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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 4, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines... authorities in mexico city say there will be a full investigation after a metro train and railway track collapsed onto a busy road in mexico city, killing at least 23 people. translation: my brother came with his wife and they managedl to get her out but he was crushed in there and we don't know anything. they don't give us reports. a court hears a police officer accused of murdering the ex—footballer dalian atkinsion had tasered him for six times longer than standard, before kicking him twice in the head. the return of face—to—face diplomacy — g7 foreign ministers meet for the first time in more than 2 years, with security and climate change on the agenda. coronavirus cases in india top
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20 million with many hospitals still short of oxygen. we're here in edinburgh looking ahead to thursday's election for the holyrood parliament — one of a series of polls right across the uk. and reflections without distractions — hundreds of people in hull are taking part in a year—long art project which aims to give people time to look back on their lives. good afternoon. the mayor of mexico city has promised an urgent investigation into a disaster on the metro system, when an overpass collapsed as a train was travelling on it. several carriages plunged
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onto a busy road below. at least 23 people are known to have died, and dozens more have been injured. you may find some of the images in will grant's report upsetting. residents of mexico city are all too accustomed to these scenes. emergency services working through the night, attempting to reach injured victims, trapped beneath the rubble. but this was not another earthquake in the mexican capital, rather it was an overpass in the city's busy subway system. it collapsed as a train travelled over it, bringing a tangle of wreckage, concrete and metal crashing onto the cars below. at that hour, the train will most likely have been taking workers home after a late shift, a quiet night turning into tragedy in an instant. it was a desperate, agonising situation for theirfamilies. translation: my daughter-in-law called us, she was with my son - and she told us that the structure fell down on top of them.
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translation: my brother came with his wife and they managedl to get her out, but he was crushed in there, and we don't know anything. they do not give us reports. now they have to get him out, but who knows how long it will take? also on the scene was the city's mayor, claudia sheinbaum, addressing the public as the picture got steadily grimmer. "i urge any family who fears they had relatives on the train to contact the emergency response team here, orat one of the hospitals," she said. this was the newest, most modern line in mexico's subway, line 12, unveiled less than a decade ago. an incident like this might have been expected on one of the older lines built in the 1960s, but supposedly not on line 12. he speaks spanish. yet many have said there were issues with its construction from the start. among them, local residents who complained about the endless expansion of the subway
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across this sprawling city. many of the tough questions ahead will be directed at the city's former mayor, marcelo ebrard, now mexico's foreign minister. he championed line 12, and on twitter he said he would fully comply with the investigation into what happened. but such investigations will have to wait. for now, the city is solely concerned with rescuing those trapped, attending to the injured, and comforting the bereaved. will grant, bbc news, mexico city. and will grant gave us this update from the scene within the last hour. well, as you can see, they are busy behind me still trying to locate survivors from this incident. trying to reach them in the rubble and the metal. the entire area around here has been closed off and every metre of line 12 is now closed as they
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perform a check along the entire length of this part of the subway system. this is the second busiest and most important subway system in north america after new york. this was its worst events for 45 years. it really has rattled the residents of mexico city. they knew that parts of mexico city. they knew that parts of the system, parts of the subway in mexico city are old and need focus and investment. they didn't expect it to be the most modern part. the part that was inaugurated just a handful of years ago. that worries people here. they feel that if it can happen to what is supposedly the shiniest, newest and most important part of their subway system, it can happen to other bridges and other parts of the infrastructure as well. many hours ahead. a terrible and deeply upsetting way to the families. will
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grant reporting from mexico city. foreign ministers from the world's leading economies are meeting in london for theirfirst face—to—face talks in more than two years. the g7 is expected to discuss new ways for the group to defend international rules. our diplomatic correspondent, james landale, has been following the meeting. over the years, lancaster house has been the scene of some historic negotiations. today, it is playing host to a new form of what i think you can loosely call pandemic diplomacy. it is secure but for the ministers who have spoken to one another on video link for months, it is at least at last face—to—face. diplomacy is slowly emerging from the virtual world. staff at lancashire house are remembering how to roll out the red carpet. visiting ministers are wearing masks and practising their awkward elbow bumps with foreign secretaries. the
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crucial point is that they are here, in person and meeting face—to—face for the first time in more than two years. much has been done to keep them safe. the delegations have been kept small. there are 35 litres of hand sanitiser here. they will talk to each other through transparent screens. they have much to discuss, notjust screens. they have much to discuss, not just the screens. they have much to discuss, notjust the pandemic itself, it is also the state of the international order. the foreign secretary and his us counterparts made clear at this ahead of the meeting. we us counterparts made clear at this ahead of the meeting.— ahead of the meeting. we are responding — ahead of the meeting. we are responding to _ ahead of the meeting. we are responding to a _ ahead of the meeting. we are responding to a situation, - ahead of the meeting. we are i responding to a situation, where ahead of the meeting. we are - responding to a situation, where our values are being challenged, the international architecture is at least in some respects being weakened. least in some respects being weakened-— least in some respects being weakened. ., ,, . ., , ., . weakened. the foreign secretary once from like-minded _ weakened. the foreign secretary once from like-minded nations— weakened. the foreign secretary once from like-minded nations to _ weakened. the foreign secretary once from like-minded nations to form - from like—minded nations to form loose, agile alliances to better defend societies from the threat of authoritarian states. the americans are on the same page. what
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authoritarian states. the americans are on the same page.— are on the same page. what we're t in: to are on the same page. what we're trying to is — are on the same page. what we're trying to is to _ are on the same page. what we're trying to is to uphold _ are on the same page. what we're trying to is to uphold the - are on the same page. what we're trying to is to uphold the rule - are on the same page. what we're trying to is to uphold the rule is i trying to is to uphold the rule is that our— trying to is to uphold the rule is that our countries have invested so much _ that our countries have invested so much in _ that our countries have invested so much in over— that our countries have invested so much in over so many decades. the benefit _ much in over so many decades. the benefit of— much in over so many decades. the benefit of notjust much in over so many decades. the benefit of not just our citizens but to the _ benefit of not just our citizens but to the rest — benefit of not just our citizens but to the rest of the world, including, by the _ to the rest of the world, including, by the way, — to the rest of the world, including, by the way, china. —wise the test for these — by the way, china. —wise the test for these ministers is whether they can agree — for these ministers is whether they can agree practical measures. the test for the _ can agree practical measures. tie: test for the foreign can agree practical measures. tte: test for the foreign secretary can agree practical measures. tt9 test for the foreign secretary is whether his global britain foreign policy can live up to its name. so, today's meeting is very much the start of a big diplomatic year for the united kingdom. there is the full heads of the g7 taking place in cornel injune and later in glasgow there is a big cup 26 climate change —— cop26. what exactly do they
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agree, notjust to defend democracies but also to deal with more immediate threat. for example, how do they agree on how to help poorer countries get better to covid—i9 vaccines. the prosecution has opened its case against a west mercia police constable accused of the murder and manslaughter of the former aston villa footballer, dalian atkinson. pc benjamin monk has denied any wrong—doing leading to mr atkinson's death in 2016. our correspondent, phil mackie, reports from birmingham crown court. many people will remember dalian atkinson, a very well—known professional footballer with a long and successful career, not least here in birmingham with aston villa. he retired in 2001 and by the summer of 2016 when he died he was suffering from very serious ill health. he had high blood pressure, heart disease and he was on dialysis. and it was on the eve of a hospital appointment in august of that year that his behaviour began to become
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quite agitated and quite erratic. it meant that in the very early hours of the morning, he left his girlfriend in his flat to drive to his father's house in telford and appeared outside shouting, ranting and bashing on the door. neighbours said they reported that incident to the police, who arrived fairly soon after. pc benjamin monk and his colleague, mary ellen bettley—smith. during the confrontation with dalian atkinson, pc monk fired his taser twice unsuccessfully. the prosecution then say that dalian atkinson died as a result of a third deployment of the taser, during which mr atkinson was incapacitated. what the prosecution allege is that the police then acted beyond reasonable force in that he was kicked in the head by pc monk, they allege, and that left an imprint on his forehead and that pc mary ellen bettley—smith beat him whilst he was lying on the ground with a baton.
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the trial is due to last another six to eight weeks. both of those offices deny charges of murder and assault. the uk and india have agreed new trade and investment deals, worth a £1 billion. the government says the contracts are expected to create more than 6,500 jobs here — mainly in the technology and health sectors. the official number of coronavirus cases in india has now topped 20 million. there's been no let up in the rate of infection, with more than 300,000 positive tests recorded for the 13th consecutive day. there are still reports of oxygen shortages in the capital, delhi, and the army has been asked to set up medical facilities to take the strain off hospitals. devina gupta sent this report. desperate hope. that's what family members in this hospital in delhi are holding onto. it is a fight for life—saving oxygen that some are losing fast. translation: | came -
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here because a man died. his death freed up a place and oxygen for my mother. translation: they put us in a shed, when she needs| to go to intensive care. this oxygen bottle came from my house. we bought it ourselves. as india crosses over 20 million infected cases, many hospitals are choked like this, dtruggling with scarce resources. —— struggling with scarce resources. translation: the situation is really critical. _ there are no beds available. we are under pressure — _ the doctors, nurses, the orderlies. even the patients. we are all under pressure. for some hospitals, it's already too late. at least 26 lives have been lost in the last 72 hours in such hospitals that exhausted their oxygen supply. just this morning, a tragedy was averted, when a children's hospital in delhi only had two hours of oxygen left, but the government so far denies any oxygen shortage.
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global aid is coming, but the challenge is to ensure speedy distribution. so the indian government has roped in the army for better management. but with unabated chaos, many indians are providing help themselves. people like mohammed khan, an auto driver in bhopal, are pitching in with the little they have. translation: | made an auto - ambulance because i saw that people were carrying their sick mothers and fathers on their shoulders. sometimes, carrying an oxygen cylinder alongside. they can't afford ambulances. covid is not sparing sport either. the massively popular indian premier league cricket tournament has been postponed, after at least four players tested positive. it's a huge disappointment here for millions, where cricket is almost a religion. however, the goal of saving lives has proved too important, as india faces the darkest test for decades. devina gupta, bbc news.
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people who live in care homes in england can now go on some trips outside without needing to quarantine for a fortnight afterwards. new guidance allows walks or garden visits, but campaigners say the changes don't go far enough. a petition organised by relatives of those in care homes calling on the government to make visiting guidance mandatory is being delivered to downing street today. our social affairs correspondent alison holt explained what the changes involve. they are allowed to go with a nominated visitor or a care worker to a public space like a park or to someone's garden. and i think it's worth remembering that the guidance was only published on saturday, so a lot of care homes won't have had time to take on board what it means. they have to do risk assessments, they have to make sure there are enough staff there to support any visits out. so, it is going to be something that is likely to ramp up as time
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goes by and the weather gets better. but it is a important step forward. there has been an increasing angerfrom families, who feel that as the rest of society opens up, the restrictions in care homes have gone on too long and when you have, for instance, someone with learning disabilities, who is desperate to get out and spend time with their family, i'm sure for many it has felt like it has been rather present for the last year. —— rather a prison over the last year. —— rather a prison over the last year. families want to make sure that those limitations are not kept in place for too long. there are some homes which have not followed guidance. they have still restricted people. so, today, a petition has been presented by campaigners to the prime minister and it is calling for each resident to have one named resident or friends legally recognised as part of their essential care team. so, whatever happens in the future, that person will still be able to have contact with the person they love. well, we can speak now to the actress, ruthie henshall whose mother has dementia
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and lives in a care home — and is supporting the petition. thank you so much for being with us. just tell us why you support this petition and what the petition is calling for. the petition and what the petition is callin: for. , :, , calling for. the petition is calling for all of the _ calling for. the petition is calling for all of the guidance _ calling for. the petition is calling for all of the guidance that - calling for. the petition is calling for all of the guidance that the l for all of the guidance that the government is giving at the moment. it needs to be made to law and made mandatory. what is happening is that we are having a postcode lottery, where some homes are applying it in some homes are not. there are some people who still have not seen loved ones or had any kind of meaningful contact with loved ones in more than a year. we want rights enshrined in law, so that whatever, people like my mother, the residents of homes, can have somebody who will always be there for them. i think that is absolutely essential. this is a human rights issue. it is notjust about keeping people safe any more. so, why are some homes following
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this guidance? is itjust on abundance of caution? than this guidance? is itjust on abundance of caution? : :, . abundance of caution? an abundance of caution and _ abundance of caution? an abundance of caution and also _ abundance of caution? an abundance of caution and also the _ abundance of caution? an abundance of caution and also the problem - of caution and also the problem being that because it is only guidance from the government is, if anything goes wrong, they are not insured, are they? they are literallyjust insured, are they? they are literally just saying what works for them and, to a certain extent, you understand it but, enough now. this is enough. this is people who are in care homes, who are lonely, and they are still dying of loneliness and isolation. they are giving up. i am an essential caregiver, which means that i can go and visit my mother whenever i went and every single resident should have an essential caregiver because if they don't have that, restrictions —— if restrictions place again, then we really looking for something, where
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everything goes back to the way it was and that can't happen. they have to have a priority and they have to have one person, just one person, who can come and see them no matter what every day. who can come and see them no matter what every day-— what every day. yes, and 'ust tell us more about i what every day. yes, and 'ust tell us more about your h what every day. yes, and just tell us more about your mother. - what every day. yes, and just tell us more about your mother. i - what every day. yes, and just tell. us more about your mother. i think she deteriorated during the pandemic but she has improved since you have been able to go and see her. big time. been able to go and see her. big time- she _ been able to go and see her. egg time. she had four been able to go and see her. e n time. she had four months in a room on her own, when the first lockdown happened. we all knew that we had to keep them safe but then, what happened was that she was walking and talking before that lockdown but after four months of being in a room on her own, she doesn't walk and she doesn't talk and her food has to be messed up and her drinks have to be thickened. that happened within four months because she was having no stimulation whatsoever. since i have got back into seeing her, the change has been unbelievable. two separate
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carers, the care home manager, they all said, oh my goodness! the light is back on in her eyes. look at the way she looks at you, it's like she has a new lease of life. all she has left is my company and my touch and my sister's company and touch. i think she deserves that. she is owed that and this is a human rights issue. the only thing that she gets a kick out of now is when i touch her and she moans with delight. why are we not giving them the same rights as we all have?— rights as we all have? thank you very much _ rights as we all have? thank you very much indeed. _ rights as we all have? thank you very much indeed. i _ rights as we all have? thank you very much indeed. i think- rights as we all have? thank you very much indeed. i think your i very much indeed. i think your camera is tilting up a nap, so we are seeing more of the sky and less of you. but maybe you can jump are seeing more of the sky and less of you. but maybe you canjump up. they go! that is better. let me ask you one more question. you are obviously angry about that and i know that some of these care homes
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have been described as prisons over the last year or so and i know that you were saying a little while ago that the whole company mobilised against the idea of a european football super league and yet you think why can't the country mobilise against what has been going on in the care homes. filth. against what has been going on in the care homes.— against what has been going on in the care homes. oh, it is 'ust nuts. i don't understand h the care homes. oh, it is 'ust nuts. i don't understand what _ the care homes. oh, it isjust nuts. i don't understand what it - the care homes. oh, it isjust nuts. i don't understand what it takes. i i don't understand what it takes. everything goes into a care home and nobody comes out. the entertainments, the visitors, everything is going into a care home and right now, nothing is going in and right now, nothing is going in and no one is coming out. even if they are coming out, they have now relax the restrictions around that but they still have to have a carer to take them out. when have they got time for that? that is why every single person, every single resident, should have a essential caregiver that no matter what, they
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have. this isjust human rights. it has made me very angry. the government needs to stop this because what is happening is that the guidance, when they make it guidance, people can make up their own rules. it has to be law.- own rules. it has to be law. thank ou so own rules. it has to be law. thank you so much _ own rules. it has to be law. thank you so much and _ own rules. it has to be law. thank you so much and thank— own rules. it has to be law. thank you so much and thank you - own rules. it has to be law. thank you so much and thank you for i you so much and thank you for battling against the wind and a slightly wonky camera. and it was really good to hear your message as well. thank you so much for being with us. voters go to the polls across scotland, wales and england on thursday, in the biggest test of opinion outside the general election. more than 100 councils are being contested in england, and the members of the welsh and scottish parliaments will be elected. my colleague clive myrie is at holyrood for us. a little less windy but a lot more rain. good afternoon to you from
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here in edinburgh. actually, it's only northern ireland that won't be going to the polls on thursday. everywhere else in the uk, elections will include local councils, police and crime commissioners as well as the welsh senedd. the results across the country will show what impact keir starmer�*s leadership of labour is having. and here in scotland, elections to the holyrood parliament, that could see an snp overall majority and possibly a mandate, the party says, for another independence referendum. nick earley is with me. it's a curious thing about these elections on thursday here in scotland. we know who the dominant party is going to be and to the first minister is going to be and yet these elections could be pivotal in terms of the constitutional question is that it raises moving forward. , , :, :, , :, forward. yes, there is going to be a lot to talk over _ forward. yes, there is going to be a
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lot to talk over this _ forward. yes, there is going to be a lot to talk over this weekend - forward. yes, there is going to be a lot to talk over this weekend but i lot to talk over this weekend but the resutt— lot to talk over this weekend but the result here could have some pretty— the result here could have some pretty profound impact over the next few years _ pretty profound impact over the next few years. the big question that everybody is asking at the moment is, can— everybody is asking at the moment is, can the — everybody is asking at the moment is, can the snp win that majority? it is is, can the snp win that majority? it is hard — is, can the snp win that majority? it is hard to— is, can the snp win that majority? it is hard to do. the system here is pretty— it is hard to do. the system here is pretty nruch— it is hard to do. the system here is pretty much designed to stop a majority— pretty much designed to stop a majority but such is the level of sunbort — majority but such is the level of support that the snp has seen since the last— support that the snp has seen since the last independence referendum in 2014. _ the last independence referendum in 2014. it _ the last independence referendum in 2014, it has been talked about. nobody— 2014, it has been talked about. nobody knows for sure. some in the party— nobody knows for sure. some in the party are _ nobody knows for sure. some in the party are prettyjittery nobody knows for sure. some in the party are pretty jittery when you talk to _ party are pretty jittery when you talk to them about whether it will happen — talk to them about whether it will happen. but if it does happen, it is a cast-iron— happen. but if it does happen, it is a cast—iron mandate for another referendum. even if the snp don't win it _ referendum. even if the snp don't win it on _ referendum. even if the snp don't win it on their own, if you factor in the _ win it on their own, if you factor in the other— win it on their own, if you factor in the other pro—independent parties such as _ in the other pro—independent parties such as the _ in the other pro—independent parties such as the scottish greens, you probably— such as the scottish greens, you probably all quite potentially have a pro—independence majority in parliament. the unionist parties on the other— parliament. the unionist parties on the other hand, a lot of them are voting _ the other hand, a lot of them are voting tactically. a lot of talk
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about — voting tactically. a lot of talk about people holding their nose and voting _ about people holding their nose and voting for— about people holding their nose and voting for another party. the regionat— voting for another party. the regional vote, the second vote is a bit more _ regional vote, the second vote is a bit more complicated. the race there is complicated as well between the conservatives and labour being the biggest _ conservatives and labour being the biggest opposition party in holyrood. biggest opposition party in holyrood-— biggest opposition party in holrood. , :, :, :, holyrood. many thanks for that. well, let's _ holyrood. many thanks for that. well, let's now _ holyrood. many thanks for that. well, let's now get _ holyrood. many thanks for that. well, let's now get a _ holyrood. many thanks for that. well, let's now get a look - holyrood. many thanks for that. well, let's now get a look at - holyrood. many thanks for that. j well, let's now get a look at the situation in wales, specifically, where there are questions over independence and whether there'll even be a welsh parliament in the future. but as tomos morgan has been finding out, covid is still featuring highly in the decisions of many voters. my heart stopped twice, so they had to cpr me, twice. in march last year, scott howell became the first coronavirus patient that needed intensive care treatment at the royal gwent hospital in newport, south wales. my wife had two calls to say that was it, i wasn't going to pull through.
