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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 30, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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hello. this is bbc news with the latest headlines... dozens of people are killed in israel during a stampede at one of the holiest sites in the jewish world, attended by tens of thousands of ultra—orthodox jews. paramedics were running by, cpr on kids, then one after the other, started coming out in ambulances, then we understood, like, something is going on here. actor and director noel clarke is suspended by bafta, after allegations of sexual harrassment, which he denies. security worries over the prime minister's phone — after it's revealed his phone number's been freely available online, for the last 15 years. sport goes silent. football, rugby, cricket and more
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will start a four—day boycott of social media today, an attempt to tackle online abuse. the boss of barclays bank predicts the uk is about to enjoy its biggest economic boom since after the second world war — it comes as the bank reveals increased profits this year. and coming up — the venues in liverpool gearing up for non—socially distanced gigs and clubnights this weekend, as part of a government pilot. it's been described as one of israel's worst disasters. at least 44 people have been killed in a stampede at a religious festival in the north of the country. more than 100 others were injured when up to 80,000 orthodox jews gathered
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at a festival at mount meron. the prime minister has described it as a heavy disaster who says he is praying for the casualties. courtney bembridge has more. and a warning her report contains distressing images.vt) videos uploaded to social media show the chaotic scenes. tens of thousands of people crushed together at the foot of mount meron. we just finished wejust finished reading we just finished reading one wejust finished reading one of israel's worst disasters. a terrible disaster of people who came to celebrate and unfortunately they were literally crushed to death. it was supposed to be a celebration, a night of prayer, singing and dancing. translation: iwas there, inside. it was crowded and there were around 60,000 to 70,000 people. no place to move. then people started to fall on the ground.
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they fell a lot on the ground. all of a sudden we saw paramedics, whatever, running by, like mid—cpr on kids. then, one after the other, there started coming ambulances. then we understood like something is going on here. many people had been watching the event live on television. emergency services struggled to reach those who were injured because of the crowds. the roads were also congested and military helicopters were brought in to take the injured to hospital. many of the first responders were volunteers, now being offered counselling. many many people were hurt and injured, and killed here. the volunteers behind us are being gathered together for an immediate debrief, to the fact that they were exposed to a very difficult site. the evening event is the start
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of the religious festival, but all future events have been cancelled because of the disaster. courtney bembridge, bbc news. we have been hearing from one eyewitness who told us more about what happened. translation: a terrible load started. _ and what happened was kind of a carousel. one person pushed another person, so everybody was pushed right and left. and after 20 minutes, i think, people started suffocating. so they wanted to get out. but no one was able to get out. there were people under me who were not breathing any more. there were horrible screams of "i can't breathe". and gradually, some of the screaming stopped. people started trying to pull people from underneath instead of the top. crazy chaos. we will have more about that and just a few moments. bafta has suspended the actor and director noel clarke just weeks after he received one of its top awards following allegations of sexual harassment and bullying.
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the kidulthood and doctor who actor vehemently denies any misconduct or wrongdoing. tim muffett reports. viewpoint, itv�*s new police drama starring noel clarke. the actor made his first tv appearance more than 20 years ago. and there have been many more since then. but it is his work behind the camera that has won him huge critical acclaim with the likes of the hood trilogy of kidulthood, adulthood and brotherhood. earlier this month, he received an outstanding contribution award from bafta, one of the academy's highest accolades. last night, bafta issued a statement. it said that... it follows a range of allegations concerning the actor's behaviour, allegations which he vehemently denies.
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in a statement, noel clarke said... tim muffett, bbc news. kent police have spoken for the first time about the murder of a serving police community support officer who was found murdered in woodland on tuesday. deputy chief constable tim smith said thatjulia james died of �*significant head injuries�* and said investigators couldn't rule out that she had been attacked by a stranger. our reporter simonjones is there. simon, what's the latest?
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this is day number four of the murder investigation and until now can't police have given very few details of what they believe happened. they have spoken to bbc radio this morning and the key points that have emerges that they say hundreds of officers are working around the clock on this case. but at the present, they have no clear motive for the killing and no clear suss back. they say thatjulia james was found with significant head injuries. she was out walking her dog and she was discovered in the woodland herejust dog and she was discovered in the woodland here just after four o'clock on tuesday afternoon. the police say this will be worrying for local people. they are trying to reassure local people. but it appears they do not have any clear leads on this. and that is why they are making a fresh appeal to the public. anyone who saw anything unusual or suspicious that may have happened on monday or tuesday, they are desperate to hear from those
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people. and also if people might have any dash camp footage of the area for around that time. simon we area for around that time. simon we are seeing flowers behind you. this must have caused a huge shock in the local community there. yes. must have caused a huge shock in the local community there.— local community there. yes, you get a real sense — local community there. yes, you get a real sense of _ local community there. yes, you get a real sense ofjust _ local community there. yes, you get a real sense ofjust how _ local community there. yes, you get a real sense ofjust how much - local community there. yes, you get a real sense ofjust how much the i a real sense ofjust how much the community is affected. when you look at those flowers, lots of people have been coming here today taking a quiet moment of contemplation. people are saying that they are frightened, they are scared, they are wondering if it is safe for them to walk out and about alone. there are a lot of dog walkers in this area and they are wondering if it is safe to go into the fields where julia james was killed. the police have said that they understand this concern, they understand the worry, but they say they're number one priority is the safety of the community. they say there are extra officers out on patrol if anyone is concerned. they can go and speak to those officers if they are
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concerned. the police are saying that there is no clear motive. and the fact thatjulia james may have been killed by a stranger. they know this will be concerning for people, but they want to be upfront and open with people in this community. we are expecting to hear more from the police this morning. there is a news conference scheduled for around 11 o'clock. ,, ., ., ~ conference scheduled for around 11 o'clock, ,, ., ., ~' , ., conference scheduled for around 11 o'clock. . ., . ~' , ., , conference scheduled for around 11 o'clock. . ., . ~' , . it's emerged that the prime minister's mobile phone number has been freely available online for the last 15 years. borisjohnson�*s number was listed on a press release from 2006 when he was a junior shadow minister and it appears to have stayed the same since. labour says it raises concerns about security and the risk of blackmail. downing street declined to comment. meanwhile, an mp asked the parliamentary standards commissioner to investigate whether the prime minister broke any rules about declaring donations. political correspondent iain watson is in westminster.
