournament after heavy criticism from all parts of the game. in the end the pressure proved too much. spurs say they regret the anxiety and upset, arsenal simply say sorry. the anxiety and upset, whether the super league will happen at all is now in huge doubt. good morning. if you are looking for since significant rainfall in the forecast, there is none for the rest of the week. a sedative cloud for some with the odd spot of rain but it should brighten up and most of us will see some sunshine. —— there is a fair bit of cloud for some this morning. it's wednesday, april 21st. one of america's most high—profile race trials has ended with the conviction of the white former police officer, derek chauvin, of the
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murder of george floyd. chauvin had been filmed kneeling on the neck of mr floyd — an african american — for more than nine minutes during his arrest in the us city of minneapolis last may. as our correspondent, lebo diseko reports, the court was hushed as the verdict was read out. we the jury, in the above entitled matter, as to count one, unintentional second—degree murder while committing a felony, find the defendant guilty. derek chauvin, convicted of two counts of murder, and one of manslaughter. the former policeman led from court in handcuffs. cheering it was a result many hadn't dared to believe was possible. in these types of cases, you know, justice has not gone in the way of victims when victims are african—americans at the hands of police. so, to hear that he was guilty on all three of the charges, itjust seemed like a dream. it's a beautiful day, it's a sad day because george floyd isn't here any more with us, but it's a beautiful day. because justice was served.
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mr floyd's family called it a victory for anyone who's ever been pinned down. because he showed me how to be strong. he showed me how to be respectful. he showed me how to speak my mind. i'm going to miss him but now i know he's in history. what a day to be a floyd, man. wow. it's ok. it was a death that shook the world, ripping open america's wounds. but much of the evidence was not got by police, it was the local community who recorded it, who remonstrated with offices as derek chauvin kneeled on george floyd's neck for nearly eight minutes. —— for nearly
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ten minutes. it was a murder in the full light of day, and it ripped the blinders off for the whole world to see. "i can't breathe. i can't breathe." those were george floyd's last words. we can't let those words die with him. this crime might never have come to trial had it not been for this community, who documented it. trauma collectively relived through the trial. but for now, some relief as people take in the victory. we got that justice, now we got that peace! many here believe that this is not a case of problems solved. rather, an opening for real change, when it comes to how black people are treated by police in america. let's get more now from lebo, who is at george floyd square in minneapolis. this has had a huge impact. tell us a little bit about how the reaction has progressed so far.—
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has progressed so far. there was tension all _ has progressed so far. there was tension all day _ has progressed so far. there was tension all day about _ has progressed so far. there was tension all day about what - has progressed so far. there was tension all day about what the i tension all day about what the verdict might be. people saying that they were afraid that it was going to be the same old story again, saying that they did not believe that the officer, derek chauvin, would be held accountable. everyone was watching on their phones as the court came in and the judge was watching on their phones as the court came in and thejudge came in, and when the verdict was read out, the cheers that erupted, where just huge. we heard from several people that didn't want to speak on camera who said that they were afraid that this might a chilly be something where authorities now say, everything that —— this might be actually something where authorities now say, everything is nowjustice is done. two girls wanted us to say that america still has a long way to go when it comes to justice. on thursday there is the funeral of a young man who was killed with an encounter with police just a week ago, ten miles or so from where we
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are now. there was relief, yes, a pleasure and celebration that this was the verdict, but also concern about the journey that is still to come. we'll be getting reaction to that story throughout the morning here on breakfast. we will be speaking to one of george floyd's friends as well. and another big story which broke last night. plans for a european super league are unravelling after all six english football clubs decided to pull out, just days after the competition was announced. manchester city, chelsea, arsenal, liverpool, manchester united and tottenham have all now gone back their decision to take part after a huge backlash from all parts of the game. joe lynskey reports. football's great breakaway lasted less than 48 hours. amid rising anger in the game, all six english clubs lost their nerve. manchester city were first to formally pull out of the european super league. earlier their coach said
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a closed—shop competition had no integrity. it's not a sport when the relation between the effort and the success — the effort and reward — doesn't exist, don't exist. so it's not a sport. it's not a sport and it doesn't matter if you lose. chelsea fans heard their team would withdraw from outside stamford bridge. they'd gathered before a match to add their voice. and the fa says supporters have played their part. in a statement english football's governing body said it would like to thank the fans for their influential and unequivocal voice. it is a powerful reminder, they say, the game will always be for fans. the prime minister said the clubs' decisions were the right one. earlier, liverpool's players had shown what they thought on twitter. some, including jordan henderson, said, "we don't like it and we don't want it to happen." now the people in the game
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have got their way. don't forget, football players are fans. they've grown up being fans of football themselves, so they know what it feels like to be a fan, and they understand the connection between the players, the fans, the club. arsenal's statement said they'd made a mistake and they apologise for it. while spurs said they regret the anxiety and upset the move caused. at manchester united, ed woodward will leave his role as executive vice chairman at the end of the year — the club say, in a separate move. this has been a climb down from those at the top, but the rest of the game has been unified, and football remains open. joe lynskey, bbc news. it has been a bonkers few hours. so is it dead in the water, what happens next?— is it dead in the water, what happens next? bonkers is an interesting — happens next? bonkers is an interesting choice _ happens next? bonkers is an interesting choice of - happens next? bonkers is an interesting choice of words. | happens next? bonkers is an interesting choice of words. i happens next? bonkers is an - interesting choice of words. i will tell you what the official statement
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from the european super league was. despite the announced departure of the english clubs forced to take such decisions due to the pressure put upon them, we are convinced our proposal is fully aligned with european law. interestingly, considering everything we now know, they go on to say... given the current circumstances, we shall reconsider the most appropriate steps to reshape the project, always having in mind our goals of offering fans the best experience. if i move, thatis fans the best experience. if i move, that is the english clubs out. the rest of the club is not officially out yet. that's certainly not fare well, goodbye, it's over, from the european super league. despite all of the english clubs leaving, quite dramatically, last night. we of the english clubs leaving, quite dramatically, last night.— dramatically, last night. we will see what happens. _ see what happens. thank you very much. we will be talking to the culture secretary about that and a few other issues at 7:30am. the bbc has seen a series of texts, in which the prime minister offers to "fix" tax rules on behalf
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of businessman sirjames dyson. in the messages, sent in march last year, borisjohnson assures sirjames that neither his singapore—based company, nor its senior employees would have to pay more uk tax, if they were to make ventilators for the nhs. here's our political editor laura kuenssberg. who you know, notjust what you know can matter round here. but revelations about connections between government and business have raised eyebrows of late, and now it's conversations of the prime minister himself under the spotlight. last year, the prominent tory—backing businessman sirjames dyson wanted to help make desperately needed ventilators for the nhs. but his firm wrote to the government asking, if they did, would they have to pay any more tax? official queries and conversations like that are allowed, but the rules for ministers say they have to be transparent, and civil servants should be involved. but in a series of direct text messages between borisjohnson and sirjames, the prime minister
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promised, "i will fix it tomorrow." the prime minister then said "rishi" — the chancellor — "says it's fixed". pushed again by sirjames — who said in a long message, "i'm afraid we really need a response to our letter," — mrjohnson wrote, "i am first lord of the treasury, and you can take it that we are backing you to do what you need." the government told us, at the height of the pandemic, there were genuine fears that we would quickly run out of ventilators, leaving the nhs unable to treat patients and putting many lives at risk. as the public would expect, we did everything we could in extraordinary times. in the end, as he explained to the bbc recently, dyson's offer wasn't taken up. we did it. we got it working between four and six weeks in spite of changing the specification. we were ready to go, ready to produce it, we'd bought the components, and then the cabinet office said they didn't want it, they didn't need it. and in a statement, sirjames insisted that urgent correspondence was only about compliance
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with the rules as 450 dyson people in uk and singapore worked around the clock, seven days a week, to build potentially life—saving equipment at a time of dire need. he said his company gained no benefit from the project, which had cost it £20 million. but questions are likely to be raised again about whether contacts between politics and powerful businesses are just too close for comfort. laura kuenssberg, bbc news. so much to talk about this morning. we'll be live in america in a few minutes with more reaction to the verdict in the george floyd murder, but first more on our other main story this morning. the proposed european super league will no longer go ahead as planned after the six english clubs set to take part last night confirmed their intention to pull out. chelsea were one of the first to make a u—turn, following widespread condemenation of the proposal from fans and footballers. former chelsea striker chris sutton has been vocal in his criticism of it and joins us now.
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good morning, chris, lovely to have you with us this morning. good morning, dan. what have you made of the last 24 hours? it has been pretty busy?— the last 24 hours? it has been pretty busy? the last 24 hours? it has been re bus ? ., ., pretty busy? last night was one of the greatest _ pretty busy? last night was one of the greatest nights _ pretty busy? last night was one of the greatest nights we _ pretty busy? last night was one of the greatest nights we have - pretty busy? last night was one of the greatest nights we have had i pretty busy? last night was one of the greatest nights we have had in our game. the question is, how on earth did we get here? there are still a lot of questions which need answering. i think a couple of days previous to that, it has been pretty depressing. six of our great clubs had turned their back on our country and our leagues, and it would have affected the whole football pyramid. they are the shameless six, and they totally underestimated the fans across the country. and credit to the fans across the country, they galvanised, they got together, we saw the scenes outside stamford bridge where the chelsea fans a stop bridge where the chelsea fans a —— stop the coach, we saw a plane over
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elland road. we saw managers coming out, pep guardiola saying, it wasn't sport, it wasn't going to be sport, it wasn't going to be a competitive league. and it goes against all sporting integrity. and everybody stood up together. this is a huge victory for the football family but it's going to be very, very difficult for people to forgive these six clubs. flan difficult for people to forgive these six clubs.— difficult for people to forgive these six clubs. ., , ., , ., these six clubs. can you understand wh the these six clubs. can you understand why they have _ these six clubs. can you understand why they have misjudged _ these six clubs. can you understand why they have misjudged things - these six clubs. can you understand why they have misjudged things so | why they have misjudged things so spectacularly? we saw a shot of steve parish there who we will be speaking to in a moment. why have they misjudged it so spectacularly, when you take for example liverpool, all the players making a statement yesterday saying they don't want it, sir kenny dalglish talking about the fact that the club have to do the right thing, the manager speaking out against it, did theyjust misjudge the feeling of fans of football of pundits, of managers? or was it a case of desperate for money
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and trying to get to that point? the bottom line — and trying to get to that point? ti2 bottom line is, these owners do not care about the fans, absolutely not. they only care about lining their own pockets. the only people who actually wanted this league to take place was a 12 mega rich guys, he wanted to make themselves richer at the expense of the game that we have all loved for years. i think the format works perfectly well, the league system in england. i enjoy the champions league in its current format, i know uefa are trying to change it. we always want to evolve, but sometimes we don't need to evolve. sometimes things are just best left alone. these owners of the clubs have totally disregarded to the football fans. it was a massive, massive victory. they underestimated enormously the response, and fair play, you mention to the liverpool players, jordan henderson, juergen klopp came out speaking against their owners. these players and the
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managers were chucked under the bus by the owners. the owners were silent, and these managers were sent out to do interviews and players were sent out to do interviews. some of them i believe he weren't even briefed, didn't know anything about it. they have done great things, and i think that is really refreshing. i have woken up this morning really positive. the last couple of days have just been incredible. positive. the last couple of days havejust been incredible. and positive. the last couple of days have just been incredible. and a very, very difficult. i think everyone is the same, to actually think about it and get our heads around it was quickly, before we speak to steve parish, only arsenal have been quite open in their apology, they said, we apologise to the fans and others. do apology, they said, we apologise to the fans and others.— the fans and others. do you think the fans and others. do you think the others _ the fans and others. do you think the others need _ the fans and others. do you think the others need to _ the fans and others. do you think the others need to do _ the fans and others. do you think the others need to do the - the fans and others. do you think the others need to do the same, | the fans and others. do you think i the others need to do the same, do you think there needs to be changes now? i you think there needs to be changes now? . �* you think there needs to be changes now? ., �* ., ., ., now? i mean, i'm not going to say fair -la now? i mean, i'm not going to say fair play to — now? i mean, i'm not going to say fair play to arsenal. _ now? i mean, i'm not going to say fair play to arsenal. for— now? i mean, i'm not going to say fair play to arsenal. for them - now? i mean, i'm not going to say fair play to arsenal. for them to l fair play to arsenal. for them to actually be in the super league, you have to be successful on the pitch to be in a super league, and that's a huge problem for arsenal. of
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course the others should apologise. i saw the manchester united statement, it was pathetic. they are not going to save face but that's the least of these clubs should be doing. the least of these clubs should be doinu. . ., the least of these clubs should be doinu. ., ~' ,, the least of these clubs should be doinu. ., ,, i. the least of these clubs should be doinu. . ~' ,, . the least of these clubs should be doing. thank you so much, chris sutton. doing. thank you so much, chris sutton- a _ doing. thank you so much, chris sutton- a lot— doing. thank you so much, chris sutton. a lot of— doing. thank you so much, chris sutton. a lot of things _ doing. thank you so much, chris sutton. a lot of things have - doing. thank you so much, chris| sutton. a lot of things have been changing in the last few hours. the european super league was condemned by the 14—other premier league sides who were not invited to take part. crystal palace chairman steve parish joins us now. joins us officially, because eclipse of the earlier! what has it been like as a chairmen watching of this unfold? —— we caught a glimpse of you earlier? the; unfold? -- we caught a glimpse of you earlier?— unfold? -- we caught a glimpse of you earlier? as chris said, when we not the you earlier? as chris said, when we got the call — you earlier? as chris said, when we got the call on _ you earlier? as chris said, when we got the call on sunday, _ you earlier? as chris said, when we got the call on sunday, i _ you earlier? as chris said, when we got the call on sunday, i was - got the call on sunday, i was relieved, and we have been living with this since i have been involved in football and people tell me longer, this constant threat that if we do not toe the line and accept that their position in football needs to be gilded, needs to be special, that they would all go off
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and do this. let's face it, this was and do this. let's face it, this was an attempted coup, this was a coup to try and steal football. and what happened was, which was fascinating, the fans, the players, the staff said, we are going to fight for the right to lose. we don't want to be in some kind of elite where there is no jeopardy and no in some kind of elite where there is nojeopardy and no risk. that winning is nothing without all of that coming. the best banner i saw is, we want our rainy cold nights in stoke. the miscalculation of this is quite spectacular. i see this morning, some of them still haven't stood down which is extraordinary. the reason they have done that is they still want to pressure the head of uefa. behind this, last week, they banked incredible games in the champions league. this has got to be the end of special voting rights. people who sit on committees that
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they should not be on, all of the privilege of coefficients that i wore them extra money based on an arbitrary period of history. what uefa need to do is start looking after the game and stop pandering to the people and trying desperately to keep them inside the tent because they are going to be inside the tent now whatever happens. warsaw and i acts —— and ajax should not be playing when they won their league in favour of arsenal who —— league teams which leapfrogged others in their league for television money. football fans wants to win fairly and they want to win well, and it has been a fantastic two days for football and i hope to capitalise on it. it football and i hope to capitalise on it. , ,., , ., , ., it. it is so interesting hearing you and our it. it is so interesting hearing you and your passion. _ it. it is so interesting hearing you and your passion. what _ it. it is so interesting hearing you and your passion. what does - it. it is so interesting hearing you and your passion. what does it i it. it is so interesting hearing you i and your passion. what does it take for those players to speak out
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against the people who effectively pay their wages? it takes an extraordinary amount of courage. it is about the fans, the players, the staff at this club who works tirelessly every day. perhaps because i am a fan since i was a child, i get it more than anyone else. but there are business pressures on all of us, but we need to remember that. this is a message that people take on board and we must never see this again. that ruestion must never see this again. that question about _ must never see this again. that question about forgiveness, you are a fan as well, as you say, as chairman. there are people who have been desperately affected by the possibility of this going ahead, is there a point where they will be able to forgive what happened? let’s able to forgive what happened? let's se arate, able to forgive what happened? l2it�*3 separate, absolutely, the able to forgive what happened? l2t�*3 separate, absolutely, the people able to forgive what happened? l2it�*3 separate, absolutely, the people and the football clubs. there is no