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the advice they got from italy was suggesting that if people had not come out of a coma within two weeks, if they did come out, they were going to have major failures of organs, and i took two and a half weeks. but yeah, it wasn't looking good. my heart had stopped twice. my kidneys had failed. i was on dialysis. he made a miraculous recovery after his eight weeks in hospital, but it took him the best part of last year before feeling normal once again. for the rest of that year, i thought i was going to die every day. so every twinge i had, every day i got up and didn't feel myself, i thought, this is going to be my last day. it makes you appreciate the very simple things. the two things i did not have in hospital that i wanted was fresh air and someone to give me a cwtch. back working from home now and spending time with the family, has his experience of covid impacted how he will vote on may the 6th? high enough yet? it has changed where i put my vote this time.
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i met nurses when i was in there, seeing how hard they worked. i met one nurse in particular who had come out of retirement to help because she felt that was her vocation and she had to help, putting herself into a crisis, where people were dying of the nursing staff, and she still put herself out there. this year, as well as education and the future of the nhs, welsh independence and abolishing the welsh parliament, as well as the government's handling of covid, are just some of the themes being passed around by the parties standing in this election. cut towards the ball! but which issues have caught the minds of the cardiff harlequins senior men's rugby team, back at training after four and a half months of enforced winter break? things like health, social care, housing, those are the important things, i think overlooked sometimes in these discussions, so yeah, those core things really, for me. i feel like this year, university students have been left behind, sort of, not concentrated enough on, sort of, our mental health. i think we need to make our own decisions, so for me,
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i believe firmly in independence and that's the way we need to go. it's one that has to look quite broad. i think we've got a lot of problems at the moment in society. i think we need to look at a broad spectrum. since the senedd's inception just over two decades ago, welsh labour has been in power in some shape or form but now, there's more choice than ever for welsh voters come may the 6th. and for many, the key question will be, do we want more of the same or is it time for a change? tomos morgan, bbc news, outside the senedd. i'm joined now by mandy rhodes, the editor of holyrood magazine and managing director of holyrood communications. i wonder how confident the snp actually are of getting the majority that they say will give them the right to call for another referendum. i right to call for another referendum.—
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right to call for another referendum. ~ :, , .~' right to call for another referendum. ~ :, , a :, , referendum. i think as nick was sa in: referendum. i think as nick was saying earlier. _ referendum. i think as nick was saying earlier, it _ referendum. i think as nick was saying earlier, it is _ referendum. i think as nick was saying earlier, it is very - referendum. i think as nick was j saying earlier, it is very unusual to get a majority in parliament, which is not designed to get that. they would be foolish to be confident about it. i think we will not know until thursday, really. but not know untilthursday, really. but if the not know until thursday, really. but if they don't get the majority but with the greens, for instance, and possibly, alex salmond is's party as well, there is an overall majority for a second referendum. will that be good for the scottish nationalists, do you think? i be good for the scottish nationalists, do you think? i think regardless. _ nationalists, do you think? i think regardless. if _ nationalists, do you think? i think regardless, if nicola _ nationalists, do you think? i think regardless, if nicola sturgeon - regardless, if nicola sturgeon returns a poll that is slightly less than they got in 2016, which is less than they got in 2016, which is less than a majority, the shine will be taken off and it will be hard for her to argue that she has a mandate for a second independence referendum. regardless, if you have a majority with other pro—independence parties, clearly, there will be an argument to ask
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again for a referendum. conservatives, the democrats and labour, for them to come together in one group and hopefully defeat in their eyes these calls for in second referendum, could that happen? i referendum, could that happen? 1 think the problem is that labour supporters will remember what happened to labour last time they got into bed with the tories to fight a referendum and it did not go well and they are still trying to recover from that.— well and they are still trying to recover from that. might there be an arc ument recover from that. might there be an argument possibly _ recover from that. might there be an argument possibly for _ recover from that. might there be an argument possibly for the _ recover from that. might there be an | argument possibly for the suggestion that there should be a second referendum. maybe labour and other parties will have the second referendum and shut this argument down. like i really don't buy into the argument. whether it is yes or
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no in the next referendum, it will depend on the margins. i no in the next referendum, it will depend on the margins.— no in the next referendum, it will depend on the margins. i don't know what i depend on the margins. i don't know what i would — depend on the margins. i don't know what i would be _ depend on the margins. i don't know what i would be talking _ depend on the margins. i don't know what i would be talking about - depend on the margins. i don't know what i would be talking about today. what i would be talking about today if there was not a constitutional debate. ~ , , debate. well, it is interesting, mand , debate. well, it is interesting, mandy. isn't — debate. well, it is interesting, mandy, isn't it? _ debate. well, it is interesting, mandy, isn't it? why - debate. well, it is interesting, mandy, isn't it? why aren't i debate. well, it is interesting, mandy, isn't it? why aren't we talking about the nhs or educational standards orjob creation? that is the argument from pro—unionist parties, labour, the liberal democrats and conservatives, but all that other stuff that is really important to how ordinary people live in this country, is being ignored. is that a potential problem for nicola sturgeon? i ignored. is that a potential problem for nicola sturgeon?— for nicola sturgeon? i don't think the issues are _ for nicola sturgeon? i don't think the issues are being _ for nicola sturgeon? i don't think the issues are being ignored - for nicola sturgeon? i don't think the issues are being ignored and | the issues are being ignored and clearly we have had a pandemic for the last over a year. but i have to say, what would nicola sturgeon be campaigning on right now, had they not been a pandemic because the domestic record is not great and the problem is that you are being tested now against your own records and she did say that she wanted to be tested against closing the attainment gap
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and that has not happened. you cannot blame everything on the pandemic and these are deep—seated problems. write thanks forjoining us. for a round up of everything you need to know about the elections, ?there's a guide on our website — with much more information about who is standing where. some breaking news and it is that the trial of two former paratroopers, charged with murdering an ira man in 1972 has collapsed. joe mccann was shot dead in the markets area of south belfast. the men known as solely as a and c said they had fired shots at him but had done so lawfully. the evidence which
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forms the prosecution plasma case was based on police interviews carried out with the men in by detectives investigating cases from the northern ireland conflict. the judge ruled the evidence was inadmissible in this afternoon he formally acquitted both of those veterans. we will have more on that important breaking story as it comes into us through the afternoon and we will be getting reaction to that decision. no surprises there is wayjoe heading. —— housing renewal.
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weeks after leaving tottenham hotspur, jose mourinho has been announced as the new manager of italian serie a side roma. he'll take charge of the club from the start of next season, with roma currently sitting seventh in the league. mourinho returns to italy, where he managed inter milan between 2008 and 2010, leading them to the champions league and serie a titles. manchester city take a two one lead into teh second leg of tonight's champions league semi final against paris saint germain who face a nervous wait on teh fitness of key man kylian mbappe. the striker didn't train with the rest of the psg team yesterday after suffering a calf injury on saturday. pep guardiola — aiming to win the competition with city for the first time — believes he'll be ready — along with psg's other star man neymar. in the first half they were
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exceptional. they were always dangerous. in the second half we were better. we were better and they were better. we were better and they were worse. they lost and they play bad if they win they play good. but if you ask my opinion, they play good. manchester united's owners are yet to respond to sunday's protests against their ownership forcing the postponment of their match with liverpool. a 28 year oid man was arrested as fans gathered against the glazer's ownership and united's potential involvement in the breakaway european super league. it comes as the premier league looks to bring in a new owners charter to stop future attempts to join any breakaway organisation. what a game to miss out on. liverpool and manchester united, probably one of the biggest games shown worldwide. you know, across the globe. maybe after our classical,
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it's up there with the biggies so the fans have caused a real problem, and getting this game postponed, i think it is concerning because now you got a precedent, 50, 100 fans can get a game called off and postponed, what happens next time fans aren't happy with their club? are they going to do the same? that's the worry i have. the organisers of the indian premier league say they unanimously agreed to postpone the tournament following an emergency meeting. players in three franchises returned positive tests in the last two days and the board of control for cricket in india said it didn't want to compromise the safety of anyone involved in the ipl. as henry morean reports. once we got no yesterday that two players had tested positive then conversation started. would the tournament be able to continue? when
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three inside another camp tested positive in this morning another was tested positive. that forced the hand of the organisers. they made the decision that the tournament couldn't go ahead. the question is when will they be able to fit the competition in because this is a tournament that is fitted into a very densely populated schedule of cricket across 2021. india are meant to be in england to play they will test amateur final from mid june and they are not due to leave until mid—september. following that there is a t20 world cup. so there is a hugely cramped schedule. it's when they can possibly fit in the remaining 30 games or so of the indian premier league. tom daley has won a second gold medal at the diving world cup in tokyo a competition which serves as a test event for the olympics this summer. he added the individual 10m platform title with a stunning back three—and—a—half somersault. he also won the 10m synchronised event alongside matty lee on saturday. daley expected to challenge for more medals at this summer's
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delayed games which he's already qualified for. that's all the sport for now. a reminder of our top story, jose mourinho has been appointed as the new manager of roma following his sacking from tottenham. it will be interesting to see how he gets on the his record at spurs was patchy. his style might be more suited to the italian game than the premier league. those who sign up can apply for 60 days of �*breathing space' to prevent them falling into a spiral of debt.
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the treasury has estimated the scheme could benefit up to 700,000 people in its first year. phil andrew is the chief executive of the debt charity, stepchange. how much help will this offer people? this is a good day for anyone in problem debt. it's a landmark piece of legislation and it gives people protection against action and any further fees and actions for 60 days. previously that protection was not in place. you had to borrow more and more so it's going to help a lot of people and it's a good day. going to help a lot of people and it's a good day-— going to help a lot of people and it's a good day. protection for that amount of time, _ it's a good day. protection for that amount of time, for _ it's a good day. protection for that amount of time, for some - it's a good day. protection for that amount of time, for some people | it's a good day. protection for that - amount of time, for some people even that won't be enough in terms of protection because they will need help for a longer period than that. 60 days is not quite long enough, we did ask for 90 days. but what it
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means you are incentivised to use those 60 days well and efficiently. so what you will do now is go to a debt advice organisation and we will take you through expenditure, either online or on the phone and whilst we are going through the process we will apply for more breathing space on your behalf. that means no interest and you won't get charged for these overdraft fees and so on and your debt will not be increasing. it also means bailiffs cannot come knocking on your door. we've heard a lot about people whose savings during the pandemic have gone up and up because they haven't been able to spend money but equally a lot of people have fallen into debt and businesses have collapsed. people have lost theirjobs. many
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people have lost their “obs. many --eole people have lost their “obs. many people have t people have lost their “obs. many people have done _ people have lost theirjobs. many people have done very _ people have lost theirjobs. many people have done very well- people have lost theirjobs. hew} people have done very well but a huge number of people... what finding that individuals... the difficulty we've got is with furlough and so on that crisis has been triggered so people have not gone through that crisis point. thank you. sorry we have had a few sound problems so we will leave it there. as covid restrictions across the uk continue to ease, mps are discussing whether vaccine certificates, which prove that someone has had a jab, would help life return to normal.
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obliging people to show they've been vaccinated before attending major events is controversial, but it's expected to be a feature of foreign travel this summer, with eu countries likely to require it. here's our health correspondent, anna collinson. as more than 34 million people in the uk will now know, when you get your coronavirus jab, you should receive a vaccination card. but it is likely that soon there will be an even easier way to know someone's vaccination status, or whether they have recently tested negative. while covid passports or certificates may not be needed for essential shops or public transport, the government in england believes it could help crowds return to large events, like the trial of 21,000 fans due to attend the fa cup final here in wembley later this month. but for many, it is a controversial idea. i think the problems come once covid passports, whatever form they take, begin to be perceived as compulsory, once people begin to think that,
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in effect, this means that we've got to get vaccinated. and the danger with that is it can actually undermine people's willingness to be vaccinated. professor reicher is one of those giving evidence to mps and peers about the use of covid passports, both here and for international travel. the european union is holding its own talks about lifting restrictions on nonessential travel. suggested proposals include allowing british people who have had both jabs to visits by the summer, with the option of applying restrictions quickly if required. a senior scientific adviser believes there should be no risk visiting countries like france or italy if infection rates fall to uk levels. the risk comes from going from a place like the uk with very low infection levels, and going to a place with much higher infection levels, and therefore having the risk of bringing infection back. if the two places are at comparable levels, and that is what the eu is saying, then there is no particular risk
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associated with travel. portugal is one country hoping to welcome back british tourists, but the government is urging people to be patient until they are satisfied it is safe and an official announcement is made. we don't want to reimport the virus, we have had a huge success in terms of our vaccination programme of bringing down the levels of covid here in the uk, so we need to be cautious. it is also a cautious message from the labour leader, who welcomes the prospect of foreign travel, but not if it would mean another lockdown. there is evidence across the world of the virus being out of control and increasing. we've got to be very, very careful. we won't be safe here until, broadly, the virus is under control across the world. but do i want to see things return to normality? of course i do. as we enjoy new freedoms, transmission rates are expected to rise, although not to the levels we saw over the winter. the main concern is vaccines possibly not working as well against new variants. but, for now, the data is promising and the hope is for a much more normal summer.
