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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 4, 2021 6:00am-10:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and charlie stayt. our headlines today: gps are forced to delay flu jabs because of a shortage of hgv drivers, which has disrupted supplies. a mass vaccine rollout for 12— 15—year—olds could still go ahead despite a decision by the government's scientific advisors not to support it. us presidentjoe biden has warned about the dangers of climate change after visiting communities devastated by hurricane ida. a magnificent seventh gold medal, for hannah cockcroft. she's the paralympic champion once again in the t34 800 metres, the first of three golds already
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today for the british team in tokyo. good today for the british team in tokyo. morning, it ha and good morning, it has been a bit cool and cloudy for some of us recently but you will be pleased to hear there is a bit more sunshine in the forecast, and temperatures will be on the up over the next few days. some rain and a forecast for tomorrow in the north, i will have all the details throughout this morning's programme. it's saturday 4 september. our top story: some gp surgeries in england and wales have begun cancelling appointments for the winter flu jab, after delays to the delivery of doses of the vaccine. a shortage of lorry drivers is believed to be behind the problem. doctors have warned it will have a serious impact on workloads and patients. our correspondent helena wilkinson has this report. this year's flu campaign is set to be the largest in history. more than 35 million people in the uk will be offered the jab on the nhs. news of a delay to some flu vaccine delivery
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is is causing concern, and cancellations. the supplier of vaccines to gp practices and pharmacies in england and wales have told their customers supply would be disrupted due to unforeseen road freight challenges. it is believed to be because of a shortage of lorry drivers. the company warned of a delay of up to two weeks. it is advising gps not to book patients in until they have confirmation of delivery. a, until they have confirmation of delive . �* ., ~' until they have confirmation of delive .�* ., ~ delivery. a two-week delay has a massive impact _ delivery. a two-week delay has a massive impact on _ delivery. a two-week delay has a massive impact on our— delivery. a two-week delay has a massive impact on our flu - delivery. a two-week delay has a | massive impact on our flu vaccine programme, because the clinics are already set up, many surgeries already set up, many surgeries already have a lot of vulnerable patients booked in, we like to get going early on in september, ready for the winter. so this is really, really worrying. for the winter. so this is really, really worrying-— for the winter. so this is really, really worrying. doctors are already deafinu really worrying. doctors are already dealing with — really worrying. doctors are already dealing with a _ really worrying. doctors are already dealing with a chronic _ really worrying. doctors are already dealing with a chronic shortage - really worrying. doctors are already dealing with a chronic shortage of. dealing with a chronic shortage of blood test tubes. supply chain
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issues have been blamed for that. the british medical association said delays to flu vaccine delivery is caused a huge increase in staff's already unsustainable workloads. adding that it created unneeded anxiety for patients. the uk's four chief medical officers are expected to decide within days whether to recommend vaccinating healthy children against coronavirus. yesterday the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation, which advises the government, decided against recommending the jabs for 12— to15—year—olds, saying the health benefits were marginal. here's our health correspondent catherine burns. america has been doing it since may. more than 10 million 12—to 15 —year—olds there have had a covert vaccine. 0ther —year—olds there have had a covert vaccine. other countries are too, including canada, brazil, france, the netherlands, italy — but not the uk. regulators approved vaccines as
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safe and effective for this age group in the summer, but the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation�*sjob is to committee on vaccination and immunisation�*s job is to decide committee on vaccination and immunisation�*sjob is to decide if it is necessary. if the answer — not for every 12—15 —year—olds. for it is necessary. if the answer - not for every 12-15 -year-olds.- for every 12-15 -year-olds. for the healthy children, _ for every 12-15 -year-olds. for the healthy children, the _ for every 12-15 -year-olds. for the healthy children, the risk- - for every 12-15 -year-olds. for the healthy children, the risk- benefit| healthy children, the risk— benefit balance is really very uncertain and very tight. normally what we do when we recommend vaccination for children is we see a very clear benefit, that clearly outweighs any possible risk. and in the absence of that clear blue water if you like between those two, we refer —— preferred to advise that healthy children should not for the moment be immunised.— children should not for the moment be immunised. covid doesn't tend to make children _ be immunised. covid doesn't tend to make children very _ be immunised. covid doesn't tend to make children very sick, _ be immunised. covid doesn't tend to make children very sick, so - be immunised. covid doesn't tend to make children very sick, so the - make children very sick, so the benefits of vaccinating them have to benefits of vaccinating them have to be weighed up against the risks. like myocarditis, inflammation of the heart. it is a very rare complication from pfizer and moderna vaccines, and affects young people more. they tend to recover quickly, but thatjcvi more. they tend to recover quickly, but thatjcvi wants to know more
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about the longer term effects. but some of the 3 million 12—to 15 —year—olds throughout the uk will be invited for a vaccine. 150,000 were already eligible because they have conditions including down syndrome orany conditions including down syndrome or any problems. same two for another 11a,000 teenagers because another 11a, 000 teenagers because they live another 11a,000 teenagers because they live with someone who is immunosuppressed. and now that has been extended to another 200,000 children with a wider range of conditions like heart problems, epilepsy or poorly controlled asthma. so as schools go back, teenagers who are most likely to be severely affected by coronavirus will be able to get a vaccine. the experts have made this call purely on the health of children, not other factors like a missing time in education. the next step, the chief medical officers in england, got —— scotland, wales and northern ireland have been asked to weigh up those other factors. have been asked to weigh up those otherfactors. which means this decision could change one way or
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another in the next week or so. the taliban say they're making advances in the panjshir valley, where there's been fierce fighting in the only part of afghanistan not under the islamists' control. the area, north of the capital kabul, is one of the country's smallest provinces, and battles there are reported to have left hundreds dead. the leaders of resistance forces have denied the taliban's claims. president biden has praised people in louisiana and mississippi for their response to hurricane ida last sunday. there's been anger at the delays in restoring power, and mr biden promised that infrastructure would be "built back better" to withstand future storms, as nada tawfik reports. one week and a storm that brought america to its knees. look at that tornado! from new orleans to new york, it was a dramatic beating. record rainfall, life—threatening floods, destructive winds and tornadoes usually only seen in the midwest tore through
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communities with no mercy. in some places it was unprecedented, and sparked fear about the ferocity and frequency of future weather. oh, my god! the river is flooding! part of this newjersey town was abandoned after the nearby river crested and left cars and homes under 10 feet of water. four people died and about 600 were left homeless. gloria lost everything, but was lucky to escape with her life. she can't swim and had to be rescued by neighbours as the water rose inside her home. i started pounding. for somebody to come and help me so i won't die. i felt like i was dying. down these streets, peoples' belongings and memories are laid out for garbage pick—up. this family lost three cars and everything in their basement. but already the insurance company has told them they will not cover much of the damage.