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plenty to talk about. first of all let's talk about the prime minister's phone. the former national security adviser lord rickett questioning why the prime minister's phone number is so freely available. ., , available. that is right, it appeared _ available. that is right, it appeared in _ available. that is right, it appeared in a _ available. that is right, it appeared in a press - available. that is right, it. appeared in a press release. available. that is right, it - appeared in a press release. it is still on the website with a link to that press release until very recently. it is indeed the prime minister past my current number. and if you call that you will get an automated message saying it is switched off, surprise, surprised. lord rickett said that it should be an elementary matter of security and that boris johnson an elementary matter of security and that borisjohnson went an elementary matter of security and that boris johnson went from an elementary matter of security and that borisjohnson went from being a backbench mp many years ago and then a juniors shadow minister when he went through the doors of number ten. he went on to say that this
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caused a greater risk because some of the people who should not have that number could be hostile states. it would be much easierfor them that number could be hostile states. it would be much easier for them to get up to mischief if the number was widely available. some other people would suggest that perhaps hostile states with intelligent services worth their salt might get a hold of the number in any case. this follows on from concerns whether some people had privileged access to the prime minister. we saw the text messages leaked. privileged access doesn't quite cover it with his phone. it looks like widespread access people may have had. downing street is not confirming even now whether the number will be changed. it confirming even now whether the number will be changed.- confirming even now whether the number will be changed. it will be interestin: number will be changed. it will be interesting to _ number will be changed. it will be interesting to see _ number will be changed. it will be interesting to see if _ number will be changed. it will be interesting to see if he _ number will be changed. it will be interesting to see if he does - number will be changed. it will be i interesting to see if he does change it. in the meantime, another twist in the saga over his downing street
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flat. ., in the saga over his downing street flat. . , ~ flat. earlier this week the electoral _ flat. earlier this week the electoral commission - flat. earlier this week the - electoral commission decided it flat. earlier this week the _ electoral commission decided it was going to launch an informal investigation. its investigations are very much focused on the conservative party. did it properly declare a loan or a donation. the conservative party insist that they followed the letter of the law. but thatis followed the letter of the law. but that is what the commission will be looking at. the labour mp margaret hodge has written to the parliamentarian commissioner to have them look at the individual conduct of mps and whether borisjohnson had made the correct declarations. we should stress that simply writing to
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the parliamentary commission for standards does not mean that they will launch an investigation. if an investigation was launched a committee of mps would have to sign off on that. ., ~ committee of mps would have to sign off on that. ., ,, , committee of mps would have to sign off on that. ., ,, i. , . off on that. thank you very much. our political _ off on that. thank you very much. our political correspondent. - off on that. thank you very much. our political correspondent. let's| our political correspondent. let's take you back to israel now. as a religious festival which has killed at least 44 people. our correspondent injerusalem has the latest. is it any clearer how this terrible disaster happen?- latest. is it any clearer how this terrible disaster happen? there is more graphic _ terrible disaster happen? there is more graphic footage _ terrible disaster happen? there is more graphic footage that - terrible disaster happen? there is more graphic footage that has - terrible disaster happen? there is i more graphic footage that has come out from the site. a lot of witnesses have been telling us what happened from their perspective. it is clear that in one of the passageways that leads away from one of the main event areas at this
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location, it is one of the holiest jewish sites in israel. it is a site for annual pilgrimage, especially before the pandemic would have attracted far more people than we even saw there overnight. there were tens of thousands of people there at the site. it is a gendered segregated area. men and boys were making their way down this passageway. we can see that some people fell, they slipped, we were told and then there was this terrible crush that resulted. and that left people being trampled on, and being suffocated. the that left people being trampled on, and being suffocated.— that left people being trampled on, and being suffocated. the death toll is currently at _ and being suffocated. the death toll is currently at 44. _ and being suffocated. the death toll is currently at 44. but _ and being suffocated. the death toll is currently at 44. but a _ and being suffocated. the death toll is currently at 44. but a lot - and being suffocated. the death toll is currently at 44. but a lot of - is currently at 1m. but a lot of people are critically injured and there are fears that that death toll could rise. , , ., could rise. definitely. there are more than _ could rise. definitely. there are more than 100 _ could rise. definitely. there are more than 100 people - could rise. definitely. there are more than 100 people who - could rise. definitely. there are more than 100 people who are l could rise. definitely. there are l more than 100 people who are in hospital. some of them are critically injured and some seriously injured. mainly men and
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boys. in israel, the country is in a state of shock. a lot of questions being asked about how on earth this happens. the local police commissioner has said that he accepts responsibility, but a lot of experts have been coming out and saying that this was an event that took place with a lot of planning. it was the biggest gathering of people that israel had seen since the pandemic. we know that senior police officers and the public security minister have gone to inspect the site in advance. there were very few changes that were put at mount meron compared to previous years. there is usually concert and dancing... big bonfires that take place. one of the things that had been changes to stop large numbers of people gathering around the bonfires. there had been some iron fencing put up. and in some of the
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really upsetting footage you can see people tearing down some of this fencing in order to make more space. thank you very much indeed for the latest from jerusalem. the headlines on bbc news... dozens of people are killed in israel during a stampede at one of the holiest sites in the jewish world, attended by tens of thousands of ultra—orthodox jews. actor and director noel clarke is suspended by bafta, after allegations of sexual harrassment — which he denies. it's emerged that the prime minister's mobile phone number has been freely available online, for the last 15 years — listed on an old press release. thousands of people will be dancing and mingling in a warehouse today as part of a government scheme to test crowd safety. it's one of several events taking place in liverpool over the weekend.
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there will be no social distancing or masks required but guests will need a negative covid test. our correspondent mairead smyth is in liverpool for us. it is going to be an extraordinary experiment, really. fun one hopes for all the people taking part. absolutely. probably the biggest and best scientific experiment that you could be involved with. 3000 people will come here. you can see the area where people will come into. this is going to be a big club event. it starts at two o'clock today which is a bit unusual for a starts at two o'clock today which is a bit unusualfor a night starts at two o'clock today which is a bit unusual for a night out and starts at two o'clock today which is a bit unusualfor a night out and it will end at 11. six djs are on the line—up and it is the first event of its kind since covid began. the entertainment industry was really
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affected by the absolute stop in event such as this. this is really important to advise the government on how more advanced like this can take place right across the country. this is one of two club events today and tomorrow, 6000 people will be here. they cannotjust turn up, they have to have a ticket and a negative covid test and agreed to be tested in the days after the event. the whole idea is to try and advise how it impacts people when they are socialising together, how the flow of air works, what events need to look like as we make our way out of restrictions. on sunday, a mini festival at liverpool parkjust a few miles from here will be smaller with a tent and headlined by blossoms who are really excited to be back on stage. it is all part of the government's research programme.