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anna collinson, bbc news. police have urged people living near aylesham in kent to remain �*cautious and vigilant�*, following the murder of a police community support officer a week ago. detectives say they haven't established a motive forjulia james' death, and have made no arrests. our correspondent, simonjones, sent this report from aylesham. well, julia james was working from home last tuesday. she went out to walk her dog when she was attacked. she had suffered head injuries, which were very severe. hundreds of officers have been involved in the investigation since but as of yet, there is no key suspect in the case, no motive that the police have been able to establish and no arrests have been made. the chief constable of kent police visited the scene today to get an update himself on what had been happening. he realised that this is a difficult time for kent police given that they are now investigating the death of one of their own offices and he realised as well that
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local people are feeling shocked and concerned. we have seen the previous interviews mr richard, our assistant chief constable, so i will repeat those messages. that is exactly what people should be doing. being vigilant, of course. thinking very carefully about their own safety and making sure that if you go out alone, telling people where you are and where you are going and suchlike. the headlines on bbc news: the mexican president promises there will be a full investigation after a metro train and railway track collapsed onto a busy road in mexico city, killing at least 23 people. a court hears a police officer — accused of murdering the ex—footballer dalian atkinsion — had tasered him for six times longer than standard — before kicking him twice in the head. foreign ministers from the world's leading economies are meeting in london for their first face—to—face talks in more than two years.
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french fishermen in normandy are threatening to blockade jersey over a new post brexit licensing system. a protest meeting in cherbourg over the weekend was attended by fishermen from several ports who demanded that the jersey decision is challenged, and thatjersey fishermen be prevented from landing their catches in france. let's get more on this now from our political reporter in jersey, freddie miller. just explain the background to this and also how much anger there is both injersey and france. to and also how much anger there is both in jersey and france.- both in jersey and france. to put this into context, _ both in jersey and france. to put this into context, jersey - both in jersey and france. to put this into context, jersey is - both in jersey and france. to put this into context, jersey isjust . both in jersey and france. to put| this into context, jersey isjust 14 this into context, jersey is just 14 miles from france and on the east coast ofjersey you can see france very clearly so there's a lot of shared history between these two places. but since friday there has been a new licensing system introduced byjersey plasma introduced by jersey plasma government, introduced byjersey plasma government, underwhich introduced byjersey plasma government, under which french boats
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have to askjersey plasma government for a licence in order to fish in these waters. it's a post—brexit decision. i was part of these licenses there are conditions attached in those conditions dictate where exactly in the waters french boat can fish, how often they can do it and what equipment they are able to use. in a nutshell over the weekend what we've heard it from the french side people saying we didn't know about these conditions, we had not discussed these, we had not agreed to these. another consequence french fishermen are saying these licences are null and void. there was a meeting over the weekend and at that meeting there were calls for jersey boats to be prevented from landing their catch in france, something that has been happening over the past few months anyway. but some fishermen are also calling for things to be taken further, because now for a blockade ofjersey and another is for the island's electricity supplies which come from france, to be cut off. of course
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these things have not yet been agreed at all but these are what the french channel calling for. you're in jersey french channel calling for. you're injersey some french channel calling for. you're in jersey some have sympathy with what's happening but others feel this licensing system doesn't go far enough and they would like to be tighter. 50 enough and they would like to be tiahter. enough and they would like to be ti hter. ::, enough and they would like to be tiahter. ::, :, enough and they would like to be tiahter. :, :, tighter. so it could all escalate. in terms tighter. so it could all escalate. in terms of— tighter. so it could all escalate. in terms of a — tighter. so it could all escalate. in terms of a blockade, - tighter. so it could all escalate. in terms of a blockade, how - in terms of a blockade, how important is tojersey? in terms of a blockade, how important is to jersey? fishing is very much _ important is to jersey? fishing is very much an _ important is to jersey? fishing is very much an important - important is to jersey? fishing is very much an important thing i important is to jersey? fishing is i very much an important thing when important is to jersey? fishing is - very much an important thing when it comes to our community. in terms of our annual gdp doesn't contribute that much to the economy but it's more a sense of being an island community and so there is a lot of support for the fishermen and for the fishing community and be sure that during lockdown last year when loads of islanders rallied around to support the local fishing community which was unable to do what it would usually be doing. this is something that goes to the heart of how people feel here. as i mentioned there is a shared history so we've always had an agreement between france and the jersey for the past number of years that has allowed each side to fish
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in each other�*s waters. i know it's got to a point where it's not clear what is going to happen next because they have been plenty of discussions over the past few months about this. we have not yet heard today from jersey plasma government, although we understand the external relations minister met with the eu a few days ago. that was after these licences were agreed and at that point there was a warning they could be choppy waters ahead. it's pretty windy today so that potentially calling set —— causing some of these choppy waters. it seems there was it was recognised that once this came when things might not be easy. of course we have seen that happening in the past few days and it's not clear what's going to happen next. hospitality bosses have lost a legal challenge to bring forward the reopening date for indoor dining in england. they'd argued there was no scientific justification for keeping pubs and restaurants shut,
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while non—essential retail could re—open. but a high courtjudge dismissed the case on the grounds the hearing would likely take place after the may 17th — when indoor hospitality is due to restart in england anyway. hundreds of people in hull are taking part in a year—long art project which aims to give people time to reflect on their lives — without distractions. volunteers will be invited to spend an hour alone in a glass—fronted box — perched hundreds of feet above the city. here's our arts correspondent, david sillito. it's been a really tough year for a lot of people. i'm really looking forward to it as being, really, a new beginning. we're in hull, or maybe more accurately, we're looking over hull. this is kate, one of the first visitors to a new arrival in the city. the hull vigil. wow.
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wow, it looks so blue. this is not how i expected it at all. i thought i was going to be terrified. she and more than 700 others will stand here for an hour at a time over the next 365 days, and gaze over the city. and think. this is an artwork about what's on our minds. my year has been very focused around two members of my family, really. my daughter, who is disabled, my elder daughter. and my dad, who's 83 and has a blood cancer. so it has been one of fear, really. you know, protecting them, shielding. each day, there will be a vigil at sunrise and another at sunset. there aren't many rules when you are up here, but there is one. no mobile phones, because they want you to, well, have a chance to enjoy the silence, the sky, the sun and the beauty of hull.
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but the real focus of this project isn't the view, but the thoughts going on inside the glass box. i think it's about... i think it's about it's about inviting people to take a moment to remember their city, to think about the future, to take stock of what's just happened and the awful year we've just lived through. and i hope it gives people a chance to reflect, genuinely, on the last year, but also take a bit of a breath before we all rush back into normality and also over this year, to see the city come back to life. but the real artworks are the people. the volunteers, such as dom, a nurse at the local hospital. he didn't really know what he was signing up for, but after months of stress, this felt like a sign of hope. when i found about vigil, i thought, well, you know, we're coming out l of the pandemic now. why not sign up for it and be part of something like this? _
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the hull vigil — a chance to reflect, to appreciate what we have, and to remind ourselves that all things pass. david sillito, bbc news, hull. if you're a star wars fan then you'll know today is may the fourth, and star wars day. and if you want the force to be with you, this is your chance. hundreds of items from the original star wars trilogy — which were owned by the darth vader actor dave prowse — are going under the hammer. ali vowles has been to find out more. you can see the costume already. it's amazing, it's so imposing. i'm being shown some of the 600 lots that will be sold online in bristol, and what a treasure trove. for daddy dave, my preferred father. much love, carrie fisher. signed photos from the stars, darth vader's helmet used at fan conventions — all are attracting attention. what's happened ?
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we have broken so many in—house records already. within 24 hours of that catalogue going online, we had over 800 bids. we have had thousands upon thousands of pounds of bids left. interest from all over the world. the appeal of star wars is completely worldwide and the fact that that little piece of star wars history comes from bristol is what i think makes this so, so special. dave prowse's imposing 6ft 6 height made him the perfect choice for darth vader. it's no secret that he was disappointed that his voice was never used on the film. one of the hottest items, his script from the empire strikes back movie. so we placed an estimate on this of £3000-£5,000. but bids have already far, far exceeded that. that is a unique piece of cinema history there. key lines were removed from it to keep darth vader's relationship with luke skywalker secret, and dave was kept
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completely in the dark. you two need a lesson in crossing the road. from being the green cross code man to the strong man in the gym, it was an extraordinary life. all catalogued and recorded by dave's family and his friend and assistant. we have spent the past couple of months going through the house, the office, the garage, the shared, and lots of boxes and cupboards, just looking for anything that could be auctioned. it was unbelievable the amount of stuff we realised we had to go through. in his final years, the bristol actor was diagnosed with alzheimer's, so some of the money raised from the online auction will go to the charity alzheimer's research uk. nine endangered giraffes have been rescued from an island threatened by rising flood waters in kenya. the baringo giraffe, also known as the rothschild giraffe, is close to extinction, with fewer than two thousand left in the wild. emmanuel igunza reports. it's an audacious rescue mission.
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the baringo giraffe is being carefully ferried to a new home in a custom—made barge. she's one ofjust 3000 baringo giraffes that remain in the world. the local community decided to act when a herd became trapped on a disappearing island. decades of rising water in lake baringo meant the island was getting smaller every year. the food availability on the island is highly fluctuating and insufficient, so it is justifying in supporting the need for the translocation of the giraffe to the mainland. he speaks his own language. the team has been using satellite images to plan the move. the digital africa platform contains data that until recently was only available to a handful of people. now the team can see changes in water levels and vegetation cover in the region going back several decades. it's a new tool for conservationists responding to africa's
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increasingly unpredictable weather. these erratic patterns means that we have to deploy real—time data and information to support conservation efforts both by citizens and governments to ensure that they plan effectively and try to mitigate the devastating impacts of these climatic changes. on the mainland, the barge must be carefully brought to the shore. the rest of the herd have already made this perilous journey and they are waiting for her in the new giraffe sanctuary. the long—term aim is to introduce more giraffes from other parts of the country and build up kenya's population of baringo giraffes. emmanuelle igunza, bbc news, kenya. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett.
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it's still quite windy by this stage particularly around the north sea coast although the winds are beginning to ease off as well. some sunshine and showers and wet weather moving away from scotland through northern ireland and heading towards the midlands and east anglia. that will work towards wales in the west country overnight. clear skies to the north away from increasing showers in northern scotland. it will be a colder night tonight and not as windy. more wintry showers tomorrow coming into northern scotland, some showers stretching across northern ireland into wales and the west country and they will push towards the midlands and they could be heavy as well. some spells of sunshine elsewhere and not as windy as today but it's still going to be called for the time of year.
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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines... two former soldiers accused of the murder of an official ira man in 1972 have been formally acquitted after their trial collapsed. a court hears a police officer, accused of murdering the ex—footballer dalian atkinsion, had tasered him for six times longer than standard, before kicking him twice in the head. authorities in mexico city say there will be a full investigation after a metro train and railway track collapsed onto a busy road in mexico city, killing at least 23 people. we re here in edinburgh looking ahead to thursday s election for the holyrood parliament — one of a series of polls right across the uk.
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and reflections without distractions — hundreds of people in hull are taking part in a year—long art project which aims to give people time to look back on their lives. the trial of two former paratroopers charged with murdering an ira man the mayor of mexico city has promised an urgent investigation into a disaster on the metro system, when an overpass collapsed as a train was travelling on it. several carriages plunged onto a busy road below. at least 23 people are known to have died, and dozens more have been injured. you may find some of the images in will grant's report upsetting. residents of mexico city are all too accustomed to these scenes.
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emergency services working through the night, attempting to reach injured victims, trapped beneath the rubble. but this was not another earthquake in the mexican capital, rather it was an overpass in the city's busy subway system. it collapsed as a train travelled over it, bringing a tangle of wreckage, concrete and metal crashing onto the cars below. at that hour, the train will most likely have been taking workers home after a late shift, a quiet night turning into tragedy in an instant. it was a desperate, agonising situation for theirfamilies. translation: my daughter-in-iaw called us, she was with my son - and she told us that the structure fell down on top of them. translation: my brother came with his wife and they managedl to get her out, but he was crushed in there, and we don't know anything. they do not give us reports. now they have to get him out, but who knows how long it will take? also on the scene was the city's mayor, claudia sheinbaum, addressing the public as the picture
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got steadily grimmer. "i urge any family who fears they had relatives on the train to contact the emergency response team here, orat one of the hospitals," she said. this was the newest, most modern line in mexico's subway, line 12, unveiled less than a decade ago. an incident like this might have been expected on one of the older lines built in the 1960s, but supposedly not on line 12. he speaks spanish. yet many have said there were issues with its construction from the start. among them, local residents who complained about the endless expansion of the subway across this sprawling city. many of the tough questions ahead will be directed at the city's former mayor, marcelo ebrard, now mexico's foreign minister. he championed line 12, and on twitter he said he would fully comply with the investigation into what happened.
