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tv   The Papers  BBC News  May 6, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines. india has once again reported a record number of cases and deaths. a new variant of coronavirus — discovered in india in march = may be linked to the massive surge. the us secretary of state has urged russia to end what he called its reckless and aggressive actions towards ukraine. antony blinken said the us is looking at increasing security assistance to the ukraine. in brazil, at least 25 people have been killed in a police operation against suspected drug traffickers. the neighbourhood where the incident took place is considered a base for one of brazil's most powerful gangs, the red command. and the united nations is calling for swift action to cut emissions of methane after new research showed that it's playing a bigger role in global warming than scientists originally thought.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are social commentator, joanna jarjue, and political commentator and non—resident fellow at new york university, faiza shaheen. hello again to both of you. let's take a look at some of tomorrow's front pages starting with... the metro — its front page is dominated by the the post—brexit fishing row — and the protest by french fishermen in jersey's territorial waters. the daily mail describes the decision by french fishermen to return to their ports as the �*grand surrender�*.
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�*that�*s what you call a bounce back�*, the express leads with the bank of england's forecast that the uk economy is set to grow at its fastest rate in more than 70 years. it's the lead for the times too — with the bank predicting what would be the strongest year of economic growth since the aftermath of the second world war. the telegraph says that the pm is to announce next week that secondary school students won't need to wear facemasks in the classroom from later in the month. the guardian leads with an inquiry into public health spending — published by the lancet and the london school of economics — which claims over £100 billion is needed to rebuild the nhs in the wake of the pandemic. and teasing ahead to summer sun — the mirror says holiday—makers could save hundreds of pounds as travel firms offer covid testing kits for as little as £20. so let's begin...
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the front page of the times. joanna, do you want to talk us through this? this is the good news on the economy, what do you make of it? well basically the bank of england is saying _ well basically the bank of england is saying that we are expected to see a _ is saying that we are expected to see a bounce back into the economy. they were _ see a bounce back into the economy. they were predicting that it would come _ they were predicting that it would come more so next year initially. i think_ come more so next year initially. i think will— come more so next year initially. i think will be — come more so next year initially. i think will be good for everybody to have some — think will be good for everybody to have some kind of good news especially for businesses and that everybody has been vaccinated, now that people are starting to go out a lot more _ that people are starting to go out a lot more i— that people are starting to go out a lot more. i think this is welcome news _ lot more. i think this is welcome news that— lot more. i think this is welcome news that everybody needs. in terms of good _ news that everybody needs. in terms of good news. so i don't think it's going _ of good news. so i don't think it's going to — of good news. so i don't think it's going to be — of good news. so i don't think it's going to be as much of a huge deal as what_ going to be as much of a huge deal as what the — going to be as much of a huge deal as what the headlines are making out. obviously there's claims that it's going — out. obviously there's claims that it's going to be the biggest boom sihce _ it's going to be the biggest boom since the — it's going to be the biggest boom since the second world war, which may be _ since the second world war, which may be correct but in reality i think— may be correct but in reality i think that _ may be correct but in reality i think that it will end up just
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may be correct but in reality i think that it will end upjust being us going — think that it will end upjust being us going back to how we originally were _ us going back to how we originally were before the pandemic. of us going back to how we originally were before the pandemic.- were before the pandemic. of the sink earlier _ were before the pandemic. of the sink earlier to _ were before the pandemic. of the sink earlier to the _ were before the pandemic. of the sink earlier to the bank _ were before the pandemic. of the sink earlier to the bank of - were before the pandemic. of the| sink earlier to the bank of england governor in a number of interviews and the various interviews, stressing if this happens and it's great news, it's only going to put us back where we were at the end of 2019, we are not moving beyond the situation we are in, so all of the basic problems in the british economy and the good bits are as they were in december 2019. so some --eole they were in december 2019. so some peeple might — they were in december 2019. so some peeple might be _ they were in december 2019. so some peeple might be happy _ they were in december 2019. so some people might be happy about - they were in december 2019. so some people might be happy about giving i people might be happy about giving everything that's happened that we at least go back to those pre—pandemic levels, but that pandemic has raised lots of questions about the way the economy works and who works for. the ways in which it is exposing the low pay that essential workers get, for instance. the way it has shown inequalities across the country, parts of the country that will be most affected, what does it mean for high streets, it might be ok in cities but for towns that had
