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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  May 5, 2021 5:00am-5:30am BST

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this is bbc news: i'm sally bundock with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. ministers in the g7 meeting in london will gather to discuss how they can help countries in regards to treatments. political leaders, they are also home to one of the world's vaccine leaders. we will only solve the vaccine crisis with the leadership of these countries. meanwhile, president biden sets ambitious vaccination targets, so americans can celebrate independence day. our goal byjuly 4th is to have 70% of adult americans with at least one shot.
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mexico city's mayor promises a full investigation into the rail bridge collapse, which has killed at least 2a people. derek chauvin, the police officer convicted of murdering george floyd, requests a re—trial alleging misconduct by both prosecutors and jurors. it's been 200 years since the death of france's best—known military leader, napoleon. we look at how the famous leader is being remembered. translation: i do not understand _ translation: i do not understand why - translation: i do not understand why we - translation: i do not understand why we are | translation: | do not- understand why we are now putting up statues of napoleon. napoleon reinstated slavery, so i think it is bizarre! hello and welcome. how best to share
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limited vaccine supplies is being considered here in london today by foreign ministers from the wealthy g7 democracies. there is growing pressure to share stockpiles and know—how with poor nations trailing far behind on fighting the pandemic. the world trade organistion is also meeting to look at one solution: waiving vaccine patents�* rights. courtney bembridge has the details. our wealthy nations doing enough to tackle covid—i9 in foreign nations? that is the question being put to g7 foreign me sisters, meeting to ensure new ways to fair access to vaccine stockpiles. the ensure new ways to fair access to vaccine stockpiles.- to vaccine stockpiles. the g7 countries _ to vaccine stockpiles. the g7 countries are _ to vaccine stockpiles. the g7 countries are the _ to vaccine stockpiles. the g7 countries are the world - to vaccine stockpiles. the g7 countries are the world and i countries are the world and political leaders and home to many of the world's vaccine produces. we were only solve the vaccine crisis with the leadership of these countries. six months into the global vaccine rollout and only 0.3%
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of the doses administered around the world have gone to people in low income countries. contrast that with the figures we are hearing from the us. alcohol by the fourth ofjuly is to— alcohol by the fourth ofjuly is to have 70% of adult americans with at least one shot. — americans with at least one shot. and _ americans with at least one shot, and at least 160 million americans fully vaccinated. that — americans fully vaccinated. that means giving close to 100 million — that means giving close to 100 million shots, some first shots and others second shots over the next _ and others second shots over the next 60 days — — our goal. in the next 60 days — — our goal. in india. — the next 60 days — — our goal. in india, where infections are spiralling out of control, less than 10% of the population has had their first than 10% of the population has had theirfirstjab. it than 10% of the population has had their first jab.— had their first “ab. it does not make moral sense for the majority of people to be in the queue, dying, waiting for the vaccine but worst still, new variants keep coming and as long as the virus remain anywhere in the world, more variants come which remain resistant to the technology
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that exist and then we are back to where we were.— to where we were. this woman founded the — to where we were. this woman founded the people's - to where we were. this woman founded the people's accent, l to where we were. this woman founded the people's accent, a campaign looking to remove pay tent restriction on medicines to allow more countries to administer doses. the world health organization supports the plan, along with 100 countries led by south africa and india, petitioning the world trade organization to waive protections on intellectual property. the eu and uk say they will oppose the move. critics say the proposal would not supply —— sulphur supply chain delays like pfizer for example, the company said in its 280 components from 86 applies in 19 countries that evenif applies in 19 countries that even if you waive the patent it would take months if not years to replicate pfizer's complex supply chain. to replicate pfizer's complex sunply chain-— supply chain. what i do not a . ree supply chain. what i do not agree with _ supply chain. what i do not agree with is _ supply chain. what i do not agree with is that - supply chain. what i do not agree with is that waving . agree with is that waving patent rights will make any difference at all to accelerating the availability to vaccine access at this time
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and if anything to vaccine access at this time and ifanything in to vaccine access at this time and if anything in the future it may diss invention size —— is incentivised any commercial entity getting involved in access and as much as we love them or loathe them, the commercial entities have the professional resources to get a vaccine into wider use of. the us, vaccine into wider use of. the us, doctor — us, doctor anthony fauci has warned the planet risks of backfiring if it leads to long, legal disputes. doctor fauci says going back and forth, consuming time and lawyers in a legal argument about waivers is not the end game. the biden administration is expected to set out its position at a world trade organization meeting, on wednesday. 2a hours ago we broke the news that there had been a disaster on one of the world's busiest metro systems in mexico city.