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it's the first time that it happened, but if we stay in the house, what if it happens again? like, does it really pay to stay in this area any more? president biden has approved an emergency declaration for new york and newjersey. today, he traveled to meet victims in louisiana, where ida first made landfall as a category 4 hurricane. after surveying the damage, he highlighted the threat from climate change. things have changed so drastically in terms of the environment. we've already crossed certain thresholds, we cannot build back a road, a highway, a bridge to what it was before. you've got to build back to what it is now, what's needed now. the cost to life, property and infrastructure has been staggering. still, climate change remains a divisive political issue. and so, over the years, america has ignored warnings and some would say this is the result. neda tawfik, bbc news, newjersey. new evidence has emerged that
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people have put on weight during the pandemic. nhs data shows that people who signed up for a weight loss programme were, on average, more than five pounds heavier than three years before covid struck. there are concerns this could lead to an increase in the number of people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. blackpool�*s famous illuminations are lighting up the seaside town again, after a star—studded switch—on last night. strictly come dancing's shirley ballas pulled the lever at the iconic tower ballroom, and youtube sensation ksi also attended. it looks really dramatic, doesn't it. 0rganisers opted for a smaller, indoor event after covid put a stop to the planned outdoor extravaganza. that looks a bit like an outdoor extravaganza to me. the lights will stay on untiljanuary again this year. it is always a nice trip to blackpool with the kids to see the lights. blackpool with the kids to see the liuhts. �* , ., .,,
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lights. and they are hopeful it will boost the number _ lights. and they are hopeful it will boost the number of _ lights. and they are hopeful it will boost the number of people - lights. and they are hopeful it will boost the number of people who i lights. and they are hopeful it will. boost the number of people who want to go as the season comes to an end. it is coming past 26 10am, let's look at what the papers are saying this morning. several of them lead with developments surrounding the vaccination of12— to 15—year—olds. the times is reporting the rollout of the vaccine to schoolchildren is due to begin as soon as next week, despite thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation deciding not to recommend it. the daily telegraph adds that ministers are confident that chris whitty and the other chief medical officers will approve the plan in the middle of next week. whilst the guardian notes that it will be the first time minsters deviate from the recommendations of scientists. we will be spending a bit of time this morning throughout the morning talking with some of our experts that we speak to on a weekly basis, just around some of the arguments around thejcvi, what their call is,
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and what might happen next, and why it is that it is quite a nuanced debate this time around. the chief medical officers had to consider the impact on education, and the wider community if teenagers don't have a jab. a quick look inside the papers this morning, the times is reporting on the hopes around the new james times is reporting on the hopes around the newjames bond times is reporting on the hopes around the new james bond film which is out later this week, no time to die, we saw the final trailer released of that, box office takings at the moment are around half of what they were pre— pandemic, and so the hope is that this will deliver a box office killing. we will be talking about that a little later on. when there is hype around something i willjust be like, i have to get involved. i am already booking the babysitters. absolutely, wh not. booking the babysitters. absolutely, why not- the — booking the babysitters. absolutely, why not. the story _ booking the babysitters. absolutely, why not. the story i _ booking the babysitters. absolutely, why not. the story i chosen - booking the babysitters. absolutely, why not. the story i chosen the - booking the babysitters. absolutely, | why not. the story i chosen the same of the times, about whether during a covid, you have more casual, generally we have got more casual. while we have been zooming in the
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office, people addressing casual. how this is playing out in the house of commons isjohn bercow apparently in 2018 got more relaxed about the dress code, said there was no exact dress code, said there was no exact dress code, said there was no exact dress code and things were suggested rather than otherwise. but now, lindsay doyle who is the common speaker, to arbitrate on all these things is apparently coming down quite hard on the whole business. and saying that people have got more relaxed, but he is expecting now that business attire will always be worn in and around the chamber. and his behaviour to, here clamping down on singing, clapping, scrolling through twitter, all of those things are to be clamped down on. it happened periodically, sometimes people clap and had always been sorted out lord but been more relaxed. he sorted out lord but been more relaxed. ., . ,, ., relaxed. he acknowledged -- admonished _ relaxed. he acknowledged -- admonished one _ relaxed. he acknowledged -- admonished one of— relaxed. he acknowledged --
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admonished one of the - relaxed. he acknowledged -- admonished one of the mps l relaxed. he acknowledged -- i admonished one of the mps for relaxed. he acknowledged -- - admonished one of the mps for not wearing a tie during zoo meetings last year. wearing a tie during zoo meetings last ear. , ., 1, wearing a tie during zoo meetings last ear. , ., �* ,, , last year. john boko barred 'eans, t-shirts, sandals * last year. john boko barred 'eans, t-shirts, sandals and fi last year. john boko barred jeans, t-shirts, sandals and trainers, - last year. john boko barred jeans, | t-shirts, sandals and trainers, but t—shirts, sandals and trainers, but now the list includes jeans, chinos, sportswear, any other casual trousers... noted chinos, because apparently some mps have taken to wearing tea —— chinos and a jacket and it goes further, because t—shirts and sleeveless tops for example are categorised as definitely not business attire. so i don't know how this is playing out, maybe it is playing out in your workplace in a similar way. i remember getting a tab on the shoulder when i work as a journalist at the house of commons and got told to leave the lobby area because i was wearing jeans and i hadn't read the rulebook that you are not supposed to wearjeans, even as a journalist. supposed to wear 'eans, even as a 'ournalist. ~ . , supposed to wear 'eans, even as a 'ournalist. ~ ., , ., , ., journalist. was it 'eans and trainers? h journalist. was it 'eans and trainers? ._ journalist. was it 'eans and trainers? i was _ journalist. was it jeans and trainers? i was marrying i journalist. was it jeans and - trainers? i was marrying smartjeans trainers? i was marrying smart 'eans with boots but — trainers? i was marrying smart 'eans with boots but that is i trainers? i was marrying smart 'eans with boots but that is not i trainers? i was marrying smartjeans with boots but that is not allowed. . with boots but that is not allowed. it has probably been paid out, it
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hasn't really changed much here. something things just say the same. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. that is acceptable, it is ok. i tell ou that is acceptable, it is ok. i tell you what. _ that is acceptable, it is ok. i tell you what. you — that is acceptable, it is ok. i tell you what, you don't _ that is acceptable, it is ok. i tell you what, you don't know- that is acceptable, it is ok. i tell you what, you don't know what i am wearing _ you what, you don't know what i am wearing on — you what, you don't know what i am wearing on my feet so it could be anything — wearing on my feet so it could be anything. laughs. i wearing on my feet so it could be anything. laughs. lam getting wearing on my feet so it could be anything. laughs. i am getting away with this _ anything. laughs. i am getting away with this section so that is all good — with this section so that is all good. good morning to you, we have had quite _ good. good morning to you, we have had quite a _ good. good morning to you, we have had quite a lot of cloud recently over_ had quite a lot of cloud recently over the — had quite a lot of cloud recently over the past week or so, it has been _ over the past week or so, it has been largely dry and for much of the uk fairly— been largely dry and for much of the uk fairly gladly. you will be pleased _ uk fairly gladly. you will be pleased he has a bit more sunshine on the _ pleased he has a bit more sunshine on the way— pleased he has a bit more sunshine on the way through the course of the weekend _ on the way through the course of the weekend. but still today are fairly large _ weekend. but still today are fairly large amount of grey out there first thing _ large amount of grey out there first thing. things are looking at mainly dry still— thing. things are looking at mainly dry still because we have high pressure _ dry still because we have high pressure in charge. starting to drift— pressure in charge. starting to drift off— pressure in charge. starting to drift off towards the gate and that is drawing in the air from —— the east _ is drawing in the air from —— the east 50— is drawing in the air from —— the east so that _ is drawing in the air from —— the east. so that will bring those higher— east. so that will bring those higher temperatures particularly tomorrow, also a weather front arriving — tomorrow, also a weather front arriving across the north—west later
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on tomorrow, so there is some rain in the _ on tomorrow, so there is some rain in the forecast across scotland and northern _ in the forecast across scotland and northern ireland tomorrow. but for today, _ northern ireland tomorrow. but for today, quite a bit of cloud across much _ today, quite a bit of cloud across much of — today, quite a bit of cloud across much of the country, we have some mist and _ much of the country, we have some mist and fog — much of the country, we have some mist and fog patches that should tend to _ mist and fog patches that should tend to clear through the morning. more _ tend to clear through the morning. more sunshine to much of southern england. _ more sunshine to much of southern england, wales and northern ireland that we _ england, wales and northern ireland that we have seen her recent days and lighter— that we have seen her recent days and lighter winds as well so it won't — and lighter winds as well so it won't be _ and lighter winds as well so it won't be as blustery across some southern — won't be as blustery across some southern and eastern areas. still a bit southern and eastern areas. still a hit of— southern and eastern areas. still a bit of breeze coming off the north sea ringing quite a lot of cloud to parts _ sea ringing quite a lot of cloud to parts of _ sea ringing quite a lot of cloud to parts of north—east england, eastern scotland _ parts of north—east england, eastern scotland as _ parts of north—east england, eastern scotland as well, so 14—15 under the cloud _ scotland as well, so 14—15 under the cloud hut— scotland as well, so 14—15 under the cloud but a — scotland as well, so 14—15 under the cloud but a few spots of drizzle as well _ cloud but a few spots of drizzle as well. further south and west we are likely— well. further south and west we are likely to _ well. further south and west we are likely to see — well. further south and west we are likely to see highs of 23—24. through— likely to see highs of 23—24. through this evening then, late sunshine — through this evening then, late sunshine for many of us, we keep the cloud _ sunshine for many of us, we keep the cloud through this evening and overnight in northern and eastern parts _ overnight in northern and eastern parts clear— overnight in northern and eastern parts. clear spell through tonight and damages remaining in double figures _ and damages remaining in double figures. similarto and damages remaining in double figures. similar to this morning there _ figures. similar to this morning there could be so misty and murky patches _ there could be so misty and murky patches through the south and west to start _ patches through the south and west to start your sunday morning. but not a _ to start your sunday morning. but not a had — to start your sunday morning. but not a bad day for most of us, a bit of stubborn — not a bad day for most of us, a bit
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of stubborn cloud for central and eastern — of stubborn cloud for central and eastern parts of england through the day, elsewhere quite a bit of sunshine _ day, elsewhere quite a bit of sunshine before this weather front topples— sunshine before this weather front topples in— sunshine before this weather front topples in during the afternoon. so it will— topples in during the afternoon. so it will turn— topples in during the afternoon. so it will turn wet later in the data northern— it will turn wet later in the data northern ireland and northern and western— northern ireland and northern and western of— northern ireland and northern and western of scotland as well. a warmer — western of scotland as well. a warmer day for the likes of newcastle, losing that easterly breeze — newcastle, losing that easterly breeze and down towards the south, top temperature tomorrow around 24-25. — top temperature tomorrow around 24-25. this — top temperature tomorrow around 24—25. this weather front will sink its way southward overnight into monday, — its way southward overnight into monday, tending to fizzle out but that could still be a bit of cloud and a _ that could still be a bit of cloud and a few— that could still be a bit of cloud and a few showers around first things— and a few showers around first things on— and a few showers around first things on monday through parts of northern— things on monday through parts of northern england and perhaps into north— northern england and perhaps into north wales as well. it should clear away on _ north wales as well. it should clear away on monday looking predominantly dry, away on monday looking predominantly dry. long _ away on monday looking predominantly dry, long spells of sunshine developing and you really notice those _ developing and you really notice those temperatures on the up. temperatures up to about 26, possibly — temperatures up to about 26, possibly 27 degrees in the south on monday _ possibly 27 degrees in the south on monday. could be even warmer on tuesday _ monday. could be even warmer on tuesday a— monday. could be even warmer on tuesday. a little bit of a late taste — tuesday. a little bit of a late taste of _ tuesday. a little bit of a late taste of some summary weather. for many— taste of some summary weather. for many of— taste of some summary weather. for many of us — time for this week's edition of click.