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already seen high street decline. we have to be a bit guarded about this v—shaped recovery because it does mean that we are just going back to an old normal, and old normal where the nhs did not have enough resources, whereby there were huge inequalities and with young people it's important to stress this that there were some groups more affected by higher unemployment rates. we do need a bigger plan and a little bit concerned about how we are talking about this great consumer boom. consumer spending is not environmentally sustainable as well. we are seeing other countries talking to ministers in south korea in the last couple of weeks that putting in place a green new deal, looking infrastructure spending, similar things are coming up in the us. what is the border plan here in the uk? , , the uk? the interesting thing is in terms of the _ the uk? the interesting thing is in terms of the accountable - the uk? the interesting thing is in terms of the accountable we've i the uk? the interesting thing is in | terms of the accountable we've got the g7 meeting injune where biden
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and other world leaders but to be fair to pick and other world leaders but to be fairto pick up and other world leaders but to be fair to pick up the point from faiza, probably not arriving environmentally friendly way but is not about equivalent of air force one. but it's going to be in cornwall but will be at part of the uk but somewhere where it might give them a better perspective on this. there's a lot they can do together, it's notjust a dog eat dog approach in terms of global economy but to support each other since we are all dealing with the aftermath of the same thing. dealing with the aftermath of the same thing-— dealing with the aftermath of the same thin. , , ,, same thing. definitely, i think even with other events _ same thing. definitely, i think even with other events that _ same thing. definitely, i think even with other events that we _ same thing. definitely, i think even with other events that we have - same thing. definitely, i think even| with other events that we have seen lake the _ with other events that we have seen lake the meetings in dallas and things— lake the meetings in dallas and things like that, there's an approach after the pandemic because everybody— approach after the pandemic because everybody basically in the world has mutually— everybody basically in the world has mutually gone through a very similar experience — mutually gone through a very similar experience. i think when we look at how economies are going to change, how economies are going to change, how workplaces are going to change, ithink— how workplaces are going to change, i think that _ how workplaces are going to change, i think that it's going to be quite a collective approach to how we are
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going _ a collective approach to how we are going to _ a collective approach to how we are going to move forward. and so i think— going to move forward. and so i think that — going to move forward. and so i think that with the you uk economy, it's good _ think that with the you uk economy, it's good to — think that with the you uk economy, it's good to be specific to us versus— it's good to be specific to us versus the us but i can see a global approach _ versus the us but i can see a global approach and future strategy when it comes— approach and future strategy when it comes to _ approach and future strategy when it comes to a _ approach and future strategy when it comes to a bounce back globally. let's _ comes to a bounce back globally. let's stay — comes to a bounce back globally. let's stay with the times of the story about the under 40s vaccines with actors his blood be used to finish off people like me, the older groups that have already had one jab of the younger people are going to get one of the alternatives that are now being given the go—ahead, moderna is the one that's them but the newest of the lot and also the pfizer. is there so this residual concern about potential health risks? . it concern about potential health risks? . , , ., concern about potential health risks?. , , ., , ., risks? . it seems to be the main concern around _ risks? . it seems to be the main concern around these _ risks? . it seems to be the main concern around these rare - risks? . it seems to be the main concern around these rare blood clots. and whilst the risk is not high compared to how many vaccines