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2a people died in the accident. the country has now entered three days of national mourning. mexico's president has declared that an investigation into the collapse of a metro overpass in the capital will be transparent and spare no one. you may find some of the images in will grant's report distressing. the scene of devastation at mexico city's subway was reminiscent of one of the city's many earthquakes, but this was not a natural disaster, rather it was a man—made one, on the newer stretch of subway track in the capital. line 12 was heralded as the future of the city's public transport system when it was inaugurated in 2012. now its carriages and the city government's reputation hang by a thread. the security camera caught the terrible moment of impact, when tons of cement and gnarled metal came crashing down onto the cars below. at that time of night, most of those killed will have been workers returning
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home after a late shift. their families anxiously gathered at the scene, desperately trying to make sense of it all. translation: il�*iy daughter—in—law called us. she was with my son and she told us that the structure fell down on top of them. translation: my brother came with his wife and they managedl to get her out but he was crushed in there. we do not know anything. they do not give us reports. now they have to get him out but who knows how long it will take. by morning all eyes turned to the mayor, claudia sheinbaum. she insisted a full structural check had been made as recently as last year. translation: on the entire line, on the entire line, - and i think we should not speculate and that is why there will be an investigation by the attorney general�*s office as well as independent experts so that we can find out the whole truth and
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know what happened. but that is not an answer that will satisfy the victims�* families or most residents of mexico city, local people who complained for years that the construction of line 12 was not up to code and that cracks had appeared following a recent earthquake. an investigation will determine whether such warnings were ignored and by whom but those questions will have to wait, at least for now, as this vast city mourns the loss of life in one small corner. will grant, bbc news, mexico city. the conservative leader of the regional district of madrid has won a resounding victory after a bitter election battle. isabel diaz ayuso, of the popular party, defied the spanish socialist—led central government by keeping madrid's bars and shops open throughout the pandemic. despite doubling her number of seats her party fell short of a majority and will need the support of the far—right
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vox party. the socialist party suffered its worst ever result in the capital, and the podemos leader, pablo iglesias, says he's leaving politics altogether. derek chauvin, the white former minneapolis police officer convicted last month of the murder of the black man george floyd, has requested a new trial. his legal team has filed court documents alleging misconduct by both prosecutors and jurors. last month, chauvin was found guilty of second and third—degree murder and manslaughter. matt sepic is a journalist with minnesota public radio. he has more details on the request for a new trial. eric nelson, chauvin's defence attorney, filed a request today for a retrial, and he is citing multiple grounds, prosecutorial misconduct among them, but he does not get into a lot detail.
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he also mentions misconduct on the part of the jury and the fact that there was so much publicity and thatjudge peter cahill, who presided over this case, refused requests from the defence to move the case out of minneapolis because of all of the pre—trial publicity. this filing today really was not a surprise, it is a prelude to an expected appeal which would happen after chauvin is a sentenced on june 25th. this is a common occurrence whenever there is a trial and a verdict that does not go the way of the defence, the defence will request a new trial as part of the process, and it really is an expected move on their part. pakistan is restricting travel to and within the country as the eid—al—fitr islamic holiday approaches. it has seen record coronavirus deaths in recent days, as it struggles
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with a third wave. but, in a poor country where many people need to work every day to survive, restrictions up to now have been relatively lenient, a move that many fear is pushing pakistan's healthcare system to the limit. umer nangiana reports from one of the worst hit areas, punjab province. busy, crowded, shops and businesses across pakistan still allowed to open eight hours a day, five days a week. social distancing is virtually impossible. and the result? hospitals are stretched to capacity. like this one in the north—east. mi capacity. like this one in the north-east— north-east. all the patients are on trips _ north-east. all the patients are on trips and _ north-east. all the patients are on trips and are - north-east. all the patients are on trips and are critical. the head of the hospital shows after the icu. it is run out of ventilators and oxygen supplies are going fast.
