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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  May 7, 2021 5:00am-5:31am BST

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this is bbc news: i'm victoria fritz with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. a boost for borisjohnson — the conservatives look set to win a former labour stronghold in the first test at the ballot box since the pandemic. it is quite clear when we see the ballots lying on the table that we just haven't got over the line on the day and that is clearly very disappointing. we had a good candidate and we've run a decent campaign, and one with integrity. the official result when confirmed is part of a huge series of super thursday elections held acoross the uk — the biggest test of opinion since the uk general election of 2019. a brazilian police operation against drug traffickers in rio ends
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with the deaths of 25 people. hello and welcome. the first major electoral test that borisjohnson has faced since winning the general election in 2019 looks likely to receive an early boost. a parlimentary by election in a traditional labour seat in the north east of england town of hartlepool might well have been won. it's the first significant result from a huge day of elections across the uk. here's our political correspondentjonathan blake. democracy delivered in hartlepool. the boats are in and with them, a verdict. for decades, labour has counted on this seat is one of its safest
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but now after taking so much of the party's territory in the general election two years ago, the conservatives are confident this too could be theirs. careful counting and socially distanced democracy in action is made for a long night but in the early hours, labour all but conceded defeat.— conceded defeat. we haven't got over the line _ conceded defeat. we haven't got over the line tonight, _ conceded defeat. we haven't got over the line tonight, which - conceded defeat. we haven't got over the line tonight, which is i over the line tonight, which is clearly disappointing. i think we had a good candidate, we had a solid campaign, one that had integrity and a good plan for hartlepool behind it that ultimately on the day ijust don't think we were able to get the numbers.— the numbers. across england, there are _ the numbers. across england, there are council _ the numbers. across england, there are council elections - the numbers. across england, there are council elections atl there are council elections at almost every layer of local government. counties, borrowers, district and more. almost 5000 seats being contested. in the north—east, the conservatives gained seats on sunderland city council, eroding labour's once rocksolid hold. i eroding labour's once rocksolid hold. ~' ., �*
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eroding labour's once rocksolid hold. ~ . �* , hold. i think what we've seen is that a lot _ hold. i think what we've seen is that a lot of _ hold. i think what we've seen is that a lot of the _ hold. i think what we've seen is that a lot of the eucalypt . is that a lot of the eucalypt boats have gone to the conservatives. and we've retain some seats but we've lost it as well, but that's politics for you. i think at the end of the day. you. i think at the end of the da . , , . , day. dudley in the west midlands _ day. dudley in the west midlands is _ day. dudley in the west midlands is one - day. dudley in the west midlands is one to - day. dudley in the west i midlands is one to watch. either main party could take control. in the south—east, there was a win the conservatives, taking harlow council in essex from labour. the counting continues in cornwall where, like many places, they will be tallying the ballots for many hours yet. in london, labour's sadiq khan is seeking another term as mayor, one of 13 upper election. the conservatives hoping to hang onto the west midlands, labour eyeing up west yorkshire. those are some of the many, many more results to come on these elections held in the shadow of a pandemic. slowly, across england, a renewed political picture is emerging. jonathan blake, bbc
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news. wth me is lewis goodall, bbc newsnight�*s policy editor. thanks very much forjoining me. good to see you. now, a concession really to a pretty significant defeat. is this a wow moment for you. it significant defeat. is this a wow moment for you.- significant defeat. is this a wow moment for you. it is a wow moment — wow moment for you. it is a wow moment it _ wow moment for you. it is a wow moment it was _ wow moment for you. it is a wow moment. it was anticipated - wow moment for you. it is a wow moment. it was anticipated that| moment. it was anticipated that it was thought to happen. we should take a step back for a moment. this is a seat that was in labour hands sent was created in 1964. it used to deliver huge labour majorities for people like peter mandelson who served in tony blair's government and although of course areas like this in seats like this have been turning away from labour, we saw that most dramatically in the 2019 election, it doesn't make it any easierfor keir election, it doesn't make it any easier for keir starmer or better because part of his pitch to become labour leader to succeed jeremy corbyn was to say, i can stop the bleeding