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animosity that i have, in fact i have nothing but respect for all of the fans of these football clubs and what they have stood up for what they stand for. i've been saying for a while, this is about a very small group of people, a tiny group of people that have decided that they know best. that commission research... they actually commission research, believe it or not, that says that 72% of the spain public want this and 52% of the british public want it. it is extraordinary in the background of what we have been living to an frankly patronising. some of those relationships will be difficult to repair because people have lied to us. they have sat on committees and haven't told the truth and have not been coming clean, and they have been coming clean, and they have been off in a zoom paradise and a bubble plotting everyone's down full. ~ bubble plotting everyone's down full.~ ., ,, .., bubble plotting everyone's down full,~ .. bubble plotting everyone's down full. , full. we appreciate your time this morninu. morning. fascinating thoughts from steve parish and chris sutton before that
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as well. let's go back to our main story, 22 minutes past seven. a "turning point in history". that's how george floyd's family lawyer described yesterday's guilty verdicts in the murder trial of former minneapolis police officer, derek chauvin. the result was met with celebrations in many cities across the us while on social media, the verdict was welcomed by a number of high—profile public figures around the world. former us president, barack obama, tweeted: "thejury did the right thing. tv presenter, oprah winfrey, described her relief at the verdict, saying... and here in the uk,
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the prime minister boris johnson tweeted... let's now speak to former police chief and the past president of the international association of chiefs of police, donald de lucca, and jonathan veal, a friend of george floyd. good morning, both, thank you so much forjoining us, i noted the middle of the night for you. jonathan, first of all, your reaction when you heard this? definitely mixed emotions. it's definitely hard to fully celebrate this moment, and a conviction on all of the charges, because, the conviction is only one step. it is difficult to celebrate when is still hurting all of our hearts not having
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george floyd to be with and talk with on a daily basis. definitely mixed emotions. i’m with on a daily basis. definitely mixed emotions.— with on a daily basis. definitely mixed emotions. �* , . ., ., ., mixed emotions. i'm sure, jonathan, ou mixed emotions. i'm sure, jonathan, you watched — mixed emotions. i'm sure, jonathan, you watched the _ mixed emotions. i'm sure, jonathan, you watched the family _ mixed emotions. i'm sure, jonathan, you watched the family press - you watched the family press conference where many of his family members spoke at length about their response to the verdict. it's interesting to see that there is a feeling from them as well that this is the start of a process of change. yeah, we definitely believe, as myself and other people of colour, there is a hope and optimism about what might ultimately be. a feeling of relief and an exhale that some level of justice was got to of relief and an exhale that some level ofjustice was got to date with the verdict.— level ofjustice was got to date with the verdict. ,., ., . . ., with the verdict. donald de lucca, i want to ask — with the verdict. donald de lucca, i want to ask you _ with the verdict. donald de lucca, i want to ask you as _ with the verdict. donald de lucca, i want to ask you as a _ with the verdict. donald de lucca, i want to ask you as a former- with the verdict. donald de lucca, i want to ask you as a former police l want to ask you as a former police chief, we heard from joe biden and so many other people who said, "i
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can't breathe, those words can't die with george floyd". do you think this will fundamentally change policing in the us? it this will fundamentally change policing in the us?— this will fundamentally change policing in the us? it needs to. this comes _ policing in the us? it needs to. this comes to _ policing in the us? it needs to. this comes to the _ policing in the us? it needs to. this comes to the point - policing in the us? it needs to. this comes to the point where, j policing in the us? it needs to. - this comes to the point where, what are we _ this comes to the point where, what are we going to do next? law enforcement is going to be held accountable, changes need to be made, _ accountable, changes need to be made. law— accountable, changes need to be made, law enforcement leaders need to be listening to communities, but changes— to be listening to communities, but changes change is already happening. people _ changes change is already happening. people are _ changes change is already happening. people are being held accountable. we need _ people are being held accountable. we need to make sure this never happens — we need to make sure this never happens again. we seek policy changes— happens again. we seek policy changes taking place, training taking — changes taking place, training taking place, and also the need to understand where people are coming from, _ understand where people are coming from. and _ understand where people are coming from, and we need to meet them at that point — from, and we need to meet them at that oint. ., ., i. from, and we need to meet them at that oint. ., ., , ., ~' from, and we need to meet them at that oint. ., ., i. ~' ., that point. how do you think, donald de lucca, that point. how do you think, donald de lucca. this— that point. how do you think, donald de lucca, this will— that point. how do you think, donald de lucca, this will affect _ that point. how do you think, donald de lucca, this will affect those - de lucca, this will affect those serving police officers at the moment? you served in the police over three decades, your most recent job was chief of police in florida. how has it made police officers feel and what sort of difference do you think it will make to their everyday work? i think it will make to their everyday work? . ,., think it will make to their everyday work? ., ,., , ., ., ,
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work? i have said this for the last coule of work? i have said this for the last couple of weeks, _ work? i have said this for the last couple of weeks, the _ work? i have said this for the last couple of weeks, the first - work? i have said this for the last couple of weeks, the first thing i work? i have said this for the last | couple of weeks, the first thing is, good cops in america are glad to see justice served. good cops don't like bad cops being in our system, in policing at all, we have no tolerance for it. and it is also the reckoning and realisation that we are held accountable for what we do. everybody watches what a police officer does from a traffic stop at the side of the road, when you talk to someone on the street, everyone is looking at the police. there is caution for obvious reasons. people want to know we are going to do our job right, hence there are telephones watching everything, the body cameras capture our movements. i think going forward, you're going to see a higher level of accountability throughout policing in america. , ., . . accountability throughout policing in america. . ., ., ., ., accountability throughout policing inamerica.i ., ., ., ., in america. jonathan, we are also ad'usted in america. jonathan, we are also adjusted in _ in america. jonathan, we are also adjusted in your— in america. jonathan, we are also adjusted in your point _ in america. jonathan, we are also adjusted in your point of- in america. jonathan, we are also adjusted in your point of view. i in america. jonathan, we are also i adjusted in your point of view. what is it you think which is the fundamental change which needs to happen to make a difference? i think, as the officer alluded to, i think— think, as the officer alluded to, i think starting with high—level
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accountability with law enforcement accountability with law enforcement a across _ accountability with law enforcement a across the board, that's one of the key— a across the board, that's one of the key points. but also a heightened level of value on human life. heightened level of value on human life when _ heightened level of value on human life. when italy —— when that is being _ life. when italy —— when that is being compromised individuals need to step _ being compromised individuals need to step up _ being compromised individuals need to step up and stand out and speak out against — to step up and stand out and speak out against any wrong that is happening in our society, whether it be law— happening in our society, whether it be law enforcement or civilian against — be law enforcement or civilian against civilian. i�*m be law enforcement or civilian against civilian.— be law enforcement or civilian against civilian. i'm aware that this is obviously _ against civilian. i'm aware that this is obviously a _ against civilian. i'm aware that this is obviously a huge - against civilian. i'm aware that this is obviously a huge news i against civilian. i'm aware that - this is obviously a huge news story not only in america but around the world as well, but you are someone who has also lost a friend. i wonder whether your personal thoughts are with george and his family today, as well as thinking about the wider ramifications of this verdict. yeah, ou ramifications of this verdict. yeah, you know. — ramifications of this verdict. yeah, you know. over— ramifications of this verdict. yeah, you know, over the _ ramifications of this verdict. yeah, you know, over the last _ ramifications of this verdict. yeah, you know, over the last ten - ramifications of this verdict. yeah, i you know, over the last ten months, it has— you know, over the last ten months, it has been_ you know, over the last ten months, it has been definitely difficult to really _ it has been definitely difficult to really bring a level of closure over the murder— really bring a level of closure over the murder of my friend. but like i
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saidi _ the murder of my friend. but like i said. we _ the murder of my friend. but like i said. we this — the murder of my friend. but like i said, we this verdict, we are really able to— said, we this verdict, we are really able to have — said, we this verdict, we are really able to have a sense of closure and move _ able to have a sense of closure and move on _ able to have a sense of closure and move on and — able to have a sense of closure and move on and focus on those systemic issues _ move on and focus on those systemic issues that— move on and focus on those systemic issues that face individuals in our country— issues that face individuals in our country and — issues that face individuals in our country and across the world as the next step — country and across the world as the next step. the inequalities and injustice — next step. the inequalities and injustice between law enforcement and civilians. we injustice between law enforcement and civilians.— and civilians. we have 'ust been seeini as and civilians. we have 'ust been seeing as we * and civilians. we have 'ust been seeing as we have _ and civilians. we have just been seeing as we have been - and civilians. we have just been seeing as we have been talking| and civilians. we have just been i seeing as we have been talking to you pictures of you with george. how will you best remember him? the will you best remember him? a gentleman, a guy whojust will you best remember him? a gentleman, a guy who just always will you best remember him? a gentleman, a guy whojust always had a jovial_ gentleman, a guy whojust always had a jovial spirit. gentleman, a guy whojust always had ajovial spirit. he gentleman, a guy whojust always had a jovial spirit. he always wanted to keep— a jovial spirit. he always wanted to keep the _ a jovial spirit. he always wanted to keep the mood light. he had a high value _ keep the mood light. he had a high value on— keep the mood light. he had a high value on people. i tell the story that, _ value on people. i tell the story that, if— value on people. i tell the story that, if you _ value on people. i tell the story that, if you knew floyd, you would think— that, if you knew floyd, you would think that — that, if you knew floyd, you would think that you are his only best friend — think that you are his only best friend in— think that you are his only best friend in the world. he had an ability— friend in the world. he had an ability to— friend in the world. he had an ability to make individuals feel special, — ability to make individuals feel special, and i know for sure that he is smiling _ special, and i know for sure that he is smiling right now. because a sense —
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is smiling right now. because a sense of— is smiling right now. because a sense of change is coming, not only for individuals but across the world as a result — for individuals but across the world as a result of his murder. to for individuals but across the world as a result of his murder.— as a result of his murder. to come back to you. _ as a result of his murder. to come back to you, donald _ as a result of his murder. to come back to you, donald de _ as a result of his murder. to come back to you, donald de lucca, - as a result of his murder. to come back to you, donald de lucca, you| back to you, donald de lucca, you spoke very passionately about the changes that might happen in the way that police officers might be feeling. that issue of trust which is a huge one, and if you look at some of the reaction on social media over the last few hours, you will see that is very much at the heart of the relationship between police officers and the general public in america. and i suppose in countries all around the world as well. can match us to be repaired, do you feel? —— can that trust to be repaired, do you feel? i feel? -- can that trust to be repaired, do you feel? i think it has to be _ repaired, do you feel? i think it has to be and _ repaired, do you feel? i think it has to be and it _ repaired, do you feel? i think it has to be and it can _ repaired, do you feel? i think it has to be and it can be. - repaired, do you feel? i think it has to be and it can be. i - repaired, do you feel? i think it has to be and it can be. i love i repaired, do you feel? i think it i has to be and it can be. i love law enforcement and the profession and at times your heart gets broken, like what we are talking about today. we seek the pain on the faces, and the call is there, and trust is built in small steps and
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improper action and behaviour. the heart set and the mindset of law—enforcement has to engage with the community and make them our partners, not, we serve you and you stand over there. we have to be hand in hand and explain why we do things, tell our story of why we do things, tell our story of why we do things in policing. so everyone understands what takes place. but also when things go wrong, that we exact responsivity and step in with quick action. that is the other part of it here, sometimes silence is the worst thing in the world. we build trust one thing at a time and one day at a time. most police officers go out there with the best of intentions. we saw a horrific act that we cannot take back and that is on the front of everybody�*s mind. over the near future, on the front of everybody�*s mind. over the nearfuture, six or 12 months, this is a call for action. we should need policy to tell —— shouldn't need policy to tell offices we need to intervene, they should have the moral courage to do it. when we see we are taking
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control of our actions and stopping behaviour that should be stopped, i think the trust will return to where it needs to be but that it will not be overnight, that will take time. i really appreciate your thoughts, both of you, thank you for sharing them, donald de lucca and jonathan veal, thank you. we will bejoined veal, thank you. we will be joined by the culture secretary oliver dowden in the next few minutes. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. health charities say expansion plans for london's ultra low emission zone should go even further. the current plan is to expand to the north and south circular in october. older, more polluting vehicles will have to pay £12.50 a day. but the british lung foundation and asthma uk say expanding it to cover all of london would reduce illness amongst 360,000 people. londoners are being reminded to take up their covid vaccinations when offered. there are growing concerns
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around new variant, including the indian strain. the capital's director for public health says we mustn't be complacent. we certainly should be planning for a re—emergence of infection and we should be looking at everything we're doing now to reduce the likelihood and the severity of that third wave, and that includes all of us getting the vaccination when it's offered as we re—emerge from the lockdown to ensure that we continue to practise all of the prevention measures — hands, face, space. as we've been hearing, plans for a european super league which would have included three london teams have unraveled. all six english clubs are pulling out. arsenal apologised to fans, tottenham's chairman said the club regretted the "anxiety and upset" caused. and chelsea confirmed they'd begun the formal withdrawal procedure. the news just broke over there and the scenes were honestly amazing. i've never seen so much joy and i think that's what football is about, so i am so happy we are saving
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the premier league and we are saving english football and i'm so happy about it. now, combining art with a food shop... the design museum in kensington has reopened its store stocking essential goods — with packaging designed by artists. items available to buy include tinned kidney beans and washing—up liquid. let's take a look at the travel situation now... now the weather with elizabeth. hello, good morning. well, it's another dry day ahead, but it won't be feeling as warm as it was yesterday. having said that, it is a milder start to the morning for most of us — temperatures are in mid single figures. there's a bit of high cloud out there for a time, but that should break up,
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we'll see the sunshine come through. but there will be more fair—weather cloud building as we head through the late morning and into the afternoon. so it's set to cloud over at times, but still some bright and some sunny spells. it will stay dry with a noticeable north—easterly wind, and top temperatures lower than they were — between 12 and 14 degrees celsius, but maybe be 15 somewhere out towards the west. now, as we head through this evening and overnight, high pressure pressure builds in. the cloud is set to melt away, and in that colder air, temperatures will drop very close to freezing so there'll be a touch of frost into thursday morning. thursday and friday, plenty of sunshine, staying dry. dry, too, at the weekend with some sunny spells and temperatures building slightly. i'm back with the latest from bbc london in half an hour. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. 7:35am. with dan walker and louise minchin. lots to come programme. 7:35am. lots to come in the programme. let's return to one of
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our main stories. the proposed european super league has suffered a damaging blow, after all six english teams involved expressed their intentions to pull out. manchester city, chelsea, arsenal, liverpool, manchester united and tottenham were all due to be part of the 12—team competition, but the move was widely condemned by fans, players and the uk government. we're joined now by culture secretary oliver dowden. thank you for being with us. i want to come to the major breaking football story, but first can i get your reaction to our main story this morning? we have been reacting to those guilty verdicts in the trial of the former police officer david showing —— derek chauvin. what is your reaction? i showing -- derek chauvin. what is your reaction?— your reaction? i think i share the feelin: of your reaction? i think i share the feeling of people _ your reaction? i think i share the feeling of people across - your reaction? i think i share the feeling of people across the - your reaction? i think i share the feeling of people across the us i your reaction? i think i share the i feeling of people across the us and probably across the uk and the world. a sense of relief that justice has been done. there were real fears it would not happen justice has been done. there were realfears it would not happen here, and it has happened. it is entirely
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right that the justice system has delivered properly for people. this is obviously _ delivered properly for people. this is obviously one of the stories which has dominated the headlines here, as well, but we are also talking about the european super league, which has been a major talking point for the last 48 hours, then in the space of a few hours yesterday evening we saw all six english sides confirm their intention to withdraw. how do you respond to that as someone who has had a lot to say on this issue over the last few days?— the last few days? well, i think it is a ireat the last few days? well, i think it is a great day _ the last few days? well, i think it is a great day for _ the last few days? well, i think it is a great day for fans _ the last few days? well, i think it is a great day for fans and - the last few days? well, i think it is a great day for fans and fans i the last few days? well, i think it is a great day for fans and fans of football up and down the country should savour this. it is their victory, they stood up and said you cannot take our game away from us. but as a government we stood square behind them from sunday night when the story first broke, i engaged with the president of uefa, the leaders of the game here in the premier league and the fa and the
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fans. the prime minister and i were clear to those fans, we will stand behind you and do whatever it takes to stop this, and it is absolutely right it has been stopped. as secretary of state for culture, just as i would stand up to protect our stately homes and great works of art, this is as much part of our national vintage and culture and needed protecting and delighted it has been. . ., needed protecting and delighted it has been. ., ~ ., . has been. talking about culture, that is one _ has been. talking about culture, that is one of _ has been. talking about culture, that is one of the _ has been. talking about culture, that is one of the major - has been. talking about culture, | that is one of the major missteps which has upset fans, a lack of recognition of the culture and history involved in many of these football clubs that have been involved. the football association has a fit and proper persons test for new owners, do you think one of the steps you could potentially look at is an understanding from owners of the cultural significance of football clubs in the uk to try to prevent something like this happening again?— prevent something like this happening again? prevent something like this ha -ienin aiain? , ~ , happening again? yes, i think this has really come _ happening again? yes, i think this has really come to _ happening again? yes, i think this has really come to the _ happening again? yes, i think this has really come to the fore - happening again? yes, i think this has really come to the fore during| has really come to the fore during this and it was a crisis over the past few days. football owners need to understand they are just