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have been given outcome that there seems to be a bit more concerned for younger age groups. and then to avoid those issues they are saying they're going to offer these alternative vaccines, and it's worth saying that astrazeneca has had a hell of a time, all kinds of pr issues. the way in which they have been paused in the eu for a time and then picked up again. at other parts of the world as well. i just want to race this point here, astrazeneca with one of the few that had waived the patent and had movement from biden talking about the global solidarity point and vaccines, that the us is also coming up to support the us is also coming up to support the waving. astrazeneca had to and from the beginning but due to the plague of issues that he has had it's not getting the same pick—up around the world. you know, it will be really upsetting and concerning for those involved in making this excellent vaccine.— for those involved in making this excellent vaccine. sometimes you
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feel ou excellent vaccine. sometimes you feel you are _ excellent vaccine. sometimes you feel you are doing _ excellent vaccine. sometimes you feel you are doing the _ excellent vaccine. sometimes you feel you are doing the right - excellent vaccine. sometimes you feel you are doing the right thingl feel you are doing the right thing and again you still get the brick path. joanna, do you want to take us through the front of the i. friday in the uk only half hour away because the british government is going to announce the list of countries you can travel to and come back from without having to go into isolation just in case you have brought, the risk of those countries is low, but this is about testing and making testing a bit cheaper. the testing if you want to go abroad to before _ the testing if you want to go abroad to before was extortionate. to the extent _ to before was extortionate. to the extent where i could not understand why it _ extent where i could not understand why it was _ extent where i could not understand why it was that expensive, and now in hindsight — why it was that expensive, and now in hindsight we are seeing the travel— in hindsight we are seeing the travel companies are just kind of throwing — travel companies are just kind of throwing them out to people for some like £20 _ throwing them out to people for some like £20 compared to 150 or £190 for these _ like £20 compared to 150 or £190 for these tests— like £20 compared to 150 or £190 for these tests before. i really struggle now to find the logic, it seems _ struggle now to find the logic, it seems a — struggle now to find the logic, it seems a bit like extortion right
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now _ seems a bit like extortion right now but — seems a bit like extortion right now but i _ seems a bit like extortion right now. but i completely welcomed the news that _ now. but i completely welcomed the news that there will be cheaper travet _ news that there will be cheaper travel tests for people. i'm looking forward _ travel tests for people. i'm looking forward to— travel tests for people. i'm looking forward to going on holiday, i don't know— forward to going on holiday, i don't know about — forward to going on holiday, i don't know about anybody else. so this is definitely— know about anybody else. so this is definitely welcome news for me, and ithink— definitely welcome news for me, and i think that _ definitely welcome news for me, and i think that the airline companies in particular have been very vocal the pandemic about the effects on their business. so this is definitely the right strategy for them _ definitely the right strategy for them to— definitely the right strategy for them to be going towards if they do want to— them to be going towards if they do want to see that bounce back going in the _ want to see that bounce back going in the future. the want to see that bounce back going in the future-— in the future. the mirror has got this as well _ in the future. the mirror has got this as well from _ in the future. the mirror has got this as well from for _ in the future. the mirror has got this as well from for go, - in the future. the mirror has got this as well from for go, and - in the future. the mirror has got l this as well from for go, and other words the greenness countries. not huge prizes because this is pretty much leaked a couple of nights ago with the foreign office changing the travel advice, with the foreign office changing the traveladvice, but with the foreign office changing the travel advice, but portugal, with the foreign office changing the traveladvice, but portugal, malta, gibraltar, and some not obvious hotspots like iceland and finland. but 70% of a saying they should quarantine on return. i don't know if that's the percent of the country staying in the uk december one