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hey, welcome to click! we are back after a summer of silliness. i hope you managed to have some kind of break yourself. i tell you, the best thing about being back on this sofa for me is i get to see my good mate, back in her box! it's been weeks since we've done it like this, isn't it? how's your summer been, how are you? oh, it's good to be back and it's lovely to see you too. and my summer has been good, thank you. i've spent two hours a day working out, which is my idea of a break. i know, i've seen your instagram, you've been hitting it hard! hmm. what have you been up to? i've been exercising my brain,
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i've been trying these, um, interactive puzzle books which i've become a bit of a fan of. on each page there's some sort of weird puzzle here and once you've worked out what's going on, you scan the qr code and it takes you to a website and tells you whether you're right or not. and that, ladies and gentlemen, is my idea of fun. goodness, and you must be cleverer than ever now? dangerously intelligent, that's me. but anyway, it's back to business now, and september means back to school. and hopefully the kids are going to get a whole year in the classroom. yeah, but because the last 18 months have been so disrupted, schools and kids now face a big challenge — and that's the fact that every child has had a different level of schooling and has different gaps in their education. but, it looks like machine learning might be able to help with the children's learning. four years ago we visited a school which had started using century al to bolster their teaching. this is software that assesses students as they learn, finding where the gaps are, and prompting them with teaching materials
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that suit their needs. what it will do is we track all your behaviours, and your mouse movements and how you learn. have they paused, are they scrolling up or down, what words are they looking at, how long are the words, has the child been guessing, have they been skipping, are they hesitating, have they taken longer to answer this question versus another one? well, you know if you know how long it takes for them to read across different subjects. so it's trying to analyse and learn how the student is behaving across the content. the really clever part is that it tracks learning across different subjects, so it can differentiate between a student who is struggling with a mathematical equation, and one who's struggling with how the maths question is posed. in that case it may suggest more literacy tasks.
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when the pandemic hit, software like this became increasingly important as students were forced to learn from home. and during the first lockdown, united learning, one of the largest groups of schools in england, introduced another adaptive learning platform to 46 of their secondary schools. sparx maths has thousands and thousands of questions and thousands and thousands of hours of exemplification as well — videos explaining how to do certain operations. now, that means that no teacher ever has to sit down and work out a specific set of questions understands at what point of learning those children are at. and also it marks those questions so the teacher doesn't have to sit for hours marking them in a book and correcting them as well, which i know from personal experience, can consume your entire life. over the past 18 months we've all needed as much help as we could get
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as our kids have flipped between school and home learning and we've flopped into bed each night exhausted after being parents, teachers and workers. for some children, learning at home has helped them to blossom — but for many, tech will never beat the teacher. earlier in the year, i met andria zafirakou, the best teacher in the universe — and that's not just according to her pupils, mind, she won the global teacher prize in 2018. the one thing that we have to bear in mind is that you know, by using technology in assessing young people, it's not as good as that 1—to—1 teacher experience, and having that 1—to—1 knowledge with a teacher willjust open up their mind a little bit more, and push them a little bit more to thinking about things which they've never thought about. there is no doubt that technology can be extremely beneficial in the classroom, but choices made by ai could set a direction for the rest of a child's life. and ultimately tech can only augment teachers and free up time so that they can do
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what they do best — teach. of course, nothing can beat physically being in the classroom, but even pre—pandemic, some students weren't able to be at school — for example, those with serious illnesses. but now, thanks to the help of some robots, some of these children might able to attend classes remotely. jen copestake's been finding out more. and can you blink your eyes? that's so cool. qasim is a student at seven kings school in east london. he has a serious medical condition which means he hasn't been able to go out since the beginning of the covid pandemic, but comes to class instead in a robot avatar. how long have you been going to school like this, qasim? well originally, it was to do with the lockdown and everything. also i had a surgery so that was also one reason. are you recovering from the surgery now? yeah. i have the impression
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qasim is a brave person. you come across very well qasim. oh, thank you. laughs. is this your first time working with a robot in this way or have you done it before? oh, it has been several months already, isn't it qasim? so did theyjust say you're going to be working with a robot instead of a child? everybody was excited. there are 500 av1 robots going to school in this way across the uk and more than 1,500 in europe. it's controlled from a child's home via an app. where are you talking to us from? like, from my ipad at home. oh wow. they can control the movement of the robot on the table, change facial expressions, raise hands, and even sleep. is the blue meaning you're asleep? yes. do you ever put that on in the class? no. laughter. qasim, i'm just going to carry you to the next classroom. sure. at the end of the day,
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qasim is put away to charge. he's occasionally had to call his teachers to remind them to switch him on for class. there's something real about it — it's got a head, it moves, it talks. it's almost like qasim is embodied in the robot so it's brilliant! it feels absolutely fine actually. so we get quite used to it and we call the robots actually by the child's name, and because the child's voice is coming out of the robot, and they're quite often laughing and joking with us, it feels like a perfectly natural relationship — it's normal. so it's the first time i'd seen a robot interacting in this way in a classroom and it was quite unexpected. it really did feel like qasim's presence was coming through that robot, and the children in the classroom seemed to enjoy it too. the first prototype av1, 3d print, first prototype comp, which is a computer screen with a robot body. the idea of interacting with robots as avatars rather than video screens came from karen dolva and her team at no isolation in oslo.
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raspberry pi in there. camera, microphone. so if a child raises a hand, these lights will light up. these are tiny led lights. then you have the antenna for good reception. you have the 4g module in here, you have the camera board so this is what will sit in the forehead of the robot and let you actually stream. karen found her experience at university to be isolating, and difficult to make new friends. this led to a period of loneliness and depression. i at least isolated myself. i don't think i realised how much i'd pulled away from everyone else until people started literally trying to get me back, which i'm very gratefulfor today. karen started looking at isolation and loneliness in pensioners before redirecting attention to children in hospitals who couldn't get to class.
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they were using videoconferencing to get lessons, but she wanted to make a more private way. we were out observing and actually saw a reaction where a kid logged on and everyone in class is saying, like, "you're looking ill", then the kid logs off again which is heartbreaking, like, you don't want that to be the experience you have when you show up in class. qasim is now looking forward to getting back to class in person, and should be able to start again this autumn. how long have you been away from school, qasim? i left some time in february, i think. january, february sometime. then i stopped again. i haven't been in quite a long time. what's that been like to shield for such a long time? eventually, just, it's like, quite annoying i guess because you can't do anything.
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since the pandemic, we've really been amazed by the broad range of use cases we've seen, but also we've seen an extreme rise in the level of anxiety amongst students. and just by having that window into the classroom, they gain more confidence, they're able to speak with their peers and their teachers, and the idea of returning to school becomes less daunting. what do you guys think, having qasim interacting like this? i think that it's good from his point of view. he's able to ask the teacher for questions if he needs help. if we didn't have this robot. then i don't think he would be getting the same education that he's getting now. - bell rings. 0oh, that's bell which means school's out! that's it for the short version of this week's click. more on the full—length version of course which is waiting for you right now on iplayer. and as ever you can find the team on social media, on youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter at @bbcclick. thanks very much for watching, class dismissed! bye.
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hello, this is breakfast with nina warhurst and charlie stayt. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the uk's four chief medical officers are expected to decide within days whether to recommend vaccinating healthy children against coronavirus. yesterday the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation, which advises the government, decided against recommending the jabs for 12— to 15—year—olds, saying the health benefits were marginal. it's believed the government thinks there's a strong case for going ahead. some gp surgeries in england and wales have begun cancelling appointments for the winter flu jab, after delays to the delivery of doses of the vaccine. a shortage of lorry drivers is believed to be behind the problem. doctors have warned it will have a serious impact on workloads and patients.