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temporary custodians of this piece of our national life and heritage that goes back over a century and i am keen we don'tjust say, right, this is all over with, forget about it. that is why i announced on monday we would have a fan led review, led by someone who commands respect from fans of all different clubs. quite how you legislate for an owner of a football club having to be tied in _ an owner of a football club having to be tied in in _ an owner of a football club having to be tied in in some _ an owner of a football club having to be tied in in some way - an owner of a football club having to be tied in in some way to - an owner of a football club having to be tied in in some way to the i to be tied in in some way to the club? , ., , to be tied in in some way to the club? , ., i , club? the first thing to say is i welcome _ club? the first thing to say is i welcome the _ club? the first thing to say is i welcome the foreign _ club? the first thing to say is i i welcome the foreign investment club? the first thing to say is i - welcome the foreign investment in the uk again and the english game has seen a lot of investment in the premier league, ensuring we have a fantastic game up and down the country pretty much every day. we have world—class players playing here. i do think it is important as part of the review that we look at how we can empower fans. it is interesting for me to look at what happened in germany. germany did not participate in this because fans had
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a strong say in it. this is one of the things we were contemplating as part of our response to this. competition in france also takes into account the national heritage and cultural implications and i think it is important we weigh those up. i think it is important we allow tracy to undertake the review but we don't intend to let this go, we intend to proceed following her review. . , . review. fans have felt disenfranchised - review. fans have felt disenfranchised with i review. fans have felt - disenfranchised with their review. fans have felt _ disenfranchised with their football teams for many years. will you be looking at the issue of ticket prices, bringing the cost of shirts down? you talk about the german model where fans are a far more stakeholders rather than consumers. will you look at the possibility of voicing that on clubs to get fan involvement up?— voicing that on clubs to get fan involvement up? there is a huge ranie of involvement up? there is a huge range of issues _ involvement up? there is a huge range of issues you _ involvement up? there is a huge range of issues you raise - involvement up? there is a huge range of issues you raise and - involvement up? there is a huge range of issues you raise and i i range of issues you raise and i think you're absolutely right. there is an essence that led review will look at finance governments deliver
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governance. one conversation the prime minister and i had with fans yesterday, they talked about how a few years back many fans did not have stakes in an above clubs. over time they have been brought out and it is important to the fan led review looks at how we can ensure fans have a financial stake in the close. if you look at things we done already, we announced at the budget the ability of people to invest albeit in lower league clubs to help preserve those clubs. it is important that we ensure this important that we ensure this important part of our national heritage has attention. the important part of our national heritage has attention. the bbc is re ”ortin heritage has attention. the bbc is reporting that _ heritage has attention. the bbc is reporting that the _ heritage has attention. the bbc is reporting that the prime - heritage has attention. the bbc is reporting that the prime ministerl reporting that the prime minister offered to fix the tax rules to encourage sirjames dyson to make ventilators for the nhs. a series of text messages sent last march, 2020. whichever way you look at this age doesn't look pretty at this morning when the logging system is under
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such intense scrutiny at the moment. in this instance, if you remember, we were at the absolute height covid crisis, a genuine national emergency and we have a real need to get ventilators in this country as part of the national ventilator challenge, we were successful and we massively increased the number of ventilators, helping to save many lives. what happened in this case, i believe, was that dyson was seeking an assurance that people from his company that came to this country to help when not disadvantaged. this went through parliament in a transparent way, there was an opportunity for mps to be able to vote on it and it was a very temperate measure. i vote on it and it was a very temperate measure. vote on it and it was a very tem erate measure. , ., ., temperate measure. i understand what ou are temperate measure. i understand what you are saying — temperate measure. i understand what you are saying but _ temperate measure. i understand what you are saying but this _ temperate measure. i understand what you are saying but this is _ temperate measure. i understand what you are saying but this is a _ temperate measure. i understand what you are saying but this is a really - you are saying but this is a really crucial issue of accountability. you have government ministers who are following the rules, we understand that, and i'm sure the government will sate the rules have not been broken, but you have a really
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influential businessmen here, a tory party supporter, who is able to text the most influential and powerful politician in the entire country and the prime minister goes back to that personal text message with "i will fix it for you tomorrow." do you feel comfortable with that correspondence between a huge businessman, an influential businessman, an influential businessman, who is a tory party supporter, and the prime minister? yes, i do, for two reasons. first, we were in the middle of a national emergency and the prime minster was doing is not for his own gay, james dyson was not doing for his own day. we were doing it to ensure we got these ventilators rapidly —— for his own gain. we were making sure to get ventilators. secondly, this went before parliament in the proper transparent way. there was an opportunity for mps to approve the very temporary measure. in the middle of a national emergency we have to move fast. i remember doing interviews like this. you were rightly pushing me and other
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ministers as to how we could move as rapidly as possible to deal with this national emergency of that is what the prime minister did. hypothetical situation. let's say a friend of yours for many years since you a text message and says, oliver, listen, i am involved you a text message and says, oliver, listen, iam involved in you a text message and says, oliver, listen, i am involved in this business deal, can you have a chat with rishi sunak about some tax relief or what the plans might be. how do you respond to that now? i speak to my private office and i say this issue has been raised and it is dealt with in the proper way. [30 this issue has been raised and it is dealt with in the proper way. do you think the prime _ dealt with in the proper way. do you think the prime minister's _ dealt with in the proper way. do you think the prime minister's text - think the prime minister's text messages should be covered by transparency rules?— messages should be covered by transparency rules? well, we have robust transparency _ transparency rules? well, we have robust transparency rules - transparency rules? well, we have robust transparency rules but - transparency rules? well, we have robust transparency rules but the i robust transparency rules but the point here is that this was not normal times, this was not business as usual as a government in peace time. we were essentially at war with this virus. people expected us to move very rapidly. the prime minister moved rapidly and the result of this was that it helps us
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to meet ventilator challenge which meant we have many more ventilators in the uk, dealt with huge crisis situation and saved lives in the process. it has to be viewed in that context. �* ., ,i ., context. before we say goodbye to ou, mr context. before we say goodbye to you. mr dowden. _ context. before we say goodbye to you, mr dowden, on _ context. before we say goodbye to you, mr dowden, on the _ context. before we say goodbye to you, mr dowden, on the issue - context. before we say goodbye to you, mr dowden, on the issue of. you, mr dowden, on the issue of transparency, lots of people will be seeing this morning that the white house style press briefings which were due to start, i think, in october last year, £2.6 million was spent on this route that downing street making it fit for purpose, it is not now going to be used for that. does that feel to you like a huge waste of money was like the labour party are talking about it being a vanity project and the government are running scared of scrutiny. government are running scared of scrutin . ., ., ., , ., scrutiny. having done a number of those press _ scrutiny. having done a number of those press conferences _ scrutiny. having done a number of those press conferences in - scrutiny. having done a number of those press conferences in the - scrutiny. having done a number of those press conferences in the old room, it is actually the dining room in downing street, not used for many dinners that used what many meetings. it was a small room, not really fit for purpose. this was just about building a modern press
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facility. it won'tjust be had by this government, it will be used by future governments, it is very similar to what many governments have around the world so it is not wasted money in that sense, it is just a normal press facility for government. in just a normal press facility for government-— just a normal press facility for rovernment. ., i i ., ., ,, just a normal press facility for rovernment. i ., ., ,, government. in the way you make some of our government. in the way you make some of your significant _ government. in the way you make some of your significant announcements, - government. in the way you make some of your significant announcements, i - of your significant announcements, i notice you and many other ministers tend to put stuff on social media now, you speak to the house on occasions. might we see you perhaps pledging to make those public statements where journalists and others are able to ask you questions about that policy, about your announcement, rather thanjust announcement, rather than just putting it announcement, rather thanjust putting it on social media? you announcement, rather than 'ust putting it on social media? you are askini me putting it on social media? you are asking me questions _ putting it on social media? you are asking me questions now - putting it on social media? you are asking me questions now and - putting it on social media? you are asking me questions now and afterj putting it on social media? you arel asking me questions now and after i have done this interview i will be talking to pretty much every other broadcast at this morning talking about the range of issues in the news this morning, including what is happening in football. pretty much every morning there is a minister that appears on your programme to answer your questions. that appears on your programme to answeryour questions. i that appears on your programme to answer your questions. i was before the house of commons on monday answering dozens of questions from mps about what is happening in
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football. there are many, many mechanisms for accountability in this country. mechanisms for accountability in this country-— mechanisms for accountability in thiscount . a, .., this country. appreciate your time, oliver dowden, _ this country. appreciate your time, oliver dowden, thank _ this country. appreciate your time, oliver dowden, thank you - this country. appreciate your time, oliver dowden, thank you for - this country. appreciate your time, i oliver dowden, thank you for talking to us. ., ., ., . �* ., ,, .,, time to find out what is happening with the weather because it is chilly again. with the weather because it is chilly again-— with the weather because it is chilly again.- good i with the weather because it is - chilly again.- good morning. chilly again. morning. good morning. it has been chilly again. morning. good morning. it has been very _ chilly again. morning. good morning. it has been very cold _ chilly again. morning. good morning. it has been very cold overnight, - it has been very cold overnight, particularly across parts of scotland and northern ireland. now temperatures are slowly starting to pick up _ temperatures are slowly starting to pick up but general temperatures to day will— pick up but general temperatures to day will be — pick up but general temperatures to day will be lower than yesterday. as we go _ day will be lower than yesterday. as we go through the rest of the week we go through the rest of the week we are _ we go through the rest of the week we are still— we go through the rest of the week we are still looking at frosty nights _ we are still looking at frosty nights. mostly dry, so if you are wanting — nights. mostly dry, so if you are wanting some significant rain, there isn't significant rain in the forecast _ isn't significant rain in the forecast for the rest of the week. hi-h forecast for the rest of the week. high pressure is dominating a weather, _ high pressure is dominating a weather, things are fairly settled. this week— weather, things are fairly settled. this week whether front brought rain across— this week whether front brought rain across scotland and northern ireland yesterday. _ across scotland and northern ireland yesterday, sinking slowly southwards. not doing much more than producing _ southwards. not doing much more than producing this band of cloud and some _ producing this band of cloud and some spots of rain. mostly stuck to the day— some spots of rain. mostly stuck to the day in _ some spots of rain. mostly stuck to the day in the south—eastern quarter
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with some _ the day in the south—eastern quarter with some fog across kent and essex. poor visibility. with some fog across kent and essex. poorvisibility. on with some fog across kent and essex. poor visibility. on the other side, for northern — poor visibility. on the other side, for northern england, scotland and northern— for northern england, scotland and northern ireland, where you currently _ northern ireland, where you currently have cloud, it will brighten _ currently have cloud, it will brighten up and we will see sunshine. with this one afloat you will see _ sunshine. with this one afloat you will see the wind coming from the north— will see the wind coming from the north sea. — will see the wind coming from the north sea, it will feel cooler along the north— north sea, it will feel cooler along the north sea coastline but the wind is not _ the north sea coastline but the wind is not particularly strong, a light breeze — is not particularly strong, a light breeze. temperatures are cooler along _ breeze. temperatures are cooler along the — breeze. temperatures are cooler along the north sea coastline, highest — along the north sea coastline, highest temperatures likely in the south—west today, 16, may 17 degrees _ south—west today, 16, may 17 degrees. in the afternoon there is a risk you _ degrees. in the afternoon there is a risk you can — degrees. in the afternoon there is a risk you can see the isolated shower here _ risk you can see the isolated shower here. through this evening and overnight— here. through this evening and overnight come under the clear skies. — overnight come under the clear skies, temperatures will fall away guite _ skies, temperatures will fall away quite rapidly. we can also see some mist and _ quite rapidly. we can also see some mist and fog patches forming in the east midlands, parts of eastern england — east midlands, parts of eastern england. it is going to be a cold night _ england. it is going to be a cold night —3, — england. it is going to be a cold night. —3, may be —4 in parts of north-east _ night. —3, may be —4 in parts of north—east england and parts of eastern — north—east england and parts of eastern scotland. a widespread frost to start _ eastern scotland. a widespread frost to start the _ eastern scotland. a widespread frost to start the day tomorrow. still under— to start the day tomorrow. still under this— to start the day tomorrow. still under this area of high pressure, not much —
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under this area of high pressure, not much in _ under this area of high pressure, not much in the way of wind. a bit breezy— not much in the way of wind. a bit breezy across the english channel. channal— breezy across the english channel. channel islands, south—west england, coastal— channel islands, south—west england, coastal counties, as well. at times, more _ coastal counties, as well. at times, more cloud — coastal counties, as well. at times, more cloud toppling in across the far north — more cloud toppling in across the far north of— more cloud toppling in across the far north of scotland. you may see the shower— far north of scotland. you may see the shower from that but it is going to be _ the shower from that but it is going to be mostly dry, a lot of sunshine, any early— to be mostly dry, a lot of sunshine, any early mist and fog will quickly disperse — any early mist and fog will quickly disperse and sunshine at the moment is strong _ disperse and sunshine at the moment is strong as— disperse and sunshine at the moment is strong as it is at the end of august— is strong as it is at the end of august so— is strong as it is at the end of august so if you are out and about, do not _ august so if you are out and about, do not forget that. cooler along the north— do not forget that. cooler along the north sea _ do not forget that. cooler along the north sea coastline, 17 possibly 18 across _ north sea coastline, 17 possibly 18 across north—west england, and parts of scotland. _ across north—west england, and parts of scotland, as well. for friday, after _ of scotland, as well. for friday, after a _ of scotland, as well. for friday, after a nippy start, of scotland, as well. for friday, aftera nippy start, some of scotland, as well. for friday, after a nippy start, some frost, as welt _ after a nippy start, some frost, as welt a _ after a nippy start, some frost, as welt a lot— after a nippy start, some frost, as well. a lot of dry weather, breezy through— well. a lot of dry weather, breezy through the english channel and the south—west. still some cloud coming in across— south—west. still some cloud coming in across the — south—west. still some cloud coming in across the far north of scotland, fit enough — in across the far north of scotland, fit enough here and there for the shower~ — fit enough here and there for the shower. temperatures eight in lerwick, — shower. temperatures eight in lerwick, i7 _ shower. temperatures eight in lerwick, 17 in birmingham, 18 as we move _ lerwick, 17 in birmingham, 18 as we move down— lerwick, 17 in birmingham, 18 as we move down towards cardiff. as we head _
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move down towards cardiff. as we head into — move down towards cardiff. as we head into the weekend, high pressure drifts a _ head into the weekend, high pressure drifts a little bit further eastwards but you can see how fresh it very _ eastwards but you can see how fresh it very much — eastwards but you can see how fresh it very much still dominant. this clutch _ it very much still dominant. this clutch of— it very much still dominant. this clutch of weather fronts trying to come _ clutch of weather fronts trying to come in — clutch of weather fronts trying to come in across the north west, so there _ come in across the north west, so there is— come in across the north west, so there is a — come in across the north west, so there is a chance that in the north west— there is a chance that in the north west we _ there is a chance that in the north west we might see some rain, but it 'ust west we might see some rain, but it just depends on the battle of the hi-h just depends on the battle of the high pressure. the weekend is looking — high pressure. the weekend is looking largely dry. there will be some _ looking largely dry. there will be some strong sunshine and still the risk of— some strong sunshine and still the risk of overnight frost. overnight sunday _ risk of overnight frost. overnight sunday into monday is when we are likely— sunday into monday is when we are likely to _ sunday into monday is when we are likely to see the weather fronts potentially make some inroads into the north— potentially make some inroads into the north west but how much inroads they will_ the north west but how much inroads they will make it open to question and i_ they will make it open to question and i will— they will make it open to question and i will keep you posted over the next couple of days at. we and i will keep you posted over the next couple of days at.— next couple of days at. we will pay ve close next couple of days at. we will pay very close attention. _ next couple of days at. we will pay very close attention. thank - next couple of days at. we will pay very close attention. thank you. i very close attention. thank you. nice to see you. "what a day to be a floyd" — that was the emotional reaction from one of george floyd's brothers, after yesterday's guilty verdicts in the murder trial of former minneapolis police officer, derek chauvin. the floyd family has spent almost a year campaigning forjustice, in a case that sparked worldwide protests against racism and excessive use of police force.