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but such investigations will have to wait. for now, the city is solely concerned with rescuing those trapped, attending to the injured, and comforting the bereaved. will grant, bbc news, mexico city. the trial of two former paratroopers charged with murdering an ira man in 1972 has collapsed. a judge has ruled that prosecution evidence was inadmissible, and formally acquitted both of the veterans. joe mccann was shot dead in the markets area of south belfast in 1972. the defendants, known as soldiers a and c, said they had fired shots at him, but said they had done so lawfully. the evidence which formed the prosecution s case was based on police interviews carried out with the men in 2010, by detectives examining cases from the northern ireland conflict. if you want to edit these astons, you must take control of this page
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correspondent, chris page... the general issue around the... it has been hugely controversial and hugely political early divisive here in northern ireland. —— politically divisive. it has been going on for a few years but the trial only began in recent weeks. the case involved the killing ofjoe mccann, who was a senior member, a commander in the official ira and he was shot dead in the markets area of south belfast and that is close to the city centre in 1972. three soldiers fired shots at him, one of them has since died but the other two, who were known as soldiers a and c, they were granted anonymity, said that they had acted
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lawfully. the defence said thatjoe mccann was known to be a skilled gunman and was potentially responsible of the death of up to 15 soldiers at that point. the case has collapsed this afternoon because the judge had ruled that the interviews that the two soldiers gave the detectives, 11 years ago the detectives, 11 years ago the detectives were tasked in investigating the cases in the northern ireland troubles, and the judge ruled that those interviews were inadmissible because they were not interviewed under caution. basically, the case has collapsed because of a procedural issue but by no doubt, there is going to be considerable fallout from what has happened here. the veteran's commissioner of northern ireland has, for example, said decay should never have got to the stage and there several other cases... has
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there several other cases... has there been _ there several other cases... has there been any _ there several other cases... has there been any other reaction yet to this decision and the collapse of this decision and the collapse of this trial? ~ �* , :, :, this trial? well, 's widow had attended the _ this trial? well, 's widow had attended the court _ this trial? well, 's widow had attended the court and - this trial? well, 's widow had attended the court and so i this trial? well, 's widow had l attended the court and so she this trial? well, 's widow had - attended the court and so she and her legal team are no doubt disappointed by the outcome. we have also had politicians flagging up this issue of veterans being prosecuted saying that the veterans, who served in northern ireland, should be afforded the same protection from prosecution as veterans who served in other conflicts over the last half—century, for example the afghanistan and iraq wars. i think you are going to see more questions being asked about this but they will go deeper than just the issues as to whether soldiers should be prosecuted and how much protection they should be given. different people have very different opinions
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on that but i think it will also go to what is probably the most complex and contentious political issue here in northern ireland and that is how do you deal with 2000 or unsolved killings from the majority of which were committed... killings from the ma'ority of which were committed. . ._ killings from the ma'ority of which were committed... thank you very much. a court has heard that the former aston villa footballer dalian atkinson died after a taser was used on him for 33 seconds and he was kicked in the head by a police officer. benjamin monk, a constable with the west mercia force, denies murder and manslaughter. our correspondent phil mackie is at birmingham crown court. just bring us up to date with what has been said.— has been said. yes, i should say that there _ has been said. yes, i should say that there is _ has been said. yes, i should say that there is another _ has been said. yes, i should say that there is another police - has been said. yes, i should say i that there is another police officer in the dock here as well and that is pc mary ellen bettley—smith, who denies a charge of assault. the trial is expected to last between
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six and eight weeks. we learned that dalian atkinson, who was a former aston villa footballer, retired and when he died, he was suffering from very serious health conditions. you had high pressure, heart disease and he was also on dialysis. it was on the eve of the hospital appointment in august that year, that he became very agitated and he drove to his father's house in telford. the neighbours thought there was disturbance and they called the police and this is what they are now discussing in court at the moment, what happened next. those two officers that but we talked about arrived on the scene. pc munk deployed his taser twice unsuccessfully on mr atkinson... the trigger was pressed for 30 seconds and it should normally be a single pressure on the... and after mr
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atkinson had fallen onto the ground and was completely... reports that pc munk kicked him repeatedly to the head and that pc mary ellen bettley—smith hit his body. we have been hearing that there were lots of witnesses to this. people who had been woken up by the disturbance in this small cul—de—sac in telford. many had described what had happened, although there do differ slightly. now we are getting on to evidence from other police officers, who arrived at the scene. one of them said that when he arrived, he arrived, he saw mr atkinson lying on the ground with pc munk�*s put on his head they will hear statements from the defence that would normally
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happen later. the case itself is expected to last between six to eight months. let's look a little more at how the investigation could take shape and what steps come next. mike mcloughlin is the managing director of xd rail, a company which offers training in rail investigations and safety. he's also a former derailment investigator. thank you for being with us. clearly, a terrible disaster in mexico and the country's president has already promised there will be a full investigation and people want answers. , :, , g, full investigation and people want answers. , :, , :, :, answers. yes, railways are no exception- — answers. yes, railways are no exception. when _ answers. yes, railways are no exception. when bridges- answers. yes, railways are no exception. when bridges are l exception. when bridges are involved, a big investigation in
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2018, when the motorways bridge collapsed. and, of course, we have had railway bridges, which have had problems as well, mainly in the uk. that is when something strikes the bridge and then disturbs the tracks and then you can get derailment. in this case, on the very little information at the moment, it is a metroline and i know that it was constructed in about 2012, so it is a fairly recent construction. from the photographs that we can see, its track bed are supported on concrete pillars. what you can see in the photograph is that it has collapsed in the centre and the rails and the infrastructure hanging down. before
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any investigation can start, there are two main things that have to happen. one, of course, the obvious one is rescue all of the injured and the fatalities. that takes priority in any major accident. whether it is a road accident, crash or whatever. the second one is that before we can begin the investigation properly, it is to make the site safe. they can be all sorts of houses here because you have got unstable structures, you have got unstable structures, you have got electricity, you have got broken objects, jagged objects, glass... this is a metro train, so it is not like a mixed traffic railway, it merely contains passengers, so the variation between emptying and loaded coaches is marginal. —— empty and loaded
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coaches. the collapse has happened mid span. the investigation process is determining what happens at the scene. there are two main questions that we start with. what happens? and once we have established that, why? the investigators can still record everything. what they can do, of course, is that they will be looking at the surrounding evidence. the position of the vehicles on the top of the supported track. they will look at the recording, video recordings. they could be taking videos themselves. they could be interviewing witnesses and they will get that circumstantial evidence or direct evidence whilst the rescue
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goes on. the main investigation will focus on what happened and there are two types of evidence that you look for here. there is the direct fracture evidence about what happened. that may be fractured components or damage. and they may be circumstantial evidence and that is a collection of facts that we put together to get a story. for example, you may not see the rails to rail could be clear evidence of how the wheels left the rail and then we can put the story together. the evidence into categories, mainly. perishable evidence and the rest of the evidence, which is a lower priority. the perishable evidence we would lose the two main reasons. time, a loss of time, and
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condition. what happens here is that the rescue and everything that is happen can change the conditions by moving things and making it safe and it may change some of the evidence on the scene itself. we have to take that into account in derailments for example, where the accident process damages the vehicles and they are not in the same condition as they were before. so, what are the investigators here have to do, is to gather the perishable evidence first, to establish what happened at the scene and then we look at why it happened and trace that back through inspections, the construction of the railway, and any other events which go into it and add to the story. i’m go into it and add to the story. i'm afraid we have run out of time to
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thank you very much indeed for talking us through how that investigation will in —— unfold. these are some live footage from the scene. mike was talking us through how the investigation will enfold and we will hear it from our correspondence will grant how there is real concern in mexico because it is real concern in mexico because it is such a busy line. this is one of the newest line, line 12 which was builtjust the newest line, line 12 which was built just a the newest line, line 12 which was builtjust a few the newest line, line 12 which was built just a few years the newest line, line 12 which was builtjust a few years ago. so there is real concern as to how this might happen. the headlines on bbc news: a court hears a police officer, accused of murdering the ex—footballer dalian atkinsion, had tasered him for six times longer than standard before kicking him twice in the head. authorities in mexico city say there will be a full investigation
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after a metro train and railway track collapsed onto a busy road in mexico city, killing at least 23 people. as covid restrictions across the uk continue to ease, mps are discussing whether vaccine certificates, which prove that someone has had a jab, would help life return to normal. obliging people to show they've been vaccinated before attending major events is controversial — but it's expected to be a feature of foreign travel this summer, with eu countries likely to require it. here's our health correspondent, anna collinson. as more than 34 million people in the uk will now know, when you get your coronavirus jab, you should receive a vaccination card. but it is likely that soon there will be an even easier way to know someone's vaccination status, or whether they have recently tested negative. while covid passports or certificates may not be needed
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for essential shops or public transport, the government in england believes it could help crowds return to large events, like the trial of 21,000 fans due to attend the fa cup final here in wembley later this month. but for many, it is a controversial idea. i think the problems come once covid passports, whatever form they take, begin to be perceived as compulsory, once people begin to think that, in effect, this means that we've got to get vaccinated. and the danger with that is it can actually undermine people's willingness to be vaccinated. professor reicher is one of those giving evidence to mps and peers about the use of covid passports, both here and for international travel. the european union is holding its own talks about lifting restrictions on nonessential travel. suggested proposals include allowing british people who have had both jabs to visits by the summer, with the option of applying restrictions quickly if required.
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a senior scientific adviser believes there should be no risk visiting countries like france or italy if infection rates fall to uk levels. the risk comes from going from a place like the uk with very low infection levels, and going to a place with much higher infection levels, and therefore having the risk of bringing infection back. if the two places are at comparable levels, and that is what the eu is saying, then there is no particular risk associated with travel. portugal is one country hoping to welcome back british tourists, but the government is urging people to be patient until they are satisfied it is safe and an official announcement is made. we don't want to reimport the virus, we have had a huge success in terms of our vaccination programme of bringing down the levels of covid here in the uk, so we need to be cautious. it is also a cautious message from the labour leader, who welcomes the prospect of foreign travel, but not if it would mean another lockdown. there is evidence across the world of the virus being out of control and increasing. we've got to be very, very careful.
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we won't be safe here until, broadly, the virus is under control across the world. but do i want to see things return to normality? of course i do. as we enjoy new freedoms, transmission rates are expected to rise, although not to the levels we saw over the winter. the main concern is vaccines possibly not working as well against new variants. but, for now, the data is promising and the hope is for a much more normal summer. anna collinson, bbc news. voters go to the polls across scotland, wales and england on thursday, in the biggest test of opinion outside the general election. more than a hundred councils are being contested in england, and the members of the welsh and scottish parliaments will be elected. my colleague clive myrie is at holyrood for us. yes, afternoon. the sun is out now and it has stopped raining, thankfully.
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actually, it's only northern ireland that won t be going to the polls on thursday. everywhere else in the uk, elections will include local councils, police and crime commissioners as well as the welsh seneth. —— the welsh senedd. the results across the country will show what impact keir starmer�*s leadership of labour is having. and here in scotland, elections to the holyrood parliament, that could see an snp overall majority and possibly a mandate, the party says, for another independence referendum. nick earley is with me. a couple of days to go before the big poll, how confident are the snp that they can get that majority. they might not get over the line. it is going to be tight, i think, whatever way it ends up. there is only going to be a few seats. i was speaking to a senior strategist at one of the opposition parties just
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half an hour ago and they said it was literally 50—50 as to whether the snp would get over the line and win 65 seats. the system here is really complicated, so anyone hoping for an answer on that, on friday may be disappointed stop it may be well into saturday when we know what is going on. if they do when that majority, it is a big moment not just for scotland but for uk politics as well because then we get into another huge debate about whether there is going to be another independence referendum. boris johnson will say no and the snp will say that that they have a cast iron mandate. even if they don't get a majority themselves, the scottish greens —— with the scottish greens, they may be able to vote for another referendum. the unionist side of this matters as well, there is a battle for second place between the conservatives and labour in scotland. the conservatives took second place last time and they are
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still pretty confident that they are going to hold onto it but labour have had a decent campaign. the question is whether that popularity for labour as they see it, translate into votes on thursday. the for labour as they see it, translate into votes on thursday.— into votes on thursday. the snp would argue _ into votes on thursday. the snp would argue that _ into votes on thursday. the snp would argue that it _ into votes on thursday. the snp would argue that it isn't - into votes on thursday. the snp would argue that it isn'tjust - into votes on thursday. the snp l would argue that it isn'tjust about independence, we have got policies on education, employment, covid—19. it is really interesting because although independence is the political dividing line in scotland, if you were to walk up the street and say to someone what is your big issue? i suspect many would tell you it is the pandemic. they want to know when they can go on holiday and when they can go and stay at their family's house or something like that. in many ways, management of
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the pandemic has been a huge issue in this election. what nicola sturgeon wants to talk about more than independence, her big campaign message in the last few days is, look at what we have done over the last year, we need experienced management of the country to keep that going over the next few months. i suspect that if the snp, even if they win a majority on thursday, the big message that they were one to send over the weekend and into monday is that we are back to work because there are big decisions to because there are big decisions to be made next week on how to deal with the pandemic and whether the next stage of easing goes ahead. so every single party in this election is talking about the pandemic. it does depend, again it comes back to independence, it depends on how you stand on that. if you are an independent supporter, you will say that if we really want to recover fully in the way that scotland needs, we need the powers of independence. if you are a unionist, you should be saying, hold on a
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minute, we should be totally focused on recovering in the pandemic and so push this argument to the side for a while. education, justice, income tax, health, really important things but quite often, even when people have a priority that is one of those things, you get talking to them and independence plays a big role in deciding that. if independence plays a big role in deciding that.— independence plays a big role in decidin: that. ,, :, deciding that. if the snp do get the ma'ori deciding that. if the snp do get the majority they _ deciding that. if the snp do get the majority they crave _ deciding that. if the snp do get the majority they crave or _ deciding that. if the snp do get the majority they crave or pro - majority they crave or pro independence parties including the greens and alex salmond is party as well get a majority here, nicola sturgeon will actually delay pushing for some kind of motion here at the parliament calling for a second referendum, so that at least she can be seen to be dealing with all of those other issues before independence comes to the fore. i think that is exactly what she will do. i think she will go back to st andrews house, where the scottish civil service is based and get back
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to work on covid—19. that is what they are saying is her absolute priority. there is then the question of, you want a referendum on the next two and half years, are you going to be able to juggle the pandemic and put full focus on the pandemic and put full focus on the pandemic as you were pitching, with getting all of the arguments that we no have changed over the border and various elements of the independence campaign, it has changed completely because of the pandemic. there will because of the pandemic. there will be those who say... but the view in team sturgeon is very much that independence, yes it should happen independence, yes it should happen in the next parliament but it is not the immediate term priority. it is not the thing. we will hear about it on sunday or monday when we hear from nicola sturgeon after the election but i would not expect her to be knocking on borisjohnson's door within the next few weeks, saying give us the powers, we can do
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it soon. let's look now at the situation in wales, where questions concerning the power of the welsh parliament have become more acute during the coronavirus pandemic. tomos morgan has been speaking to voters there. my heart stopped twice, so they had to cpr me, twice. in march last year, scott howell became the first coronavirus patient that needed intensive care treatment at the royal gwent hospital in newport, south wales. my wife had two calls to say that was it, i wasn't going to pull through. the advice they got from italy was suggesting that if people had not come out of a coma within two weeks, if they did come out, they were going to have major failures of organs, and i took two and a half weeks. but yeah, it wasn't looking good. my heart had stopped twice. they had to perform cpr on me. my kidneys had failed. i was on dialysis. he made a miraculous recovery after his eight weeks in hospital, but it took him the best part of last year before
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feeling normal once again. for the rest of that year, i thought i was going to die every day. so every twinge i had, every day i got up and didn't feel myself, i thought, this is going to be my last day. it makes you appreciate the very simple things. the two things i did not have in hospital that i wanted was fresh air and someone to give me a cwtch. back working from home now and spending time with the family, has his experience of covid impacted how he will vote on may the 6th? high enough yet? it has changed where i put my vote this time. i met nurses when i was in there, seeing how hard they worked. i met one nurse in particular who had come out of retirement to help because she felt that was her vocation and she had to help, putting herself into a crisis, where people were dying of the nursing staff, and she still put herself out there. this year, as well as education and the future of the nhs, welsh independence and abolishing the welsh parliament, as well as the government's handling of covid, are just some of the themes being passed
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around by the parties standing in this election. cut towards the ball! but which issues have caught the minds of the cardiff harlequins senior men's rugby team, back at training after four and a half months of enforced winter break? things like health, social care, housing, those are the important things, i think overlooked sometimes in these discussions, so yeah, those core things really, for me. i feel like this year, university students have been left behind, sort of, not concentrated enough on, sort of, our mental health. i think we need to make our own decisions, so for me, i believe firmly in independence and that's the way we need to go. it's one that has to look quite broad. i think we've got a lot of problems at the moment in society. i think we need to look at a broad spectrum. since the senedd's inception just over two decades ago, welsh labour has been in power in some shape or form but now, there's more choice than ever for welsh voters come may the 6th. and for many, the key question will be, do we want more of the same or is it time for a change?
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tomos morgan, bbc news, outside the senedd. for a round up of everything you need to know about the elections,?there's a guide on our website — with much more information about who is standing where. that's at bbc.co.uk/news or on the bbc news app. it's back to you, ben, in london. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello there. we have still got cold winds today and some wet weather around as well. the temperatures towards the end of the afternoon still perhaps no higher than 7 or 8 degrees across the northern half of the uk. quite windy by this stage as well, particularly around those north sea coasts, although the winds are beginning to ease off a bit elsewhere. we see some sunshine and showers.
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a zone of wet weather moving away from scotland, through northern ireland, northern england and heading towards east anglia. that will work its way towards wales and the west country overnight. clearer skies following to the north away from increasingly snowy showers in northern scotland and it will be a cold night tonight, not as windy. clear skies in scotland and northern england, so we are more likely to have frost. wintry showers tomorrow coming into northern scotland. some showers stretching across northern ireland into wales and the west country. those will push their way towards the midlands and into the south—east of england. they could be heavy as well. the odd shower around elsewhere but some spells of sunshine. it won't be as windy as it is today and it will still be cold for this time of year. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: two former soldiers accused of the murder of an official ira man in 1972 have been formally acquitted after their trial collapsed.
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a court hears a police officer, accused of murdering the ex—footballer dalian atkinsion, had tasered him for six times longer than standard before kicking him twice in the head. authorities in mexico city say there will be a full investigation after a metro train and railway track collapsed onto a busy road in mexico city, killing at least 23 people. and reflections without distractions. hundreds of people in hull are taking part in a year—long art project which aims to give people time to look back on their lives. sport and for a full round up, let's go to the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. jose mourinho wasting no time in finding his next club after being appointed as the new manager of italian side roma from next season. his appointment coming just 15 days after being sacked by tottenham. european football reporter
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john bennettjoins me now. italy i guess one of the more likely destinations. i guess no surprise it's where he is heading next. we were hoping to getjohn's response but a few audio problems. we will try again. we were just saying perhaps italy was always going to be a likely destination if the portuguese nationaljob didn't portuguese national job didn't become portuguese nationaljob didn't become available but i guess it's the timing of his appointment, just 15 days after he was sacked by tottenham and didn't get the chance to lead them in that league cup final. i don't think we are going to be able to bring you john. apologies. technology failing us. manchester city take a 2—1 lead
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into the second leg of tonight's champions league semi final against paris saint germain, who face a nervous wait on the fitness of key man kylian mbappe. the striker didn't train with the rest of the psg team yesterday after suffering a calf injury on saturday. pep guardiola, aiming to win the competition with city for the first time, believes he'll be ready, along with psg's other star man neymar. in the first half they were exceptional. they were always dangerous. in the second half we were better. we were better and they were worse. they lost and they play bad if they win, they play good. but if you ask my opinion, they play good. the organisers of the indian premier league say they unanimously agreed to postpone the tournament following an emergency meeting. players in three franchises returned positive tests in the last two days and the board of control for cricket in india said it didn't
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want to compromise the safety of anyone involved in the ipl. as henry morean reports. once we got news yesterday that two players had tested positive, then conversations started. they were always going to talk about would the tournament continue. then three inside another camp tested positive and then this morning another player tested positive. that forced their hands and they had a meeting at midday today and made the decision. the tournament couldn't go ahead. the tournament couldn't go ahead. the question is when will they be able to fit the competition in because this is a tournament that has fitted into a very densely populated schedule of cricket across 2021. india meant to be in england to play the will test amateur final from mid—june and they are not due to leave until mid—september.