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we had a business event here in liverpool earlier this week. 400 people were shaking hands and mingling, things we have not seen for a long time. and today the first club event. djs very excited to be back on stage. club event. djs very excited to be back on stage-— back on stage. exciting times in liverpool- _ back on stage. exciting times in liverpool. thank _ back on stage. exciting times in liverpool. thank you _ back on stage. exciting times in liverpool. thank you very - back on stage. exciting times in| liverpool. thank you very much. coronavirus restrictions are being relaxed further today for people in northern ireland. shops can reopen, as can gyms and swimming pools, and people can once again stay overnight in self—contained holiday accomodation. let's speak to cathal o'dolan. he runs the rushin house caravan park in county fermanagh and has been busy preparing to reopen today. it's a big day for you. a very big
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da . it's a big day for you. a very big day- and _ it's a big day for you. a very big day- and we — it's a big day for you. a very big day. and we are _ it's a big day for you. a very big day. and we are delighted - it's a big day for you. a very big day. and we are delighted to i it's a big day for you. a very big | day. and we are delighted to get open again. the sun is shining, we are looking forward to welcoming all of our visit is back again. haifa of our visit is back again. how tou~h of our visit is back again. how tough has _ of our visit is back again. how tough has it — of our visit is back again. how tough has it been _ of our visit is back again. how tough has it been free - of our visit is back again. how tough has it been free the last year? it tough has it been free the last ear? ., , , tough has it been free the last ear? , , tough has it been free the last ear? . , , , ., ~ tough has it been free the last ear? ., , , ., . ., year? it has been very tough. we had a time when — year? it has been very tough. we had a time when we _ year? it has been very tough. we had a time when we open _ year? it has been very tough. we had a time when we open from _ year? it has been very tough. we had a time when we open from june i year? it has been very tough. we had a time when we open from june until| a time when we open from june until october and the major holidays were all gone. we are open, we are ready for business, we are looking forward to welcoming all of our guests back. we cannot wait.— to welcoming all of our guests back. we cannot wait. ~ . . , ., , we cannot wait. what has demand been like? absolutely _ we cannot wait. what has demand been like? absolutely phenomenal. _ we cannot wait. what has demand been like? absolutely phenomenal. there i like? absolutely phenomenal. there is a hue like? absolutely phenomenal. there is a huge pent-up — like? absolutely phenomenal. there is a huge pent-up demand. - like? absolutely phenomenal. there is a huge pent-up demand. there i like? absolutely phenomenal. there is a huge pent-up demand. there is| like? absolutely phenomenal. there l is a huge pent-up demand. there is a is a huge pent—up demand. there is a big caravan in fraternity and the pent—up demand... if you want to
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come, but quickly and get in there. i suppose that is partly because it is notjust beautiful where you are, but also because people cannot go abroad at the moment.— but also because people cannot go abroad at the moment. exactly. a lot ofthe abroad at the moment. exactly. a lot of the care of— abroad at the moment. exactly. a lot of the care of mining _ abroad at the moment. exactly. a lot of the care of mining would _ abroad at the moment. exactly. a lot of the care of mining would normally| of the care of mining would normally go to france or spain, and they are not ina go to france or spain, and they are not in a position to travel as we all know. consequently, we are delighted to have them and availability will be limited. it is going to be an issue, but wejust have to make the best of it. what have to make the best of it. what sort of preparations _ have to make the best of it. what sort of preparations have - have to make the best of it. what sort of preparations have you made? how is it going to be different from normal? . . , how is it going to be different from normal? .. , ., �* how is it going to be different from normal? , ., �* ., , normal? our facilities, aren't open to beain normal? our facilities, aren't open to begin with. _ normal? our facilities, aren't open to begin with, the _ normal? our facilities, aren't open to begin with, the toilet _ normal? our facilities, aren't open to begin with, the toilet is - normal? our facilities, aren't open to begin with, the toilet is an i normal? our facilities, aren't open to begin with, the toilet is an open to begin with, the toilet is an open to begin with, we built a new reception centre. we have redone some of our facilities. we have
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reception centre. we have redone some of ourfacilities. we have hand sanitation points. we are actively... we are out in the open. all caravans by law have to be six metres apart. we have big advantages in that respect and we would say it is a very safe holiday.— in that respect and we would say it is a very safe holiday. good luck to ou. it is a very safe holiday. good luck to you- it sounds _ is a very safe holiday. good luck to you. it sounds like _ is a very safe holiday. good luck to you. it sounds like you've - is a very safe holiday. good luck to you. it sounds like you've got i is a very safe holiday. good luck to j you. it sounds like you've got huge demand, so lots of excited people. really good luck to you today and in the future. we really good luck to you today and in the future. ~ ., ., ~' really good luck to you today and in the future. ~ ., ., ~ ., ., ., the future. we look forward to seeinr the future. we look forward to seeing all _ the future. we look forward to seeing all of — the future. we look forward to seeing all of our _ the future. we look forward to seeing all of our guests i the future. we look forward to seeing all of our guests in i the future. we look forward to seeing all of our guests in the | the future. we look forward to i seeing all of our guests in the very nearfuture. seeing all of our guests in the very near future-— near future. yes. if you want to book you _ near future. yes. if you want to book you better _ near future. yes. if you want to book you better book _ near future. yes. if you want to book you better book now, i near future. yes. if you want to book you better book now, as l near future. yes. if you want to | book you better book now, as he says, there is not much availability left. people aged 40 or over in england will be invited to book their first dose of a covid vaccine from today. text messages are going out to people in that age group, inviting them to arrange a jab through the nhs online
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booking service. it is the third time this week that the vaccine programme has been extended. the boss of barclays bank says the uk is about to experience its biggest economic boom since the aftermath of world war two. jes staley�*s upbeat assessment came as barclays revealed its profits for the first three months of this year had more than doubled from a year earlier, to nearly £2.5 billion. we think the economy will grow in this year at the highest rate it has grown since 1948. that is a pretty spectacular number. so that is helping the performance of the bank, clearly pima credit losses are much, much lower. revenues are much higher in certain businesses like the investment bank. but i would say overall, we are coming out of this pandemic in a reasonably good place. we have to recognise how the vaccination programme has been so successful in the uk. so hopefully 2021 turns out to be a pretty good year for all of us.