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and the haemorrhaging of support in these sorts of places. i can be taken seriously. i can be considered credible in a way thatjeremy corbyn never could and yet here we are, potentially likely, probably, almost certainly on the verge of losing a seat that jeremy corbyn actually won in 2017 and 2019, albeit with a significant exit party presents and i suppose the danger, a chill down the back of the spine of many labour mps tonight will be waking up in thinking, they will look at the size of their majority, smaller than the one labor party is to lose. they also had significant brexit party presents in their constituencies, and think, that could be me in a couple of years' time. there are 38 constituencies where the brexit party vote in those constituencies was larger than the labour majority. assuming much of it goes to the conservatives, those seats could become conservative seats. the danger for
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labourers, the seats. the dangerfor labourers, the expansion of seats. the danger for labourers, the expansion of the electoral map we saw so dramatically in the 2019 election may not have stopped. that is of course the danger, and as you say, keir starmer ran as the man who would stop the rot. the man who would win back the north. thatjust hasn't happened. why do you think that is? is it because people don't know him, he hasn't been out and about on the way you would normally expect. iii the way you would normally exect. ,, ., ,., expect. if keir starmer sat here tonight, _ expect. if keir starmer sat here tonight, this - expect. if keir starmer sat here tonight, this has - expect. if keir starmer sat | here tonight, this has been expect. if keir starmer sat i here tonight, this has been a very unusual. for the leader of the opposition to introduce themselves to the country. normally, leader of the opposition and they have a 0pposition and they have a party conference speech. they can go on campaign easily. they can go on campaign easily. they can go on campaign easily. they can go and meet people. he hasn't been able to do that. he's been in his back room doing pmq, so it's been unusual. whether government has been front front and centre every single day through the
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covid press conferences and so on. and we're coming to the point where it looks like we may be emerging from at least this period of the pandemic and the vaccine so on. that is the best case scenario for labour where they can get beyond that and really start to go on the attack. concern for labour is that it isn't the story or not the whole story. part of the story is you're just seeing a cultural and political realignment in a lot of these places which was happening before brexit but has been spurred on and intensified by the brexit process were a lot of these places now come to associate the labour party with the role they play during the brexit. and what happened in parliament 2019 where they perceived to be trying to board what they wanted to do. i think that is the big danger here, which is effectively you are seeing that reorientation and thatis seeing that reorientation and that is just happening seeing that reorientation and that isjust happening in britain either. look at the social democratic parties
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across europe. the french socialists struggling. the german sdp. the pd in italy. again, basically nowhere. social democracy across europe is on its need and to some extent guest armour is about arresting the decline in britain on the basis of this result. ., , , ~ result. really interesting. we are expecting _ result. really interesting. we are expecting the _ result. really interesting. we are expecting the declaration | are expecting the declaration around half past five in the morning. a bit later on. i’m morning. a bit later on. i'm not going — morning. a bit later on. i'm not going to _ morning. a bit later on. i'm not going to go _ morning. a bit later on. in not going to go home at this oint. ., �* , , ., point. you've been up all niuht. point. you've been up all night- do _ point. you've been up all night. do stick with - point. you've been up all night. do stick with us. l point. you've been up all. night. do stick with us. do stay with us here. let's get more on the elections taking place here in the uk and i'm joined by mo hussein a former conservative party adviser and sienna rodgers, editor of labourlist. i want to start with you, mo. lewis picked up on a bit of this, about this vaccine balance. there was a lot of expectation management when it