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following that there is a t20 world cup in october so there is a hugely cramped schedule and it's when they can possibly fit in the remaining 30 games or so of the indian premier league. tom daley has won a second gold medal at the diving world cup in tokyo a competition which serves as a test event for the olympics this summer. he added the individual 10m platform title with a stunning back three—and—a—half somersault. he also won the 10m synchronised event alongside matty lee on saturday. daley expected to challenge for more medals at this summer's delayed games which he's already qualified for. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. we are hearing that meghan markle is going to publish a children's book injune and it's entitled the bench.
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it is about the relationship between a father and son and it's going to be published by random house and apparently she has said in a statement that the bench started as a poem i wrote for my husband on father's day, a month after archie was born. that poem then became this story. so the duchess of sussex is going to become an author. it's about the relationship between a father and son and we will bring you more details on that as it comes into us. foreign ministers from the world's leading economies are meeting in london for theirfirst face—to—face talks in more than two years. the g7 is expected to discuss new ways for the group to defend international rules. our diplomatic correspondent, james landale, has been following the meeting. over the years, lancaster house here has been the scene of some historic negotiations. this is a building,
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where new nations have been formed and created. today, it is playing host to a new form of what i think you can loosely call pandemic diplomacy. it is constrained, it is secure but for the ministers, who have spent months talking to one another on video link, it is at least, at last, face—to—face. diplomacy is slowly emerging from the virtual world. staff at lancashire house are remembering how to roll out the red carpet. visiting ministers are wearing masks and practising their awkward elbow bends with the foreign secretary. the crucial point is that they are here in person, meeting face—to—face for the first time in more than two years. such has been done to keep them safe. the delegations have been kept small. there are 35 litres of hand sanitiser. they will talk to each other through transparent screens and they will have much to discuss, notjust the pandemic itself, but also the state of the international order, as the foreign secretary and his us
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counterparts made clear ahead of the meeting. our societies, our economies have been shocked and shaken by coronavirus. at the same time, we are responding to a situation, where our values are being challenged. the international architecture is at least, in some respects, being weakened. the foreign secretary once like—minded nations, largely liberal democracies, to form loose and agile alliances to better defend society from the threat of authoritarian states including russia and china. the americans are on the same page. what we're trying to do is to uphold the international rules —based order that our countries have invested so much in over so many decades to the benefit, i would argue, not just of our own citizens, but of people around the world, including, by the way, china. the test for these ministers is whether they can agree practical measures to defend the west against misinformation and cyber attacks.
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the test for the foreign secretary is whether his global britain foreign policy can live up to its name. so, today's meeting is very much the start of a big diplomatic year for the united kingdom. there is the full heads of government, g7, taking place in cornwall injune and then later in the year in glasgow, there is the big united nations cop26 climate change summits. this is the starter before the main course. the foreign secretary is missing today what he calls decisive action and that is going to be the test for all of the excitement of these ministers meeting face—to—face, what exactly do they agree, notjust to defend democracies but also to deal with more immediate threat? so, for example, what do they agree on how to help poorer countries get better access to covid—19 vaccines. the high court has ruled in favour of the government over a challenge from hospitality leaders to reopen indoor pubs and restaurants before the 17th of may.
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the case was brought by hugh osmond, founder of punch taverns, and sacha lord, founder of parklife and the warehouse project. it argued that there is no justification or scientific basis for indoor hospitality to remain closed while other businesses such as non—essential retail have been permitted to resume trading. sacha lord is also the nightlife economy adviser for greater manchester and hejoins us now. tell us a little bit more about this whole case. tell us a little bit more about this whole case-— tell us a little bit more about this whole case. , :,, , , : whole case. our case was simple. we 'ust whole case. our case was simple. we just wanted — whole case. our case was simple. we just wanted fairness. _ whole case. our case was simple. we just wanted fairness. we _ whole case. our case was simple. we just wanted fairness. we saw - just wanted fairness. we saw nonessential retail open which is fantastic but we were saying the government asked hospitality to spend half £1 billion in implementing paying for these new measures like track and trace,
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one—way systems, table service. we did all that and yet when nonessential retail were allowed to open without those measures in place would remain closed. so we asked the judge to have a look at a judicial review and in fact the case to begin with was expedia did. thejudge actually didn't say he rolled with the government's evidence, the government actually used a stalling tactic to push it down the road so in the end it was academic and there wasn't enough time to actually hear this case. and i have to say, it felt like a losing battle from the start because we lobbied hard to get rid of the 10pm curfew. the first judicial review compelled the government to draw a substantial meal and when this case landed they put the number one lawyer on it from the treasury. so we are not surprised. the treasury. so we are not surprised-— the treasury. so we are not surrised. , :,, :, the treasury. so we are not surrised. , :, :, surprised. some people would say and the government _
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surprised. some people would say and the government might _ surprised. some people would say and the government might say, _ the government might say, hospitality like pubs and restaurants are different from shops whether you like it or not. the risk of spreading call with his higher in a pub and a crowded atmosphere indoors with people drinking, that is different than in a shop. the government — is different than in a shop. the government has _ is different than in a shop. tt9 government has always said data not dates and actually a few hours after the ruling, sage produced a report that said since day one of the pandemic they have only been 226 cases directly associated to hospitality. we were not saying less real without the measures, we don't expect people to be queueing at the bars. yes there is alcohol in the mix, but there is table service and you cannot leave your table to go to the bar. so there was a controlled environment. let's not forget we are licensed and regulated and those that do flood the law will be
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closed. :, :, , ,:, :, closed. the government has said all alon: it is closed. the government has said all along it is acting _ closed. the government has said all along it is acting out _ closed. the government has said all along it is acting out of— closed. the government has said all along it is acting out of an _ along it is acting out of an abundance of caution and maybe it is abundance of caution and maybe it is a bit harsh on the hospitality industry but i think the government would say better to err on the side of caution. tar would say better to err on the side of caution. :, :, : would say better to err on the side of caution-— would say better to err on the side of caution. for once we can say we have something _ of caution. for once we can say we have something that _ of caution. for once we can say we have something that is _ of caution. for once we can say we have something that is world - of caution. for once we can say we l have something that is world leading and that is the vaccination. it's incredible what the scientist and the nhs and volunteers have done. but all we wanted was famous. the hospitality sector is the fifth biggest industry in the whole of the uk. in greater manchester it employs more than 420,000 people. those businesses have been crushed. businesses have been lost, relationships have been ruined and people have taken their own lives. they have been huge redundancies. so we were just asking for fairness. but you don't have too much longer to wait, although are you saying
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that even in the weeks remaining that even in the weeks remaining that indoor hospitality is still not allowed that more businesses could actually go to the wall? t am allowed that more businesses could actually go to the wall?— actually go to the wall? i am not sa in: actually go to the wall? i am not saying that. _ actually go to the wall? i am not saying that. l — actually go to the wall? i am not saying that, i know— actually go to the wall? i am not saying that, i know it's - actually go to the wall? i am not saying that, i know it's going - actually go to the wall? i am not saying that, i know it's going to | actually go to the wall? i am not l saying that, i know it's going to be a fact. everyday we are closed it costs the industry £200 million. that's billion a week. if the government had turned round in our favour it would have saved £2.8 billion. how manyjobs and businesses could be saved? if we do follow this road map on the 21st of june is the date we are working towards, that is going to be the first time that hospitality can actually trade with no social distancing in place. that's going to be another seven weeks away so there is still a long way to go. bzferr; be another seven weeks away so there is still a long way to go.— is still a long way to go. very good to talk to you- _ is still a long way to go. very good to talk to you. thank _ is still a long way to go. very good to talk to you. thank you - is still a long way to go. very good to talk to you. thank you for - is still a long way to go. very good to talk to you. thank you for being j to talk to you. thank you for being with us. the headlines on bbc news: two former soldiers accused of the murder of an official ira man in 1972 have been formally acquitted after their trial collapsed.
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a court hears a police officer, accused of murdering the ex—footballer dalian atkinsion, had tasered him for six times longer than standard before kicking him twice in the head. authorities in mexico city say there will be a full investigation after a metro train and railway track collapsed onto a busy road in mexico city, killing at least 23 people. two former soldiers accused of the murder of an official ira man in 1972 have been formally acquitted. the trial has collapsed. will we had a reaction to that from the ministry of defence saying the mod has noted the courts decision today which has been welcomed by the defence secretary ben wallace. the soldiers have received independent legal representation funded by the mod
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throughout these proceedings. the secretary of state says welfare support is provided for all those involved in this process, whether serving or veteran. so there isjust in from the ministry of defence. the uk and india have agreed new trade and investment deals, worth a billion pounds. the government says the contracts are expected to create more than 6,500 jobs here, mainly in the technology and health sectors. let's get more on this from lesley batchelor, former director general of the institute of exporters. she's now an international trade expert at open borders direct. how significant is this agreement? i think it's _ how significant is this agreement? i think it's great news. it brings us closer— think it's great news. it brings us closer to — think it's great news. it brings us closer to agreeing the terms for a possible _ closer to agreeing the terms for a possible free trade agreement in the future _ possible free trade agreement in the future. : :, , : :, :, future. and how beneficial would
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that sort of _ future. and how beneficial would that sort of free _ future. and how beneficial would that sort of free trade _ future. and how beneficial would | that sort of free trade agreement be? how important to the two economies to each other in relative terms? 50 economies to each other in relative terms? :, :, :, , :, terms? so the uk and india as a bilateral agreement _ terms? so the uk and india as a bilateral agreement of - terms? so the uk and india as a bilateral agreement of a - terms? so the uk and india as a - bilateral agreement of a roundabout £24 billion so it's a huge thing and i £24 billion so it's a huge thing and i know— £24 billion so it's a huge thing and i know that — £24 billion so it's a huge thing and i know that india and the uk have aspirations— i know that india and the uk have aspirations to get towards 2030 where _ aspirations to get towards 2030 where they want to double it. so that's— where they want to double it. so that's 48— where they want to double it. so that's 48 billion. so huge amount of trade _ that's 48 billion. so huge amount of trade a _ that's 48 billion. so huge amount of trade a lot— that's 48 billion. so huge amount of trade. a lot of trade coming from india _ trade. a lot of trade coming from india to _ trade. a lot of trade coming from india to the — trade. a lot of trade coming from india to the uk. i would like to see more _ india to the uk. i would like to see more exports going on, that would be good _ more exports going on, that would be good they— more exports going on, that would be good. they hit run about 5.8 alien dollars— good. they hit run about 5.8 alien dollars that — good. they hit run about 5.8 alien dollars that we do in trade with the indian _ dollars that we do in trade with the indian market.— dollars that we do in trade with the indian market. 9 :, :, :, :, indian market. what would india want from the uk — indian market. what would india want from the uk in _ indian market. what would india want from the uk in terms _ indian market. what would india want from the uk in terms of _ indian market. what would india want from the uk in terms of real- from the uk in terms of real free—trade agreement? from the uk in terms of real free-trade agreement? free-trade agreements _ free-trade agreement? free-trade agreements work _ free-trade agreement? free-trade agreements work on _ free-trade agreement? free-trade agreements work on a _ free-trade agreement? free-trade agreements work on a few - free-trade agreement? free-trade
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agreements work on a few things. | agreements work on a few things. mainty— agreements work on a few things. mainly agriculture. obviously technology from their point of view, pharmaceuticals and textiles. these are the _ pharmaceuticals and textiles. these are the four or five main ones they normally— are the four or five main ones they normally work with. one of the major problems— normally work with. one of the major problems you have with dealing with a country _ problems you have with dealing with a country like india is it's a very comptex— a country like india is it's a very complex country and it is unfortunately suffer from a lot of poverty— unfortunately suffer from a lot of poverty and if you look at the generat— poverty and if you look at the general gdp for the country like india _ general gdp for the country like india it — general gdp for the country like india it sits around about 2000 us dollars— india it sits around about 2000 us dollars whereas in the uk it is roundabout $42,000. in the usa at 65.000 _ roundabout $42,000. in the usa at 65,000. its 45 in the eu. these are very disparate figures to try and marry— very disparate figures to try and ntarry up— very disparate figures to try and marry up and work on some kind of parity— marry up and work on some kind of parity were — marry up and work on some kind of parity were aiming for. we marry up and work on some kind of parity were aiming for.— parity were aiming for. we are lookin: parity were aiming for. we are looking to _ parity were aiming for. we are looking to do _ parity were aiming for. we are looking to do a _ parity were aiming for. we are looking to do a free-trade - parity were aiming for. we are - looking to do a free-trade agreement looking to do a free—trade agreement and so is the eu and they are quite close. , :, :, :, :, close. they are further forward than we are but this _ close. they are further forward than we are but this is _ close. they are further forward than we are but this is promising, - close. they are further forward than we are but this is promising, what l we are but this is promising, what we are but this is promising, what we got _ we are but this is promising, what we got on — we are but this is promising, what we got on here. we have managed to agree _ we got on here. we have managed to agree certain elements about food
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and medical devices but it's a good step forward. we haven't been negotiating for as long as the eu so they are _ negotiating for as long as the eu so they are bound to be further forward _ they are bound to be further forward. , :, , :, forward. generally, the government ist in: to forward. generally, the government is trying to get _ forward. generally, the government is trying to get these _ forward. generally, the government is trying to get these sorts - forward. generally, the government is trying to get these sorts of - is trying to get these sorts of agreements around the world post—brexit, how do you think it is doing in the search for trade agreements with other countries? t agreements with other countries? i think it's done very well and getting _ think it's done very well and getting what we call a rollover agreement and recognition of a trade of some _ agreement and recognition of a trade of some sort. that has been very useful— of some sort. that has been very useful for— of some sort. that has been very useful for exporters in particular. 0bviousty— useful for exporters in particular. obviously as traders we are dealing with the _ obviously as traders we are dealing with the new trade and cooperation agreement with the eu. but most of it has— agreement with the eu. but most of it has been— agreement with the eu. but most of it has been rolling over so it's great — it has been rolling over so it's great news and we really want to start _ great news and we really want to start getting the free—trade agreements across the line now. good to talk to you- — agreements across the line now. good to talk to you. thank _ agreements across the line now. good to talk to you. thank you _ agreements across the line now. (3999 to talk to you. thank you very much. police have urged people living near aylesham in kent to remain �*cautious and vigilant�*, following the murder
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of a police community support officer a week ago. detectives say they haven�*t established a motive forjulia james�* death, and have made no arrests. our correspondent, simonjones, sent this report from aylesham. well, julia james was working from home last tuesday. she went out to walk her dog when she was attacked. she had suffered head injuries, which were very severe. hundreds of officers have been involved in the investigation since but as of yet, there is no key suspect in the case, no motive that the police have been able to establish and no arrests have been made. the chief constable of kent police visited the scene today to get an update himself on what had been happening. he realised that this is a difficult time for kent police given that they are now investigating the death of one of their own offices and he realised as well that local people are feeling shocked and concerned. we have seen the previous interviews mr richard, our assistant chief constable, so i will repeat those messages. that is exactly what people should be doing. being vigilant, of course.
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thinking very carefully about their own safety and making sure that if you go out alone, telling people where you are and where you are going and suchlike. marriage certificates in england and wales will from today include the name of both the mother and father of the newlyweds. until now, the document only named the fathers. marriages will also be recorded electronically for the first time, as part of an attempt to modernise and simplify the registration system . hundreds of people in hull are taking part in a year—long art project which aims to give people time to reflect on their lives without distractions. volunteers will be invited to spend an hour alone in a glass—fronted box perched hundreds of feet above the city. here�*s our arts correspondent, david sillito.
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it�*s been a really tough year for a lot of people. i�*m really looking forward to it as being, really, a new beginning. we�*re in hull, or maybe more accurately, we�*re looking over hull. this is kate, one of the first visitors to a new arrival in the city. the hull vigil. wow. wow, it looks so blue. this is not how i expected it at all. i thought i was going to be terrified. she and more than 700 others will stand here for an hour at a time over the next 365 days, and gaze over the city. and think. this is an artwork about what�*s on our minds. my year has been very focused around two members of my family, really. my daughter, who is disabled, my elder daughter. and my dad, who�*s 83 and has a blood cancer. so it has been one of fear, really.