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occasions. ,., staying in the uk december one occasions-— staying in the uk december one occasions. ., _, . staying in the uk december one occasions. ., .., . . occasions. there so that concern. we saw last summer _ occasions. there so that concern. we saw last summer with _ occasions. there so that concern. we saw last summer with the _ occasions. there so that concern. we saw last summer with the travel- saw last summer with the travel corridors that people may be feeling that we relax too much and that we had another wave, and i think that 70% figure people saying, are they going to go on holiday? they don't know what they're bringing back still because of the coaches have not had as high of levels of vaccines and there are a number of variants that are circling around the world right now. and travel of course is one of the major ways in which covid has spread around the world. i can understand the concern, but it will be off—putting for holiday—makers if they have to come back and quarantine. it will be about that trade—off about the economy and what people can do safely. i economy and what people can do safel . . , , economy and what people can do safel . .,, , ., ., economy and what people can do safel. , ., ., safely. i was 'ust going to say... how they — safely. i wasjust going to say... how they assess _ safely. i wasjust going to say... how they assess these - safely. i wasjust going to say... | how they assess these countries beforehand and i can if you like the
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difference — beforehand and i can if you like the difference between now and before it is the _ difference between now and before it is the obviously the vaccinations were _ is the obviously the vaccinations were a _ is the obviously the vaccinations were a completely different stage when _ were a completely different stage when it _ were a completely different stage when it comes to that. and a lot of these _ when it comes to that. and a lot of these countries are european countries _ these countries are european countries is welcome we know that vaccinations are kind of going well over there. — vaccinations are kind of going well overthere, not vaccinations are kind of going well over there, not as well probably as over there, not as well probably as over here, — over there, not as well probably as over here, but i think the situation has changed. i understand why somebody would be concerned but obviously— somebody would be concerned but obviously it will test. which countries will be best based on the levels _ countries will be best based on the levels of— countries will be best based on the levels of vaccination and there will be looking — levels of vaccination and there will be looking at the risks with variance _ be looking at the risks with variance. basically i'm just, be looking at the risks with variance. basically i'mjust, i be looking at the risks with variance. basically i'm just, i feel like i'm _ variance. basically i'm just, i feel like i'm pitching why i should go on holiday— like i'm pitching why i should go on holiday right now. you like i'm pitching why i should go on holiday right now.— holiday right now. you are selling it to us. faiza, _ holiday right now. you are selling it to us. faiza, i _ holiday right now. you are selling it to us. faiza, i would _ holiday right now. you are selling it to us. faiza, i would if- holiday right now. you are selling it to us. faiza, i would if you - holiday right now. you are selling it to us. faiza, i would if you pick| it to us. faiza, i would if you pick up it to us. faiza, i would if you pick up on the daily telegraph because not only does it have an actual picture that is everything agency picture that is everything agency picture because it's also on the front of the mail but their approach is different because they're gone for a dispatch, a reporter at the scene. and i'lljust quote the first
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paragraph, because quite nice to catch the difference in the journalism you get. this is henry samuel aboard the fishing boat after they red flares raged and fog warrants blasted as an armada of up to 70 french fishing boats staged a don blockade ofjersey yesterday. but as they laid siege to the channel islands main port and refuse to let any vessels out the famously hot—headed french fishermen insisted the real extremists were on the other side. what you make of this kind of approach? we don't see that that often on front pages, do we? there's a lot of war metaphors in that kind of language used across a number of stories and reporting this showdown between the fishermen and the french. to be fair to these fishermen there asked just fighting for their livelihoods. we might disagree about how father should be having these licenses, whether the
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change since this is an article about change that that was made too abruptly byjersey and that france is not applied with the trade deal, we can argue about if they have gone about it the right or wrong way but these metaphors hide that this is a matter of these kind of french fishermen fighting for their livelihoods. but it's a really important story we have heard about a number of brexit teething problems. the last thing we want is to have these flare—ups and these diplomatic spats at every turn, every corner. we are seeing them again and again whether it be about vaccines, whether it be about fishing rights. and how are we going to sort this out over the longer term? these are our neighbours and we want to have strong trade connections. we need that for the economy and more importantly for diplomatic reasons. we want to be friendly with the eu. find diplomatic reasons. we want to be friendly with the eu.— friendly with the eu. and it would not let you _ friendly with the eu. and it would