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came to hartlepool and what might happen. we still haven't had the declaration. how much do you think of this is just potentially good luck? i do you think of this is 'ust potentially good luck? i don't think it's good _ potentially good luck? i don't think it's good luck. - potentially good luck? i don't think it's good luck. the - think it's good luck. the vaccine down, that is the thing that labour will point to, will .2, willa played some role in this, as will be unlocking and going back to some sense of normality in the economy moving again. have to remember that two years ago, general election, there was no vaccine and no pandemic and we saw the crumbling, who never voted conservative before changing hands. that is the continuation of this political reconfiguration of the country that we had been seeing. it seems to me that people have really listened, what has struck a chord with people is this government promise of levelling up, and the idea of jobs and investment, the things that matter on a day—to—day basis to people. the government
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spoke about this a lot of the last election. it now has to deliver this. this was a test for the government in terms of whether that new supporter really not conservative voting people would stay with them and it feels like, let's wait and see what happens at hartlepool but it feels like it will, not just there but also in the councils across the wider region as well. i think that message has chimed people, and they now want to see results, but i don't gets right to put it to a vaccine balance. i will brin: it to a vaccine balance. i will bring you — it to a vaccine balance. i will bring you in _ it to a vaccine balance. i will bring you in if— it to a vaccine balance. i will bring you in if i _ it to a vaccine balance. i will bring you in if i may, - it to a vaccine balance. i will bring you in ifi may, siena. | bring you in if i may, siena. it's interesting, this idea about controlling the narrative, the tory party is effectively the party that has controlled the narrative with the coronavirus in the recovery, for example. where does this leave the labor party now. �* , ., ., does this leave the labor party now. 2 ., ., ., now. it's fair to say that boris johnson _ now. it's fair to say that boris johnson is - now. it's fair to say that boris johnson is a - now. it's fair to say that boris johnson is a really borisjohnson is a really effective campaigner and his taken on the role of my
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minister and actually continued that role ofjust campaigning. it may not be governing effectively or following the rules in terms of ministerial code and those things, we've seen all those tory sleaze stories in recent weeks. but he is very good at campaigning. we need to remember at the moment this is still a legacy to the next 30 minutes. whenever that result comes _ next 30 minutes. whenever that result comes out. _ next 30 minutes. whenever that result comes out. this _ next 30 minutes. whenever that result comes out. this is - next 30 minutes. whenever that result comes out. this is a - result comes out. this is a blow— result comes out. this is a blow to _ result comes out. this is a blow to the astana if the result _ blow to the astana if the result is as bad as predicted. as lewis— result is as bad as predicted. as lewis was saying, he was chosen — as lewis was saying, he was chosen to _ as lewis was saying, he was chosen to be labour leader primarily— chosen to be labour leader primarily on the basis he would be electable. labour members were _ be electable. labour members were talking about how they wanted _ were talking about how they wanted a guy who looks like a prime — wanted a guy who looks like a prime minister, like he belongs in number 10. prime minister, like he belongs in numberio. now prime minister, like he belongs in number 10. now there are real— in number 10. now there are real questions again coming up ahout— real questions again coming up about the — real questions again coming up about the fact that actually, this is— about the fact that actually, this is an _ about the fact that actually, this is an existential issue for the _ this is an existential issue for the labour party. we can't 'ust for the labour party. we can't just say— for the labour party. we can't just say a _ for the labour party. we can't just say a guy with great hair who— just say a guy with great hair who looks good in a suit is going to turn the party's fortunes around. there are much