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we calculate that there is some £200 billion on deposits with banks that is excess of what consumers normally have, ie, that is pent up demand that will be spent once the economy begins to reopen. i think the second half of 2021 will be quite something, actually. there we are. optimistic. let's talk to our business correspondent katie prescott. boone tines coming. is he right? it prescott. boone tines coming. is he riuht? , ., ., ., ., right? it is important to hear from someone like _ right? it is important to hear from someone like that _ right? it is important to hear from someone like that who _ right? it is important to hear from someone like that who has - right? it is important to hear from someone like that who has got i right? it is important to hear from someone like that who has got a l someone like that who has got a great overview of what businesses are doing in terms of spending and saving. and what we are all doing. he was saying there is a huge amount of cash around and as things start to reopen, we might feel confident to reopen, we might feel confident to spend it. of course economists never agree on anything. we've heard from others saying that there is no guarantee that we will start going out and spending this money. there is still a certain amount of
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uncertainty about the economy and jobs. we don't know if this big explosion is going to happen. of course we are coming off a very low base. you've got to remember how much the economy shrank last year as economic activity was so curtailed. we are just starting to come out of that lock down, so it is still very early to say if this boone is going to happen. it is great to hearfrom the boss of barclays is here that thatis the boss of barclays is here that that is what he predicts. if there is a boon coming _ that is what he predicts. if there is a boon coming that _ that is what he predicts. if there is a boon coming that is - that is what he predicts. if there is a boon coming that is great, l that is what he predicts. if there i is a boon coming that is great, but for some businesses it is too late. you walk up and down and there are lots of empty shops and stores. yes. lots of empty shops and stores. yes, this is the highest _ lots of empty shops and stores. yes, this is the highest level _ lots of empty shops and stores. yes this is the highest level of empty shops that there has been in a long while. that number is continuing to increase particularly in the north of england. that is not very surprising particulate, i mean if you look at the context of this. we
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saw amazon's results, and there revenue tripled. and that tells you a lot about what is going on. that has accelerated the shift away from the high street. we've been shopping online. this is a massive problem for landlords who pay into the pension fund for example. and local councils that rely on this income. i think will be come out of the pandemic there's going to be a bit of a reckoning about what is going on on the high street. and a shift as to how we use that space. katie, thank ou as to how we use that space. katie, thank you very _ as to how we use that space. katie, thank you very much. _ if you're thinking of taking your dog for a walk in this countryside over the bank holiday weekend — the message from farmers is to please keep it on a lead. they say the rise in both dog ownership and rambling during the pandemic has led to more attacks on flocks. fi lamdin can tell us more — she's on dartmoor. a warning there are some images that
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you might find distressing at the beginning. sunday morning, get here today, some people out last night for a nice bank holiday walk with their dog, dog disappeared for five minutes, yeah. only bit one sheep. neil cole lost 30 lambs and eight ewes after a dog chased some of his flock earlier this month. and to see ewes dead, lying in the field in distress, is, how do you explain that? i can only say, your heart sinks. why do you let your dogs off a field full of sheep? and he's not alone. in dartmoor, there have been 52 attacks on livestock reported so far this year. i'm getting calls almost daily about dog attacks. the injuries that sheep suffer through dogs are absolutely horrendous. in the hot weather, they can end up getting maggots onjust
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a small little bite mark, or the stress alone from chasing them can mean that they abort their lambs. it's a real problem. going to go short, back in, praise him back. there has been an 11% increase in pet ownership since lockdown, with many more of us now getting dogs. and that's why training courses like these are so important if we are to keep our dogs under control in the countryside. come, mouse, come, mouse, come! my whippet mouse and i were invited along. all the distractions and smells of being outside within the confines of safe strict schooling. people have had the lockdown puppies, and they're now showing signs of either anti—social behaviour or potentially chasing livestock. my advice is not to let your dogs out to chase anything, whether that's squirrels, rabbits, pheasants, because ultimately if your dog is going to start to chase a squirrel, then they're going to chase deer, livestock, anything, really.
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sit, sit. leave it. we used to call her betsy bonkers, ok, so this is why we had to do a couple of courses. she's a cockapoo, they're very bright, they need stimulation, and it's an ongoing feast with this one. if i'm not continually reinforcing her training, we are going to have problems. i think anybody who doesn't try and train their dog properly is a fool. and an anti—social fool. the national sheep association say two thirds of farmers they surveyed have seen an increase in dog attacks since lockdown. i would like to see the law and the guidance around the need for dogs to be on a lead changed. i think it should become an absolute requirement for dogs to be on a lead in the vicinity of livestock, full stop. that would stop them attacking sheep. sheep worrying is not only costing
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farmers thousands of pounds, but more than half say it's affected their mental health. i can only describe it as somebody putting their life into creating this piece of art, to have somebody come and stick their boot through it and just smash it. and it'sjust... yeah, i can't really describe it. it just makes you feel sick to the stomach. as we were filming, this lamb, just a few minutes old, finds its feet. steady. this is the ending they are working so hard for and are so desperate to protect. neal and his daughter are marking some of the lambs this morning. when a sheep is attacked, when livestock are attacked on the common, you get
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the call? i are attacked on the common, you get the call? ., ., , , ., the call? i do, there has been a hue the call? i do, there has been a huge increase _ the call? i do, there has been a huge increase in _ the call? i do, there has been a huge increase in dog _ the call? i do, there has been a huge increase in dog -related l huge increase in dog —related instances this year, and there is always going to be a conflict between people using the moors and the livestock that graze there. there is no longer a time where livestock can graze the moors in peace and quiet and safety. the moors is at bursting point and this bank holiday i am really urging people, if you're coming to the moors, please be a responsible dog owner, keep your dog on a lead, get some suitable training for your dog, don't let them run loose on the moors, and please remember that it is a criminal offence for your dog to chase livestock.— is a criminal offence for your dog to chase livestock. have you ever seen at this _ to chase livestock. have you ever seen at this bad _ to chase livestock. have you ever seen at this bad before? - to chase livestock. have you ever seen at this bad before? never, l to chase livestock. have you ever seen at this bad before? never, i have been _ seen at this bad before? never, i have been doing _ seen at this bad before? never, i have been doing it _ seen at this bad before? never, i have been doing it nearly - seen at this bad before? never, i have been doing it nearly ten i seen at this bad before? never, i i have been doing it nearly ten years now, there has always been a problem, we know we've got a national problem but this year it is off the scale, it's really bad. what off the scale, it's really bad. what would ou off the scale, it's really bad. what would you like _ off the scale, it's really bad. what would you like to _ off the scale, it's really bad. what would you like to see _ off the scale, it's really bad. what would you like to see happen, the laws changed? i would you like to see happen, the laws changed?— laws changed? i would like to see the moors police, _ laws changed? i would like to see the moors police, possibly - the moors police, possibly patrolled, if it gets much worse i think we are going to have to look into an all dogs on leads policy,