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rrot let you in _ friendly with the eu. and it would not let you in on _ friendly with the eu. and it would not let you in on holiday! - friendly with the eu. and it would not let you in on holiday! on - friendly with the eu. and it would not let you in on holiday! on a . not let you in on holiday! on a serious point, do you like this kind ofjournalism we've got a report actually describing what they are experiencing when they are there as opposed to reporters sitting in an office in london hundreds of miles away and interpreting the television pictures and words that come through on the agencies? i pictures and words that come through on the agencies?— on the agencies? i think it depends. because obviously _ on the agencies? i think it depends. because obviously sometimes - on the agencies? i think it depends. because obviously sometimes when | because obviously sometimes when you're _ because obviously sometimes when you're actually there you will get a clearer _ you're actually there you will get a clearer picture. also think that maybe — clearer picture. also think that maybe there's a bit of a risk of it being _ maybe there's a bit of a risk of it being more _ maybe there's a bit of a risk of it being more emotive in the language. ithink— being more emotive in the language. i think in— being more emotive in the language. i think in times like this it's everything important to report the true picture of what's going on whether— true picture of what's going on whether it's quite extreme but also quite _ whether it's quite extreme but also quite responsible in the way that you are — quite responsible in the way that you are using your words. i think what _ you are using your words. i think what i _ you are using your words. i think what i find — you are using your words. i think what i find with the stories in their— what i find with the stories in their front pages about fishermen at there's— their front pages about fishermen at there's a _ their front pages about fishermen at there's a lot of mothering and i feel like — there's a lot of mothering and i feel like jersey is very, it's a lot closer— feel like jersey is very, it's a lot closer to — feel like jersey is very, it's a lot
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closer to france than it is to us. so the — closer to france than it is to us. so the actual commonality that they have got— so the actual commonality that they have got in— so the actual commonality that they have got in reality before brexit with these fishermen is probably a lot closer— with these fishermen is probably a lot closer than what we are saying. and it's _ lot closer than what we are saying. and it's going down a massive slippery— and it's going down a massive slippery slope but already of the rin- slippery slope but already of the ring these fishermen will stop i think— ring these fishermen will stop i think now— ring these fishermen will stop i think now we just need to have the perspective of resolving things and kind of— perspective of resolving things and kind of coming together and negotiating as adults rather than this rhetoric and these other frenchmen are going crazy at the border, _ frenchmen are going crazy at the border, allegedly. find frenchmen are going crazy at the border, allegedly.— frenchmen are going crazy at the border, allegedly. and 'ust on that ickin: u- border, allegedly. and 'ust on that picking up briefly. _ border, allegedly. and 'ust on that picking up briefly. the _ border, allegedly. and just on that picking up briefly. the grand - picking up briefly. the grand surrender as the mail brought called that. sub the headline,. it's all playing on the history and tension between the french and the english.
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in the papers will tell us the times is saying emmanuel macron and boris johnson anxious to tone down the rhetoric ahead of next month's g7. joanna i wanted you to pick up on the contrast between if you you're a daily mail reader and the rest of the uk you will see that story about jersey, and if you are a scottish daily mail reader you will see a story saying that maybe nicola sturgeon is going to have as good of election that she might�*ve hoped —— is not. to election that she might've hoped -- is not. ., , ., , election that she might've hoped -- isnot. ., , is not. to be honest he probably would've been _ is not. to be honest he probably would've been better _ is not. to be honest he probably would've been better for - is not. to be honest he probably| would've been better for anybody is not. to be honest he probably - would've been better for anybody who is not pro—independence in scotland to see everything that is happening in jersey. to see everything that is happening injersey. because obviously if we think that we are intertwined with the eu, excel and intertwined with the eu, excel and intertwined with the rest of the uk. so i mean it's kind of like a more neutral headline, probably in her best interest that they are not covering as much of the jersey because that would commit if this is an election