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the taliban say they're making advances in the panjshir valley, where there's been fierce fighting in the only remaining part of afghanistan not under the islamists' control. the area, north of the capital kabul, is one of the country's smallest provinces and battles there are reported to have left hundreds dead. the leaders of resistance forces have denied the taliban's claims. president biden has been visiting some of the areas of louisiana worst hit by hurricane ida last sunday. he praised the state's response, though he noted the frustration at the delay in restoring power. mr biden promised that the infrastructure would be "built back better" to withstand future storms. new evidence has emerged that people have put on weight during the pandemic. nhs data shows that people who signed up for a weight loss programme were on average more than five pounds heavier than three years before covid struck. there are concerns this could lead to an increase in the number
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of people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. that is really interesting because there were some people who got super fit through lockdown and others took comfort in food, so many health implications, it will take years to unpack. implications, it will take years to unack. ~ ., , ., implications, it will take years to unack. ~ , ., ~ ~' unpack. 6:31am is the time now, mike is in the chair — unpack. 6:31am is the time now, mike is in the chair for _ unpack. 6:31am is the time now, mike is in the chair for sport. _ unpack. 6:31am is the time now, mike is in the chair for sport. in _ unpack. 6:31am is the time now, mike is in the chair for sport. in the - is in the chair for sport. in the chair? you — is in the chair for sport. in the chair? you know— is in the chair for sport. in the chair? you know what - is in the chair for sport. in the chair? you know what i - is in the chair for sport. in the | chair? you know what i mean. sometimes — chair? you know what i mean. sometimes people _ chair? you know what i mean. sometimes people can't - chair? you know what i mean. sometimes people can't tell i chair? you know what i mean. i sometimes people can't tell the difference between me setting up and standing _ difference between me setting up and standing up. the paralympic scum to an end _ standing up. the paralympic scum to an end in_ standing up. the paralympic scum to an end in tokyo tomorrow, team gb, they seem _ an end in tokyo tomorrow, team gb, they seem to— an end in tokyo tomorrow, team gb, they seem to to and in the second on they seem to to and in the second on the medal— they seem to to and in the second on the medal tally, thanks in part to hannah— the medal tally, thanks in part to hannah cockcroft. she's reigned supreme since the london paralympics in tokyo, and now hannah cockcroft
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has won her seventh gold medal overall. she set a new paralympic record too, in the t34 800 metres, in what was a british, one—two, as kare adenegan took silver. there has also been more british success, on the water — let's get more with our reporter out in tokyo, rachael latham. so hannah cockcroft�*s success, one of three golds for paralympics gb so far today. of three golds for paralympics gb so far toda . , ., ., of three golds for paralympics gb so fartoda . , ., ., , far today. yes, hannah absolutely stormed ahead of— far today. yes, hannah absolutely stormed ahead of the _ far today. yes, hannah absolutely stormed ahead of the rest - far today. yes, hannah absolutely stormed ahead of the rest of- far today. yes, hannah absolutely stormed ahead of the rest of the i stormed ahead of the rest of the field to win the gold medal, but it wasn't an easy ride physically for her. she actually slipped her hand on her wheelchair during the warm—up so she was pushing her wheel and her hand went through the spike on her chair, which left her hand split open, so she had to race with a bandaged up. she said she was very happy to win the gold but she does think her injury may have stopped herfrom breaking the think her injury may have stopped her from breaking the world record. hannah cockcroft is one of those athletes who always wants more. she did break the world record in the 100 metres last week, and she said her teammate, 100 metres last week, and she said herteammate, kare 100 metres last week, and she said her teammate, kare adenegan got the silver. 0ver
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her teammate, kare adenegan got the silver. over in the canoeing there was gold silver. 0ver in the canoeing there was gold 1— silver. over in the canoeing there was gold 1— two, charlotte henshaw got the gold medal, this is her fourth paralympic games but the first time she has won gold. she has silver and bronze in the swimming pool in previous years. and her teammate settled first silver after winning a gold medal yesterday. and staying at the para canoe, also gold to laura sugar, she started in athletics, moved over to para— canoe and finally got that gold medal on the water in the 200 metres kl3 class. �* ., ., , class. and we are not finished, it is still daylight _ class. and we are not finished, it is still daylight there _ class. and we are not finished, it is still daylight there in _ class. and we are not finished, it is still daylight there in tokyo, i is still daylight there in tokyo, what more can we look forward to later on today? we what more can we look forward to later on today?— what more can we look forward to later on today? we will be sticking with the athletics _ later on today? we will be sticking with the athletics again, _ later on today? we will be sticking with the athletics again, and - later on today? we will be sticking with the athletics again, and it - with the athletics again, and it will be katina cox in the 400 metres later on this evening, we have already seen her when two golds in the cycling track in tokyo, she made history in rio five years ago by competing in athletics and cycling, she is doing it again here and she
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is hoping to defend her title and when another gold on the track later. and over in the field competition, alec davies will be going in the shot put, also the paralympic champion from rio, he holds a world champion he holds the paralympic record and he will be hoping to add another gold to his collection. —— aled davies. it is looking like another super saturday here in tokyo. looking like another super saturday here in tokyo-— looking like another super saturday here in tokyo. a stunning fightback from dan evans means he's now through to the fourth round of the us open, for the first time. he was staring at defeat, when australian alexei popyrin surged into a two—set lead, but he showed the world he's recovered now from the after—effects of having covid—19, with great strength and character, as he dug in to level the match at two sets all. both players were now exhausted, but evans summoned the energy
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to take the match in a nail—biting fifth set, the tie break sealed as popryin double faulted on match point. evans could hardly believe it and faces the second seed daniil medvedev next. so evans marches on, unlike naomi 0saka — the women's defending champion has been knocked out, losing in one of the great upsets to the canadian teenager leylah fernandez. 0saka was serving for the match in the second set, but the 18—year—old hung in and fought back to win in three sets. 0saka was in tears afterwards, and said she will now take a break from the sport. now to the cricket, and wow — what a third test its proving to be between england and india — you just can't tell which way this one is going to swing next. and remember the series is level at 1—1. it's why this penultimate test at the oval is so crucial. and having looked in control, england lost two early wickets, yesterday, with craig 0verton and dawid malan both falling to umesh yadav. but then 0llie pope came to the rescue, guiding england to a first innings lead. he looked set for a century
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but was bowled out for 81. england were eventually dismissed for 299, but then india looked revived with the bat, finishing the day on 43 without loss, 56 runs behind. the women's super league is back, and manchester united started with a 2—0 win over reading. kirsty hanson put united ahead just before the break, nicely slotting home after being played through. and after reading were left fuming that they were denied a goal which was deemed not to have crossed the line, they don't have goal—line technology so they were supposedly, understandably i guess, furious. salt was rubbed into their wounds when 0na batlle sealed the three points early in the second in marc skinner's first game as manager, having replaced casey stoney. the bbc are broadcasting one live game around, there will be coverage of evidence versus manchester city
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later on bbc one from 1:15pm. britain's dina asher—smith ran a personal best in the women's 200 metres at the diamond league in brussels. she was second with 75 metres to go behind jamaican shericka jackson, but a late surge from 18—year—old sensation christine mboma blew them both away to take first, with asher—smith coming third. despite this, she said she was just happy to be running that fast again. that is great to see. elsewhere in brussels, kelly hodgkinson finished second in the women's 800 metres behind the jamaican laoya goul. and scotland take on moldova tonight, they are coming third in group f and steve clark says his players know it is a much when —— must win moment now in their campaign. it is is a much when -- must win moment now in their campaign.— is a much when -- must win moment i now in their campaign.— now in their campaign. it is 'ust about winning, i now in their campaign. it is 'ust about winning, winning i now in their campaign. it isjust about winning, winning with i now in their campaign. it isjust about winning, winning with a l now in their campaign. it isjust i about winning, winning with a good performance, that is what it is about. can't think too much about it, we have to win against moldova.