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deeper— fortunes around. there are much deeper issues for the labour party— deeper issues for the labour party to _ deeper issues for the labour party to discuss and it often seems _ party to discuss and it often seems like the party is mired in factional infighting rather than — in factional infighting rather than addressing those big questions. than addressing those big questions-— than addressing those big ruestions. ,, ., ., , questions. siena, what is the best case _ questions. siena, what is the best case scenario _ questions. siena, what is the best case scenario in - questions. siena, what is the best case scenario in your. best case scenario in your view? ~ ~ view? well, i think in hartlepool, - view? well, i think in hartlepool, certainly| view? well, i think in - hartlepool, certainly from view? well, i think in _ hartlepool, certainly from when i hartlepool, certainly from when i visited, — hartlepool, certainly from when i visited, it seemed as if the seat — i visited, it seemed as if the seat was _ i visited, it seemed as if the seat was going conservative and a lot _ seat was going conservative and a lot of— a lot of labour people will point _ a lot of labour people will point to— a lot of labour people will point to the fact the pro brexit— point to the fact the pro brexit vote was split. it seems like it's— brexit vote was split. it seems like it's an _ brexit vote was split. it seems like it's an extension of that. to bring _ like it's an extension of that. to bring that investment into the area that they have been promised. that seems like it's going — promised. that seems like it's going to — promised. that seems like it's going to happen. but of course, this is— going to happen. but of course, this isiust — going to happen. but of course, this isjust the start of several— this isjust the start of several days of lots of different kind of results over the country. i'm hearing that it is— the country. i'm hearing that it is kind _ the country. i'm hearing that it is kind of different in west yorkshire _ it is kind of different in west yorkshire in terms of the reception on the doorstep. it wants to _ reception on the doorstep. it wants to be getting things like
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the west yorkshire mayoralty. and if— the west yorkshire mayoralty. and if it — the west yorkshire mayoralty. and if it does that, it does point _ and if it does that, it does point to— and if it does that, it does point to some kind of success. how— point to some kind of success. how representative was hartlepool in terms of what is going out with the country, what is going on with the cultural changes that as a result of the reserve back in 2019. is hartlepool an outlier. are we seeing an encroachment of the uk map. are we seeing an encroachment of the uk map-— are we seeing an encroachment of the uk map. blue seats. very much the _ of the uk map. blue seats. very much the latter. _ of the uk map. blue seats. very much the latter. hartlepool- much the latter. hartlepool bucked the trend at the last election. i do think that will be part of this wider pattern that we have seen. it speaks to how the government operates. this government is very good at
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being politically rated. mostly to the response of other pandemic. it has done a lot of things that we will not expect. thereby appealing to a much broader sense of voters, and the electorates as well. and on the electorates as well. and on the other side, or labour, the real challenges been what will be seen, can we reconnect with these traditional labour heartlands, can keir starmer speak to the redwall and if the answer is no, there are much more fundamental questions for labour to answer. it has been a seachange, and we are seeing that certainly.— that certainly. thank you both of ou that certainly. thank you both of you for— that certainly. thank you both of you for your _ that certainly. thank you both of you for your time _ that certainly. thank you both of you for your time today, i that certainly. thank you both of you for your time today, do stay with us here. we will have plenty more on this story. the declaration expected in about 15 minutes. we will bring it to you when we can.
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i, nelson rolihlahla mandela, do hereby swear to be faithful to the republic of south africa. after six years of construction and numerous delays, the channel tunnel has been formally opened by the queen and president mitterrand. the tunnel is not yet ready for passengers and freight services to begin. for centuries, christianity and i islam struggled for supremacy. now the pope's visit symbolises their willingness to coexist. - roger bannister became the first man in the world to run a mile in underfour minutes. memories of victory as the ve celebrations reach their climax. this night is dedicated i to everyone who believes in a future of peace and freedom. -
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this is bbc news, our top story: the conservatives look set to win the former labour stronghold of hartlepool in north—eastern england, in the first test at the ballot box since the pandemic. just checking in on other news. police in brazil have defended an operation against a drug trafficking gang which ended with the deaths of 25 people. it happened in one of rio dejaneiro's poorest neighbourhoods, known as favelas. a police officer is among the victims. courtney bembridge has this report, and a warning, some of the details are distressing. as police swooped in helicopters and armoured vehicles, suspects could be seen trying to escape across the rooftops.