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today that's going to hopefully give her immaturity and that mandate for scottish dependents, last thing she needsis scottish dependents, last thing she needs is really to be seen how much of a hard time we are having in our break away from the eu. b5 of a hard time we are having in our break away from the eu.— of a hard time we are having in our break away from the eu. as you say is, scotland — break away from the eu. as you say is, scotland would _ break away from the eu. as you say is, scotland would like _ break away from the eu. as you say is, scotland would like to _ break away from the eu. as you say is, scotland would like to remain i break away from the eu. as you say is, scotland would like to remain in | is, scotland would like to remain in the eu and the s&p would like it to remain in the eu. follow—up friday according to the top of the metro, scott a picture of keir starmer underjohnson. but nothing to do with either of them. local elections all under england. it washed elections and the scottish elections. —— all over england. is that a problem that we still tell politics from that sort of macrolevel ?if ? if the temperature check of how
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the parties _ ? if the temperature check of how the parties reflect _ ? if the temperature check of how the parties reflect the _ ? if the temperature check of how the parties reflect the wider- the parties reflect the wider strategy, vision, the sort of ways in which these leaders are acting for the economy. it's all about local issues as well of course. but it's about both of those things and certainly because this is super thursday and big elections come and by—election in hartlepool, this is a real moment. and the labour party is expecting a pretty brooding couple of days, keir starmer is trying to lower expectations. it will raise questions about his leadership. if we lose places like him and i say we because i'm a member of the labour party like hartlepool which has been a labour seat for 30 years, it will raise issues about the strategy being used. they have thrown out a lot of the, what i would say is ambitious and inspiring policy is with her about public ownership or
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housing and the rest of it. and about the kind of vision that keir starmer is putting forward. this is a really important moment for, i would say from a labour party perspective certainly for keir starmer and understanding what is and what is not working. right now it does not look good.— it does not look good. thank you very much- _ it does not look good. thank you very much. faiza _ it does not look good. thank you very much. faiza there _ it does not look good. thank you very much. faiza there and i it does not look good. thank you i very much. faiza there and joanna, will you come again? i very much. faiza there and joanna, will you come again?— will you come again? i will if you will you come again? i will if you will have me _ will you come again? i will if you will have me back. _ will you come again? i will if you will have me back. we _ will you come again? i will if you will have me back. we will i will you come again? i will if you will have me back. we will do. i will you come again? i will if you i will have me back. we will do. bless ou both, will have me back. we will do. bless you both. lovely _ will have me back. we will do. bless you both, lovely to _ will have me back. we will do. bless you both, lovely to speak _ will have me back. we will do. bless you both, lovely to speak to - will have me back. we will do. bless you both, lovely to speak to you i you both, lovely to speak to you both. have a good night and we will speak to you again. both outings during the course of this evening, you can always find them online at any time. the current lot will be online very shortly. we have some more weather next and then i will be back at the midnight hour with the news. do stay with us on bbc news.
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good evening, i'm tulsen tollett and this is your sports news where we start with the europa league, and it won't be an all english final. despite manchester united progressing 8—5 on aggregate against roma, arsenal were held to a goalless draw at home by villarreal in their semifinal second leg meaning the spanish side go through 2—1 on aggregate, and it was a chance missed as katie gornall reports. manchester united in rome, arsenal at home. with an all english champions league final already set up, here was a chance to make it a full house for the premier league in europe. for arsenal against villareal, the stakes couldn't be higher. a place in the europa league final could save their season. aubameyang hits the post! 2—1 down from the first leg, every inch would have to be earned. pierre—emerick aubameyang has endured a fraught season on and off the pitch. his dry spell in front of goal continued in the first half. this would be tense. arsenal needed goals.
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the second half brought more urgency but not accuracy, and time was running out. aubameyang has delivered on this stage before, with ten minutes left, could he do so again? well, this was the painful answer. it was the best arsenal could muster. while villareal celebrate their first european final, arsenal are left to ponder how it all unravelled. after a turbulent week, manchester united were sitting very comfortably in rome. they started this game 6—2 up and as half—time approached, roma's hopes all but ended with a chance expertly timed and ruthlessly seized by edinson cavani. the italians were out but they would go out fighting. edin dzeko, once of city, made his mark, before bryan cristante cut united's cushion to three goals. after united equalised, roma would go on to have the final say, scoring the 13th goal of this frantic tie. what a way to reach your first final as manchester united manager. katie gornall, bbc news.