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we know what this week was all about, we need points to keep us in contention towards the end of the group stage, so we are always fighting so come 0ctober group stage, so we are always fighting so come october or november we are in the mix for qualification. and we still have that in front of us. we need a performance and we need a win against moldova and that is what we focus on. good luck, you are finally getting your rugby back —— rugby boots back on today because after 18 months and the pandemic trust bits —— grassroots rugby players can get stuck back into scrums and malls and later we will be speaking to eddie jones, the head coach, who is down at wimbledon.— jones, the head coach, who is down at wimbledon. ., , , at wimbledon. some of the players we will see today. — at wimbledon. some of the players we will see today, for _ at wimbledon. some of the players we will see today, for them _ at wimbledon. some of the players we will see today, for them playing i will see today, for them playing rugby and being a part of that team activity, it is their mental health, the social element of it, the part it plays in the community, notjust the sport. it plays in the community, not 'ust the sort. , ., , ., , ., the sport. they have been able to train but not _
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the sport. they have been able to train but not actually _ the sport. they have been able to train but not actually play - the sport. they have been able to i train but not actually play matches. to have full contact and properly play competitively, which means a lot of them —— a lot to them. it is 6:38am. a hospital surgeon was given his own second chance at life following an amazing gift from a colleague. rebecca brazendale decided she wanted to help, after all other avenues had been exhausted. gill dummigan reports. asa as a surgeon andrew is used to making others better at a progressive kidney condition left him needing dialysis in march last year as lockdown head. it him needing dialysis in march last year as lockdown head.— him needing dialysis in march last year as lockdown head. it was a very stran . e year as lockdown head. it was a very strange time. _ year as lockdown head. it was a very strange time. i _ year as lockdown head. it was a very strange time, i had _ year as lockdown head. it was a very strange time, i had dialysis - year as lockdown head. it was a very strange time, i had dialysis at i year as lockdown head. it was a very strange time, i had dialysis at home| strange time, i had dialysis at home which was ok but it was tiring. andrew needed transplant, family and friends had all offered to help over the years but none were a match. it was hard to take because you think something is going to be there, it is within touching distance and it was on a few occasions, and then no, that can't go ahead.— that can't go ahead. which is when rebecca stepped _ that can't go ahead. which is when rebecca stepped in. _ that can't go ahead. which is when rebecca stepped in. he _ that can't go ahead. which is when rebecca stepped in. he needed i that can't go ahead. which is when rebecca stepped in. he needed it| that can't go ahead. which is when i rebecca stepped in. he needed it and his family needed _
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rebecca stepped in. he needed it and his family needed for _ rebecca stepped in. he needed it and his family needed for some _ his family needed for some normality. i spoke to him and i said "i normality. ! spoke to him and i said "i know— normality. i spoke to him and i said "i know you — normality. i spoke to him and i said "i know you think i am crazy but really _ "i know you think i am crazy but really i — "i know you think i am crazy but really i have _ "i know you think i am crazy but really i have thought about it long and hard. — really i have thought about it long and hard, and i would like to try. " and hard, and i would like to try. “ what and hard, and i would like to try. what did you and hard, and i would like to try. “ what did you think when rebecca first... i what did you think when rebecca first... ., , what did you think when rebecca first... .,, ., ., .,, what did you think when rebecca first... ., ., ., , first... i was amazed, i was really touched that _ first... i was amazed, i was really touched that she _ first... i was amazed, i was really touched that she even _ first... i was amazed, i was really touched that she even offered, i i first... i was amazed, i was really i touched that she even offered, i put her in touch with the team at preston, not expecting anything to come of it whatsoever really. but the were come of it whatsoever really. but they were a _ come of it whatsoever really. but they were a match and in march this year at manchester island infirmary, —— infirmary, rebecca? was translated into andrew. was there ever a point where you thought actually i am starting to feel a bit nervous. ., ., ., , actually i am starting to feel a bit nervous. ., ., , ., nervous. no, no i was 'ust wanting to net it nervous. no, no i was 'ust wanting to get it done h nervous. no, no i was 'ust wanting to get it done to i nervous. no, no i wasjust wanting to get it done to make _ nervous. no, no i wasjust wanting to get it done to make andrew's i nervous. no, no i wasjust wanting. to get it done to make andrew's life and family— to get it done to make andrew's life and family life better. i to get it done to make andrew's life and family life better.— and family life better. i went down to theatre. — and family life better. i went down to theatre. i _ and family life better. i went down to theatre, i knew— and family life better. i went down to theatre, i knew rebecca - and family life better. i went down to theatre, i knew rebecca was i and family life better. i went down to theatre, i knew rebecca was allj to theatre, i knew rebecca was all right and in recovery, went under anaesthetic and the next thing i knew was waking up in recovery, the surgeons saying all has gone well. the pandemic saw a drop of nearly two—thirds in living transplant operations, which has left thousands on the waiting list.—
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on the waiting list. there are siml on the waiting list. there are simply not — on the waiting list. there are simply not enough _ on the waiting list. there are simply not enough organs i on the waiting list. there are i simply not enough organs available from deceased donors to meet the need, there are always thousands of people on the waiting list for a kidney transplant, and not enough organs available from deceased donors to fulfil kidneys from living donors also transplant better which is why andrew and rebecca want others to think of doing the same. i andrew and rebecca want others to think of doing the same.— think of doing the same. i think it is an amazing _ think of doing the same. i think it is an amazing thing _ think of doing the same. i think it is an amazing thing for _ think of doing the same. i think it is an amazing thing for me i think of doing the same. i think it is an amazing thing for me just i think of doing the same. i think it is an amazing thing for me just to feel as _ is an amazing thing for me just to feel as i _ is an amazing thing for me just to feel as i did — is an amazing thing for me just to feel as i did before, i don't feel any different at all, and for it to be amazing, one kidney can make andy so much _ be amazing, one kidney can make andy so much better. so be amazing, one kidney can make andy so much better-— so much better. so far the kidney is workin: so much better. so far the kidney is working fantastic, _ so much better. so far the kidney is working fantastic, it _ so much better. so far the kidney is working fantastic, it is _ so much better. so far the kidney is working fantastic, it is a _ so much better. so far the kidney is working fantastic, it is a great i working fantastic, it is a great kidney she has given me, i am amazingly touched, it is a jester you can't put into words, it has transformed my life and given me for the foreseeable future some certainty stop —— gesture. mr; the foreseeable future some certainty stop -- gesture. my life hasn't changed _ certainty stop -- gesture. my life hasn't changed apart _ certainty stop -- gesture. my life hasn't changed apart from - certainty stop -- gesture. my life hasn't changed apart from a i certainty stop -- gesture. my life j hasn't changed apart from a scar, and it— hasn't changed apart from a scar, and it is— hasn't changed apart from a scar, and it is my— hasn't changed apart from a scar, and it is my scar, is a happy scar to see _ and it is my scar, is a happy scar to see what _ and it is my scar, is a happy scar to see what i _ and it is my scar, is a happy scar to see what i didn't make a family as happy— to see what i didn't make a family as happy as — to see what i didn't make a family
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as happy as can be. what an amazing thing to do! remarkable story, always full of respect when you hear about people making those decisions, transplants. and it came as quite a surprise. a year ago phil hayward set out to run ten kilometres a day for charity. he's finally completed his epic challenge raising over £15,000 for the mental health charity mind. but he didn'tjust run the distance — he crawled, went barefoot and even borrowed his girlfriend's high heels, as samantha nanda reports. ten kilometres a day for 366 days with no days off. phil has run over 2270 miles, gone through six pairs of trainers and countless blisters during his fundraising challenge. and to keep it interesting, he ran