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some of them armed with high—powered weapons. down on the street level, police were closing in. 0fficers described it as a "war scenario". it's the deadliest police operation since 2016. here's the account of one resident, who says an injured boy came into her home. translation: when the police saw the blood, they came - in screaming, "where is he, where is he?" ijust had time to put my children here behind me, and they killed the boy in the room. they didn't give the boy time to say anything. my only reaction was to protect my family. my nine—year—old daughter saw everything. she will never want to sleep in that room again. residents took to the streets to protest, accusing the police of using excessive force. the're calling for peace and justice. human rights campaigners are
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also campaigned against it. we also campaigned against it. - condemned this massacre, how can they be 25 deaths? it’s can they be 25 deaths? it's were arrested _ can they be 25 deaths? it's were arrested in _ can they be 25 deaths? it's were arrested in the raid and these are some of the weapons seized. police have defended the operation, saying the gang is involved in drug trafficking, robbery, assault and murder and had trafficking, robbery, assault and murderand had been recruiting miners. translation: ~ ., ., translation: want to make it ve clear translation: want to make it very clear that _ translation: want to make it very clear that please _ translation: want to make it very clear that please do - translation: want to make it very clear that please do not. very clear that please do not act on emotion. to carry out such an operation there is a lot of planning and we follow many protocols are before people say the operation was not planned, we carried out ten months of investigation. aha, months of investigation. a supreme court ruling last year band police from carrying out raids in these impoverished neighbourhoods during the pandemic unless there are exceptional circumstances. in the months that followed, deaths and murders decreased and there was no increase in
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crime. courtney bembridge, bbc news. time to check on the latest sports news. hello, i'm tulsen tollett and this is your sports news, where we start with football and manchester united are through to the europa league final after an 8—5 aggregate semi—final win over roma. the tie was as good as over after a 6—2 first leg win at old trafford but after scoring first through edinson cavani there were some nervy moments for 0le gunnar solsksjaer�*s team as roma swept forward looking to cut the advantage. for me now, the main thing is we are in the final, we know we have to play better than this but we are here because we were able to score four goals during the two legs and that shows in this instance that, while we want to keep him at old trafford. arsenal won't bejoining theirfellow english side after former gunners boss unai emery�*s villarreal held out for a goalless draw in the second leg of their semi
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fial at the emirates stadium, meaning they go through courtesy of a 2—1 win last week. we are devastated. we had so much enthusiasm to be in the final and we know how much it meant to the club and the fans or ourselves to be in the final and to win the title and be in the champions league and it is a huge blow. women's top seed ashleigh barty is through to the madrid 0pen final after a straight sets victory over paula badosa. australian won 6—4, 6—3, which makes up for losing to the spanish wild card in charlston last month. barty now goes up against 5th seeded belarussian aryna sabalenka for the right to lift the trophy. in the men's draw, rafael nadal is through to the quarterfinals after a comfortable straight sets win over alexei popyrin. the top seed is chasing a sixth title at this event and was a 6—3, 6—3 winner over the 21 year old australian and will now play fifth
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seed alexander zverev in the last eight. phil mickelson leads after the first round of the wells fargo championship in north carolina. the veteran american, who's slipped to 115 in the world rankings, rolled back the years by opening up with a 7—under par round of 64. he's two shots clear of the field and a shot further back is england's tommy fleetwood, who chipped in for an eagle at the 10th on his way to a 67 while former world number one rory mcilroy is struggling 8 shots off the lead. the 23 teams that will compete in the 104th edition of giro d'italia were presented in turin on thursday. british rider simon yates, who came close in 2018, will start as one of the favourites to claim the maglia rosa while two time winner vincenzo nibali is also in the field with a time trial in turin first up on saturday.
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the course also suits me a light, a lot of climbing and in the last four years not so much time trial kilometres and it also coincided with the olympic goals as well which is also an aim for me personally, and i think during this event is a better way to prepare for the games. you can get all the latest sports news at our website: bbc.com/sport but from me, tulsen tollett, and the rest of the team that is your sports news for now. let's return now to our top story, that key uk by—election in hartlepool in north east england. with me is lewis goodall bbc newsnight�*s policy editor. talking through some of these with the guests, it seems to be that there is a strategic mismanagement on messaging here when it comes to the labour
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party. they went very hard down this sleaze line and allegations of corruption and it seems that it did not land with people when they were voting. in your view, why was that? it voting. in your view, why was that? ,, voting. in your view, why was that? , , ., that? it is possible that did land a little _ that? it is possible that did land a little bit and - land a little bit and the conservative victory may have done that if star had not done this and we're not sure why he is focusing on them and there may be a few reasons and it may not be that it did turns out to be the wrong even though it hasn't paid off now and vary in mind whatever situation the labour party was in a few months ago, for a the labour party had its main critique of the government was incompetence, saying it kept getting decisions wrong about the pandemic and getting timings of lockdown wrong, track and trace networking, inlets, and that seemed effective, they went ahead in the poles by quite some margin