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here's what terrence floyd had to say. we said, "god, we need justice. we need it now." and he answered. good job. oh, man. i'm just grateful, you know? i'm grateful that my grandmother, my mother, my aunts, they just got to see this history made. i'm even grateful my brother is not here, i'm grateful and i'm proud of him. mm—hm! i will salute him — every day of my life, i will salute him. cos he showed me how to be strong. he showed me how to be respectful. he showed me how to speak my mind. i'mma miss him, but now i know he's in history.
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what a day to be a floyd, man. wow. hundreds of people cheered outside the court as the verdict was announced. they described how they felt about derek chauvin's conviction. i felt about derek chauvin's conviction.— felt about derek chauvin's conviction. ., , conviction. i felt like there is some hope _ conviction. i felt like there is some hope of— conviction. i felt like there is some hope of change - conviction. i felt like there is some hope of change and i conviction. i felt like there is i some hope of change and there conviction. i felt like there is - some hope of change and there can be change. i some hope of change and there can be chance. . , , some hope of change and there can be chane. , , some hope of change and there can be chance. , , change. i was 'ust shocked. it was all change. i was 'ust shocked. it was an emotion. — change. i wasjust shocked. it was all emotion, it _ change. i wasjust shocked. it was all emotion, it was _ change. i wasjust shocked. it was all emotion, it was all _ change. i wasjust shocked. it was all emotion, it was all emotion. i l all emotion, it was all emotion. i don't _ all emotion, it was all emotion. i don't think— all emotion, it was all emotion. i don't think anybody expected this. | don't think anybody expected this. i think don't think anybody expected this. think i am don't think anybody expected this. i think i am definitely still processing the emotion, i don't think it has hit me quite yet. i'm overjoyed, very happy because think it has hit me quite yet. i'm °v9tj°yed. very happy because this morning i didn't have no hope. bring a are changes here! this is where it started. . . a are changes here! this is where it started. , , , ., started. this is the beginning of makin: it started. this is the beginning of making it different. _ started. this is the beginning of making it different. now- started. this is the beginning of making it different. now we'vel started. this is the beginning of i making it different. now we've got to keep _ making it different. now we've got to keep going. i will processing tomorrow— to keep going. i will processing tomorrow chris yeah, we are protesting tomorrow! after the verdict was delivered, us vice president
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kamala harris vowed to introduce legislation in george floyd's name which would bolster police accountability. america has a long history of systemic racism. black americans — and black men in particular — have been treated over throughout course of our history as less than human. black men are fathers. and brothers. and sons. and uncles. and grandfathers. and friends. and neighbours. their lives must be valued in our education system. in our health care system. in our housing system. in our economic system. in our criminaljustice system. in our nation. full stop. because of smartphones, so many americans have now seen the racial injustice that black americans have known for generations. the racial injustice that we have
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fought for generations. that my parents protested in the 1960s. that millions of us, americans of every race, protested last summer. here's the truth about racial injustice. it is notjust a black america problem. or a people—of—colour problem. it is a problem for every american. let's take a look at how the news has been reported in the us. the washington post leads on the guilty verdict that was delivered in george floyd's murder trial in the us last night. the paper quotes george's family, who said they can 'breathe again'. and the minneapolis newspaper, the star tribune, reports the elation felt by the hundreds of people who gathered outside court to hear the verdict. we'll have more reaction
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from america after eight. also talking about our other main story, the european super league. lots happening. iahh story, the european super league. lots happening-— story, the european super league. lots happening. john barnes will be here, lots happening. john barnes will be here. former _ lots happening. john barnes will be here, former liverpool _ lots happening. john barnes will be here, former liverpool player - lots happening. john barnes will be here, former liverpool player and i here, former liverpool player and all six clubs, if you have just switched on, thinking what and it is happening, all six english clubs actually pulled out in the space of actually pulled out in the space of a couple of hours last night so that is a developing story. let’s a couple of hours last night so that is a developing story.— is a developing story. let's look at somethin: is a developing story. let's look at something completely _ is a developing story. let's look at something completely different, i something completely different, shall we? for generations their bellows have spread news across the town squares and communities of britain — but there will be "no—yez" at this year's town crier championship. out nice! i see what you did there. this year the uk's top shouters will be required to enter their cries in writing. so how's it all going to work? we'rejoined now by ten—time — and current — national champion, alistair chisholm, along with crier for barnoldswick elizabeth anderson—watson.
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you looked resplendent. raining champion. _ you looked resplendent. raining champion. how— you looked resplendent. raining champion, how is _ you looked resplendent. raining champion, how is this _ you looked resplendent. raining champion, how is this going - you looked resplendent. raining champion, how is this going to i you looked resplendent. raining - champion, how is this going to work? when you give it right, you can make more _ when you give it right, you can make more of— when you give it right, you can make more of a _ when you give it right, you can make more of a well written right then you can — more of a well written right then you can other badly written one. the writing _ you can other badly written one. the writing is— you can other badly written one. the writing is important and given the circumstances in which we find ourselves. _ circumstances in which we find ourselves, where we cannot meet up and have _ ourselves, where we cannot meet up and have a _ ourselves, where we cannot meet up and have a proper competition, it has been — and have a proper competition, it has been decided that on this occasion— has been decided that on this occasion we write the cry on the subject— occasion we write the cry on the subject of— occasion we write the cry on the subject of nature and the environment, raising money for it shouts. _ environment, raising money for it shouts, mental health charity, and mental— shouts, mental health charity, and mental health issues post disease marker— mental health issues post disease marker will be greater than before. it is marker will be greater than before. it is in _ marker will be greater than before. it is in a _ marker will be greater than before. it is in a very— marker will be greater than before. it is in a very good cause, we write the cry— it is in a very good cause, we write the cry and — it is in a very good cause, we write the cry and they are assessed and that for— the cry and they are assessed and that for town crier is a very important _ that for town crier is a very important part of the, what shall we call it. _ important part of the, what shall we call it. the _ important part of the, what shall we call it, the extreme sports of town are crying — call it, the extreme sports of town are crying a— call it, the extreme sports of town are crying. a well—written cry is to cry, are crying. a well—written cry is to cry. you _ are crying. a well—written cry is to cry. you can — are crying. a well—written cry is to cry, you can get more variety in the cry, you can get more variety in the
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cry and _ cry, you can get more variety in the cry and if— cry, you can get more variety in the cry and if it — cry, you can get more variety in the cry and if it is — cry, you can get more variety in the cry and if it is well written then people — cry and if it is well written then people listen. the writing of the cry is— people listen. the writing of the cry is very— people listen. the writing of the cry is very important and in some competitions there is a price of the best content of the cry, regardless of how _ best content of the cry, regardless of how it _ best content of the cry, regardless of how it is — best content of the cry, regardless of how it is actually pride in a competition. there is a prize. it is the way— competition. there is a prize. it is the way to— competition. there is a prize. it is the way to do it, given that these strange _ the way to do it, given that these strange circumstances in which we find ourselves. i�*m strange circumstances in which we find ourselves.— strange circumstances in which we find ourselves. i'm fascinated. the role that dates _ find ourselves. i'm fascinated. the role that dates back _ find ourselves. i'm fascinated. the role that dates back to _ find ourselves. i'm fascinated. the role that dates back to the - find ourselves. i'm fascinated. the | role that dates back to the norman invasion, the newsreaders of their time. elizabeth, how and why did you want to become town crier? meiji. time. elizabeth, how and why did you want to become town crier?- want to become town crier? well, i knew nothing _ want to become town crier? well, i knew nothing about _ want to become town crier? well, i knew nothing about it _ want to become town crier? well, i knew nothing about it originally - want to become town crier? well, i knew nothing about it originally and j knew nothing about it originally and i knew nothing about it originally and i was _ knew nothing about it originally and i was approached _ knew nothing about it originally and i was approached by _ knew nothing about it originally and i was approached by a _ knew nothing about it originally and i was approached by a town - knew nothing about it originally and i was approached by a town councill i was approached by a town council member— i was approached by a town council member to — i was approached by a town council memberto have— i was approached by a town council member to have a _ i was approached by a town council member to have a go— i was approached by a town council member to have a go because - i was approached by a town council member to have a go because i- i was approached by a town council. member to have a go because i have an outgoing — member to have a go because i have an outgoing personality— member to have a go because i have an outgoing personality and - member to have a go because i have an outgoing personality and i'm - an outgoing personality and i'm quite _ an outgoing personality and i'm quite loud _ an outgoing personality and i'm quite loud. being _ an outgoing personality and i'm quite loud. being the _ an outgoing personality and i'm quite loud. being the secretaryl an outgoing personality and i'm i quite loud. being the secretary of the company— quite loud. being the secretary of the company of— quite loud. being the secretary of the company of town _ quite loud. being the secretary of the company of town crier- quite loud. being the secretary of the company of town crier is - quite loud. being the secretary ofi the company of town crier is now, quite loud. being the secretary of. the company of town crier is now, it is fantastic — the company of town crier is now, it is fantastic. i've _ the company of town crier is now, it is fantastic. i've been _ the company of town crier is now, it is fantastic. i've been doing - the company of town crier is now, it is fantastic. i've been doing it - is fantastic. i've been doing it since — is fantastic. i've been doing it since i— is fantastic. i've been doing it since i was _ is fantastic. i've been doing it since i was 29 _ is fantastic. i've been doing it since i was 29 so _ is fantastic. i've been doing it since i was 29 so i _ is fantastic. i've been doing it since i was 29 so i have - is fantastic. i've been doing it since i was 29 so i have beenl is fantastic. i've been doing it. since i was 29 so i have been the youngest— since i was 29 so i have been the youngest female _ since i was 29 so i have been the youngest female for— since i was 29 so i have been the youngest female for a _ since i was 29 so i have been the youngest female for a long - since i was 29 so i have been thej youngest female for a long time. since i was 29 so i have been the i youngest female for a long time. it is a fantastic — youngest female for a long time. it is a fantastic community— youngest female for a long time. it is a fantastic community and - youngest female for a long time. it is a fantastic community and one i youngest female for a long time. it| is a fantastic community and one of the things— is a fantastic community and one of the things is. — is a fantastic community and one of the things is. we _ is a fantastic community and one of the things is, we were _ is a fantastic community and one of the things is, we were worried - is a fantastic community and one ofi the things is, we were worried about
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the things is, we were worried about the mental— the things is, we were worried about the mental health _ the things is, we were worried about the mental health of— the things is, we were worried about the mental health of our— the things is, we were worried about the mental health of our community| the mental health of our community and mental— the mental health of our community and mental health _ the mental health of our community and mental health of— the mental health of our community and mental health of the _ the mental health of our community and mental health of the country- the mental health of our community| and mental health of the country and we wanted _ and mental health of the country and we wanted to— and mental health of the country and we wanted to do— and mental health of the country and we wanted to do something. - and mental health of the country and we wanted to do something. we - we wanted to do something. we couldn't— we wanted to do something. we couldn't have _ we wanted to do something. we couldn't have a _ we wanted to do something. we couldn't have a championship. we wanted to do something. we i couldn't have a championship last year and — couldn't have a championship last year and we — couldn't have a championship last year and we didn't— couldn't have a championship last year and we didn't want— couldn't have a championship last year and we didn't want to - couldn't have a championship last year and we didn't want to not. couldn't have a championship last i year and we didn't want to not have won this _ year and we didn't want to not have won this year— year and we didn't want to not have won this year so _ year and we didn't want to not have won this year so we _ year and we didn't want to not have won this year so we looked - year and we didn't want to not have won this year so we looked into - year and we didn't want to not have| won this year so we looked into this and got _ won this year so we looked into this and got ahead — won this year so we looked into this and got ahead and _ won this year so we looked into this and got ahead and we _ won this year so we looked into this and got ahead and we have - won this year so we looked into this and got ahead and we have had - won this year so we looked into this and got ahead and we have had a i and got ahead and we have had a fantastic— and got ahead and we have had a fantastic response. _ and got ahead and we have had a fantastic response. if— and got ahead and we have had a fantastic response.— fantastic response. if possible, i would like _ fantastic response. if possible, i would like to _ fantastic response. if possible, i would like to have _ fantastic response. if possible, i would like to have a _ fantastic response. if possible, i would like to have a bit - fantastic response. if possible, i would like to have a bit of - fantastic response. if possible, i would like to have a bit of a - fantastic response. if possible, i would like to have a bit of a live| would like to have a bit of a live town preying on the programme. —— town preying on the programme. —— town cyring. in a moment we are going to hand to the local news... no, we are getting the headlines. you have to get the cry right! elizabeth, can we get oyez, oyez, and coming up on programmer pro shortly... and then we will get the award—winning version. elizabeth, you first. award-winning version. elizabeth, ou first. , award-winning version. elizabeth, ou first. i ., , ., you first. oyez! the headlines on bbc breakfast _ you first. oyez! the headlines on bbc breakfast are _ you first. oyez! the headlines on bbc breakfast are coming - you first. oyez! the headlines on bbc breakfast are coming up - you first. oyez! the headlines on i bbc breakfast are coming up soon! that is— bbc breakfast are coming up soon! that is good — that is good. applause
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there are not many of us on the studio but that was impressive. now to the ten time winner, we are ready when you are. to the ten time winner, we are ready when you are-— to the ten time winner, we are ready when you are. very good. oyez! oyez! in mel when you are. very good. oyez! oyez! in mel stop — when you are. very good. oyez! oyez! in mel stop church _ when you are. very good. oyez! oyez! in mel stop church lies _ when you are. very good. oyez! oyez! in mel stop church lies heidi's - in mel stop church lies heidi's height. — in mel stop church lies heidi's height, casty bridge nearby. but there— height, casty bridge nearby. but there is— height, casty bridge nearby. but there is a— height, casty bridge nearby. but there is a threat could mean we lose his landscape and his sky? his parish. — his landscape and his sky? his parish. it— his landscape and his sky? his parish, it could soon be lost. meet dyian— parish, it could soon be lost. meet dylan amid — parish, it could soon be lost. meet dylan amid concrete brick and car it for 1000 _ dylan amid concrete brick and car it for 1000 houses could be built and each for1000 houses could be built and each will— for 1000 houses could be built and each will have its car. what for1000 houses could be built and each will have its car.— each will have its car. what about the headlines _ each will have its car. what about the headlines are _ each will have its car. what about the headlines are coming - each will have its car. what about the headlines are coming up? - each will have its car. what about| the headlines are coming up? oh, that as well! _ the headlines are coming up? oh, that as well! ladies and gentlemen, listeners. _ that as well! ladies and gentlemen, listeners, viewers everywhere, next on bbc _ listeners, viewers everywhere, next on bbc breakfast, the headlines! done _ on bbc breakfast, the headlines! done as— on bbc breakfast, the headlines! done as it — on bbc breakfast, the headlines! done as it has never been done before, absolutely brilliant. as he says, headlines coming up! can’t
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before, absolutely brilliant. as he says, headlines coming up! can't do better than that, _ says, headlines coming up! can't do better than that, can _ says, headlines coming up! can't do better than that, can we? _ good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today. justice for george floyd. former police officer derek chauvin is found guilty of his murder. we the jury, in the above entitled matter, as to count one, unintentional second degree murder while committing a felony, find the defendant guilty. the family say the verdict is a "turning point in history" for america and justice has been done for their brother. what a day to be a floyd, man. wow.