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barefoot, in heels, dribble the ball and even crawled.— and even crawled. cheering and applause _ and even crawled. cheering and applause do — and even crawled. cheering and applause. do you _ and even crawled. cheering and applause. do you think - and even crawled. cheering and applause. do you think you i and even crawled. cheering and applause. do you think you will. and even crawled. cheering and i applause. do you think you will miss it? mentally i — applause. do you think you will miss it? mentally | think _ applause. do you think you will miss it? mentally i think i _ applause. do you think you will miss it? mentally i think i will, _ it? mentally i think i will, physically _ it? mentally i think i will, physically my _ it? mentally i think i will, physically my body i it? mentally i think i will, physically my body has i it? mentally i think i will, i physically my body has been it? mentally i think i will, - physically my body has been crying out for a couple of months but mentally i will miss it. the out for a couple of months but mentally i will miss it.- mentally i will miss it. the pe teacher was _ mentally i will miss it. the pe teacher was surprised - mentally i will miss it. the pe teacher was surprised by i mentally i will miss it. the pe| teacher was surprised by about mentally i will miss it. the pe i teacher was surprised by about a hundred family friends and student at the finish line. we hundred family friends and student at the finish line.— at the finish line. we are from his army school. _ at the finish line. we are from his army school, our— at the finish line. we are from his army school, our children - at the finish line. we are from his army school, our children and i army school, our children and ourselves _ army school, our children and ourselves have run out a few times with him. _ ourselves have run out a few times with him, but what he has done is phenomenal. with him, but what he has done is phenomenal-— with him, but what he has done is phenomenal. every day for a year, i can imagine — phenomenal. every day for a year, i can imagine doing _ phenomenal. every day for a year, i can imagine doing it _ phenomenal. every day for a year, i can imagine doing it once _ phenomenal. every day for a year, i can imagine doing it once in a year, | can imagine doing it once in a year, it has been inspirational. since can imagine doing it once in a year, it has been inspirational.— it has been inspirational. since the onset of covid _ it has been inspirational. since the onset of covid we _ it has been inspirational. since the onset of covid we have _ it has been inspirational. since the onset of covid we have seen i it has been inspirational. since the onset of covid we have seen a - onset of covid we have seen a massive — onset of covid we have seen a massive increase in demand for our services, _ massive increase in demand for our services, so— massive increase in demand for our services, so it will help us to expand — services, so it will help us to expand our services really, and get our community through this awful time that— our community through this awful time that we have been through. lifelong — time that we have been through. lifelong everton fan phil was spurred on by messages from some of his heroes. i spurred on by messages from some of his heroes. . ., , , ., . ,, ., his heroes. i am gobsmacked at the tenacity that — his heroes. i am gobsmacked at the tenacity that you — his heroes. i am gobsmacked at the tenacity that you have _ his heroes. i am gobsmacked at the tenacity that you have got, - his heroes. i am gobsmacked at the tenacity that you have got, and - tenacity that you have got, and the goodwill that you have got to do it
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for the mind charity. so this is a good luck wish from me, tip my hat to you. good luck wish from me, tip my hat to ou. �* , ~ . good luck wish from me, tip my hat to ou. �* , . . ., , good luck wish from me, tip my hat to ou. fl. ., ., to you. phil's challenge has not onl ket to you. phil's challenge has not only kept peeple _ to you. phil's challenge has not only kept people entertained i to you. phil's challenge has not i only kept people entertained over lockdown but he has managed to raise thousands of pounds to his heart. people like myself, and i thought if i could do something to help people by showing it is ok to not be ok, and doing things out of your comfort zone basically. i and doing things out of your comfort zone basically-— zone basically. i think he is absolutely _ zone basically. i think he is absolutely amazing, - zone basically. i think he is absolutely amazing, he - zone basically. i think he is| absolutely amazing, he has zone basically. i think he is - absolutely amazing, he has tried so hard and _ absolutely amazing, he has tried so hard and he — absolutely amazing, he has tried so hard and he is really good. what are ou auoin hard and he is really good. what are you going to — hard and he is really good. what are you going to do _ hard and he is really good. what are you going to do next? _ hard and he is really good. what are you going to do next? sleep! - always the classic question, what are you going to do next?- are you going to do next? sleep, start again- _ are you going to do next? sleep, start again. how— are you going to do next? sleep, start again. how do _ are you going to do next? sleep, start again. how do you - are you going to do next? sleep, start again. how do you stop, - start again. how do you stop, though? it is become such a big part of your life. i am worried about his knees. samantha nanda reporting there. looking at the weather. things are
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changing, are they not? thea;r looking at the weather. things are changing, are they not?— changing, are they not? they are. and about — changing, are they not? they are. and about time. _ changing, are they not? they are. and about time. good _ changing, are they not? they are. and about time. good morning, i changing, are they not? they are. and about time. good morning, it} changing, are they not? they are. - and about time. good morning, it has been mostly dry but for many of us quite cloudy and cool. through the weekend we have got a little bit more sunshine on offer. not everywhere at most places it should see a bit of sunshine at times and the temperatures will be on the up for the next few days, too. here is this morning in pemba —— the fog should clear away in the middle part of the morning so today should be looking like a largely dry day. sunny spells but some cloud that has been quite stubborn to clear away. still high—pressure in charge of the weather that it is shifting the position, moving away a little bit to the east and that will be drawing in this breeze for a south—easterly direction which will bring in warmer air. also a weather front pushing into the northwest which is later on. some rain tomorrow for scotland and northern ireland. most places
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dry tomorrow but the cloud is big enough for a spews —— for a few spots of dribble. further south, brighter with more sunshine around. less windy than it has been as well so it will feel that little bit warmer but still the breeze coming in from the north the union cloud and coolest conditions for the likes of aberdeen to newcastle. from the south, 23 degrees also towards cardiff. as we head through into the evening hours, late sunshine for many of us and then overnight, things stay largely dry once again. quite a bit of cloud, particularly in the north and east. just clear skies towards the south and the west but reasonably mild air moving in so it won't be a cold night stop temperatures staying well into the double figures. through tomorrow, a mild start with areas of cloud drifting around, particularly through central and eastern parts of england, they could be stubborn to clear but for most of us, a day of long spells, sunshine, or wet
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weather moving in for northern ireland and the north—west of scotland later on in the afternoon stop before it gets there, temperatures between 17 and 2a degrees on sunday. then as we head through sunday night and into monday, the weather front pushes further south though it will bring a few showers overnight but it will tend to fizzle out fairly quickly on monday so one of two showers around three essential parts of the uk to start the day. elsewhere it should be dry for much of the day with long pals —— spells of sunshine and warmer than it has been recently. we could see temperatures on monday up to 26 or 27 degrees, charlie and nina. time now for this week's addition of the film review with anna smith. hello and welcome to the film review
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with me, anna smith. i'm filling in for mark kermode to review this week's releases. my first choice is an ambitious rock opera which divided audiences at this year's cannes film festival. chattering. how did the show go? i killed them. destroyed them. murdered them. good boy. and yourgig? i...i saved them. one, two, three, four.
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i'm still slightly reeling from annette, the long and complicated story of a famous comedian called henry, played by adam driver, and his opera singer wife, anne, played by marion cotillard. the title refers to the child they have together. but to say much more about her would be a spoiler. let's just say that things get very surreal after these two have a kid and hit a rocky patch. this is directed with bold visual flare by holy motors helmer, leos carax. and is scripted by the band, sparks, who were recently the subject of edgar wright's documentary. ron and russell mael bring a recognisably quirky humour to the score, and there are moments of intentional hilarity, as driver and cotillard sing in unusual places, including in bed. but the story structure feels haphazard, and the characters are hard to access. i also think this could've used the input of a real standup comedian, even though henry's meant to be losing his touch, his standup scenes seem unfunny and unrealistic. still, realism is not
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the goal with this film, and there are high points — for one thing, i enjoyed the performance from simon helberg, after his similar turn as an accomplice in florence fosterjenkins. and there's a duet at the end of the film which is very powerful. this moment delivers a revelatory explanation for a lot of the madness that's preceded it, but it feels like too little too late. a lavish folly, annette is in cinemas now.
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next, to marvel�*s first asian superhero — shang—chi and the legend of the ten rings. shang—chi is the son of a master criminal father and a martial artist mother, but he's keeping a low profile, working as a valet in san francisco. going by the name of shawn, he enjoys drinks and karaoke with his best buddy, katy, played by awkwafina. you have the wrong guy! does he look like he can fight? come on, bro! but a spectacular scrap on a bus reveals him to be seriously skilled in the fighting department, with daddy issues to rival luke skywalker. you 0k? katyjoins him on a trip to mako to find his sister and fight against the ten rings organisation — who will be familiar to devotees of the marvel cinematic universe. directed by destin daniel cretton, this is also the first marvel film
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where the majority of the cast are asian or of asian descent. shang—chi. shawn—chi. no, shang—chi. shawn—chi. shang... shawn... shang. shawn... s—h—a—n—g — shang. shang? _ yeah. star, simu liu makes a likeable lead and is joined by seasoned actors, michelle yeoh and tony leung, with meng?er zhang making an impressive screen debut as shang—chi's sister. marvel regular benedict wong also makes a welcome return. but once again, the secret weapon is that fabulous awkwafina, and her irreverent comic relief. even if she's also there to explain everything in very simple terms. personally, i could have done without the return of ben kingsley as hammy actor trevor slattery, who first appeared in iron man 3. and his fluffy cg sidekick seems aimed to please purely small kids and the merchandising department.