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ventilators and oxygen supplies are going fast-— are going fast. very unfortunate, - are going fast. very unfortunate, we - are going fast. veryj unfortunate, we are are going fast. very - unfortunate, we are seeing a third wave and at the moment we have 510 people and of those, there are one in three deaths, there are one in three deaths, the reason being the patients, they are much critical. find they are much critical. and when rural— they are much critical. and when rural hospitals - they are much critical. and when rural hospitals fill - they are much critical. and when rural hospitals fill up, they send patients to urban centres but hospitals in lahore are also nearing capacity. it is now so bad, the army is being called out to help. these soldiers are out on the streets to enforce coronavirus restrictions. the idea it seems is that the site of a uniformed soldier holding a gun will make people put on their masks and maintain social distancing. for a big city as big as lahore is, it is a gigantic task, even for the army. the army is
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patrolling in 16 cities, helping the police to slow the crisis. pakistan needs to vaccinate more people. so far, the rollout is slow. only 2 million people have been vaccinated, 218 million still need to be. the government is resisting calls for a total lockdown. i resisting calls for a total lockdown.— resisting calls for a total lockdown. . lockdown. i agree with the advice of _ lockdown. i agree with the advice of the _ lockdown. i agree with the advice of the doctors - lockdown. i agree with the advice of the doctors but l lockdown. i agree with the - advice of the doctors but when you look at it from a ballistic point of view, you must understand this is a developing country and there are many economic problems that you have and a0 and 50% of the people are on daily wages and when you go into a lockdown like that, the most effective people are the most effective people are the daily wages —— holistic point of view. the daily wages -- holistic point of view.— point of view. night-time raids, sending _ point of view. night-time raids, sending the - point of view. night-time l raids, sending the message point of view. night-time - raids, sending the message that the authorities are cracking down on those breaking the rules as the situation gets
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worse, across the border in india, people worry it will get a lot worse here. umer nangiana, bbc news. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: hope for coral reefs under threat. we take a look at a pioneering initiative to try to restore them in indonesia. i, nelson rolihlahla mandela, do hereby swear to be faithful to the republic of south africa. after six years of construction and numerous delays, the channel tunnel has been formally opened by the queen and president mitterand. the tunnel is not yet ready for passengers and freight services to begin. for centuries, christianity and i islam struggled for supremacy. now the pope's visit symbolises their willingness to coexist. - roger bannister became the first man in the world
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to run a mile in underfour minutes. memories of victory as the ve celebrations reach their climax. this night is dedicated i to everyone who believes in a future of peace and freedom. - this is bbc world news, the latest headlines: global g7 leaders consider how to do more to help poorer countries access coronavirus vaccines and treatments. mexican authorities promise a full investigation after at least 2a people were killed in a train overpass collapse.
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known as underwater rainforests, coral reefs are home to around 25 percent of marine species. but threats such as over—fishing and rising sea temperatures mean more and more are left grey and lifeless. now a pioneering initiative to try to restore them is taking place in indonesia — as our science editor david shukman reports. it's 1 of the most shocking sites in the underwater world, when corals die, either because they are damaged or because the sea becomes too hot for them and it looks like a graveyard. when a reef dies, it becomes quiet and grey and desolate, it's so depressing. the solution _ it's so depressing. the solution pioneered - it's so depressing. the solution pioneered by| it's so depressing. the solution pioneered by professor smith involves whole communities in indonesia. they take these metalframes communities in indonesia. they take these metal frames called reef stars and fix them to the seabed. fragments of live
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corals are attached to them and the result is a revival of habitat that many depend on. you see fish come in, you will double its in1 you see fish come in, you will double its in 1 day. you see small fish, sort of binding hole in the reef stars amongst the coral. 6 months medium—sized fish. the whole ecosystem responds she could give it the chance of kickstarting the system. the latest reef— kickstarting the system. the latest reef to _ kickstarting the system. the latest reef to be _ kickstarting the system. the latest reef to be helped in this way is called hope. the word is spelt out in the new corals and the aim is to apply the new tech leg to other areas around the world. —— same techniques. overthe around the world. —— same techniques. over the years there have been dozens of attempts to try and bring reefs to live, some more successful than others, and they will be on a really small scale, as with this latest initiative, so there will be questions about it. it's funded by the pet food company sheba which uses of fish in its product. so can this venture really make any kind of difference? well, scientists i've spoken to are
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impressed by the way reefs that were once dead are now being revived. and because the task is so huge, they welcomed funding from big—name companies. funding from big-name companies.— funding from big-name comanies. , , ,, , companies. the businesses involved were _ companies. the businesses involved were dependent . companies. the businesses| involved were dependent on companies. the businesses- involved were dependent on fish and marine resources to actually invest in restoring the ocean and recovering depleted reefs is a good thing. obviously with business, you always have that extra filter of scrutiny. always have that extra filter of scrutiny-— always have that extra filter ofscrutin . �* , , of scrutiny. and because most corals are _ of scrutiny. and because most corals are threatened - of scrutiny. and because most corals are threatened as - of scrutiny. and because most| corals are threatened as global temperatures continue to rise, any attempt to save even small areas will need real determination. david shukman, bbc news. time to check on the latest sports news. this is your sports news where we start with football and manchester city are through to their first ever champions league final beating paris st germain 2—0 at the etihad stadium in their semi—final second leg and a—1 on aggregate.