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president biden promises to do more to deal with systemic racism, he says chauvin's conviction is just the start. "i can't breathe. i can't breathe". those were george floyd's last words. we can't let those words die with him. european super leave. all six premier league clubs pull out of the proposed tournament after heavy criticism from all parts of the game. the spotlight now falls on the owners of the clubs that signed up. good evening, mr henry, we're from the bbc. any word for the fans? that's the liverpool's ownerjohn henry. fans have more questions now about how to rebuild trust.
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most of us should see some sunshine bytes bells at some point today, and for the next few day —— sunshine and bright spells at some point today and the next few days it is sunny by day and called by night. —— cold by night. it's wednesday, april 21st. our top story. one of america's most high—profile race trials has ended with the conviction of the white former police officer, derek chauvin, of the murder of george floyd. chauvin had been filmed kneeling on the neck of mr floyd, an african—american, for more than nine minutes during his arrest in the us city of minneapolis last may. as our correspondent, lebo diseko reports, the court was hushed as the verdict was read out. we the jury, in the above entitled matter, as to count one, unintentional second—degree murder while committing a felony, find the defendant guilty. derek chauvin, convicted of two counts of murder, and one of manslaughter. the former policeman led from court in handcuffs. cheering
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it was a result many hadn't dared to believe was possible. in these types of cases, you know, justice has not gone in the way of victims when victims are african—americans at the hands of the police. so, to hear that he was guilty on all three of the charges, itjust seemed like a dream. it's a beautiful day, it's a sad day because george floyd isn't here any more with us, but it's a beautiful day. because justice was served. mr floyd's family called it a victory for anyone who's ever been pinned down. because he showed me how to be strong. he showed me how to be respectful. he showed me how to speak my mind. i'm going to miss him but now i know he's in history. what a day to be a floyd, man. wow. it's ok. it was a death that shook the world, ripping open america's unhealed wounds on racism
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and police brutality. but much of the evidence of this crime was not gathered by police. instead, it was the local community who documented it. filming, begging... he's not responsive right now! and remonstrating with officers as derek chauvin knelt on george floyd's neck for nearly nine and a half minutes. it was a murder in the full light of day, and it ripped the blinders off for the whole world to see. "i can't breathe. i can't breathe." those were george floyd's last words. we can't let those words die with him. this crime might never have come to trial had it not been for this community, who documented it. trauma collectively relived through the trial. but for now, some relief as people take in the victory. we got that justice, now we got that peace!
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many here believe that this is not a case of problems solved. rather, an opening for real change, when it comes to how black people are treated by police in america. let's get more now from lebo, who is outside the court in minneapolis. this outside the court in minneapolis. reverberated aro| tell this reverberated around the world. tell us a little bit about reaction there so far.— tell us a little bit about reaction there so far. certainly, there has been a sense _ there so far. certainly, there has been a sense of— there so far. certainly, there has been a sense of relief, _ there so far. certainly, there has been a sense of relief, and - there so far. certainly, there has been a sense of relief, and we i there so far. certainly, there has i been a sense of relief, and we saw those celebrations outside the store where george floyd died under derek chauvin's me. people saying that yes, —— derek chauvin's me. people saying that yes. -- derek chauvin's chauvin's me. people saying that yes, —— derek chauvin's knee. people saying yes, this is an victory, but one case in so many where african americans are killed by police and in many cases nothing is done. we had joe biden saying he wants this
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to be the start of change, certainly he wants to push a law through congress but whether or not he has the votes to do that remains to be seen. . ~' the votes to do that remains to be seen. ., ~ i ., ., ., ., ., seen. thank you for that and for our seen. thank you for that and for your reporting. _ seen. thank you for that and for your reporting, we _ seen. thank you for that and for your reporting, we will- seen. thank you for that and for your reporting, we will be - seen. thank you for that and for i your reporting, we will be speaking to a minnesota state representative here shortly. all six premier league teams involved in the european super league have now withdrawn from the competition. manchester city, chelsea, arsenal, liverpool, manchester united and tottenham have all now gone back their decision to take part after a huge backlash from all parts of the game. the super league said it would reconsider "the most appropriate steps" to reshape the project. former premier league footballer chris sutton told bbc breakfast earlier that the clubs underestimated their fans. i think that last night was one of the greatest nights we have had in our game. the question is, how on earth did we get here? there are still a lot of questions which need answering. i think the couple of days previous to that, it has been pretty depressing. six of our great english clubs
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had turned their back on our country and our leagues, and it would have affected the whole football pyramid. they are the shameless six, and they totally underestimated the fans across the country. that was chris sutton speaking to us earlier. let's speak now to our sports editor dan roan. good morning, i know you have been at the centre of this, breaking news about chelsea and at the last night, and this story continues to develop minute by minute.— minute by minute. yes, in the last few minutes. _ minute by minute. yes, in the last few minutes, the _ minute by minute. yes, in the last few minutes, the owner _ minute by minute. yes, in the last few minutes, the owner of - minute by minute. yes, in the last i few minutes, the owner of liverpool football club, john henry, based in boston, has released a video message to liverpool's fans. i havejust caught a quick glimpse of it but i noticed that he did apologise to liverpool fans for what he has put them through over the last few days. he was very much one of the principal architect of this super league plan along with manchester
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united and real madrid. he said he had listened to the backlash of the supporters and realise that it could not continue. nonetheless, i think it will take quite some time, despite that apology, i think arsenal also apologised late last night, the other clubs released rather brief, rather sheepish statements. it will take time for those wounds, the damage that has been done over the last few days, to been done over the last few days, to be healing. the rhetoric has been very strong, players have being threatened with bans from the national teams, clubs have faced the possibility of expulsion.— possibility of expulsion. thank you so much, possibility of expulsion. thank you so much. i— possibility of expulsion. thank you so much, i know— possibility of expulsion. thank you so much, i know you _ possibility of expulsion. thank you so much, i know you have - possibility of expulsion. thank you so much, i know you have had - possibility of expulsion. thank you so much, i know you have had a i possibility of expulsion. thank you i so much, i know you have had a busy few hours. the owner of liverpool, john henry, hasjust made a statement in the last few minutes which has been put out by the club. we will try and bring you that later, we will speaking tojohn barnes in the next few minutes about
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what has happened over the last few hours. the bbc has seen a series of texts in which the prime minister assures to "fix" tax rules on behalf of businessman sirjames dyson. in the messages, sent in march last year, borisjohnson assures sirjames that neither his singapore—based company, nor its senior employees would have to pay more uk tax, if they were to make ventilators for the nhs. our chief political correspondent adam fleming joins us now with the details. we have had all sorts of stories to talk about this week and this is an interesting development around the heavily scrutinised issue of lobbying government. yes, we have been talking — lobbying government. yes, we have been talking about _ lobbying government. yes, we have been talking about this _ lobbying government. yes, we have been talking about this for - lobbying government. yes, we have been talking about this for weeks i been talking about this for weeks now and now there is an extra little twist to it. to understand this you need to cast your mind back to last spring, when covid had just hit the uk, everyone was worried we would not have enough ventilators. james dyson said, don't worry, i can step in and probably invent one double—click but he was worried that lots of his team were based in
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singapore, and with their tax status be affected if they came to the uk to work on the project? the prime minister and he made a private text exchange when the pm said, i will fix this, and said he would get on to rishi sunak, the chancellor, and the treasury. that raises questions between interactions and ministers between interactions and ministers between business people are meant to have an official overseeing them and if there is not, you are meant to declare it pretty quick and it's not clear that either of those things happen in this case. oliver dowden, the culture secretary, who was doing interviews this morning, said, there is nothing to see here. yes. interviews this morning, said, there is nothing to see here.— is nothing to see here. yes, i do, for two reasons. _ is nothing to see here. yes, i do, for two reasons. we _ is nothing to see here. yes, i do, for two reasons. we are - is nothing to see here. yes, i do, for two reasons. we are in - is nothing to see here. yes, i do, for two reasons. we are in the i for two reasons. we are in the middle — for two reasons. we are in the middle of— for two reasons. we are in the middle of a national emergency and no one _ middle of a national emergency and no one was— middle of a national emergency and no one was doing this for their own .ain no one was doing this for their own gain but— no one was doing this for their own gain but to — no one was doing this for their own gain but to make sure that we got ventilators — gain but to make sure that we got ventilators rapidly to make sure we dealt _ ventilators rapidly to make sure we dealt with— ventilators rapidly to make sure we dealt with a national emergency and it was— dealt with a national emergency and it was a _ dealt with a national emergency and it was a temporary measure. secondly. — it was a temporary measure. secondly, this measure went before parliament in the proper transparent way.