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that aside, the film is fantastic to look at, from visual effects to costumes, all the departments are at the top of their game here. shang—chi is an entertaining blockbuster that should please fans of the mcu, and it's a historic moment for asian representation in mainstream movies. who are you? it's in cinemas now. i hear your sister's back. she came home herself. where was she? where did the police find her? isis she 0k? lauren? she gasps. a missing woman returns home in wildfire, an impressive debut from director, cathy brady. danika mcguigan plays kelly, who reappears in her small northern irish town a year after she vanished. hersister, lauren, played by nora—jane—noone, is relieved
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but also angry with kelly for putting her through the trauma of the past year. as kelly shakes up lauren's suburban existence, the sisters tragic past is revealed. it's a tense and powerful drama exploring loss, mental health and family, with strong supporting performances from martin mccann and also kate dickey, whom we saw in last week's our ladies. but this film really belongs to its two female leads who are terrific and very believable as siblings. wildfire is an intense and moving watch that's made all the more poignant knowing that star nika mcguigan sadly passed away last year. it's in cinemas now. i could never make up this plot. if i did, somebody would say, "this is preposterous, "this would not happen." i was so overwhelmed by this story. it's unbelievable. onto a documentary about a literary scandal — misha and the wolves. if you haven't heard of misha defonseca, don't
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look her up before watching, because this documentary is the cinematic equivalent of a real page turner. misha is a holocaust survivor. she's here to tell her astonishing story. you could have heard a pin drop. when she was only seven years old, she walked alone through nazi occupied countries, across thousands of miles, in search of her deported parents. in 1997, defonseca published her memoirs of surviving the holocaust as a child, partly by befriending a pack of wolves. the book was a huge success, but her publisher, jane daniel, had nagging doubts about the veracity of the tail, especially after misha turned down the chance to appear on oprah. after the pairfell out, daniel hired an investigators to dig deeper, and the results make for shocking viewing. but there are plenty of colourful talking heads, most of whom are female, which strikes me as a rare. she's trying to hide something. i would've loved to have heard more from the wolf breeders, who make a fascinating contribution,
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although that detective work from a real holocaust survivor is at the heart of this film that's as unsettling as it is sensational. he speaks french. how can this possibly be? she's both a victim and a villain in this story. it's in cinemas now. this is how it works, you give me 20% of the takings at the door, that's the door, the cloak room and the bar. i say who comes in, i say who goes out. my word is final. it's a deal. next stop, essex criminals and the fifth and the rise of the foot soldier series. rise of the foot soldier: origins stars terry stone as tony tucker, the real—life drug dealer who was killed in 1995.
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this traces his move from army vet to nightclub doorman, where he teams up with notorious heavy, bernard o'mahoney who's played by series newcomer, vinniejones. tony is introduced as a bighearted geezer who is always prepared to drop his kebab in order to break up a fight. his descent into crazed criminal behaviour all seems a bit sudden. what starts off like a recruitment ad for the army moves into a tawdry nightclub thriller and borderline spoof of british crime movies. i'll find you! unprovoked violence comes thick and fast, and i feel like they might be going for some kind of record for use of the c word. it's disturbing in parts, but often so over—the—top, you have to laugh. there's some criminal use of good music, like new order, and some music that is just criminal in itself. die—hard foot soldier fans may wish to know that this is in cinemas now. if you're curious about it for comedy value, then you might want to wait for it to come to the small screen. i've always done things backwards. i kissed you. and then i met you. what the...? oh, my god! i thought you were someone else!
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congratulations on your upcoming wedding. - i don't know how upcoming it is, he won't set a date. we'll talk about it later. later. teddy, what is it. with you and later? hot on the heels of the brilliant palm springs comes another comedy inspired by the classic groundhog day. the australian film long story short stars rafe spall as teddy, a serial procrastinator who marries leanne, the woman of his dreams, played by zahra newman. after his wedding day, teddy wakes up and it's one year later. leanne is pregnant and teddy is seriously confused, especially when he continues jumping into his own future one year at a time on his wedding anniversary. josh lawson's comedy is very open about its debt to groundhog day, which is referred to several times, and this also has a strong whiff of it's a wonderful life. this is about lesson learning, and while its messages are driven
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home simply and invariably repetitively, the film benefits from endearing characters and spall�*s gift for sarcastic asides. long story short might not be a classic, but it's a pleasant way to pass the time. it's on sky cinema and the streaming service now. thanks for watching the film review with me, anna smith, and for watching the show from our home studios for the past year and a half. mark will be back from his break next week, when the show will be coming from the bbc studio. hugger. hold on, everybody! ah! we make a good team!
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and charlie stayt. our headlines today: a mass covid vaccine rollout for 12— to is—year—olds could still go ahead despite a decision by the government's scientific advisors not to support it. gps are forced to delay flu jabs because of a shortage of hgv drivers which has disrupted supplies. us presidentjoe biden has warned about the dangers of climate change after visiting communities devastated by hurricane ida. a magnificent seventh gold medal for hannah cockcroft — she's the paralympic champion once
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again in the t34 800 metres, the first of three golds already today for the british team in tokyo. good morning, a bit cool and cloudy for some _ good morning, a bit cool and cloudy for some of— good morning, a bit cool and cloudy for some of us— good morning, a bit cool and cloudy for some of us recently— good morning, a bit cool and cloudy for some of us recently but - good morning, a bit cool and cloudy for some of us recently but you - good morning, a bit cool and cloudy for some of us recently but you willl for some of us recently but you will be pleased — for some of us recently but you will be pleased to — for some of us recently but you will be pleased to hear— for some of us recently but you will be pleased to hear there _ for some of us recently but you will be pleased to hear there is- for some of us recently but you will be pleased to hear there is a - for some of us recently but you will be pleased to hear there is a bit- be pleased to hear there is a bit more _ be pleased to hear there is a bit more sunshine _ be pleased to hear there is a bit more sunshine and _ be pleased to hear there is a bit more sunshine and the - be pleased to hear there is a bitl more sunshine and the forecast, be pleased to hear there is a bit- more sunshine and the forecast, and temperatures — more sunshine and the forecast, and temperatures will— more sunshine and the forecast, and temperatures will be _ more sunshine and the forecast, and temperatures will be on _ more sunshine and the forecast, and temperatures will be on the - more sunshine and the forecast, and temperatures will be on the up - more sunshine and the forecast, and temperatures will be on the up overl temperatures will be on the up over the next _ temperatures will be on the up over the next few— temperatures will be on the up over the next few days. _ temperatures will be on the up over the next few days. summary - temperatures will be on the up over the next few days. summary in - temperatures will be on the up over the next few days. summary in the i the next few days. summary in the forecast _ the next few days. summary in the forecast tomorrow— the next few days. summary in the forecast tomorrow for— the next few days. summary in the forecast tomorrow for the - the next few days. summary in the forecast tomorrow for the north, . forecast tomorrow for the north, more _ forecast tomorrow for the north, more details _ forecast tomorrow for the north, more details throughout - forecast tomorrow for the north, more details throughout the - more details throughout the morning's— more details throughout the morning's programme. - it's saturday 1! september. our top story: the uk's four chief medical officers are expected to decide within days whether to recommend vaccinating healthy children against coronavirus. yesterday the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation, which advises the government, decided against recommending the jabs for 12— to is—year—olds, saying the health benefits were marginal. it's believed the government think there's a strong case for going ahead. here's our health correspondent catherine burns. america has been doing it since may.