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which would be a shame because it is the minority which are ruining it for the majority.— the minority which are ruining it for the majority. the minority which are ruining it for the ma'ori . , _, ., ., for the ma'ority. lets come over now and talk for the majority. lets come over now and talk to neil. _ for the majority. lets come over now and talk to neil. just _ for the majority. lets come over now and talk to neil. just a _ for the majority. lets come over now and talk to neil. just a few _ for the majority. lets come over now and talk to neil. just a few weeks i and talk to neil. just a few weeks ago some of your flock were attacked and you lost quite a few of them, how are you doing now? we and you lost quite a few of them, how are you doing now?- and you lost quite a few of them, how are you doing now? we are doing fine, how are you doing now? we are doing fine. where — how are you doing now? we are doing fine. where just _ how are you doing now? we are doing fine, where just really _ how are you doing now? we are doing fine, where just really nervous - fine, where just really nervous about — fine, where just really nervous about the _ fine, where just really nervous about the may day bank holiday now, getting _ about the may day bank holiday now, getting all— about the may day bank holiday now, getting all the sheep marked up hoping — getting all the sheep marked up hoping people get the message. you're _ hoping people get the message. you're notjust worried hoping people get the message. you're not just worried about your flock, you're also worried about other wildlife? brute flock, you're also worried about other wildlife ?_ flock, you're also worried about other wildlife? we have got lots of environment _ other wildlife? we have got lots of environment schemes, _ other wildlife? we have got lots of environment schemes, we've i other wildlife? we have got lots of environment schemes, we've got i other wildlife? we have got lots of| environment schemes, we've got a other wildlife? we have got lots of i environment schemes, we've got a lot of ground _ environment schemes, we've got a lot of ground nesting birds and mammals that are _ of ground nesting birds and mammals that are rare, we don't want dogs destroying — that are rare, we don't want dogs destroying them.— that are rare, we don't want dogs destroying them. when you approach owners and you _ destroying them. when you approach owners and you ask— destroying them. when you approach owners and you ask them _ destroying them. when you approach owners and you ask them to - destroying them. when you approach owners and you ask them to politelyl owners and you ask them to politely put their dogs back on the lead, what sort of reaction have you been getting? what sort of reaction have you been caettin ? , ., , what sort of reaction have you been caettin ? , . , , , what sort of reaction have you been urettin? , ., , , , ., what sort of reaction have you been iiettin? , ., , , , .,, getting? generally it seems to be, we've ot getting? generally it seems to be, we've got a — getting? generally it seems to be, we've got a right — getting? generally it seems to be, we've got a right to _ getting? generally it seems to be, we've got a right to be _ getting? generally it seems to be, we've got a right to be here. i getting? generally it seems to be, we've got a right to be here. but. we've got a right to be here. but very— we've got a right to be here. but very often— we've got a right to be here. but very often people get quite nasty and say, — very often people get quite nasty and say, we don't have to do that, and say, we don't have to do that, and the _ and say, we don't have to do that, and the dogs aren't doing any harm,
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even _ and the dogs aren't doing any harm, even though the dogs are chasing birds. _ even though the dogs are chasing birds, mammals, and sometimes sheep. but they— birds, mammals, and sometimes sheep. but they don't like putting their dogs _ but they don't like putting their dogs on — but they don't like putting their dogs on a lead if we tell them to, they feel— dogs on a lead if we tell them to, they feel they have got a right to be here — they feel they have got a right to be here and that is their right, they've — be here and that is their right, they've got no interest in us and livestock— they've got no interest in us and livestock and animals.— they've got no interest in us and livestock and animals. thank you very much. _ livestock and animals. thank you very much. we — livestock and animals. thank you very much, we will— livestock and animals. thank you very much, we will let _ livestock and animals. thank you very much, we will let you i livestock and animals. thank you very much, we will let you get i livestock and animals. thank you i very much, we will let you get back on, you have got many more sheep that have got to be marked. the message this weekend, well, the farmers would like people to listen and say, if you are out in the countryside, please, if you are near wildlife, pleasejust countryside, please, if you are near wildlife, please just put your dog on the lead. good advice, fiona, thank you very much indeed. now it's time for a look at the weather. hi, ben good morning. lovely with the sunshine with fi there. can you believe it is actually made tomorrow, and we could have some further wintry flurries to come over
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the hills in scotland today. plenty of showers building up, much like yesterday. some hail and thunder, the heaviest this afternoon probably across parts of south—west england and on the hills of wales. temperatures at the moment 13, cold down the east coast and a cold night to come tonight again. the showers, mostly fading away, but we continue with a frosty night, we have had one every single night of april, into the start of may, widespread frost, too. that will be the case on saturday morning. temperatures rising through the day but it will just be enough to set up the showers, some of them will be heaviest on saturday afternoon in southern england and wales. by monday looking particularly wet and windy. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... dozens of people are killed in israel during a stampede at one of the holiest sites in the jewish
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world, attended by tens of thousands of ultra—orthodox jews. actor and director noel clarke is suspended by bafta after allegations of sexual harrassment, which he denies. security worries over the prime minister's phone after it is revealed that his phone number has been freely available online for the last 15 years. sport goes silent. football, rugby, cricket and more will start a four—day boycott of social media today, an attempt to tackle online abuse. time for a round—up of the sport, from the bbc sport centre. good morning. the weekend's sport will feel very different without football clubs tweeting when say a goal is scored. a complete sporting boycott of social media will start this afternoon. clubs and players from sports including football, cricket,
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rugby and tennis willjoin official associations and some sponsors in the four—day protest. they want facebook, instagram and twitter to do more to tackle people who use their sites to leave racist and sexist comments. nesta mcgregor has the details. taking the knee, slogans, banners, big campaigns. now, football's latest attempt to stamp out racism is digital silence. do i think it will make a difference? probably not. but what it does do, it sends a warning to these companies to let these people know that we're not going to take this abuse any more. led by the premier league, efl and with support from the other major sports, a vow of silence on the platforms where the abuse takes place. if they still don't take action, then i think you'll see these clubs, players, staff, corporations, start to get together and think of more tough measures to take to finally force action.