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parliament in the proper transparent way there _ parliament in the proper transparent way. there was an opportunity for mps to— way. there was an opportunity for mps to be — way. there was an opportunity for mps to be able to approve this very temporary— mps to be able to approve this very temporary measure. i think in the middle _ temporary measure. i think in the middle of— temporary measure. i think in the middle of a — temporary measure. i think in the middle of a national emergency, we had to— middle of a national emergency, we had to move fast. i remember doing interviews _ had to move fast. i remember doing interviews like this, and you are rightly— interviews like this, and you are rightly pushing me and other ministers as to how we could move as rapidly— ministers as to how we could move as rapidly as— ministers as to how we could move as rapidly as possible to deal with this national emergency and that is what the _ this national emergency and that is what the prime minster did in this instance — what the prime minster did in this instance. ., ,., what the prime minster did in this instance. ., ., , instance. labour say that these text messa . es instance. labour say that these text messages are _ instance. labour say that these text messages are jaw-dropping, - instance. labour say that these text messages are jaw-dropping, in - instance. labour say that these text | messages are jaw-dropping, in their messages are jaw—dropping, in their words. but interestingly, tony blair has just been on the radio saying, chill out, this isjust the kind of thing prime ministers have to do in a crisis. that doesn't mean that questions will not be asked about this. . .. questions will not be asked about this. ., ,, i ., questions will not be asked about this. . ~' i ., i questions will not be asked about this. ., ,, i ., i . questions will not be asked about this. . ,. i . ., questions will not be asked about this. ., ,, i . ., ., the queen will mark her 95th birthday today in private, four days after the funeral of her husband, the duke of edinburgh. there will be no public celebrations as she continues to observe two weeks of mourning until friday and no photograph celebrating the day is expected to be released this year. coming up to 12 minutes past eight,
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and let's get the details of the weather. it is chillier than i expected. that looks lovely, though. it caught you out, louise! bless you! it is chilly, it has been a cold and frosty starts this morning particularly in scotland, england has a cold start that temperature is picking up nicely. it will stay dry over the next few days, significant rainfall not in the forecast and frosty nights. a weak weather front is moving southwards, bringing cloud and the odd spot of rain with it into southern areas. some showers developing across the south—west but brightening up in northern england, patchy cloud in northern ireland and some sunshine in scotland. the cloud across the far north of scotland could produce some showers in the northern isles. we also have a breeze coming in across the south—east sew along the north sea coastline, it will feel a little bit nippy. high temperatures in the south—west at 17 degrees. the
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temperature will fall away quite quickly this evening, showers will fade and will be a cold night under clear skies. fade and will be a cold night under clearskies. patchy fade and will be a cold night under clear skies. patchy mist and fog forming across east midlands, eastern england. look at all of the blue on the chart telling you we have temperatures of freezing or below, so widespread frost. we could have temperatures as low as —4 across north—east england and scotland. the strong spring sunshine is as strong as it is at the end of august, so tomorrow we will have the clear spells coming through, the fog dispersing, breezy along the english channel and cloudy in the north of scotland. top temperatures up to 17 across the north west of england and parts of eastern scotland. the rather remaining to set fair into the parts of eastern scotland. the rather remaining to set fair into —— the weather remains set fair into the weather remains set fair into the next weekend. it was a murder that sparked a wave of protests around the world, and last night the family of george floyd pledged
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to continue their fight against racism and the excessive use of police force in the united states. it comes after a jury in minneapolis found former police officer, derek chauvin, guilty of mr floyd's murder last may. here's what one of his brothers had to say. i'mma put up a fight every day. because i'm notjust fighting for george any more, i'm fighting for everybody in this world. yeah. i get calls, i get dms, people from brazil, from ghana, from germany, everybody, london, italy, they're all saying the same thing. we won't be able to breathe until you're able to breathe. that's right. today, we are able to breathe again. applause after the verdict, us president biden said the legacy of george floyd's death should not focus on the violence of his murder, but rather on what actions needed to be taken to ensure something like this would not happen again. the guilty verdict does
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not bring back george. but through the family's pain, we're finding purpose so george's legacy will notjust be about his death, but about what we must do in his memory. i also spoke to gianna, george's young daughter again. when i met her last year, i've said this before, at george's funeral, i told her how brave i thought she was. and i sort of knelt down to hold her hand. i said, "daddy is looking down on you, he's so proud". she said to me then, i'll neverforget it, "daddy changed the world". and i told her this afternoon, daddy did change the world. let that be his legacy, a legacy of peace, not violence. joining us now is cedrick frazier,
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minnesota state representative. good minnesota state representative. morning, thank y joining good morning, thank you so much for joining us. before we talk about the future, tell us about your reaction when you heard the verdict. meiji. future, tell us about your reaction when you heard the verdict. well, i was pleased _ when you heard the verdict. well, i was pleased with _ when you heard the verdict. well, i was pleased with the _ when you heard the verdict. well, i was pleased with the verdict, - when you heard the verdict. well, i was pleased with the verdict, but i was pleased with the verdict, but also knowing that this was only one step. it was accountability for the officer that caused the death, or ex officer that caused the death, or ex officer that caused the death and murdered george floyd, but we have more to do to make sure that we have a public safety system where every life matters but particularly black lives matter, who have not always been treated with the respect they need. i been treated with the respect they need. .. . been treated with the respect they need. ~ , , need. i think this is the third time white close _ need. i think this is the third time white close officer _ need. i think this is the third time white close officer has _ need. i think this is the third time white close officer has been - white close officer has been convicted of killing a black man —— i think this is the first time white police officer has been convicted of killing a black man in minnesota, do you think this will change things? this is only one step. our system
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should work this way. the way that people separated when this verdict came down, it should not be an exception that someone could commit such an egregious act and murder someone the way the former officer did, should be elevated like this. we should expect the system to be for all people in society particularly black people who have not been valued. i'm hoping things will change but we have to do a lot of work at state level to pass other laws to make sure we have accountability when former officers crossed the line —like form officer chauvin did. crossed the line -like form officer chauvin did-— crossed the line -like form officer chauvin did. e ., ., , ., ,, chauvin did. what laws do you think need to change? _ chauvin did. what laws do you think need to change? we _ chauvin did. what laws do you think need to change? we want _ chauvin did. what laws do you think need to change? we want laws - chauvin did. what laws do you think- need to change? we want laws changed about how people _ need to change? we want laws changed about how people deal— need to change? we want laws changed about how people deal with _ need to change? we want laws changed about how people deal with traffic- about how people deal with traffic stops, this goes to the killing of daunte wright which happened just ten days ago. this goes to how
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drivers can be pulled over if you have expired tags or air freshener, this will limit the interactions which can turn deadly. brute this will limit the interactions which can turn deadly. we have had semi people — which can turn deadly. we have had semi people reacting _ which can turn deadly. we have had semi people reacting to _ which can turn deadly. we have had semi people reacting to this - semi people reacting to this including joe biden reminding all of us of those words, i can't breathe, he said, those words should not die with george floyd. so many things have been said but these are important things, aren't they? the important things, aren't they? very important. i think in this moment what we have to do as a community, as a state in minnesota, is a country in the us and as the world, we have to make sure that from this moment for three put together a system that values black lives. —— from this moment forward. so we have transparency and reform in our policing. teiiii so we have transparency and reform in our policing-— in our policing. tell us a bit about what ou in our policing. tell us a bit about what you think — in our policing. tell us a bit about what you think can _ in our policing. tell us a bit about what you think can be _ in our policing. tell us a bit about what you think can be done - in our policing. tell us a bit about what you think can be done to - what you think can be done to restore trust between police and the communities. i restore trust between police and the communities-—
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restore trust between police and the communities. i think we are going to movin: communities. i think we are going to moving forward _ communities. i think we are going to moving forward have _ communities. i think we are going to moving forward have a _ communities. i think we are going to moving forward have a system - communities. i think we are going to moving forward have a system that i moving forward have a system that has true accountability. we need to have a system where, myself as a black man, if i am going out and driving my car, we have to get to a place where i feel safe doing that. right now honestly i have to tell you, even after this verdict, i still don't feel safe driving my car. if i have an interaction with an officer, i don't feel safe yet. we have a way to go to make sure that a black man like myself will feel safe when he gets in his car and leaves his home, to feel safe that he will come back. i and leaves his home, to feel safe that he will come back.— that he will come back. i 'ust wanted to i that he will come back. i 'ust wanted to ask i that he will come back. i 'ust wanted to ask you i that he will come back. i 'ust wanted to ask you that, h that he will come back. ijust i wanted to ask you that, exactly. that he will come back. ijust - wanted to ask you that, exactly. how you felt and how friends and family of yours deal, that is still how you feel at the moment? that of yours deal, that is still how you feel at the moment?— feel at the moment? that is still how i feel at the moment? that is still how i feel _ feel at the moment? that is still how i feel at _ feel at the moment? that is still how i feel at the _ feel at the moment? that is still how i feel at the moment. - feel at the moment? that is still how i feel at the moment. this i feel at the moment? that is still| how i feel at the moment. this is only one case. there have been so many cases. only ten days ago, we had another black unarmed man killed by law enforcement officer, less than nine minutes away from my home. and looking to the future, it has caused reverberations around the
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whole world, this, hasn't it? are you optimistic? i whole world, this, hasn't it? are you optimistic?— you optimistic? i am hopeful, because of— you optimistic? i am hopeful, because of the _ you optimistic? i am hopeful, because of the historic - you optimistic? i am hopeful, i because of the historic manner you optimistic? i am hopeful, - because of the historic manner in which this verdict came down for a former officer chauvin who murdered george floyd, i am hopeful that we are at a point now that are at a point now as george floyd, i am hopeful that we are at a point now as a country we need to have change and a different system of policing in our country, and particularly in regards to black and particularly in regards to black and brown people in our country. really good to talk to you, thank you so much indeed, cedrick frazier, minnesota state representative. a really busy morning this morning, trying to bring you up—to—date with the massive stories. the verdict in the massive stories. the verdict in the george floyd trail is one of those, and the other one is the european super league. in the last few minutes, liverpool ownerjohn w henry has issued a video statement apologising
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for the club's involvement in the european superleague. it comes as all six clubs pulled out. let's have a look at what he had to say. i want to apologise to all the fans and supporters are liverpool football club for the disruption i cold over the past 48 hours. it goes without saying that should be said, the project put forward was never going to stand without the support of the fans. no one ever thought differently in england. over the 48 hours, you were very clear that it would not stand. we heard you, i heard you. and i want to apologise tojuergen klopp, to billy, to the players and everyone who works so hard to make our fans players and everyone who works so hard to make ourfans proud. they have absolutely no responsibility for this disruption. they were the most disrupted, and unfairly so. this is what hurts most. they love your club and work to make you proud everything all day. —— every single
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day. i note the entire lfc team has the expertise, leadership and passion necessary to help us move forward. that is a pretty staggering apology. we said yesterday only arsenal had formally apologised but that is the owner of liverpool saying, we got it wrong. owner of liverpool saying, we got it wroni. . . owner of liverpool saying, we got it wron _ , ., , ., owner of liverpool saying, we got it wron.. , ., ,., , wrong. yes, that statement was 'ust released 20 — wrong. yes, that statement was 'ust released 20 minutes i wrong. yes, that statement was 'ust released 20 minutes ago i wrong. yes, that statement was 'ust released 20 minutes ago via i wrong. yes, that statement was 'ust released 20 minutes ago via the i released 20 minutes ago via the club's website. it's incredible to think, that man with all of that power, who had gone all the way down the road with the european super league, now had to say these words. directly offer a personal apology to juergen klopp and the players and the fans, for getting it so badly wrong. you wonder if they had communicated better with the staff in the club in the first place, if it would have even got to this point. chelsea, one of the other clubs to make a u—turn, played brighton in the premier league last night. brighton were one of many clubs to speak out against the super league plans
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and the club's chief executive, paul barber, joins us now. good morning, great to see you. your reaction to the developments in the last hour or so, now we are seeing clubs having to apologise for what looks like a terrible mess? it's been an extraordinary 72 hours, sally _ been an extraordinary 72 hours, sally it's— been an extraordinary 72 hours, sally. it's been unedifying, it's been _ sally. it's been unedifying, it's been bad — sally. it's been unedifying, it's been bad news for the sport. i think it has— been bad news for the sport. i think it has been— been bad news for the sport. i think it has been a — been bad news for the sport. i think it has been a pr disaster for the six clubs— it has been a pr disaster for the six clubs that chose to take part in this european super league. but i think— this european super league. but i think once — this european super league. but i think once again, the football fans in this— think once again, the football fans in this country have spoken, they have _ in this country have spoken, they have been— in this country have spoken, they have been listened to, and i'm glad to see _ have been listened to, and i'm glad to see that— have been listened to, and i'm glad to see that all six clubs have now withdrawn — to see that all six clubs have now withdrawn their membership of the european _ withdrawn their membership of the european super league. you condemned this idea too much _ european super league. you condemned this idea too much at _ european super league. you condemned this idea too much at the _ european super league. you condemned this idea too much at the very _ european super league. you condemned this idea too much at the very start - this idea too much at the very start of it. how would have it affected your club? i of it. how would have it affected your club?— your club? i think all fans of football in _ your club? i think all fans of football in this _ your club? i think all fans of football in this country - your club? i think all fans of football in this country have j your club? i think all fans of- football in this country have become used to— football in this country have become used to 150 — football in this country have become used to 150 years of tradition where football— used to 150 years of tradition where football success is earned on the field. _ football success is earned on the field, through merit, not through being _ field, through merit, not through being rich— field, through merit, not through being rich or powerful or having the biggest _ being rich or powerful or having the
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biggest clubs. we all believe in the dream _ biggest clubs. we all believe in the dream of— biggest clubs. we all believe in the dream of being able to take a club from— dream of being able to take a club from the _ dream of being able to take a club from the lower reaches of the football — from the lower reaches of the football pyramid, as we did at brighton, all the way to the premier league _ brighton, all the way to the premier league. but i have the opportunity to play— league. but i have the opportunity to play in— league. but i have the opportunity to play in european competition effectively curtailed by a competition which would have been a closed _ competition which would have been a closed shop would have taken away that dream. notjust for the clubs and their— that dream. notjust for the clubs and their owners, but most importantly for the fans. we are watchin: importantly for the fans. we are watching incredible _ importantly for the fans. we are watching incredible pictures - importantly for the fans. we are watching incredible pictures of. watching incredible pictures of chelsea fans protesting last night at stamford bridge where your club brighton were playing. it's almost like the match was completely overshadowed by what was happening. what was the atmosphere like, and what have people said to you about what have people said to you about what was going on last night? i had to make my— what was going on last night? i had to make my way — what was going on last night? i had to make my way through _ what was going on last night? i had to make my way through those crowds to make my way through those crowds to get _ to make my way through those crowds to get into _ to make my way through those crowds to get into the stadium. first of all, to get into the stadium. first of all. it— to get into the stadium. first of all. it is— to get into the stadium. first of all. it is an _ to get into the stadium. first of all, it is an unusual experience to see crowds— all, it is an unusual experience to see crowds at football club again so that was— see crowds at football club again so that was quite nice in a way. the atmosphere was not in any way hostile — atmosphere was not in any way hostile or— atmosphere was not in any way hostile or unpleasant, the chelsea fans were —