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you know, protecting them, shielding. each day, there will be a vigil at sunrise and another at sunset. there aren�*t many rules when you are up here, but there is one. no mobile phones, because they want you to, well, have a chance to enjoy the silence, the sky, the sun and the beauty of hull. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hello again. the wind direction has changed following that low pressure moving away and we have a northerly wind which is maintaining this cold feel.
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these are the temperatures towards the end of the afternoon. it�*s still quite windy out there as well especially down some of those north sea coasts. we have got some sunshine and showers and wet weather moving away from scotland across northern ireland and northern england into the midlands and across east anglia. that will work its way down towards wales in the west country overnight. clear skies following from the north. so it�*s going to be colder tonight and not as windy as last night. where we have the clear skies in scotland and northern england we are likely to have a frost. the wintry showers across northern scotland. some showers across northern ireland heading into wales and the west country. they will work themselves into the midlands and south—east of england. elsewhere the odd shower around in some sunshine. those temperatures still on the low side for the time of year. it probably
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won�*t be as windy tomorrow. the winds continue to ease overnight into thursday. this comes in from the atlantic bringing more clout for a while across southern parts of england and. rain mainly through the english channel. elsewhere we will see some sunshine and showers and lots more showers to come in scotland moving down into northern england. it could be a bit wintry of the hills. top temperature is not changing much. we could start with more frost on friday with vital wins and clear skies. there will be a few scattered showers around but many places probably having a dry day and those temperatures beginning to lift across the board. quickly enter the start of the weekend and another area of low pressure is going to bring some rain to many parts of the country on saturday will stop but the winds are going to be coming in from the south and that could bring some much—needed warm weather into the south—east of the uk.
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tomos morgan, bbc news, outside the senedd.
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this is bbc news. i�*m ben brown. the headlines... two former soldiers accused of the murder of an official ira man in 1972 have been formally acquitted after their trial collapsed. a court hears a police officer, accused of murdering the ex—footballer dalian atkinsion, had tasered him for six times longer than standard, before kicking him twice in the head. authorities in mexico city say there will be a full investigation after a metro train and railway track collapsed onto a busy road in mexico city, killing at least 23 people. a call to light candles this evening at a vigil to remember murdered police community officer, julia james, a week after the discovery of her body in woods in kent.
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we�*re in edinburgh ahead of the scottish parliamentary elections this thursday. can the snp get the majority they say would pave the way for a second independence vote? and reflections without distractions — hundreds of people in hull are taking part in a year—long art project which aims to give people time to look back on their lives. and coming up... the indian premier league has been suspended after an increase in coronavirus cases among players. we�*ll have more on that at 4.30pm.
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the trial of two former paratroopers accused of murdering a man in belfast in 1972 has collapsed, after police interviews they gave were ruled inadmissible. the ex—soldiers, known only as a and c, insisted that they acted lawfully when they shotjoe mccann, who led a group called "the official ira". ajudge has now formally acquitted the men. the ministry of defence has welcomed the decision. let�*s get more on this from our ireland correspondent, chris page. where�*s my chris, this has been a very controversial case indeed. the whole issue — very controversial case indeed. tt9 whole issue of the prosecution of veterans who were in northern ireland during the troubles has been one of the most controversial ones both here in belfast and in other parts of the uk. this trial has been going on for a number of days. it was the trial of two former paratroopers known as soldier a and c, they were granted anonymity. they
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were charged with the murder ofjoe mccann, who was a senior member of a public paramilitary group, known as the official ira. he was shot dead in the markets area of south belfast in the markets area of south belfast in 1972. now, these soldiers and another soldier who has since died, they were asked at the time to help police arrestjoe mccann and asjoe mccann, the curt herds, —— the court heard, escaped, they fired the shots. the court heard thatjoe mccann was not armed in the time but he had been involved in the death of “p he had been involved in the death of up to 15 british soldiers by that point. so, soldier a up to 15 british soldiers by that point. so, soldiera and up to 15 british soldiers by that point. so, soldier a and soldier
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c... detectives were tasked of investigating the unsolved conflict investigating the unsolved conflict in northern ireland. this afternoon, thejudge ruled in northern ireland. this afternoon, the judge ruled that he was formally acquitting the accused because those interviews, that material was inadmissible and could not be used inadmissible and could not be used in court. it has been as you expect, and angry reaction from relatives of that goaljoe mccann outside the court. :, , :, g :, that goaljoe mccann outside the court. :, n :, court. -- relatives ofjoe mccann outside the _ court. -- relatives ofjoe mccann outside the court. _ court. -- relatives ofjoe mccann outside the court. this _ court. -- relatives ofjoe mccann i outside the court. this arrangement since _ outside the court. this arrangement since found — outside the court. this arrangement since found to be unlawful has been retied _ since found to be unlawful has been relied upon — since found to be unlawful has been relied upon by soldiers c and c. let there _ relied upon by soldiers c and c. let there be _ relied upon by soldiers c and c. let there be no— relied upon by soldiers c and c. let there be no doubt that the two cowards — there be no doubt that the two cowards who hid behind anonymity did
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shoot _ cowards who hid behind anonymity did shootjoe _ cowards who hid behind anonymity did shootjoe mccann in the back. instead, — shootjoe mccann in the back. instead, ironically, it has been retied — instead, ironically, it has been relied upon them to exclude their interviews — relied upon them to exclude their interviews. the powers have truly benefited — interviews. the powers have truly benefited from exceptional arrangement of their experience in iretand _ arrangement of their experience in ireland. the a number of people who felt that— ireland. the a number of people who felt that these soldiers should not have been brought to the court in the first— have been brought to the court in the first place have welcomed what has happened today. the the first place have welcomed what has happened today.— has happened today. the former defence minister, _ has happened today. the former defence minister, who _ has happened today. the former defence minister, who is - has happened today. the former defence minister, who is in - has happened today. the former i defence minister, who is in belfast for the trial, said that the soldiers shouldn�*t have ever been prosecuted and that they had been dragged through the courts. now, whenever it comes to the questions that people asking about the decision to bring the case against the soldiers, the public prosecution service here in northern ireland has been defending itself. they say that the pps were being satisfied and
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this case was properly brought before the court and the case overcame a number of legal challenges before reaching trial. there was a reasonable prospect of conviction and it was proper for the court to determine these issues. there has been reaction this afternoon from the ministry of defence in london. this is an issue, of course, that goes far beyond northern ireland in terms of its significance. we have had the veterans commissioner for northern ireland, who is a former ulster unionist party mp, also says that the prosecution had never been —— should have never been brought. there is a much wider issue at stake here about how you deal with unsolved killings from the northern ireland conflict, 2000 of them, most of them are carried out by paramilitaries and whether soldiers pa ramilitaries and whether soldiers should paramilitaries and whether soldiers should be offered the same protection as soldiers who served in
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other overseas military operations, for example, the iraq and afghanistan wars. so far, there are four other cases of soldiers being prosecuted for incidents during the troubles here that are making their way through the courts in northern ireland. we way through the courts in northern ireland. ~ , :, ~ way through the courts in northern ireland. 9 , :, ~ :, :, ireland. we will be talking to a former government _ ireland. we will be talking to a former government minister . ireland. we will be talking to a - former government minister about this in the next few minutes. a court has heard that the former aston villa footballer dalian atkinson died after a taser was used on him for 33 seconds and he was kicked in the head by a police officer. benjamin monk, a constable with the west mercia force, denies murder and manslaughter. earlier i spoke to our correspondent phil mackie who�*s at at birmingham crown court following the case. i should say that there is another police officer in the dock here as well and that is pc mary ellen bettley—smith, who denies a charge of assault. what we have been hearing today as the opening of the prosecution case in the trial, that is expected to last between six and eight weeks, we learned that dalian atkinson, who was a former aston villa
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footballer, had retired in 2001 but by 2016, when he died, he was suffering from a very serious health condition. he had high blood pressure, he had heart disease and he was also on dialysis. it was on the eve of a hospital appointment in august of that year that he became very agitated and he drove to his father�*s house in the early hours of the morning in telford. neighbours thought there was a disturbance, they could hear shouting and they called the police. this is what they are now discussing caught in the moment, what happened next. —— in court at the moment. those two offices that we have talked about arrived at the scene. pc monk deployed his taser twice unsuccessfully on mr atkinson but then fired it a third time. the opening case of the prosecution said that the trigger was pressed for 33 seconds and it should normallyjust be a single pressure on the trigger and it would cut off after it was fired and that after mr atkinson had fallen to the ground and was completely incapacitated, prosecution allege that mr pc monk kicked him repeatedly in the head
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and that pc bettley—smith repeatedly hit him to the body with a baton. she told the jury is that they would have to consider very carefully whether or not this was excess force or whether they were acting unlawfully after that third taser had been deployed. we have been hearing that there were lots of witnesses to this, people who had been woken up by the disturbance in the small cul—de—sac. many of whom had described what had happened, although their accounts differ slightly. we are now getting onto evidence from some of the other police officers, who arrived at the scene, one of whom said that when he arrived, he saw mr atkinson lying on the ground with pc monk�*s foot on his head and mr atkinson making low growling sounds. now, and usually, juries have been told that after the prosecution —— unusually. complete outlining its case, they will hear statements from its defence. that would ordinarily happen much later in the course of a criminal trial and the case itself is expected to last year
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at birmingham crown court between six and eight weeks. the mayor of mexico city has promised an urgent investigation into a disaster on the metro system, when an overpass collapsed as a train was travelling on it. several carriages plunged onto a busy road below. at least 23 people are known to have died, and dozens more have been injured. you may find some of the images in will grant�*s report upsetting. residents of mexico city are all too accustomed to these scenes. emergency services working through the night, attempting to reach injured victims, trapped beneath the rubble. but this was not another earthquake in the mexican capital, rather it was an overpass in the city�*s busy subway system. it collapsed as a train travelled over it, bringing a tangle of wreckage, concrete and metal crashing onto the cars below. at that hour, the train will most likely have been taking workers home after a late shift, a quiet night turning into tragedy in an instant. it was a desperate, agonising
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situation for theirfamilies. translation: my daughter-in-iaw called us, she was with my son - and she told us that the structure fell down on top of them. translation: my brother came with his wife and they managedl to get her out, but he was crushed in there, and we don't know anything. they do not give us reports. now they have to get him out, but who knows how long it will take? also on the scene was the city�*s mayor, claudia sheinbaum, addressing the public as the picture got steadily grimmer. "i urge any family who fears they had relatives on the train to contact the emergency response team here, orat one of the hospitals," she said. this was the newest, most modern line in mexico�*s subway, line 12, unveiled less than a decade ago. an incident like this might have been expected on one of the older lines built in the 1960s, but supposedly not on line 12. he speaks spanish.
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yet many have said there were issues with its construction from the start. among them, local residents who complained about the endless expansion of the subway across this sprawling city. many of the tough questions ahead will be directed at the city�*s former mayor, marcelo ebrard, now mexico�*s foreign minister. he championed line 12, and on twitter he said he would fully comply with the investigation into what happened. but such investigations will have to wait. for now, the city is solely concerned with rescuing those trapped, attending to the injured, and comforting the bereaved. will grant, bbc news, mexico city. and will grant gave us this update from the scene earlier this afternoon. well as you can see, they are busy behind me still trying to locate survivors from this incident, trying to reach them in the rubble and the metal.
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the entire area around here has been closed off and every metre of line 12 is now closed as they perform a check along the entire length of this part of the subway system. this is the second busiest and most important subway system in north america after new york. this is its worst event since 45 years. -- 35 —— 35 years. it really has rattled the residents of mexico city. they knew that parts of the system, parts of the subway in mexico city are old and in need of focus, investment and repair perhaps. they did not expect it to be the most modern parts, the part that was inaugurated just a handful of years ago. that worries people here, they feel like if it can happen to what is supposedly the shiniest, newest and most important part of their subway system, it can happen to other bridges,
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other parts of this infrastructure as well. many, many questions to the authorities here but still many hours ahead. a terrible and deeply upsetting wait for the families. we can speak more about this now to the author and journalist, who is in mexico city. how angry people that a disaster like this can happen on such a modern line of the metro system? such a modern line of the metro s stem? , 9, such a modern line of the metro s stem? , :, :, :, :, ~ system? there is a lot of anger. a lot of people _ system? there is a lot of anger. a lot of people are _ system? there is a lot of anger. a lot of people are very _ system? there is a lot of anger. a lot of people are very disgruntled | system? there is a lot of anger. a| lot of people are very disgruntled i would say. these things happen again and again in the city and a lot of the infrastructure is very bad. this was a particularly that this was particularly seen as a high profile, politicised project, which very much boosted the mayor, who is now foreign secretary and seen as a contenderfor foreign secretary and seen as a contender for the foreign secretary and seen as a contenderfor the president foreign secretary and seen as a contender for the president of mexico. these things looks like
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something that should have been avoided. neighbours going out there and taking photographs of these bridges, which looks very unstable. so, i would say a lot of people are very angry but in some ways, there have been so many of these things over so many years, you might not get the kind of flare—ups that a lot of very much disgruntled people about the situation. we of very much disgruntled people about the situation.— of very much disgruntled people about the situation. we know that there is going _ about the situation. we know that there is going to _ about the situation. we know that there is going to be _ about the situation. we know that there is going to be an _ there is going to be an investigation, or at least that is what is being promised by the politicians, but is there suspicion that it was badly built in the first place or badly maintained all sort of badly run with bad safety procedures? t of badly run with bad safety procedures?— of badly run with bad safety rocedures? :, :, :, procedures? i would say all three of the above- — procedures? i would say all three of the above- so. _ procedures? i would say all three of the above. so, when _ procedures? i would say all three of the above. so, when the _ procedures? i would say all three of the above. so, when the project - procedures? i would say all three of| the above. so, when the project was donein the above. so, when the project was done in 2006 and 2012, the then mayor, there was a lot of questions then. tragically, one of the biggest ways of corruption many being
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embedded were in construction projects. it was very typical and very common in mexico. there were questions about whether cheaper materials we used then the recommendations, different types of trains were turned down because of money. then there were issues with maintenance and in 2017, we had the earthquake year and after that earthquake, there was very clear damage to a lot of columns in that line in that area. we were unsure whether they were restored properly. finally, last year, they were neighbours and residents going out and taking pictures and saying it is dangerous, i drive my car down that road and i don�*t like the look of that bridge. many warning signs. 50 that bridge. many warning signs. so many people use the metro system and presumably have to continue to use it and they are not sure whether this might happen again any time
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soon. , :, , , this might happen again any time soon. , , ,:, , soon. yes, absolutely. the stories that they are _ soon. yes, absolutely. the stories that they are hearing _ soon. yes, absolutely. the stories that they are hearing from - soon. yes, absolutely. the stories| that they are hearing from people, they are a real nightmare stories. one of the survivors described how he was in the train and suddenly it was like the gravity went on to the train was hurtling towards the road and he was thrown up and literally felt himself bang on the roof of the train but he managed to grab something and climb out of it and he was virtually 0k something and climb out of it and he was virtually ok but that is a kind of real nightmare scenario when you are in a crowded metro below ground or above ground. you have thoughts of what could happen and this really —— reinforces those. we have had the latest coronavirus statistics. in terms of cases, 1946.