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for some, the boycott doesn't go far enough, though, or address why people behave like this in the first place. but as seen recently, football does have the power to affect change or prevent it. even before the lockdown kicked in, we were seeing significant increases in reported incidents based on discrimination. so this isn'tjust online. the fact that we've not been in grounds and we haven't had grassroots football, i think is hiding the fact that this is a problem in society. there's no room for racism. with the spotlight on social media companies, facebook, which owns instagram, recently gave users more control over who can message them privately. this isn't about profit and it's not about money. we've been working on some of these tools for a very long time. regardless of any calls for boycotts. how to handle being racially abused at work is a conversation andros had with his dad. the 29—year—old hopes it's not a lesson he'll have to pass down.
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hopefully we will have eradicated the problem. i feel like it is all about education, like i've said before. and hopefully, if we educate the kids now, when they are in their 20s and in their 30s, we're not receiving the same racist abuse on daily basis. hopefully i won't have to have these tough conversations with my son when he's older. nesta mcgregor, bbc news. this is the sort of tweet we won't be seeing over the weekend. man united's talisman, bruno fernandes, said on twitter he hopes people didn't switch off at half—time last night. and if you did, you would have missed manchester united coming from behind and hitting roma for six in the first leg of their europa league semifinal. it was a dazzling second—half display from united, who scored five times after the break, including two from eddison cavani, and this from mason greenwood, who made it 6—2.
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things were't quite so comfortable for arsenal, as they were beaten 2—1 by villareal. the spanish side were two goals up within half an hour, and things were looking grim for the gunners, but a late nicolas pepe penalty gave them a vital away goal. mark selby and stuart bingham are tied at 4—4 going into the morning session of their semifinal at the world snooker championship. while in the other semi, kyren wilson was a relentless potting machine, winning five frames in a row at one point, and poor shaun murphy was left twiddling his thumbs and hardly had a look in. so, wilson has a 6—2 lead going into this afternoon's semi—final at the world snooker championships, but it's a new day and he still needs 11 more if he is to make the final. that's all the sport for now. around a third of all the people in the uk are living in areas that have not reported any covid deaths in april, according
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to bbc news analysis. health experts welcomed the progress but said we should remain cautious to avoid another wave of cases. naomi grimley has been looking at the numbers. getting back to normal is something we all want to do. and some areas of the country already seem in a good place. take plymouth, for example. home to more than a quarter of million people, it's not seen a covid death in the last 58 days. oxford has not reported a covid death occurring in the last 60 days. in fact, as this map by the bbc�*s data unit shows, more than four out of ten uk councils have not reported any covid deaths in the past month. it's a large drop compared with january, when the uk was at the peak of its second wave.
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then only two councils in the uk reported no covid deaths. but experts are still urging caution. it's a really good sign and we are seeing several parts of the country where prevalence is really, really low. so i think it gives us confidence. we do need to of course be a little bit cautious, because with the road map, we have had significant reopening of society on 12th april. there's another one coming up on 17th may. it's great news but of course we do need to monitor those changes. so this is why it's really important that we have these five—week intervals between these relaxations, just so we can monitor the impact on r, on hospital admissions, and on deaths and safely proceed to the next step in the road map. hi, would you like to come through? across the uk, coronavirus deaths are falling faster for vaccinated groups rather than unvaccinated ones. over the past month, for example, deaths of over—50s have dropped by nearly 80%.
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but with most under—40s still unvaccinated, ministers insist we must still follow the rules so that the road map out of lockdown is irreversible. naomi grimley, bbc news. lets speak to our head of statistics, robert cuffe. it shows how far we've come, doesn't it? whether it's locked down, whether it's the vaccine, we don't know which, in which area, but it does show huge progress? yes. know which, in which area, but it does show huge progress? yes, the comparison — does show huge progress? yes, the comparison with _ does show huge progress? yes, the comparison with january _ does show huge progress? yes, the comparison with january is - does show huge progress? yes, the comparison with january is almost l comparison with january is almost shocking. i think we have seen about 600 deaths reported in april so far, that may go up a little bit to a little bit over 600, as deaths come in, but back injanuary, it was 30,000. so it is a huge full, an almost inconceivable fall since the start of the year. and as naomi was reporting, more than a third of councils have not seen any covid that in about a month. and it is two thirds, who have seen none or one.