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hostile or unpleasant, the chelsea fans were making their protest from what i _ fans were making their protest from what i could see respectfully and in .ood what i could see respectfully and in good voice — what i could see respectfully and in good voice. our coach was slightly delayed _ good voice. our coach was slightly delayed coming to the stadium because — delayed coming to the stadium because of the numbers of people outside _ because of the numbers of people outside but i think it was a clear demonstration from chelsea fans, as they were _ demonstration from chelsea fans, as they were from other fans up and down _ they were from other fans up and down the — they were from other fans up and down the country, of the big six clubs. _ down the country, of the big six clubs. that _ down the country, of the big six clubs, that this european super league — clubs, that this european super league was not something they wanted — league was not something they wanted. it wasn't something the fans wanted. _ wanted. it wasn't something the fans wanted. it— wanted. it wasn't something the fans wanted, it wasn't something the rest of the _ wanted, it wasn't something the rest of the football pyramid wanted, and i'm of the football pyramid wanted, and i'm really— of the football pyramid wanted, and i'm really pleased that we are now in the _ i'm really pleased that we are now in the position where this european super— in the position where this european super league is off the table, we can look— super league is off the table, we can look forward again, but obviously the last 72 hours has caused — obviously the last 72 hours has caused a — obviously the last 72 hours has caused a huge amount of damage and relationships has been damaged, trust _ relationships has been damaged, trust has — relationships has been damaged, trust has been lost. we have a lot of work— trust has been lost. we have a lot of work now — trust has been lost. we have a lot of work now to do to actually repair that _ of work now to do to actually repair that. ~ ., ., , ., , that. while over the last 72 hours we have all— that. while over the last 72 hours we have all been _ that. while over the last 72 hours we have all been distracted - that. while over the last 72 hours we have all been distracted by i that. while over the last 72 hours i we have all been distracted by this, something else has been happening. changes to the champions league have been put forward. we saw them announced on monday. what do you make of them? while we are talking about this, we aren't looking at that so closely.— that so closely. no, football is
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ever changing _ that so closely. no, football is ever changing and _ that so closely. no, football is ever changing and obviously i that so closely. no, football is i ever changing and obviously uefa that so closely. no, football is - ever changing and obviously uefa are trying _ ever changing and obviously uefa are trying their— ever changing and obviously uefa are trying their best to create as much value _ trying their best to create as much value as _ trying their best to create as much value as possible for their competition. my immediate priority for brighton is staying in the premier— for brighton is staying in the premier league this season and playing — premier league this season and playing in— premier league this season and playing in the premier league next season _ playing in the premier league next season i_ playing in the premier league next season. i think the most important thing _ season. i think the most important thing in _ season. i think the most important thing in regards to the changes of the champions league is that we look forward _ the champions league is that we look forward now to having as football system _ forward now to having as football system and if football pyramid where success _ system and if football pyramid where success on _ system and if football pyramid where success on the field is rewarded —— -- whether— success on the field is rewarded —— -- whether it — success on the field is rewarded —— —— whether it is a lower level or high-level_ —— whether it is a lower level or high—level we don't want or stand for a _ high—level we don't want or stand for a closed — high—level we don't want or stand for a closed shop where the biggest clubs lock— for a closed shop where the biggest clubs lock up as much money as possible — clubs lock up as much money as possible and make it even more difficult — possible and make it even more difficult for the rest of this to complete. difficult for the rest of this to complete-— difficult for the rest of this to comlete. , ., , ., .., , complete. -- rest of us to complete. thank ou complete. -- rest of us to complete. thank you so — complete. -- rest of us to complete. thank you so much, _ complete. -- rest of us to complete. thank you so much, paul— complete. -- rest of us to complete. thank you so much, paul barber. - let's get the thoughts now of former liverpool playerjohn barnes. john, really good to talk to about this. i'm sure you have been listening very carefully, i don't know if you are able to hearjohn
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henry the owner of liverpool speak in the last few minutes as well. it seems, lots to talk about, but it seems, lots to talk about, but it seems to be a staggering misjudgment and a miscalculation about the feelings of football fans, the feelings of football fans, the feelings of football fans, the feelings of players, and even the manager at liverpool and these other clubs involved, by some these owners. it clubs involved, by some these owners. . . owners. it started in 1992 in the premier league _ owners. it started in 1992 in the premier league came _ owners. it started in 1992 in the premier league came into - owners. it started in 1992 in the i premier league came into being. owners. it started in 1992 in the - premier league came into being. the top football clubs, five who wanted top football clubs, five who wanted to break away and start their only league because they wanted more money, they thought they deserved more money. a lot of teams in the first division after the top five were soundly criticised for wanting to do that, they were invited to the party, then the premier league started, so it has been a close shot. there is promotion and relegation but it has been about unequal this wealth for the bigger clubs as much as it is not the top six so this has been going on since 1992. after that what football fans wanted wet multimillionaire people coming into when the clubs. when these people come in, we expect them
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to understand the nature of football, but it is the other way round. football has to understand the nature of big business and big business is about money, based on finances and nothing else. so we are caught in between the two whereby we are happy for these multi billionaire owners to come in clubs, but we want them to do what we say, that's not how they became millionaires. they make decisions solely based on finance so we have to get the right balance. the fans have nothing to do with this, this is a power struggle between uefa, fifa, sky, everyone who runs football, and it is a new group which wants to take over, to exploit football and exploit the masses. now the fans have one, our ticket prices and share price is going to go down? i don't know how they have one. they may feel they have won but the winners are the status quo which has been exploiting football for years. it is fair to say that football fans have felt disenfranchised and lost contact with their club very much as you say over the last 1520, maybe
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even more years. what was different about this, why did this engender such a strong reaction from not only those involved in playing the games, but right across the fan spectrum? because we were convinced by sky, by other clubs, that it was the wrong thing to do for the people. who other people? who will benefit from this? the premier league, fifa, will league 1, lead to an grassroots football benefit? no, they won't. who will benefit? and had this been a proposal and the asl said, there will still be promotion and relegation, not promotion and relegation, not promotion and relegation but access to it, do you think they would have said no? they would triple their income but you would triple their income but you would be allowed to qualify? do you think then in the name of football and the working classes and fans, we would not do this because that is not going to help crewe alexandra and grimsby? they would not have done that. it has been framed as a football revolution for the working class people, but it isn't, it has
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been a power struggle to control and exploit football. what would help if that salary cap came in, better governance, better control, so that would be fair, i had pep guardiola talking about the unfairness of it all. is it fair that they can spend much more than anyone else, money they have generated? it suits us to talk about the moral high ground and for fifa to be talking about morality and we are taking fifa side, because they say, for the good football, knowing what they go through, that beggars belief. iliinfheh through, that beggars belief. when eo - le through, that beggars belief. when --eole sa through, that beggars belief. when people say today. _ through, that beggars belief. when people say today, that _ through, that beggars belief. when people say today, that is _ through, that beggars belief. when people say today, that is a - through, that beggars belief. when people say today, that is a huge victory for fans, do you think it is our victory at all? is it a hollow victory or is something happening? let's see if these fans can afford to buy shirts for their loved ones or get tickets to the stadium. it is still big business. the status quo will remain. if football fans were happy with what is going on before, they are fine. it's not a victory for football fans. they are fine. it's not a victory forfootball fans. or of they are fine. it's not a victory for football fans. or of those chelsea fans outside the ground,
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when the fans can get in, how many of those can even afford tickets? that they will be asked to help to make it even better. and secondly for the big six, do you not think that uefa is now going to give them more money to still be a part of it, which is what they wanted in the first place? i think it was warm money getting out of uefa —— i think it was a power ploy to get more money from uefa which they have done. the distribution of wealth is still among the elite. this is not going to help grassroots football, it will help people who wants to be invited to the party, who are elites, and if they had, this would not have happened. i elites, and if they had, this would not have happened.— elites, and if they had, this would not have happened. i had some fans discussin: not have happened. i had some fans discussing this _ not have happened. i had some fans discussing this yesterday, _ not have happened. i had some fans discussing this yesterday, a - discussing this yesterday, a discussion which touches on some of these, one saying this is a huge victory, and the other said, are you going to complain to your team next season when they are not spending huge amounts of money trying to get big players? ithink huge amounts of money trying to get big players? i think that encapsulates some of the things you are talking about. and alongside that, we have spoken to oliver
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dowden the culture secretary today about this fine review of football. do you think there are any changes that will be coming in the pipeline? first of all, if liverpool fans are not happy and they want to get rid ofjohn henry and sell the club, who do they want to sell the club too? someone with more money than him, and if someone comes in with the same amount of money, how do you think they got their money? making decisions regarding finance. unless it is going to be a football fan all the old david dean, the hill woods, the old david dean, the hill woods, the family's from liverpool who owned it, those days are over. it is business people who come and take decisions based on finance. who do we want to come into football? we have to understand, if discovered in terms of who can run a club, the only way it will work... . terms of who can run a club, the only way it will work. . .— only way it will work. .. , john barnes. _ only way it will work. .. , john barnes. mid _ only way it will work. .. , john barnes, mid point! _ only way it will work. .. , john barnes, mid point! what- only way it will work. .. , john barnes, mid point! what is. only way it will work. .. , john i barnes, mid point! what is the only way it will work. .. , john - barnes, mid point! what is the way it is going to work, john? the barnes, mid point! what is the way it is going to work, john?— it is going to work, john? the only it is going to work, john? the only it wa it it is going to work, john? the only it way it will _ it is going to work, john? the only it way it will work, _ it is going to work, john? the only it way it will work, is _ it is going to work, john? the only it way it will work, is if _ it is going to work, john? the only it way it will work, is if we - it is going to work, john? the only it way it will work, is if we can - it way it will work, is if we can then control football from the point
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of view of bringing in a salary cap, controlling it, reviewing it, being better audited, so it is a level playing field for every team in the premier league you can spend the same amount of money, players will still make a lot of money but owners will not be put under pressure by fans to spend money they haven't got, or, because they are not able to spend it because two clubs cannot just buy the best players to win, that isn't the ideal way to run a competition anyway if you talk about their play. so a salary cap coming in would be the best thing.- in would be the best thing. thank ioodness in would be the best thing. thank goodness we _ in would be the best thing. thank goodness we got _ in would be the best thing. thank goodness we got that _ in would be the best thing. thank goodness we got that last - in would be the best thing. thank goodness we got that last bit! - in would be the best thing. thank i goodness we got that last bit! thank ou so goodness we got that last bit! thank you so much. _ goodness we got that last bit! thank you so much, have _ goodness we got that last bit! thank you so much, have a _ goodness we got that last bit! thank you so much, have a good _ goodness we got that last bit! thank you so much, have a good day, - goodness we got that last bit! thank you so much, have a good day, mr barnes _ time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. health charities say expansion plans for london's ultra low emission zone should go even further. the current plan is to expand to the north and south circular in october. older more polluting vehicles will have to pay £12.50 a day. but the british lung foundation
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and asthma uk say expanding it to cover all of london would reduce illness amongst 360,000 people. londoners are being reminded to take up their covid vaccinations when offered. there are growing concerns around new variants, including the indian strain. the capital's director for public health says we mustn't be complacent. we certainly should be planning for a re—emergence of infection and we should be looking at everything we're doing now to reduce the likelihood and the severity of that third wave, and that includes all of us getting the vaccination when it's offered as we re—emerge from the lockdown to ensure that we continue to practise all of the prevention measures — hands, face, space. as we've been hearing all six english clubs — including three london teams — are pulling out of a planned european super league. arsenal apologised to fans, tottenham's chairman said the club
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regretted the "anxiety and upset" caused. and chelsea confirmed they'd begun the formal withdrawal procedure. now, combining art with a food shop. the design museum in kensington has reopened its store stocking essential goods with packaging designed by artists. items available to buy include tinned kidney beans, tea, coffee and washing—up liquid. let's take a look at the travel situation now... now the weather with elizabeth. hello, good morning. well, it's another dry day ahead, but it won't be feeling as warm as it was yesterday. having said that,
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it is a milder start to the morning for most of us — temperatures are in mid single figures. there's a bit of high cloud out there for a time, but that should break up, we'll see the sunshine come through. but there will be more fair—weather cloud building as we head through the late morning and into the afternoon. so it's set to cloud over at times, but still some bright and some sunny spells. it will stay dry with a noticeable north—easterly wind, and top temperatures lower than they were — between 12 and 14 degrees celsius, but maybe be 15 somewhere out towards the west. now, as we head through this evening and overnight, high pressure pressure builds in. the cloud is set to melt away, and in that colder air, temperatures will drop very close to freezing so there'll be a touch of frost into thursday morning. thursday and friday, plenty of sunshine, staying dry. dry, too, at the weekend with some sunny spells and temperatures building slightly. i'll be back in half an hour. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. i think this is the latest we have ever gone to gethin and kym, sorry, john barnes was talking. when you start! such a shame because _ talking. when you start! such a shame because bonnie - talking. when you start! such a shame because bonnie tyler i talking. when you start! such a - shame because bonnie tyler popped in and now— shame because bonnie tyler popped in and now she's gone. doesn't matter, loves _ and now she's gone. doesn't matter, loves coming — and now she's gone. doesn't matter, loves coming up this morning. as the number of cases of the indian variant doubles to 160 injust one week, we'll be asking dr punam if there are new symptoms we should look out for. plus she'll be answering your questions so please do get in touch. plus, with around 400,000 people being jabbed every day, _ working hard to get us back to some form of normality are _ the covid vaccine marshals. we'll be meeting the volunteersi who have put aside their dayjobs to help out for free! brilliant effort! but if you're fed up of all things covid and frustrated you can't
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justjet away abroad, don't miss our guide to exotic uk breaks. you won't need a flight to get yourself to this stunning italian village! but it isn't italy! and you don't need _ but it isn't italy! and you don't need to— but it isn't italy! and you don't need to take a flight. that's the thing _ we'll have more on that when we're joined by a travel expert in the studio. and once you've found the perfect i location you'll need the perfect i picnic to take with you. don't worry, our chef _ anna haugh has got you covered with some tips that _ are covid—safe and satisfying! but make sure you set up camp away from the trees, because mystery blobs of alien—like slime are taking over the countryside, and they're far more intelligent than you might think! "but what are they?" i hear you ask. that's what we'll be finding out. look... weird. . plus neiljones is back for another mid—week strictly fitness. - today it's all about the core. if it legs and core? legs and core. not leis
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if it legs and core? legs and core. not legs ankle. — if it legs and core? legs and core. not legs ankle, legs _ if it legs and core? legs and core. not legs ankle, legs and - if it legs and core? legs and core. not legs ankle, legs and core. - join us for that, and much more, at 9:15! don't miss like they! never miss a le: da . for many of us, lockdown may have felt like a fashion—free zone of pyjamas, joggers and hoodies. but according to those in the know, it's inspired a clothing revolution which could be here to stay. gone is the no—pain—no—gain fashion of old. instead, the new look on the high street is based on one thing over everything else — comfort. breakfast's jayne mccubbin has been finding out more. fashion plus lockdown equals...? i was wearing only pyjamas! i've been wearing pyjamas... that's it? ..for over 12 months. a lot of pyjamas. you'll see a lot of people wearing pyjamas in town. joggers...and hoodies. that's it? and that's it. it's fair to say we haven't been living our best fashion lives in the last 12 months. but lockdown has created a new fashion buzz, and —
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brace yourself — it's all about comfort. meet leanne — scouse fashionista, influencer dj and all—round girl about town. we spent so much of our lives before covid worrying about fitting into tightjeans, lying on the floor, pulling them up, buttoning them up. now we're all about comfort. i have poshjoggers, which is a matching jogging suit, little bit of a shoulder out, some nice high wedges, big earrings... but everything stretches, everything's cosy, nothing needs ironing! who needs to do that after 12 months being stuck in the house? i like it. i like the sound of this. fashion has never really been for the faint—hearted — all pain, no gain. lockdown has changed all that and, some say, for good. one look at the huge
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queues waiting to buy, buy, buy tell us we need ideas, ideas, ideas. and lockdown has told designers rachel and joanne all they need to know. comfort. that's it? all the way. i think so. so obviously nothing too structured, nothing too fitted. are we talking elasticated waist? yes. so, yeah, we've got a drawstring waist, but i don't want to go for a meal now and have to open my top button. you know, or go home and you've got lacerations from where yourjeans have been too tight! no, i'm not doing it. we just realised that we wanted to be comfortable, but still look nice, as well. you want evidence of this new trend? you got it. on asos, sales of relax skaterjeans have massively overtaken sales of skinny styles. sales of tracksuit bottoms at net—a—porter have exploded. while m&s saw athleisure sales go through the roof during the pandemic. and this isn'tjust about the ladies — oh, no! # my darling, i...