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england captain harry kane believes an all—english champions league final between chelsea and manchester city can only benefit the home nation ahead of the upcoming euros. it is great for our national team so that we have a lot of our players playing in those games. that is what we want. we want them getting exposed to the biggest games around the world. i'm sure it'll be a great final. two teams deserve to be there. they have played really well. i will be excited to watch the game and see who comes out on top. newcastle united have been cleared of tax fraud, after a four year criminal investigation by hmrc into alleged �*secret�* payments to agents, for former players including demba ba, pakiss cisse and moussa sissoko. meanwhile, owner mike ashley has accused the premier league of blocking the sale of the club last summer and is seeking damages for the collapse of the £300 million deal with a saudi arabian—backed consortium. the british and irish lions head coach warren gatland says his squad selection for their tour of south africa was the most
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challenging he had ever been involved in. he left out some big names including johnny sexton, billy vunipola and kyle sinkler, but there were a few surprise inclusions. along with those three — england's henry slade was also left out in the backs, but ireland's bundee aki is included. and wales's louis rees—zammit becomes the youngest lion since 1959 at the age of 20. despite england coming fifth in the six nations, they have 11 players involved, wales have ten, scotland and ireland both have eight. for the forwards, exeter number eight, sam simmonds is the surprise addition, which increased the squad number from 36 to 37. alun wynjones was named as captain on what will be his fourth lions tour and he understands the history that goes before him. you become a lion and you're joining the other custodianship of lions rugby, the home nations become linked in happens every four years. to be added to a list of captains is enormous. the tour as that have
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gone before is surreal. british number one dan evans has been knocked out of the madrid 0pen losing his third round match in straight sets to germany's alexander zverev. evans came into this after two tough three set victories and after the 5th seed zverev took the first set 6—3 it was looking ominous. but evans battled hard in the second as the match went game for game until the tie break was needed to separate them, zverev will now face top seed rafael nadal in the quarter—finals. the giro d'italia starts on saturday — and great britain's simon yates is joint favourite. it's a race he came close to winning in 2018, and he says it made perfect sense to return to italy this year, rather than take part in the tour de france. i think the course also suits me a lot. i mean, a lot of climbing. in recent years not so much 200 kilometres. the last two years also coincided
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with the olympic games as well, which is also a main goalfor me. personally. and i just think that doing the giro is a better way to prepare for the games. and it was the kit launch for team gb today as the start of the olympics in tokyo draws closer. there is still some trepidation injapan as another surge of coronavirus cases sweeps across the country... but gymnast max whitlock and cyclist laura kenny looked optimistic as they modelled their kits in london. kenny, who is a mum to three—year—old albie, said she and husband jason, would miss having him in the crowd to cheer them on. this one is going to be the most strange, i suppose. just not to have any support in the crowd. we were going to take albie with us, he was going to come, so for him not to be able to travel at all kind of seems a little bit strange. but, you know, if we can have the home support virtually, it will still be nice. it will still feel like the country is coming together. for more on that and everything else
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you can go on the bbc sport website, or download the app. and that's all the sport for now. hello. the showers have been fading away through the night, but under the starry skies it's going to be another cold and frosty start on friday morning. and given that we have some damp services around her could be the odd icy patch with the river mist. but on the whole good deal of sunshine first thing. and as the sun gets to work the cobbled bubble up at the showers will become more widespread once again, it will looks like they will congregate across from the england and that perhaps eastern england in the afternoon to hail and thunder with them. if you are showers further west but still a lot of showers for scotland and over the mountains falling as snow. temperature is probably a degree or so up on those of yesterday. but it's all change overnight and it's a saturday, deep area of low pressure brings a wet and pretty windy day on saturday for
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most with showers to follow on sunday and still some gusty winds through the showers but at the deli windows so temperatures will be higher over the weekend. don't really notice it on saturday for manyjust because it looks pretty wet. perhaps a little bit more brightness on sunday.
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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. another day of record infections and deaths in india. we have a special report looking atjust how badly this crisis is affecting rural health facilities. polls close across england, scotland and wales in the biggest test of opinion since the uk general election of 2019. the us secretary of state antony blinken, on a visit to kyiv, urges russia to end what he calls its reckless and aggressive actions towards ukraine. as the us sees a record number of migrants crossing the southern border, we follow one family hoping for a better life.

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