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combine that with the story from the times this week saying a lot of places are not seeing very many cases at the moment, really for a lot of the uk at the moment, the immediate effects of covid are not that visible. bud immediate effects of covid are not that visible-— that visible. and so if you live in one of those _ that visible. and so if you live in one of those areas _ that visible. and so if you live in one of those areas where i that visible. and so if you live in one of those areas where you i that visible. and so if you live in i one of those areas where you have not seen any deaths for weeks and possibly not many cases, there must be huge pressure now for the government to unlock now, unlocked, sooner. , y ., government to unlock now, unlocked, sooner. , , ., ., government to unlock now, unlocked, sooner. , ., , sooner. yes, if you are sitting in plymouth _ sooner. yes, if you are sitting in plymouth and — sooner. yes, if you are sitting in plymouth and have _ sooner. yes, if you are sitting in plymouth and have not - sooner. yes, if you are sitting in plymouth and have not seen i sooner. yes, if you are sitting in plymouth and have not seen a i sooner. yes, if you are sitting in i plymouth and have not seen a covid death in two months, if you work in a pub, and furlough is not covering everything, the argument comes a bit harder. but asjonathan van tam might say, you are 2—1 up, five minutes to go, don't lose concentration. every person who gets vaccinated is another person who helps that next stage of unlocking be successful. but i think these data show how difficult it is to make that argument, when people are still feeling the immediate effects of the restrictions, but aren't seeing the immediate effects of
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coronavirus.— coronavirus. those football metaphors _ coronavirus. those football metaphors are _ coronavirus. those football metaphors are contagious! | coronavirus. those football - metaphors are contagious! robert, thank you very much indeed. live music, large crowds and no masks or social distancing. it might sound like a dim and distant memory but that's what lies in store for thousands of people in liverpool this weekend. the city is hosting pilot events for the re—opening of the entertainment industry, but if you haven't had a negative covid test, you're not getting in. danjohnson has been finding out. the show is back on the road and rolling into town for a big weekend that has been a long time coming. 3,000 people congregating together in one place. hopefully, all relaxed and a few drinks in them and they will be cool and looking forward to the excitement of the whole night. and this draughty warehouse turned nightclub is the perfect place to get people back together. i've done a couple of social distancing gigs, over the summer. how were they? they were ok. i mean, it was nice to see people, but you are told to sit
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down and don't dance. keep your voice down. all the opposite of what i've been trying to do for years. going back to the authentic rave, if you like. that is supremely exciting for us all. and it's going to be a step to the future, hopefully. across the city, there's an even bigger gig on sunday. here, too, no masks, no social distancing. though all 5,000 will be tested before and after. i can assure you it will feel like the real thing. i suspect i will have a tear in my eye, quite frankly. i can only imagine what it is going to be like for the bands. headlining are blossoms, all the way from stockport, after a year of playing at home,
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stuck like everyone else in this business. i still can't actually imagine it. it's been such a while. to see people together. we could be a bit taken back by it. but we'll probablyjust be focusing on not messing up. we haven't played for that long. remembering the words and stuff. i'll probably be able to enjoy it like two songs from the end. at first, i'lljust be like, "play it right, play it right." and it's no surprise in this city, the fans are keen. i'm excited for the event. just the idea of being in a crowd and feeling normal again. that's what i'm really looking forward to. | i wouldn't say i've got concerns. j the other half's a bit concerned. she's a primary school teacher. she's a little bit worried, _ you know, if any one tests positive. more worried about work. but i've been saying all week the show's got to go on. i
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back at the warehouse, they're almost ready. we've got perfect natural ventilation here. large openings all down one side of the building. the sensors will detect carbon dioxide levels to work out if the airflow is good enough to stop the virus spreading. so, by measuring the amount of co2 in the space, we're able to estimate the ventilation flow rate. but, more importantly, we're able to investigate the fresh air distribution. how does that air move around the space and around the people? and with music finally starting to get back to full volume, these will be gigs nobody wants to end. we'll probably be at the front of the stage, looking out. it'll be encore after encore. i've never done an encore. it's probably the time to do it, isn't it, this gig? of course you've done an encore. not like a proper encore, unplanned. play charlemagne again. three times. i'll do that. danjohnson, bbc news, liverpool.
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i'm joined byjeremyjoseph, owner of renowned g a y and heaven nightclubs. are you excited by these experiments that are going on in liverpool this weekend? i’m that are going on in liverpool this weekend? �* , , ., ., , weekend? i'm split in two, to be honest with _ weekend? i'm split in two, to be honest with you. _ weekend? i'm split in two, to be honest with you. there - weekend? i'm split in two, to be honest with you. there are i weekend? i'm split in two, to be honest with you. there are two i honest with you. there are two sides, obviously excited because there is a test event going on, i am petrified as well, on a personal level, it's very difficult, we've got outside opening at the bar is and i am still struggling being around people who may be outside without masks on. so i don't know how i am going to feel reopening, whether i am personally ready to be in a crowd, but then on the business side, i have to be because we are not going to survive financially without it. so there's two sides of it, the business side and the personal side. it, the business side and the personalside. so, excited to it, the business side and the personal side. so, excited to see the results, petrified of actually having to face crowd's again. but i
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mean, having to face crowd's again. but i mean. 21st _ having to face crowd's again. but i mean, 21st june _ having to face crowd's again. but i mean, 21st june is _ having to face crowd's again. but i mean, 21st june is the _ having to face crowd's again. but i mean, 21st june is the date i having to face crowd's again. but i mean, 215tjune is the date when all mean, 21stjune is the date when all restrictions will be lifted, should be lifted, if everything goes to plan, so, is that what you're planning for, in terms of your big clubs? ., �* , ., , ., _ clubs? no, we're planning stage by stae, clubs? no, we're planning stage by stage. we're _ clubs? no, we're planning stage by stage, we're planning _ clubs? no, we're planning stage by stage, we're planning for— clubs? no, we're planning stage by stage, we're planning for 17th i clubs? no, we're planning stage by stage, we're planning for17th may. j stage, we're planning for 17th may. i'm not convinced 21st ofjune is going to happen, to be honest, because you see so many conflicting reports, whether masks are differently going to go, whether social distancing is deftly going to 90, social distancing is deftly going to go, sage is saying one thing, ministers are saying another. so i am not working to 21stjune, i am working to 17th may, which is when we can get back inside, socially distanced, 25% capacity, i can get the business back to breaking even. so, to me, it is about 17th may, i'm taking it stage by stage. when we get closer to 21stjune, i will then start thinking about it, but we have got to look at the next stage in the roadmap, which is 17th may. haifa
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roadmap, which is 17th may. how touih is it roadmap, which is 17th may. how tough is it been _ roadmap, which is 17th may. how tough is it been for— roadmap, which is 17th may. how tough is it been for you, financially, over the last year? it's been hell on earth, to be honest. we have had very little support, i think we have got about £60,000 or £70,000 in grants, and this has cost us in bills over £1.3 million. even this morning i woke up to the nightmare of a letter from my solicitor saying, last year we paid out about £100,000 in insurance, our insurance is about to be renewed, they are going to put it up again because insurance companies are now saying they don't particular want to support hospitality, they are not wanting to insure it, they paid out zero, we've been paying them, and now they don't want to carry on supporting us and they are going to increase it. so, it feels like we are getting no support, and it's just a complete... it's a struggle. everyone keeps looking at what is going on outside and they go, oh, my god, you must be so excited to be
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reopening. and actually outside opening is, like, 10% of our capacity, so we're not making any money out of it. it's a lot of work and all we really doing is reducing our losses rather than actually making money and recovering. iltrui’eilii. making money and recovering. well, we really hope _ making money and recovering. well, we really hope that _ making money and recovering. well, we really hope that you _ making money and recovering. well, we really hope that you do _ making money and recovering. well, we really hope that you do manage to bounce back. flan we really hope that you do manage to bounce back-— bounce back. can i get one quick .lui bounce back. can i get one quick ilui in? bounce back. can i get one quick plug in? go _ bounce back. can i get one quick plug in? go on. _ bounce back. can i get one quick plug in? go on, then. _ bounce back. can i get one quick plug in? go on, then. talking i bounce back. can i get one quick i plug in? go on, then. talking about test events. — plug in? go on, then. talking about test events. i _ plug in? go on, then. talking about test events, i am _ plug in? go on, then. talking about test events, i am running _ plug in? go on, then. talking about test events, i am running the i plug in? go on, then. talking about. test events, i am running the london marathon in october, and marathon events have announced on 15th may, they are doing a test running event at kempton park and they need runners, so if you go on to the london marathon socials, i will be running it there is a 5k testing running it there is a 5k testing running event, so please be good, we want to get the london marathon back up want to get the london marathon back up and running, which is the best charity fundraiser in the world. yeah, it certainly is, having done it once, i can concur with that. thank you very much. jeremyjoseph, owner of g a y and heaven nightclubs.