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# can't get enough of your love, babe. if you'd have asked ben what he associated elastic pants with a few years ago, he would have said... terry wogan would have been a man who'd wear elasticated pants. very comfortable. but now he's turned comfort into business in the finest italian cottons. to some extent, all of us have become hooked on comfort. we've started selling a hybrid trouser, but it's made with a nice italian stretch cotton, and we've trimmed it with an elasticated waistband and a drawstring so you've got that extra level of comfort — and those have been selling like hotca kes. so in the last four or five weeks, we've seen a 300% increase in the sales of that hybrid trouser — that work—jogger, if you like. behold the work—jogger — modelled by freddie. mm, comfy. so let's head to liverpool to meet the new fashionistas
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hooked on comfort. katie, this seems like a perfect example of lockdown fashion. yeah. look at this stretch on that! leatherjoggies. is that an elasticated waist? elasticated waist! it's all about the comfy look. yeah. i have, like, five of the same joggers, but different colours — like, ten of the same tops. lose the high heels, just get your comfies on. so remember — comfy plus stretchy equals fashion. there's no going back. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. if they are going back? —— is there any going back? let's get more now on that new style of comfort clothing from fashion expert trinny woodall, who joins us from west london. is this right, what do you think of this new version, when we are easing ourselves out of lockdown? it is what is. ourselves out of lockdown? it is what is- we _
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ourselves out of lockdown? it is what is. we have _ ourselves out of lockdown? it is what is. we have all _ ourselves out of lockdown? it 3 what is. we have all spent a year at home, working at home and being at home, working at home and being at home and not having to make that effort. if you have been on a zoom, we have been making an effort on the top half and many times i have had meetings during the day and i am really presentable up here and the bottom half is very relaxed. there is an easing and listening to that film i can so appreciate all those people thinking, well, my body has changed shape, it's the "covid diet". wejust changed shape, it's the "covid diet". we just want to feel comfortable. we have evolved, the memory becomes more distant. there are things we can do to make ourselves feel better and slowly get back into feeling not like before but a new evolution of that. i feel ou have but a new evolution of that. i feel you have open — but a new evolution of that. i feel you have open the _ but a new evolution of that. i feel you have open the door— but a new evolution of that. i feel you have open the door of- but a new evolution of that. i feel you have open the door of what might be the most inappropriate question i have ever asked but are you wearing loose—fitting trousers? i b�*a�*iiiii have ever asked but are you wearing loose-fitting trousers?— loose-fitting trousers? i will show ou loose-fitting trousers? i will show you because _ loose-fitting trousers? i will show you because i _ loose-fitting trousers? i will show you because i will— loose-fitting trousers? i will show you because i will show _ loose-fitting trousers? i will show you because i will show you - loose-fitting trousers? i will show you because i will show you how i loose-fitting trousers? i will show. you because i will show you how you can up the ante. this could be a lot of people's thing. loose—fitting
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trousers. excuse me. they are floppy and comfortable, and an oversized shirt. if i want to make this feel a bit less lockdown, i might took in a bit less lockdown, i might took in a bit of the shirt, lots of ladies might not like their tummy but you have the protection of the half took, the elongation of the leg and it is about colour, wearing great colours that suit you. i will put on a jacket, colours that suit you. i will put on ajacket, nearly colours that suit you. i will put on a jacket, nearly the same colour, just to give myself structure, and i do think the structure over sloppiness is great. —— floppiness. then the details, bit of effort with the we more or less make up during lockdown. it is now slowly getting into that, "i'm present, i'm here." i might put in an earring and in two secondsit i might put in an earring and in two seconds it is a whole new look. i will try to do the earings on breakfast tv in two seconds. gosh, i wish i had a clip—on. it can be
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simple, and voila! you have that and you are comfortable. i simple, and voila! you have that and you are comfortable.— you are comfortable. i love that you did that in 40 _ you are comfortable. i love that you did that in 40 seconds. _ you are comfortable. i love that you did that in 40 seconds. i _ you are comfortable. i love that you did that in 40 seconds. i am - you are comfortable. i love that you did that in 40 seconds. i am struck| did that in 40 seconds. i am struck by your cupboard you have clearly gone for colour here. lovely colours. ~ gone for colour here. lovely colours-— gone for colour here. lovely colours. ~ ., ., colours. when we get back out to beini out colours. when we get back out to being out and _ colours. when we get back out to being out and about _ colours. when we get back out to being out and about we _ colours. when we get back out to being out and about we have - colours. when we get back out to being out and about we have to i being out and about we have to revisit who we want to be as a person. we might have evolved during lockdown. i want to change my career, my partner, my life. you want to have that feeling that you get from dressing in colours that inspire you, putting up make up that makes you feel full of life. sometimes i like to be surrounded by colour. i inspire lots of women on my instagram to get a rail, £16 from amazon, and things that really inspire you and that you love and that bring you joy when you wear them and to start to make that the basis of a new wardrobe. shes
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them and to start to make that the basis of a new wardrobe. as louise is, i am fascinated _ basis of a new wardrobe. as louise is, i am fascinated by _ basis of a new wardrobe. as louise is, i am fascinated by the - basis of a new wardrobe. as louise is, i am fascinated by the rack - is, i am fascinated by the rack behind you. give us an idea, you have talked through the outfit and the half took.— have talked through the outfit and the half took.- i _ have talked through the outfit and the half took.- i might - have talked through the outfit and the half took.- i might try i the half took. genius! i might try it m self. the half took. genius! i might try it myself. what _ the half took. genius! i might try it myself. what sort _ the half took. genius! i might try it myself. what sort of _ the half took. genius! i might try it myself. what sort of date - the half took. genius! i might try i it myself. what sort of date would you pull out those sparkly numbers? is that to make you feel better by when you feel super—confident? i did when you feel super-confident? i did it yesterday- — when you feel super-confident? i did it yesterday- i _ when you feel super-confident? i did it yesterday. i am _ when you feel super—confident? i c c it yesterday. i am obsessed with white and silver and yellow. yellow is a colour that brings me joy. everybody can find a colour that suits them. i always believed everyone pursuits every colour, you have to find the right tone. something like yellow, which can be scary, if you are caramel skin tones, a warm brown undertone or a milky peach and cream you can do, it may be a lemon. if you are very, very karen mel you can do mustard. —— very caramel. embracing colours
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will give yourself great energy. i put on this address today because i just love this address and i love the colour of it. have you been a shopping yet? we did so much shopping yet? we did so much shopping online? i loved going into a shop, as i did earlier this week stop do you think we will get back in the shops?— in the shops? what is very interesting _ in the shops? what is very interesting is _ in the shops? what is very interesting is that - in the shops? what is veryj interesting is that retailers in the shops? what is very - interesting is that retailers have got very used to people buying online. one major retailer i was speaking to said they were going to keep their best stuff online and put a list of in the stores. i found that really interesting. i have been half inspired, but generally, if we were not in covid, this time of year is that interstitial time. stores will have put out their first bit of spring, summer, then a bit later. it is a weird time to shop on the high street i was happy to be there, really happy to see the high street busy, because i felt for every single one of those retailers was a
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—— when everything was closed. it was desolate. it brings joy and vitality back to the high street, which is what we need. itiinl’e vitality back to the high street, which is what we need.- vitality back to the high street, which is what we need. we can see all the cosmetics _ which is what we need. we can see all the cosmetics behind _ which is what we need. we can see all the cosmetics behind you, - which is what we need. we can see all the cosmetics behind you, the i all the cosmetics behind you, the wardrobe with the lovely colours. what is on your right shoulder? it looks like a keg of beer. that what is on your right shoulder? it looks like a keg of beer.— looks like a keg of beer. that is a stack from _ looks like a keg of beer. that is a stack from trinny _ looks like a keg of beer. that is a stack from trinny of _ looks like a keg of beer. that is a stack from trinny of london, - looks like a keg of beer. that is a l stack from trinny of london, apart from my brand. stack from trinny of london, apart from my brand-— from my brand. thank you for that and thank you _ from my brand. thank you for that and thank you for _ from my brand. thank you for that and thank you for your _ from my brand. thank you for that and thank you for your advice - and thank you for your advice similarly to speak to you. i love those hearings. i feel like i need ifeel like i need to revamp my wardrobe. let's get the weather, carol is with us, she always looks magnificent. carol is with us, she always looks magnificent-— magnificent. some yellow in my forecast because _ magnificent. some yellow in my forecast because for— magnificent. some yellow in my forecast because for many - magnificent. some yellow in my forecast because for many we i magnificent. some yellow in my i forecast because for many we will eventually see some sunshine even if you are ecstatic cloudy. we have been talking about how frosty april has been so far. 16 nights of frost in altnaharra and aviemore, the average for the whole of april is
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eight nights. perth, thirsk and wallingford, the average at this time in april is around 4.5, to maybe six nights. that gives you an idea. we are not out of the woods yet in terms of frost because over the next few nights we are still going to see it. for the rest of the week, generally dry with one or two showers in the forecast. high pressure continues to dominate our weather. today we have this week when a front slipping southwards, taking a fair bit of cloud with it and some patchy rain —— this week when the front. it slips southwards and will break up so they will be brightness coming through. could catch some showers across south—west england but it will brighten in england but it will brighten in england and who have patchy cloud and sunny spells. northern ireland and sunny spells. northern ireland and sunshine in scotland. these are the kind of wind speeds we are looking at. not particularly strong. just a light breezes. this cloud across the final of the scotland could produce the odd shower and in lerwick we have highs of 7 degrees.
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top temperatures today will be in the south—west, 16 or 17. fruit this evening and overnight, the showers will fade. again, clear skies, temperatures will fall and we also have patchiness and shallow fog likely to form a east midlands and parts of eastern england. despite the temperatures here, we could see them fall as low as —4 —5 across north—east england and also parts of scotland. a frosty start to the day tomorrow stop high pressure still firmly in charge, more a breeze coming across the english channel and around this high pressure, so it will feel cooler if you take a stroll along the north sea coastline. there will be a lot of dry weather. this cloud coming in at the times, one another scotland, possibly the show it in the northern isles. for most they won't and the mist and fog will lift rapidly. dry, sunny, fair weather cloud developing through the day and temperatures between eight in lerwick and 17 in
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cardiff, liverpool, and potentially somewhere in eastern scotland, as well. into friday, and if he starts, some frost around. still have some cloud again across the far north—east of scotland, toppling around that area of high pressure. still breezy through the english channel. 12 in norwich, 18 in cardiff, 18 in glasgow and 18 in liverpool. as we move through the weekend with a high pressure drifts a bit further east. these weather fronts are trying to come in across the north west. thejury fronts are trying to come in across the north west. the jury is out as to whether they will or not but we may seek rain and north—west from them. generally speaking the weekend will be dry with sunshine, but still the risk of overnight frost. what do you do with your plants? keep them in the kitchen, put them outside? i think i know the answer. 50 in the kitchen, put them outside? i think i know the answer.— think i know the answer. so do i.
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you watch _ think i know the answer. so do i. you watch carefully _ think i know the answer. so do i. you watch carefully and - think i know the answer. so do i. you watch carefully and like - think i know the answer. so do i. you watch carefully and like our. you watch carefully and like our tomatoes, you keep them in the kitchen. ~ , i tomatoes, you keep them in the kitchen-_ l— tomatoes, you keep them in the kitchen._ i am - tomatoes, you keep them in the kitchen._ i am not. tomatoes, you keep them in the kitchen._ i am not a i kitchen. absolutely. i am not a gardener. _ kitchen. absolutely. i am not a gardener. but _ kitchen. absolutely. i am not a gardener, but thank _ kitchen. absolutely. i am not a gardener, but thank you. - kitchen. absolutely. i am not a gardener, but thank you. whatj kitchen. absolutely. i am not a i gardener, but thank you. what we sorted that- _ gardener, but thank you. what we sorted that. have _ gardener, but thank you. what we sorted that. have a _ gardener, but thank you. what we sorted that. have a lovely - gardener, but thank you. what we sorted that. have a lovely day, i sorted that. have a lovely day, carol — the prime minister warned yesterday that the uk must learn to live with coronavirus and suggested that we could see another wave of cases later this year. at the same press conference, borisjohnson also confirmed that india had been added to the uk's red travel list. joining us now form bristol is professor adam finn from thejoint committee for vaccinations and immunisation. good morning. thank you for being with us today. a really busy morning so good to have you on. if the prime minister writes about this potential new wave? what should we look out for? �* . . new wave? what should we look out for? �* ., ., , for? i'm afraid he is right. the models we — for? i'm afraid he is right. the models we have _ for? i'm afraid he is right. the models we have seen - for? i'm afraid he is right. the models we have seen on - for? i'm afraid he is right. the models we have seen on jcvi l for? i'm afraid he is right. the - models we have seen on jcvi clearly models we have seen onjcvi clearly point to a summit surge in cases, as the lockdown is relaxed. there are still many people in the adult population who have not been
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immunised and will therefore start to transmit the infection between each other. it to transmit the infection between each other-— each other. it is difficult to say it but can _ each other. it is difficult to say it but can you _ each other. it is difficult to say it but can you give _ each other. it is difficult to say it but can you give us - each other. it is difficult to say it but can you give us any - each other. it is difficult to say it but can you give us any kind | each other. it is difficult to say i it but can you give us any kind of sense of how big and has significant wave could be? {lei sense of how big and has significant wave could be?— wave could be? of course there is a wide range — wave could be? of course there is a wide range of— wave could be? of course there is a wide range of uncertainty _ wave could be? of course there is a wide range of uncertainty around i wide range of uncertainty around this because it depends how quickly the vaccine roll—out continues. the supplies of vaccine and so on, and how many people come forward to receive the vaccination. it also depends on how people behave as the lockdown is gradually relaxed. if people move too far forward with that too fast we will see things start to come earlier. the sense that the problem is all over, i'm afraid, is a flawed one. we are still in a vulnerable situation and there are still significant numbers of people potentially who could be harmed by this infection if it happens. harmed by this infection if it ha ens. ~ i ., harmed by this infection if it hauens. ~ ., ,, harmed by this infection if it happens-— harmed by this infection if it hauens. ~ . ~' ., happens. when you talk to the government — happens. when you talk to the government about _ happens. when you talk to the government about the - happens. when you talk to the government about the road i happens. when you talk to the i government about the road map happens. when you talk to the - government about the road map they always mention it is about data, not
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dates. many people at the 17th of may in their mind as the next stage for those changes to take effect. at what point does that have to be adjusted? what point does that have to be ad'usted? ~ i ., what point does that have to be ad'usted? . i ., ., ., adjusted? well, you are right that this is a balancing _ adjusted? well, you are right that this is a balancing act, _ adjusted? well, you are right that this is a balancing act, isn't - adjusted? well, you are right that this is a balancing act, isn't it? i this is a balancing act, isn't it? people want some kind of certainty, the businesses want to know how to plan. on the other hand, it has always been presenting as a provisional timetable based on what actually happens. i think if we do start to see significant rises in cases in some parts of the country need to adjust back those states in order to avoid the situation coming into effect. it is a bit hard to be definite about this because by definition it is uncertain. other thins definition it is uncertain. other thin . s it definition it is uncertain. other things it is _ definition it is uncertain. other things it is difficult _ definition it is uncertain. other things it is difficult to - definition it is uncertain. other things it is difficult to be - things it is difficult to be definite about. the so—called indian variant. how concerned are you about it and the fact that... we know now from friday people will not be allowed in from india but how concerned are you about that? i
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think we have known all along that this virus would evolve. initially likely to make itself more infectious but because that is an advantage to the virus, and that happened with the so—called uk variant before we had any significant vaccination going on. as we all gradually become immune from being infected by vaccination, variants of the virus that can resist that immunity it will predominates, they will have an advantage over the old versions, if you like. this is one example of many instances where this is happening around the world. probably others that we don't even know about because testing is not available in all parts of the world. somewhere in between here, and i don't think we will see a complete collapse and back to square one situation. the immunity we have got already from infection and vaccines will continue to be useful, but it will get eroded
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and there will come a point when we need to reformulate the vaccines to keep up with changes in the virus. india goes on the red list on friday so you can come back but you have to go to a quarantine hotel, i should have been clear. let's talk about johnson &johnson. there have been concerned by the european medicines agency about the rare blood clots with regard to that vaccine. i think it is really important _ with regard to that vaccine. i think it is really important as _ it is really important as information comes up, even if it is preliminary information, that it is made public. we need people to be confident that they have been told the whole story about these vaccines. we would like them to be perfect, they are very, very effective but a couple of them are showing signs of these very rare side effects and it is important people know about that so that they understand the whole picture, but i would emphasise that these vaccines are very effective in the side are extremely rare. just are very effective in the side are extremely rare.— are very effective in the side are extremely rare. just to go back to the variant. _ extremely rare. just to go back to the variant, how _ extremely rare. just to go back to the variant, how long _ extremely rare. just to go back to the variant, how long does - extremely rare. just to go back to the variant, how long does it - the variant, how long does it take... is it dependent on various factors, how long will it take to
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find out if the new variant is affected by the various vaccines that people are getting at the moment? i ., .., ., ., i moment? the thing you can do fairly tuickl is moment? the thing you can do fairly quickly is work _ moment? the thing you can do fairly quickly is work in _ moment? the thing you can do fairly quickly is work in the _ moment? the thing you can do fairly quickly is work in the lab, _ moment? the thing you can do fairly quickly is work in the lab, looking i quickly is work in the lab, looking to see if the antibodies we have in our blood from being immunised neutralise these viruses. that can be done in a matter of days or certainly a small number of weeks. the real proof comes in reality, if you like, when we see whether or not these variants begin to emerge in a highly vaccinated population, so we will be looking at places like israel, the uk, where there are a lot of people who have been immunised, and looking very high to see if there are any cases occurring in people who have been immunised and whether these particular variants are likely to show up in that context. so, yes, it is a matter of really keeping a close eye on what is going on as we go along with a sense of what is happening. really good to talk to you, as ever, thank you for your time. we have to keep you waiting for technical reasons and i appreciate your
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patience. thank you. ila reasons and i appreciate your patience. thank you. no problem. professor adam _ patience. thank you. no problem. professor adam finn. _ patience. thank you. no problem. professor adam finn. we - patience. thank you. no problem. professor adam finn. we will - professor adam finn. we will continue to talk about some of the big stories around this morning. sally will be back with the latest on the european super league. we say the european super league, probably the european super league, probably the former european super league. you're watching bbc breakfast, it's 8:59.
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good morning, welcome to bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire. here are the headlines. justice for george floyd. former police officer derek chauvin is found guilty of his murder. we the jury, in the above entitled matter, as to count one, unintentional second—degree murder while committing a felony, find the defendant guilty. the family say the verdict is a "turning point in history" for america and justice has been done for their brother. president biden has promised to do more to deal with systemic racism and said chauvin's conviction was just the start. what is your reaction to the verdict? do you believe the conviction of george floyd's killer marks a turning point in america's race relations. and potentially around the world? do get in touch with us. plans to shake up elite football
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in europe are in tatters,

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