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this is showing the latest covid figures. the deaths is four, so maintaining the low levels of debt at the moment from the coronavirus. 160 hospital admissions and vaccinations, the total number of vaccine goal vaccinations is now just over 15 million. those are the latest covid—19 figures for the uk. the headlines on bbc news. two former soldiers accused of the murder of an official ira man in 1972 have been formally acquitted after their trial collapsed. a court hears a police officer, accused of murdering the ex—footballer dalian atkinsion, had tasered him for six times longer than standard before kicking him twice in the head. authorities in mexico city say
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there will be a full investigation after a metro train and railway track collapsed onto a busy road in mexico city, killing at least 23 people. voters go to the polls across scotland, wales and england on thursday, in the biggest test of opinion outside the general election. more than 100 councils are being contested in england, and the members of the welsh and scottish parliaments will be elected. my colleague, clive myrie, is at holyrood for us. a little bit of sunshine there for you, clive. arguably, the vote here to the parliament could be the most consequential of the night on thursday. a critical moment perhaps for the union between scotland and the rest of the uk. nicola sturgeon and the snp believe
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a majority of seats, 65, in the parliament would be a mandate for a second independence referendum. our political correspondent nick eardley is here. i nick eardley is here. just wonder how confident th! are i just wonder how confident the snp are that they are going to get the votes that they need to get a majority here. votes that they need to get a majority here-— votes that they need to get a majority here. speaking to a few --eole majority here. speaking to a few people over _ majority here. speaking to a few people over the _ majority here. speaking to a few people over the last _ majority here. speaking to a few people over the last few - majority here. speaking to a few people over the last few hours, | majority here. speaking to a fewj people over the last few hours, i think it is on a knife edge. there is no one in the snp, who would confidently predict that they are going to get a majority. there are some opposition parties who say that it is 50-50. the some opposition parties who say that it is 50—50. the system in the scottish parliament is pretty complicated. you have constituency votes and regional votes and one impacts the other. if she does win that majority, if nicola sturgeon manages to hold that place basically in the palm of her hands with 65 msps, she can kind of do what she went in there. getting a referendum
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is more complicated though because we know that she wants to create with boris johnson we know that she wants to create with borisjohnson and she wants to be legally binding and the prime minister has made it pretty clear that he is not going to stand for it. so, the unionist parties are going to spend the last two days of this campaign saying... they will try to deprive the snp from getting that majority because it will stop a referendum. bearing in mind that evenif referendum. bearing in mind that even if the snp don�*t get a majority of their own, the scottish greens and potentially alex salmond�*s new party as well... the and potentially alex salmond's new party as well- - -_ party as well... the battle is between _ party as well... the battle is between labour _ party as well... the battle is between labour and - party as well... the battle is - between labour and conservatives for the second place and labour are not looking too good in the polls? tia. looking too good in the polls? no, the scottish _ looking too good in the polls? tt9, the scottish labour leader, if you believe some of the polls is doing ok believe some of the polls is doing 0k and they suggest that he is quite popular but the fear that some fairly high up in the scottish
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labour party have is that that is not translating in the support for the party at the moment. scottish labour, used to come to a scottish election and you would know that the scottish labour party would win. they used to weigh the votes instead of actually camping. that is not going to happen any more. the question is whether this is a start of a rebuild for them. some at the start of the campaign suggesting it could challenge the conservatives for second place. i�*ve got to say that the tories feel fairly confident at the moment about holding onto second place but the order isn�*t the only thing that matters here. the numbers matter here as well. when it comes to that second place, it will be important forfiguring out second place, it will be important for figuring out who frames the unionist debate over the next five years, if that referendum is discussed as you would expect for quite a while.
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discussed as you would expect for quite a while-— discussed as you would expect for quite a while. nick, thank you. let us talk now— quite a while. nick, thank you. let us talk now to _ quite a while. nick, thank you. let us talk now to stephen _ quite a while. nick, thank you. let us talk now to stephen gethins. i quite a while. nick, thank you. let| us talk now to stephen gethins. we all know who�*s going to be the leading party after the elections on thursday, we know it is going to be the snp and we know who the first minister will be. ijust wonder how confident the snp are and perhaps you as well, on whether or not that majority, that outright majority is going to be one. majority, that outright ma'ority is going to be e_ majority, that outright ma'ority is going to be o_ majority, that outright ma'ority is going to be one. obviously, we don't know et going to be one. obviously, we don't know yet because _ going to be one. obviously, we don't know yet because the _ going to be one. obviously, we don't know yet because the elections - going to be one. obviously, we don't know yet because the elections are l know yet because the elections are on thursday, clive. but as nick pointed out there and this is something that should be pointed out to those who are used with the westminster system, it is difficult to get a majority. if it was in westminster, it would translate to something like 550 of the 650 seats
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for majority. it depends on those both sets of mps and getting those regional list seats as well. it is a difficult thing to do but one thing thatis difficult thing to do but one thing that is clear is that we seem to be looking at a pro—independence majority because, of course, the green party are pro independence as well and they are already in parliament. i think that is going to be a really difficult thing. i think it will be difficult to ignore. ok. it will be difficult to ignore. ok, so, sa it will be difficult to ignore. ok, so. say there — it will be difficult to ignore. ok, so, say there is _ it will be difficult to ignore. ok, so, say there is a _ it will be difficult to ignore. ok, so, say there is a majority for pro—independence parties, the greens, alex salmond�*s party as well as the snp, at what point of the parliament, should nicola sturgeon get on the phone to number ten to borisjohnson and say, it�*s time. well, what happened last time round was busy negotiations started in the months that came after the 2011 election and then it took place
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about three years after that 2014. i think nicola sturgeon has been clear that she wants to, once we are beyond the pandemic, which is something that she has made clear, she would want to look at a referendum then. i think there are a lot of people in the snp, who went to see independence as soon possible. i certainly support independence and of course you want to see it as soon as possible but i think the first minister has been clear that she will do it after the pandemic is over. we know that the uk is changing rapidly, brexit has changed and the union has changed everything about this and i think it will be something they want to do in this parliamentary term. ok. will be something they want to do in this parliamentary term.— this parliamentary term. ok, so to be clear, this parliamentary term. ok, so to be clear. if— this parliamentary term. ok, so to be clear, if the _ this parliamentary term. ok, so to be clear, if the scottish _ this parliamentary term. ok, so to be clear, if the scottish greens - this parliamentary term. ok, so to | be clear, if the scottish greens and other parties come forward and put in motion before the parliament year, saying that they need to get on the phone to borisjohnson now, we need the motion to push for a second independence referendum now,
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the snp and nicola sturgeon would be in the position of saying no to that, with a?— in the position of saying no to that, with a? i'm not sure they would. that, with a? i'm not sure they would- the _ that, with a? i'm not sure they would. the snp _ that, with a? i'm not sure they would. the snp is _ that, with a? i'm not sure they would. the snp is a _ that, with a? i'm not sure they would. the snp is a party - that, with a? i'm not sure they would. the snp is a party with | that, with a? i'm not sure they. would. the snp is a party with a commitment to that independence from friends in... sorry to interrupt, so to be clear, if there is a motion within six months of the majority of the votes in this parliament being for pro—independence parties, within six months, if the greens and other parties put forward a motion for that, you�*re saying that the snp would vote for that now? well, i am not going to be an snp member of parliament, so it is not fairfor me to say. parliament, so it is not fair for me to sa . :, ~' :, parliament, so it is not fair for me tosa. :, «a, , :, parliament, so it is not fair for me tosa. :, «a, y :, �* to say. you know exactly what i'm sa int. to say. you know exactly what i'm saying- would _ to say. you know exactly what i'm saying. would nicola _ to say. you know exactly what i'm saying. would nicola sturgeon - to say. you know exactly what i'm i saying. would nicola sturgeon push for that when the greens and other parties, if they help to put a
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majority here for pro—independence parties, if they put that forward straightaway, would nicola sturgeon back at? 9 y :, :, :, :, straightaway, would nicola sturgeon back at? 9 :, :, :, , back at? well, you would have to see the nature of— back at? well, you would have to see the nature of it. _ back at? well, you would have to see the nature of it. also, _ back at? well, you would have to see the nature of it. also, as _ back at? well, you would have to see the nature of it. also, as the - the nature of it. also, as the government, they will be the ones who will be negotiating that section 30 order with westminster as well, so you can see the snp pushing for that and going for responsible timeframe. many snp members were once independence as soon as they can better remember independence is notjust for the can better remember independence is not just for the scottish parliament, there will be talks were westminster. there will be talks for what is and what is not possible. i know that ministers will be committed to exploring every detail in the aftermath of the election if the snp returns. the important thing people need to do if they want an snp government is to go out and vote for them on thursday. otc
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snp government is to go out and vote for them on thursday.— for them on thursday. ok. it is good to talk to you- _ it is good to talk to you. let�*s look now at the situation in wales, where questions concerning the power of the welsh parliament have become more acute during the coronavirus pandemic. tomos morgan has been speaking to voters there. my heart stopped twice, so they had to cpr me, twice. in march last year, scott howell became the first coronavirus patient that needed intensive care treatment at the royal gwent hospital in newport, south wales. my wife had two calls to say that was it, i wasn�*t going to pull through. the advice they got from italy was suggesting that if people had not come out of a coma within two weeks, if they did come out, they were going to have major failures of organs, and i took two and a half weeks. but yeah, it wasn�*t looking good. my heart had stopped twice. they had to perform cpr on me. my kidneys had failed. i was on dialysis. he made a miraculous recovery after his eight weeks in hospital,
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but it took him the best part of last year before feeling normal once again. for the rest of that year, i thought i was going to die every day. so every twinge i had, every day i got up and didn�*t feel myself, i thought, this is going to be my last day. it makes you appreciate the very simple things. the two things i did not have in hospital that i wanted was fresh air and someone to give me a cwtch. back working from home now and spending time with the family, has his experience of covid impacted how he will vote on may the 6th? high enough yet? it has changed where i put my vote this time. i met nurses when i was in there, seeing how hard they worked. i met one nurse in particular who had come out of retirement to help because she felt that was her vocation and she had to help, putting herself into a crisis, where people were dying of the nursing staff, and she still put herself out there. this year, as well as education and the future of the nhs, welsh independence and abolishing the welsh parliament, as well as the government�*s handling
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of covid, are just some of the themes being passed around by the parties standing in this election. cut towards the ball! but which issues have caught the minds of the cardiff harlequins senior men�*s rugby team, back at training after four and a half months of enforced winter break? things like health, social care, housing, those are the important things, i think overlooked sometimes in these discussions, so yeah, those core things really, for me. i feel like this year, university students have been left behind, sort of, not concentrated enough on, sort of, our mental health. i think we need to make our own decisions, so for me, i believe firmly in independence and that's the way we need to go. it�*s one that has to look quite broad. i think we�*ve got a lot of problems at the moment in society. i think we need to look at a broad spectrum. since the senedd�*s inception just over two decades ago, welsh labour has been in power in some shape or form but now, there�*s more choice than ever for welsh voters come may the 6th. and for many, the key question will be, do we want more of the same
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or is it time for a change? tomos morgan, bbc news, outside the senedd. we are expecting the fourth and final leaders debate in edinburgh up close on thursday and full coverage of course you on bbc news. for a round up of everything you need to know about the elections, ?there�*s a guide on our website — with much more information about who is standing where. that�*s at bbc.co.uk/news or on the bbc news app. and don�*t forget all that information also on the bbc news app. that�*s it from edinburgh. now time for all the sports news. good afternoon. jose mourinho appointed as the new manager of italian side
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roma from next season, just 15 days after being sacked by tottenham. his 17 month spell in north london ended before he had the chance to contest the league cup final and with it went his record of winning trophies at every club he�*s managed. football reporterjohn bennet told me the timing�*s a surpise, the destination isn�*t. the announcement came as a surprise but when _ the announcement came as a surprise but when you _ the announcement came as a surprise but when you think about it, this is a very— but when you think about it, this is a very logical move. he is a very respected — a very logical move. he is a very respected coach in italian football for what _ respected coach in italian football for what he did and into milan in two successful years between 2008 and 2010 _ two successful years between 2008 and 2010. he went to steady our tittes, _ and 2010. he went to steady our tittes, he — and 2010. he went to steady our titles, he won a treble of trophies and a _ titles, he won a treble of trophies and a second and final season, he won the _ and a second and final season, he won the champions league. so italy was always— won the champions league. so italy was always a likely destination. and this is— was always a likely destination. and this is a _ was always a likely destination. and this is a very— was always a likely destination. and this is a very interesting project. they've — this is a very interesting project. they've had new owners for the last year or— they've had new owners for the last year or so, — they've had new owners for the last year or so, very ambitious new owners— year or so, very ambitious new owners and _ year or so, very ambitious new owners and jose mourinho has talked about— owners and jose mourinho has talked about this _ owners and jose mourinho has talked about this and said he was really impressed by their winning project and what — impressed by their winning project and what he called a winning
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mentality. the owners have been talking _ mentality. the owners have been talking about this appointment as well talking about this appointment as wet! and — talking about this appointment as well and say they were impressed by his winning _ well and say they were impressed by his winning mentality and his passion — his winning mentality and his passion for football. so the announcement has come as a surprise but when _ announcement has come as a surprise but when you _ announcement has come as a surprise but when you think about it this is a reatiy— but when you think about it this is a really interesting project for housing — a really interesting project for housing renewal and a logical project — housing renewal and a logical project for him. the housing renewal and a logical project for him.— housing renewal and a logical project for him. housing renewal and a logical oro'ect for him. :, :, , project for him. the next move was alwa s project for him. the next move was always going _ project for him. the next move was always going to _ project for him. the next move was always going to come _ project for him. the next move was always going to come outside - project for him. the next move was always going to come outside of. always going to come outside of english football, do you think that this spells the end now for housing renewal in english football? you never say never _ renewal in english football? yet. never say never because of because he lives english football and for all the critics he�*s had over the last two years he has been very successful in english football, particularly a chelsea of course. but it always seemed as though his likely destination would be outside of england. realmadrid was talk about because the realmadrid president is a big fan. but i think italy was always going to be the likely destination. it�*s going to be a toughjob for him likely destination. it�*s going to be a tough job for him because
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likely destination. it�*s going to be a toughjob for him because roma have not won a league title since 2001, they haven�*t won a trophy since 2008, they are seventh in the league, so it�*s a big job for him to try and get them towards competing for trophies. try and get them towards competing fortrophies. but try and get them towards competing for trophies. but you get the impression from what he has said today about this new job that impression from what he has said today about this newjob that he is really relishing the challenge. manchester city take a 2—1 lead into the second leg of tonight�*s champions league semi final against paris saint germain, who face a nervous wait on the fitness of key man kylian mbappe. the striker didn�*t train with the rest of the psg team yesterday after suffering a calf injury on saturday. pep guardiola, aiming to win the competition with city for the first time, believes he�*ll be ready along with psg�*s other star man neymar. in the first half they were exceptional. they were always dangerous. in the second half we were better. we were better and they were worse. they lost and they play bad if they win, they play good. but if you ask my opinion,
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they play good. the ipl face a race against time to rearrange the postponed tournamnet after calling a halt to the competition today. organisers said they had to priooritise the ehalth and well bing of those involved. eleven english player competing wil now return home. india re meant to tour england this summer and then stage the twentytwenty world cup there later this year, limiting the window to conclude the competition. that�*s all the sport for now. the trial of two former paratroopers accused of murdering a man in belfast in 1972 has collapsed — after police interviews they gave were ruled inadmissible. the ex—soldiers, known only as a and c, insisted that they acted lawfully when they shotjoe mccann — who led a group called
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"the official ira". ajudge has now formally acquitted the men. the ministry of defence has welcomed the decision. tobias ellwood is the chair of the defence select committee. thank you for being with us. what is your reaction to the collapse of this case? t your reaction to the collapse of this case?— your reaction to the collapse of this case? :, :, , , , :, this case? i am not surprised and i am pleased _ this case? i am not surprised and i am pleased this _ this case? i am not surprised and i am pleased this trial— this case? i am not surprised and i am pleased this trial has _ this case? i am not surprised and i am pleased this trial has ended i this case? i am not surprised and i i am pleased this trial has ended stop given the events took over 50 years ago and no new evidence was forthcoming but also the idea that some outstanding results cases would be revisited as part of the 1998 good friday agreement, that may have seen a good idea at the time but in practice is always going to be difficult to conclude. we saw this historical enquiries team set up to conduct this work but it has caused so much stress on both sides and asking soldiers to recall events that took place 50 years ago. i am
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pleased to see that the cps has confirmed it will not appeal against today�*s decision. as the judge confirmed today, we cannot have 1972 evidence being freshened up with a new 2010 cover. that is not legitimate. new 2010 cover. that is not legitimate-— new 2010 cover. that is not lecitimate. , :, , , : :, legitimate. should this prosecution have ever been _ legitimate. should this prosecution have ever been brought? _ legitimate. should this prosecution have ever been brought? that i legitimate. should this prosecution have ever been brought? that is i legitimate. should this prosecution i have ever been brought? that is what i'm sa int , have ever been brought? that is what i'm saying, it— have ever been brought? that is what i'm saying. it was _ have ever been brought? that is what i'm saying, it was part _ have ever been brought? that is what i'm saying, it was part of _ have ever been brought? that is what i'm saying, it was part of this - i�*m saying, it was part of this agreement to look back at some of the legacy cases which were not concluded so it meant well and the intention was there, but ultimately it has caused a lot of heartache and pain and people who have retired, veterans that had packed up their uniforms decades ago, now having their doors knocked on to say you are going to be questioned under caution, that is not the way we should be processing. so i�*m pleased to see this case has been dropped and i do hope it will have an impact on other pending cases which are in
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the pipeline. on other pending cases which are in the pipeline-— the pipeline. they have been reaction from _ the pipeline. they have been reaction from the _ the pipeline. they have been reaction from the family i the pipeline. they have been reaction from the family of. the pipeline. they have been i reaction from the family of joseph reaction from the family ofjoseph mccann, the man who was killed back in 1972, they are saying they had been failures of state at all levels investigating his death and saying the ruc failed, the criminaljustice system failed. what would you say about that reaction? t system failed. what would you say about that reaction?— about that reaction? i understand that reaction _ about that reaction? i understand that reaction but _ about that reaction? i understand that reaction but we _ about that reaction? i understand that reaction but we have - about that reaction? i understand that reaction but we have to i that reaction but we have to recognise it is now had its moment in court on the judge has given recognise it is now had its moment in court on thejudge has given his response. iserved in in court on thejudge has given his response. i served in northern ireland myself in the 1990s and it was a difficult and tense atmosphere to operate in. you had to make critical on the ground decisions. these cases are coming back from the height of the troubles in 1972. it doesn�*t justify any of the british acts that took place but this evidence has been looked at in the
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past, no new evidence has come forward and i hope it will have an impact on further trials being dropped. impact on further trials being dro -ed. :, �* :, ~ impact on further trials being droued. :, �* :, ~ :, impact on further trials being dro-oed. :, �* :, ~ :, g, dropped. you've talked about how lont ato dropped. you've talked about how long ago this _ dropped. you've talked about how long ago this was, _ dropped. you've talked about how long ago this was, should - dropped. you've talked about how long ago this was, should they i dropped. you've talked about how long ago this was, should they be | dropped. you've talked about how. long ago this was, should they be a on prosecutions, whether it�*s soldiers who served in northern ireland all killings or alleged killings by civilians? this ireland all killings or alleged killings by civilians?- ireland all killings or alleged killings by civilians? this is a big tuestion killings by civilians? this is a big question we _ killings by civilians? this is a big question we are _ killings by civilians? this is a big question we are looking - killings by civilians? this is a big question we are looking at i killings by civilians? this is a big question we are looking at with l killings by civilians? this is a big i question we are looking at with the overseas operations bill currently going through parliament at the moment. we cannot do that retrospectively, that was never going to be the case. i�*m puzzled as to why the government said it could look at this in the legacy issues in the past. we can look into the future now and protect our soldiers who have to make very difficult decisions on the ground. we now have a five year limit to say unless any new evidence comes forward we should draw a line after that period of time. �* 99, , draw a line after that period of time. �* , :, draw a line after that period of time.�* , :, , time. because there will always be --eole time. because there will always be people who — time. because there will always be people who say — time. because there will always be people who say they _ time. because there will always be
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people who say they can't - time. because there will always be people who say they can't be i time. because there will always be people who say they can't be any i people who say they can�*t be any time limits on justice. people who say they can�*t be any time limits onjustice. riff people who say they can't be any time limits on justice.— time limits on 'ustice. of course not. if time limits on 'ustice. of course not. .f any — time limits on justice. of course not. if any new— time limits on justice. of course not. if any new evidence - time limits on justice. of course not. if any new evidence does i time limits on justice. of course i not. if any new evidence does come forward then it would be for the attorney general to make comments and bring this case forward. but what we�*ve seen in the past is taking previous evidence that has already been looked at and trying to regurgitate it and justify it coming to court again. that should not happen. to court again. that should not ha- nen. �* , 9, to court again. that should not ha..en_ �*, ., ': to court again. that should not ha-nen. �*, :, m :_ happen. it's a difficult balance because there _ happen. it's a difficult balance because there was _ happen. it's a difficult balance because there was real- happen. it's a difficult balance| because there was real tension happen. it's a difficult balance i because there was real tension in northern ireland once again for a variety of reasons and it�*s fair to say this case has added to those tensions. ttgfe say this case has added to those tensions. 9 99, �* say this case has added to those tensions. 9 m �* ., ~ say this case has added to those tensions. 9 �* :, ~ :, say this case has added to those tensions. 9 �* :,~ :, g, tensions. we can't take away from the wider political _ tensions. we can't take away from the wider political impact - tensions. we can't take away from the wider political impact about i the wider political impact about what is going on at the moment but i just say this is a current reservist and a former regular, we need to be still trusting our service personnel and make sure they have all the support they need so they do not hesitate in times of war when they have to make very difficult life or death situation decisions. but some
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n-eole death situation decisions. but some people would _ death situation decisions. but some people would say. _ death situation decisions. but some people would say, you _ death situation decisions. but some people would say, you can't - death situation decisions. but some people would say, you can't give i people would say, you can�*t give solely as carte blanche —— soldiers. we had incidents in iraq for example where there was poor behaviour and standards to drop below what we expect. and quite rightly they went to court and those soldiers were prosecuted. so there must be a system in place. when we send our soldiers into a conflict around the world we go there to actually defend our values and our standards and every time it sold the chooses to ignore those and do their own thing then they bring the reputation of then they bring the reputation of the armed forces into question. we cannot have that. so the standards we uphold, they must be processes in place to make sure they are enforced. place to make sure they are enforced-— place to make sure they are enforced. :, ,, y :, :, y :, the uk and india have agreed new trade and investment deals, worth a billion pounds.