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we're less than a week away from may's elections, with different contests depending on where you live. our correspondent lewis goodall has been taking a look at what's happening and where. there is a bumper crop of elections coming up in england and scotland in may, the biggest set of elections, the biggest democratic test for the three major parties this side of the next general election. so let's have a look at some of the contests that are taking place across the country. for a start, we've got 143 different english councils up for election, 5000 seats, in some places, a third of the chamber, in some places, half the chamber, because some of those seats are held over from councils which should have been elected but won't because of the pandemic. msps in holyrood up for election, 129 of them. all members of the welsh assembly. we have seen what huge powers those bodies have in scotland and wales during the pandemic. in england as well, police and crime commissioners, up for real action.
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25 seats for the london assembly, as well as a whole sweet of other directly elected mayors, 13 of them. how are these elections conducted? it might be a bit more complicated than you think, it depends where you live and what you are voting in. in scotland and wales you get two votes, one for your local constituency member, and another for the regional list. this vote effectively helps parties which do not do so well in the local constituencies but do still do well overall in the election, it tops up their representation and gives them extra seats and makes the overall system more proportional. but that is different of course if you are living in england. in english local councils, it is our old friend, first—past—the—post. one photo, one candidate, one vote, whichever candidate, one vote, whichever candidate gets one more vote than all of the other candidates, they are elected, whichever party controls more than 50% of the seats
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in a local chamber, they control the local council, and if they are not able to get more than 50% of the seats, then they have to form a coalition with another party. and thatis coalition with another party. and that is different again if you are voting in the english mayoral elections or the police and crime commissioners. there, there is something called a supplementary vote system, voters get two preferences, if no—one gets over 50%, then the other candidates are eliminated one by one, and the preferences of those voters are readers to beat it until you get over 50% for one candidate and hey presto, you've got a mayor or you've got an english local police and crime commissioner. but one thing that unites all of these elections is the fact that they are taking place in very different circumstances than we might have expected, certainly different from backin expected, certainly different from back in the 1950s. this one is taking place in a global pandemic. covid—secure local voting stations, covid—secu re local voting stations, voters covid—secure local voting stations, voters being asked to bring their own pencil shield is, being asked to
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vote by post, we can't know what effect all of that is going to have on turnout. could be much lower, could be much higher, if lots of people choose to vote by post. and there for this is a very unpredictable set of elections and we can't know what power they are going to have in order to give us wider insight into trends in our politics more generally. lewis goodall reporting there. members of the british asian community are sending urgently needed medical supplies and facilities for those suffering with covid in india. as the situation worsens, many here have started fundraising, as rahila bano reports from bolton. how is your health? how is everyone? how is the family? this is a desperately worrying time. make sure you take care of uncle, auntie and everyone. nine members of his family in delhi had the virus in november but have all recovered. since then, india's health crisis has got far worse.
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i call my friends or talk to my mum, there is someone who has got it and someone we know has died of it, so... it is heartbreaking. there are approximately 21,000 people of indian origin in bolton. they've been fundraising at temples, gurdwaras and mosques like this one to send money home for medical equipment. we've collected more than £5,000, £6,000 current and it is still ongoing. what happens is where the hospital can't provide them oxygen, they are buying them privately and using them in cricket fields, setting up beds wherever they possibly can. this is just one of the oxygen bottles that have been paid for by worshippers in bolton. the committee has taken this great initiative _ the committee has taken this great initiative by the support of bolton, uk. fundraising efforts are also taking place across the region. we have just celebrated
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lord hanuman's birthday yesterday so we felt that it was appropriate that we do something where people can come and also realise, do some devotional singing and also pray at the same time for people who are losing their loved ones. one, it's a prayer meeting but secondly we are also raising funds. as the struggle continues, indian communities here hope their efforts will go a long way in helping india's fight against covid. rahila bano, bbc news, bolton. five people have been arrested over the theft of lady gaga's dogs in los angeles. the singer's french bulldogs were returned two days after being stolen at gunpoint in february. the woman who said she'd found the dogs was one of those detained. the dutch government has said the
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eurovision— the dutch government has said the eurovision song contest in rotterdam next month— eurovision song contest in rotterdam next month will take place in front of a live _ next month will take place in front of a live audience, at around a fifth _ of a live audience, at around a fifth of— of a live audience, at around a fifth of its _ of a live audience, at around a fifth of its normal capacity. for a look at the _ fifth of its normal capacity. for a look at the weather _ fifth of its normal capacity. for a look at the weather forecast. i hello. a fairfew hello. a fair few of you will stay dry for the rest of today, with some lapses of sunshine, but the showers have been building up and they will be more widespread in the afternoon. some of the heaviest will be across the higher ground of northern england and wales and also in a zone in south—west england. it will be a chilly day especially with the showers. temperatures dropping in the showers, and a high potentially of only 13. tonight, the showers fade, clearskies of only 13. tonight, the showers fade, clear skies away from some of the showers continuing around the coasts, and a run of night—time frosts continues, away from towns and city centres, tomorrow morning. a few coastal showers tomorrow, and then as temperatures rise during the day, more cloud and showers in the afternoon, heaviest on the hills of
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wales and just inland from the south coast of england. temperatures up a little bit but overall it will be a cool weekend with a mixture of sunshine and showers. big changes on the way for monday, with some very wet and windy weather.
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hello. this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world... dozens of people are killed in israel during a stampede at one of the holiest sites in the jewish world, attended by tens of thousands of ultra—orthodox jews. we've just finished treating one of israel's worst disasters. a terrible disaster of people who came to celebrate lag b'omer, and unfortunately, were literally crushed to death. actor and director noel clarke is suspended by bafta, after allegations of sexual harrassment which he denies. security worries over the prime minister's phone — after it's revealed his phone number's been freely available online, for the last 15 years.
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a vital consignment of american medical supplies has arrived

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