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and then of course the vaccine came along and that effectively at a stroke the entire approach and angle of attack from the labour party because the that they are calling are incompetent and yet we have executed the fastest vaccine rollout in europe! that strategy was neutralised and what didn't leave the party with? what left them with were allocations around corruption and leaves and something the whole labour party could unite on and frankly, by focusing on that, it means you don't have to come up with that many policies of your own! it is effective in opposition because you can say that the main problem with the government is they are sleazy or corrupt so elect us instead and does not require much thinking. i've been talking to labour party sources over the past few weeks and i'm sure they are reasonably confident they will be more to come on those stories and they will build and build and build on it but is
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certainly as far as the hartlepool election is consent, it did not win at. for hartlepool election is consent, it did not win at.— it did not win at. for people watching — it did not win at. for people watching outside _ it did not win at. for people watching outside the - it did not win at. for people watching outside the uk, i watching outside the uk, international viewers, something people say to me, they are surprised and shocked by what they regard the level of apathy when it comes to the uk public on public decisions, government decisions. they can be more politically active in different countries. i wonder what your view is on cynicism and what the actions of the politicians from the electric actually does to the voters? it depends, let's wait and see with these elections because there has been much speculation about what the turnout would be for these elections. we know from hartlepool, it would be about 42%— 43% and that is not bad for a by—elections in hartlepool, generally a low turnout, in 2019 it was only 57%, so not that bad at all. lots of speculation whether it is low because of the pandemic but we
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do not know, it could be because of the postal vote it has gone up. in terms of apathy, let's wait and see of the results of the turnout. stay with us on bbc news. hello there. thursday brought another rash of showers, some significant snow to some parts of scotland. it's still cold air with us for the day ahead, so it will be a chilly start, and there will be further snow showers over the hills of scotland. but as we've gone through the evening and overnight, the showers have tended to fade away. we had a lot of hail and thunder in eastern areas, but under the starry skies once again, because it's cold air, temperatures approach freezing — a little below — and given there is some dampness on the surfaces, it could be a bit icy in a few spots. perhaps a little bit of river mist as well. but an abundance of sunshine first thing. the showers already with us in some areas, as you can see, become more widespread as the morning goes on. initially, across many parts of england and wales developing
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across scotland, one or two for northern ireland, but then congregating on the east into the afternoon. hail and thunder and snow over the hills. so, again, chilly, but temperatures probably a little bit higher than yesterday, up to 15 perhaps in the south. but then, it's all change as we go through the coming night and into saturday. we've got the next weather system coming in, so the frost won't be as widespread by saturday morning. more limited to the far north—east of scotland, which is where we probably won't get the milder air in. it's this deep area of low pressure that's pulling itself in off the atlantic, giving us all, really, a spell of wetter weather. looks quite wet in western areas, and given we've got the south—westerly wind coming in off the atlantic, it is bringing much milder air in, which means a lot of rain potentially across south—west england, wales, into the north of england. you can see a wetter day for northern ireland and much of scotland. it may actually dry up and brighten up in south—eastern areas later. the rain may not actually reach the far north of scotland, and the milder air slow to arrive here, perhaps some wintriness on the hills. but we could see 16 or 17 if it brightens up in the south. through the night, that weather front�*s dragging its heels,
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really slow to move its way eastwards. we've got one band of rain moving up towards the north of scotland, showers following in behind. still the south—westerly wind into sunday, so still mild, but with plenty of showers merging together across north and west areas near the centre of the area of low pressure. it will be windy through the weekend as well, but we could see 20—22 celsius and possibly some late afternoon thunderstorms in south—eastern areas. quite a lot of uncertainty on the detailfor sunday, but it does look a very unsettled weekend ahead. you can get more from the website.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the first major electoral test that boris johnson the first major electoral test that borisjohnson has the first major electoral test that boris johnson has faced since 2019 it looks like to have received an early boost. parliamentary by—election in the traditional labour seat in the traditional labour seat in the north—east town of hartlepool may well have been one. the first significant results from a huge day of elections across the uk. democracy delivered in hartlepool. the votes are in and
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with them, a verdict. for decades, labour has counted on this seat as one

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