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the government says the contracts are expected to create more than 6,500 jobs here, mainly in the technology and health sectors. the official number of coronavirus cases in india has now topped 20 million. there�*s been no let up in the rate of infection, with more than 300,000 positive tests recorded for the 13th consecutive day. there are still reports of oxygen shortages in the capital, delhi, and the army has been asked to set up medical facilities to take the strain off hospitals. devina gupta sent this report. desperate hope. that�*s what family members in this hospital in delhi are holding onto. it is a fight for life—saving oxygen that some are losing fast. translation: | came - here because a man died. his death freed up a place and oxygen for my mother. translation: they put us in a shed, when she needs| to go to intensive care.
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this oxygen bottle came from my house. we bought it ourselves. as india crosses over 20 million infected cases, many hospitals are choked like this, dtruggling with scarce resources. translation: the situation is really critical. _ there are no beds available. we are under pressure — _ the doctors, nurses, the orderlies. even the patients. we are all under pressure. for some hospitals, it�*s already too late. at least 26 lives have been lost in the last 72 hours in such hospitals that exhausted their oxygen supply. just this morning, a tragedy was averted, when a children�*s hospital in delhi only had two hours of oxygen left, but the government so far denies any oxygen shortage. global aid is coming, but the challenge is to ensure speedy distribution. so the indian government has roped in the army for better management. but with unabated chaos, many indians are providing help themselves.
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people like mohammed khan, an auto driver in bhopal, are pitching in with the little they have. translation: | made an auto - ambulance because i saw that people were carrying their sick mothers and fathers on their shoulders. sometimes, carrying an oxygen cylinder alongside. they can�*t afford ambulances. covid is not sparing sport either. the massively popular indian premier league cricket tournament has been postponed, after at least four players tested positive. it�*s a huge disappointment here for millions, where cricket is almost a religion. however, the goal of saving lives has proved too important, as india faces the darkest test for decades. devina gupta, bbc news. as covid restrictions across the uk continue to ease, mps are discussing whether vaccine certificates, which prove that someone has had a jab, would help life return to normal.
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obliging people to show they�*ve been vaccinated before attending major events is controversial, but it�*s expected to be a feature of foreign travel this summer, with eu countries likely to require it. here�*s our health correspondent, anna collinson. as more than 34 million people in the uk will now know, when you get your coronavirus jab, you should receive a vaccination card. but it is likely that soon there will be an even easier way to know someone�*s vaccination status, or whether they have recently tested negative. while covid passports or certificates may not be needed for essential shops or public transport, the government in england believes it could help crowds return to large events, like the trial of 21,000 fans due to attend the fa cup final here in wembley later this month. but for many, it is a controversial idea. i think the problems come once covid passports, whatever form they take, begin to be perceived as compulsory, once people begin to think that,
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in effect, this means that we�*ve got to get vaccinated. and the danger with that is it can actually undermine people�*s willingness to be vaccinated. professor reicher is one of those giving evidence to mps and peers about the use of covid passports, both here and for international travel. the european union is holding its own talks about lifting restrictions on nonessential travel. suggested proposals include allowing british people who have had both jabs to visits by the summer, with the option of applying restrictions quickly if required. a senior scientific adviser believes there should be no risk visiting countries like france or italy if infection rates fall to uk levels. the risk comes from going from a place like the uk with very low infection levels, and going to a place with much higher infection levels, and therefore having the risk of bringing infection back. if the two places are at comparable levels, and that is what the eu is saying,
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then there is no particular risk associated with travel. portugal is one country hoping to welcome back british tourists, but the government is urging people to be patient until they are satisfied it is safe and an official announcement is made. we don�*t want to reimport the virus, we have had a huge success in terms of our vaccination programme of bringing down the levels of covid here in the uk, so we need to be cautious. it is also a cautious message from the labour leader, who welcomes the prospect of foreign travel, but not if it would mean another lockdown. there is evidence across the world of the virus being out of control and increasing. we�*ve got to be very, very careful. we won�*t be safe here until, broadly, the virus is under control across the world. but do i want to see things return to normality? of course i do. as we enjoy new freedoms, transmission rates are expected to rise, although not to the levels we saw over the winter. the main concern is vaccines possibly not working as well against new variants. but, for now, the data is promising and the hope
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is for a much more normal summer. anna collinson, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news: two former soldiers accused of the murder of an official ira man in 1972 have been formally acquitted after their trial collapsed. a court hears a police officer, accused of murdering the ex—footballer dalian atkinsion, had tasered him for six times longer than standard before kicking him twice in the head. authorities in mexico city say there will be a full investigation after a metro train and railway track collapsed onto a busy road in mexico city, killing at least 23 people. bill and melinda gates have announced they are divorcing after 27 years of marriage. in a statement, the couple stressed they would continue to work together on the charitable foundation that they set up to help tackle global poverty.
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peter bowes reports. one of the most famous and highest achieving couples in the world. wealthy beyond imagination, bill and melinda gates met at microsoft, but they are best known as a power couple for the work of their charitable foundation. the news that they are planning to separate came out of the blue. they both tweeted a statement. "after a great deal of thought and a lot of work on our relationship, we have made the decision to end our marriage." the couple will continue to work together at their foundation, but they say... "we no longer believe we can grow together as a couple in this next phase of our lives." the bill and melinda gates foundation has had a huge impact on the world of philanthropy, with billions spent fighting causes, such as infectious diseases and encouraging vaccinations in children. they already had been developing kind of the state philanthropic persona, in a very public sense. bill with a focus on global health
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and climate change with a kind of technocratic approach. melinda with a focus on gender equity, a more community—centred approach. in a sense, i think their decoupling had already occurred. bill gates, who founded microsoft in 1975, is the world�*s fourth richest person, with a net worth of more than $100 billion. there is no word on any financial agreement between the couple. they have asked for space and privacy for theirfamily as they begin to navigate their new lives. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. marriage certificates in england and wales will from today include the name of both the mother and father of the newlyweds. until now, the document only named the fathers. marriages will also be recorded
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electronically for the first time, as part of an attempt to modernise and simplify the registration system. nine endangered giraffes have been rescued from an island threatened by rising flood waters in kenya. the baringo giraffe, also known as the rothschild giraffe, is close to extinction, with fewer than 2,000 left in the wild. emmanuel igunza reports. it�*s an audacious rescue mission. the baringo giraffe is being carefully ferried to a new home in a custom—made barge. she�*s one ofjust 3000 baringo giraffes that remain in the world. the local community decided to act when a herd became trapped on a disappearing island. decades of rising water in lake baringo meant the island was getting smaller every year. the food availability on the island is highly fluctuating and insufficient, so it is justifying in supporting the need for the translocation of the giraffe to the mainland.
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he speaks his own language. the team has been using satellite images to plan the move. the digital africa platform contains data that until recently was only available to a handful of people. now the team can see changes in water levels and vegetation cover in the region going back several decades. it�*s a new tool for conservationists responding to africa�*s increasingly unpredictable weather. these erratic patterns means that we have to deploy real—time data and information to support conservation efforts both by citizens and governments to ensure that they plan effectively and try to mitigate the devastating impacts of these climatic changes. on the mainland, the barge must be carefully brought to the shore. the rest of the herd have already
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made this perilous journey and they are waiting for her in the new giraffe sanctuary. the long—term aim is to introduce more giraffes from other parts of the country and build up kenya�*s population of baringo giraffes. emmanuelle igunza, bbc news, kenya. hundreds of people in hull are taking part in a year—long art project which aims to give people time to reflect on their lives without distractions. volunteers will be invited to spend an hour alone in a glass—fronted box, perched hundreds of feet above the city. here�*s our arts correspondent, david sillito. it�*s been a really tough year for a lot of people. i�*m really looking forward to it as being, really, a new beginning. we�*re in hull, or maybe more accurately, we�*re looking over hull. this is kate, one of the first visitors to a new arrival in the city. the hull vigil.
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wow. wow, it looks so blue. this is not how i expected it at all. i thought i was going to be terrified. she and more than 700 others will stand here for an hour at a time over the next 365 days, and gaze over the city. and think. this is an artwork about what�*s on our minds. my year has been very focused around two members of my family, really. my daughter, who is disabled, my elder daughter. and my dad, who�*s 83 and has a blood cancer. so it has been one of fear, really. you know, protecting them, shielding. each day, there will be a vigil at sunrise and another at sunset. there aren�*t many rules when you are up here, but there is one. no mobile phones, because they want you to, well, have a chance to enjoy the silence, the sky, the sun and the beauty of hull.
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but the real focus of this project isn�*t the view, but the thoughts going on inside the glass box. i think it's about... i think it's about it's about inviting people to take a moment to remember their city, to think about the future, to take stock of what's just happened and the awful year we've just lived through. and i hope it gives people a chance to reflect, genuinely, on the last year, but also take a bit of a breath before we all rush back into normality and also over this year, to see the city come back to life. but the real artworks are the people. the volunteers, such as dom, a nurse at the local hospital. he didn�*t really know what he was signing up for, but after months of stress, this felt like a sign of hope. when i found about vigil, i thought, well, you know, we're coming out i
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of the pandemic now. why not sign up for it and be part of something like this? _ the hull vigil — a chance to reflect, to appreciate what we have, and to remind ourselves that all things pass. david sillito, bbc news, hull. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hello there. there is still a cold wind today. that�*s blowing in some showers and longer spells of rain. yesterday�*s area of low pressure that brought the wet and windy weather, half a month�*s worth of rain in some cases, has swept away towards the east. but the wind direction has changed following that low pressure and we have a northerly wind which is maintaining this cold feel. these are the temperatures towards the end of the afternoon. only seven or eight degrees across northern parts of the uk. and it�*s still quite windy out there as well,
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especially down some of those north sea coasts. winds are gradually easing and we�*ve got some sunshine and some showers and a zone of wetter weather moving away from scotland across northern ireland, northern england into the midlands and across east anglia. and that will work its way down towards wales and the west country overnight. with clear skies following to the north away from some increasingly snowy showers in northernmost part of scotland. so it�*s going to be colder tonight, it won�*t be as windy as last night, and where we have the clear skies in scotland and northern england we are more likely to have a frost in the morning. more wintry showers across northern scotland, probably not reaching the central belt. some showers across northern ireland heading into wales and the west country, those will work their way into the midlands and towards the south—east of england, some of them heavy. elsewhere, the odd shower around and some sunshine. those temperatures still on the low side for the time of year. 11c or 12c at best. it probably won�*t be as windy tomorrow and the winds continue to ease down overnight into thursday. at the same time this little runner comes in from the atlantic
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bringing more cloud for a while across southern parts of england. rain mainly through the english channel. that should move through. elsewhere we will see some sunshine and some showers and lots more showers to come in scotland moving down into northern england again. it could be a bit wintry over the hills in the top temperatures not changing too much. 11c or 12c. still cold on thursday. we could start with a bit more frost more widely on friday with lighter winds and clear skies. where the cloud does bubble up there will be a few scattered showers around but many places will be having a dry day and those temperatures begin to lift across the board, around 14c or 15c. quickly into the start of the weekend, another area of low pressure is going to bring some rain to many parts of the country on saturday. some stronger winds too. the winds are going to be coming in from the south and that could bring some much—needed warm weather into the south—east of the uk.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... two former soldiers accused of the murder of an official ira leader in 1972 have been formally acquitted after their trial collapsed. a court hears that a police officer accused of murdering the former footballer dalian atkinsion had tasered him for six times longer than standard — before kicking him twice in the head. authorities in mexico city promise a full investigation after a bridge collapse resulted in a train plunging onto a busy road — at least 23 people were killed. a call to light candles this evening to remember the murdered police community officerjulia james,
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one week after the discovery of her body in woods in kent.

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