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riyadh mahrez who scored in the opening leg in france last week picked up both city's goals while psg finished the match with 10 players when angel di maria was sent off a petulant kick out at fernandinho. but it's the premier league champions elect who are through to istanbul later this month. reaching the final of champions league help us to make like you said the biggest picture we have done over the last a years. what we have done for years. what we have done for years is incredible, in terms of the premier leagues and the caps and every competition played and in reaching the final, it helps us to understand what we have done. real madrid's marcelo will play against chelsea later in the second leg of their champions league semi—final, after he was freed from electoral duty in the spanish capital. the brazilian had been called to work as a scrutineer for a regional election and the club had tried to free him of it, but it's understood that a woman who had no idea who the defender is offered to step in meaning he could travel to london with his team—mates with the tie precariously
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poised at 1—1 from the opening leg. chelsea trained on tuesday as they get ready for the match at home looking to reach a final in this tournament for the first time since they won it 2012. thomas tuchel was manager of psg when they made last year's final and he knows what's required. we will encourage them, we will demand from them and will be stronger tomorrow 8 o'clock as a group, as1 stronger tomorrow 8 o'clock as a group, as 1 club, with1 big goal, to overcome real madrid and this will only happen if we bring our best level to the pitch and the best level means that we focus to win. 15 days after he was sacked by tottenham, jose mourinho has been installed as the manager of italian side roma next season replacing fellow portuguese paulo fonseca. roma who play the second leg oftheir europa league semi—final against manchester united on thursday night, are currently seventh in serie a, and it sees the 58
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year old return to italy, where he managed inter milan between 2008 and 2010, leading them to the champions league and serie a titles. but his time in north london was short lived and he was dismissed afterjust 17 months at the club. the indian premier league has been postponed after further covid 19 cases among players forced the cancellation of another match in the world's richest cricket tournament. the country has recorded more than 20 million cases, and so far reported more than 222,000 deaths from the virus. india's board of control for the game says they do not want to compromise on the safety of the players, support staff and the other participants. india are scheduled to tour england from mid june to september and then host the t20 world cup later this year. elise mertens fought back from a set down to knock the two—time former champion simona halep out of the madrid open on tuesday. halep took the first set but mertens came back in a second which saw seven breaks of serve and she broke again in the 12th game of the deciding set
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to take the win in two hours and 3a minutes. the belgian will now play fifth seed aryna sabalenka in the quarter—finals. you can get all the latest sports news at our website — that's bbc.com/sport. that is your sports news for now. president emmanuel macron will lay a wreath at the tomb of napoleon later, to mark 200 years since the death of france's best—known military leader. at a time when france, like other countries, has been questioning the impact of its historical figures and their place in the national story, lucy williamson has been looking at how napoleon is remembered. how do you commemorate an emperor in the 21st century, a man who threatened much of europe and reversed abound on
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slavery but also laid the foundations of the modern french state? �* ,, �* french state? translation: i tried to make _ french state? translation: i tried to make him _ french state? translation: i tried to make him as _ french state? translation: i tried to make him as i - french state? translation: i tried to make him as i think. french state? translation: i tried to make him as i think he was, very tormented, internal, never satisfied, always looking for power and a place in history. i didn't want to make a conqueror but someone very lonely who died alone. this new statue of napoleon _ lonely who died alone. this new statue of napoleon is _ lonely who died alone. this new statue of napoleon is destined l statue of napoleon is destined for the town of montalban near toulouse, made original and by the emperor in but is he still a hero here?— the emperor in but is he still a hero here? translation: i don't understand _ a hero here? translation: i don't understand why - a hero here? translation: i don't understand why we - a hero here? translation: i don't understand why we are l a hero here? translation: i- don't understand why we are now putting up statues of napoleon and we've had such a fuss about removing statues of men because of their racist past. napoleon reinstated slavery so i think it's bizarre.— reinstated slavery so i think it's bizarre. translation: i think it's _ it's bizarre. translation: i think it's a _ it's bizarre. translation: i think it's a great _ it's bizarre. translation: i think it's a great idea. - it's bizarre. translation: i think it's a great idea. even | think it's a great idea. even with— think it's a great idea. even with his _ think it's a great idea. even with his shortcomings, he was still a — with his shortcomings, he was still a great man, whether we like it— still a great man, whether we like it or— still a great man, whether we like it or not.— like it or not. the city council _ like it or not. the city council was _ like it or not. the city council was initially . like it or not. the city - council was initially divided over the statue. translation:
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as with any _ over the statue. translation: as with any highest _ over the statue. translation: as with any highest historical i as with any highest historical ego, some spots are darker than others but if you take just1 element, it's easy to condemn anyone. today we are in the did take a ship of the political correct and i am among those who want to fight it. napoleon was a man _ who want to fight it. napoleon was a man who _ who want to fight it. napoleon was a man who knew- who want to fight it. napoleon was a man who knew the - who want to fight it. napoleon l was a man who knew the power who want to fight it. napoleon - was a man who knew the power of public image. at his former home outside paris, they are preparing for a new exhibition, looking at his many different faces. this room tells the story of napoleoncareful�*s of his image, from busts in the style of roman emperors to this painting which shows him leading an army across the alps. re— emergent to replace the mule he was actually travelling on the magnificent horse. napoleon reportedly loved this painting so much, he ordered several copies of it to use as propaganda. 200 years on, the story of francemore balanced,�*s more complicated,
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balanced , �*s more complicated, more balanced,�*s more complicated, more controversial. some believe president emmanuel macron shouldn't be commemorating this anniversary at all. �* ,, �* ~' at all. translation: i think the current _ at all. translation: i think the current presidentuse - at all. translation: i think the current presidentuse ofl the current presidentuse of napoleon's bonaparte to suggest he is editor napoleongreatness�*s is a mistake and worrying, when there is doubt about democracy and when some french people perhaps even hope for an authoritarian strongman. clearest authoritarian strongman. clea rest sign of napoleoncomplex to's france than this? a man who died in exile after the shame of military defeat laid to rest in honour under a golden dome. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. next, we have the top business stories, unileverto next, we have the top business stories, unilever to begin with, which is putting its sustainability plan to shareholders who will vote on the today. our green is it really? and other countries such as ikea coming up with new ways to reduce waste or unable
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us as customers to reduce waste. i will see you in a moment. don't go anywhere. hello. it seems like everything is running late this spring, and now the april showers have finally arrived. there's nothing like an angry sky to get the weather watchers out. there'll be more like this during wednesday. sunshine, yes, in between the showers, but catch a shower — heavy, hail and thunder and it's going to feel quite chilly as well with the air coming down from the north. around an area of low pressure which may be some distance away now, but in its way, we have this northerly flow of chilly air, unstable air with the showers developing.
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cold enough for them to be wintry on hills as well. around an area of low pressure which may be some distance away now, but in its way, we have this northerly flow of chilly air, unstable air with the showers developing. cold enough for them to be wintry on hills as well. temperatures well below average, but make a mental note of this — it will look quite different by the time we get to this weekend, as i'll show you in a moment. we start wednesday with the return of frost possible in any cold rural spots, but particularly into parts of scotland and northern england, as you can see. whilst many of us will start dry and sunny, there will be scattered wintry showers in northern scotland from the word go, into northern ireland, in parts of wales, some showers, too, and across from the word go, into northern ireland, in parts of wales, some showers, too, and across the midlands, eastern and southern england. this zone here is where we're likely to see most of the showers during wednesday. could well bring some snow to relatively low levels, so that'll be surprising if you see that falling on thursday morning. again, the chance of frost as the day begins. these showers will move on south into northern ireland and northern england. there is an area of cloud and rain flirting with southern parts of england. still something to play for in how much rain will fall
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here, so we'll keep you updated. in between the two zones of wet or potential wet weather, there'll be some sunshine. another chilly start on friday morning, another day of sunshine and showers. the heaviest ones look to be focused across eastern parts, temperatures a little bit higher. and then, here comes some more rain. that's from another area of low pressure heading our wayjust in time for next weekend. that means the winds picking up and more rain moving in and as that clears, there'll be showers following. but the air is coming in from the south, so although it'll be windy, although it'll be wet at times, at least the temperatures will be heading up.
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them in indonesia.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. going greener — consumer goods giant unilever�*s shareholders will vote on a plan to reduce its greennhouse gas emissions. the eu is set to reveal its new industrial strategy and its centred on microchips and semiconductors. and, pack your bags — jeff bezos�* space company will start taking bookings for its first space tourists. unilever is putting its climate transition action
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plan to a shareholder vote today.

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