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more than 10 million 12— to is—year—olds there have had a covid vaccine. other countries are too, including canada, brazil, france, the netherlands, italy — but not the uk. regulators approved vaccines as safe and effective for this age group in the summer, but thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation's job is to decide if it is necessary. its answer — not for every i2—is —year—olds. for the healthy children, the risk—benefit balance is really very uncertain and very tight. normally what we do when we recommend vaccination for children is we see a very clear benefit, that clearly outweighs any possible risk. and in the absence of that clear blue water if you like between those two, we prefer to advise that healthy children should not for the moment he immunised. covid doesn't tend to make children very sick, so the benefits of vaccinating them have to be weighed up against the risks — like myocarditis,
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inflammation of the heart. it is a very rare complication from pfizer and moderna vaccines, and affects young people more. they tend to recover quickly, but thejcvi wants to know more about the longer term effects. but some of the 3 million 12— to is—year—olds across the uk will be invited for a vaccine. 150,000 were already eligible because they have conditions including down syndrome or any problems. same too for another 111i,000 teenagers because they live with someone who is immunosuppressed. and now that has been extended to another 200,000 children with a wider range of conditions like heart problems, epilepsy or poorly controlled asthma. so as schools go back, teenagers who are most likely to be severely affected by coronavirus will be able to get a vaccine. the experts have made this call purely on the health of children, not other factors like a missing
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time in education. the next step, the chief medical officers in england, scotland, wales and northern ireland have been asked to weigh up those other factors. which means this decision could change one way or another in the next week or so. our political correspondent helen cattjoins us now. helen, we're expecting a decision from the uk's four chief medical —— government scientists recommend and government ministers then make the decisions. usually they correspond but the suggestion out is it may bea be a diversion? it has been easy for ministers so — be a diversion? it has been easy for ministers so far— be a diversion? it has been easy for ministers so far during _ be a diversion? it has been easy for ministers so far during the - ministers so far during the vaccination programme, as you set at each stagejcvi has made a clear recommendation and then ministers have been able to go ahead and implement. this is the first time we have seen something where there is this sense of it being so finely
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balanced. we know ministers have previously been suggested that they are quite keen to vaccinate teenagers, earlierthis are quite keen to vaccinate teenagers, earlier this week the prime minister's official spokesman told journalist plans have been made so that if the jcvi told journalist plans have been made so that if thejcvi said let's go ahead, they could roll it out to teenagers. we know the preparations were being made there, of course now the recommendation has not come through, as you said the chief medical officers have been asked to take a broader look at this. the sources at the department of health do suggest that it is not off the table, and certainly in westminster i think the expectation is that those chief medical officers will all work together so it is unlikely we will see a different approach to different parts of the country. helen, thank you very much. some gp surgeries in england and wales have begun cancelling appointments for the winter flu jab, after delays to the delivery of doses of the vaccine. a shortage of lorry drivers is believed to be behind the problem. doctors have warned it will have a serious impact on workloads and patients. our correspondent helena
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wilkinson has this report. this year's flu campaign is set to be the largest in history. more than 35 million people in the uk will be offered the jab on the nhs. news of a delay to some flu vaccine delivery ——news of a delay to some flu vaccine deliveries is causing concern, and cancellations. seqirus, which supplies vaccines to gp practices and pharmacies in england and wales have told their customers supply would be disrupted due to unforeseen road freight challenges. it is believed to be because of a shortage of lorry drivers. the company warned of a delay of up to two weeks. it is advising gps not to book patients in until they have confirmation of delivery. a two—week delay has a massive impact on our flu vaccine programme, because the clinics are already set up, many surgeries already have a lot of vulnerable patients booked in, we like to get going early on in september,
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ready for the winter. so this is really, really worrying. doctors are already dealing with a chronic shortage of blood test tubes. supply chain issues have been blamed for that. the british medical association said delays to flu vaccine deliveries caused a huge increase in staff's already unsustainable workloads, adding that it created unneeded anxiety for patients. helena wilkinson, bbc news. the taliban say they're making advances in the panjshir valley, where there's been fierce fighting in the only remaining part of afghanistan not under the group's control. the area, north of the capital kabul, is one of the country's smallest provinces and battles there are reported to have left hundreds dead. the leaders of resistance forces have denied the taliban's claims. president biden has praised people in louisiana and mississippi
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for their response to hurricane ida last sunday. there's been anger at the delays in restoring power, and mr biden promised that infrastructure would be "built back better" to withstand future storms as nada tawfik reports. one week and a storm that brought america to its knees. look at that tornado! from new orleans to new york, it was a dramatic beating. record rainfall, life—threatening floods, destructive winds and tornadoes usually only seen in the midwest tore through communities with no mercy. in some places it was unprecedented, and sparked fear about the ferocity and frequency of future weather. oh, my god! the river is flooding! part of this newjersey town was abandoned after the nearby river crested and left cars and homes under 10 feet of water. four people died and about 600 were left homeless. gloria jett lost everything, but was lucky to escape with her life. she can't swim and had to be rescued by neighbours
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as the water rose inside her home. i started pounding. for somebody to come and help me so i won't die. i felt like i was dying. down these streets, peoples' belongings and memories are laid out for garbage pick—up. the roldan family lost three cars and everything in their basement. but already the insurance company has told them they will not cover much of the damage. it's the first time that it happened, but if we stay in the house, what if it happens again? like, does it really pay to stay in this area any more? president biden has approved an emergency declaration for new york and newjersey. today, he traveled to meet victims in louisiana, where ida first made landfall as a category 1! hurricane. after surveying the damage, he highlighted the threat from climate change. things have changed so drastically in terms of the environment. we've already crossed certain thresholds, we cannot build back a road, a highway,
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a bridge to what it was before. you've got to build back to what it is now, what's needed now. the cost to life, property and infrastructure has been staggering. still, climate change remains a divisive political issue. and so, over the years, america has ignored warnings and some would say this is the result. nada tawfik, bbc news, newjersey. new evidence has emerged that people have put on weight during the pandemic. nhs data shows that people who signed up for a weight loss programme were on average more than five pounds heavier than three years before covid struck. there are concerns this could lead to an increase in the number of people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. blackpool�*s famous illuminations are lighting up the seaside town again, after a star—studded switch—on last night. strictly come dancing's shirley ballas pulled the lever at the iconic tower ballroom.
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and the lights come on... there you go. the lights will stay on untiljanuary again this year. it's hoped the extra two months will bring more tourists to the area and give a boost to businesses. if we hold for this shot it is rather dramatic. helping them in a difficult time. last year i packed the car ready to take the kids to blackpool to see the lights, and looked online and we had missed them by a week. check the dates before you depart! that had missed them by a week. check the dates before you depart!— dates before you depart! that is bad ”lannin. dates before you depart! that is bad planning. 7:11am. _ more than 35 million people in the uk are expected to be offered a flu jab this winter — but a delay in the supply of doses from one of the biggest manufacturers is causing concern about the rollout. it's been caused a shortage of lorry drivers — let's find out what impact it could have on gps. we're joined by dr david wrigley, who is vice—chair of the british medical association. i guess there are two elements to
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this, the impact on you as gps but also on the wider public. let's start with what it is like, the astra admin of cancelling. it start with what it is like, the astra admin of cancelling. it has been so difficult _ astra admin of cancelling. it has been so difficult and _ astra admin of cancelling. it has been so difficult and we - astra admin of cancelling. it has been so difficult and we plan - astra admin of cancelling. it has| been so difficult and we plan our flu campaign probably 12 months in advance _ flu campaign probably 12 months in advance from when the last one end, we begin— advance from when the last one end, we begin planning for the next one. all this _ we begin planning for the next one. all this reparation was ready for the delivery of vaccines and then 'ust the delivery of vaccines and then just yesterday we had the message that they— just yesterday we had the message that they were delayed and it was a real body— that they were delayed and it was a real body blow to the practice and staff and — real body blow to the practice and staff and i— real body blow to the practice and staff and i suppose one colleague actually _ staff and i suppose one colleague actually when she said she told us -- told _ actually when she said she told us -- told her— actually when she said she told us —— told her staff they were visibly shaken. — —— told her staff they were visibly shaken. at — —— told her staff they were visibly shaken, at the thought of having to cancel— shaken, at the thought of having to cancel those appointments because we 'ust cancel those appointments because we just had _ cancel those appointments because we just had the debacle would the blood bottle _ just had the debacle would the blood bottle shortage and having to cancel hundreds _ bottle shortage and having to cancel hundreds of blood tests and having to explain — hundreds of blood tests and having to explain to patients that we are doing _ to explain to patients that we are doing our— to explain to patients that we are doing our best, this is totally outside — doing our best, this is totally outside of our control but unfortunately we are having to cancel — unfortunately we are having to cancel these appointments. in a space _ cancel these appointments. in a space of— cancel these appointments. in a space of two weeks we have had to tell patients that a blood test is
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cancelled and now their flu jab is cancelled — cancelled and now their flu jab is cancelled. 50 cancelled and now their flu 'ab is cancelled. :: :: , cancelled and now their flu 'ab is cancelled, $1 $1 , . cancelled and now their flu 'ab is cancelled. i: i: , ., , ., cancelled. so 5500 patients at your ractice cancelled. so 5500 patients at your practice that _ cancelled. so 5500 patients at your practice that you — cancelled. so 5500 patients at your practice that you will _ cancelled. so 5500 patients at your practice that you will have - cancelled. so 5500 patients at your practice that you will have to - cancelled. so 5500 patients at your practice that you will have to begin | practice that you will have to begin again, terms of the impact on their health and then the impact on the trajectory on hospitals, how do you see that playing out? because some may say it is only a fortnight, only the flu? ~ ,._ may say it is only a fortnight, only the flu? _ , may say it is only a fortnight, only theflu?~ ,., ,~ the flu? we say it is only a fortnight — the flu? we say it is only a fortnight and _ the flu? we say it is only a fortnight and we _ the flu? we say it is only a fortnight and we just - the flu? we say it is only a fortnight and we just can't| the flu? we say it is only a - fortnight and we just can't plan ahead — fortnight and we just can't plan ahead now because we don't know what is to come _ ahead now because we don't know what is to come. these flu jabs are for the most — is to come. these flu jabs are for the most elderly patients, over 65s, the most elderly patients, over 65s, the most _ the most elderly patients, over 65s, the most vulnerable. we want to get flu jabs _ the most vulnerable. we want to get flu jabs in— the most vulnerable. we want to get flu jabs in theirarms the most vulnerable. we want to get flu jabs in their arms as quickly as possible _ flu jabs in their arms as quickly as possible to — flu jabs in their arms as quickly as possible to protect them. but now we 'ust possible to protect them. but now we just can't— possible to protect them. but now we just can't plan because we don't know— just can't plan because we don't know when that will happen. we are told that _ know when that will happen. we are told that is— know when that will happen. we are told that is due to freight delivery issues _ told that is due to freight delivery issues and i am sure there is plans for this— issues and i am sure there is plans for this and — issues and i am sure there is plans for this and the bma are calling for the government to take action and ask why— the government to take action and ask why there are no contingency plans— ask why there are no contingency plans in— ask why there are no contingency plans in place for such scenarios. we know — plans in place for such scenarios. we know it — plans in place for such scenarios. we know it is difficulties with lorry— we know it is difficulties with lorry driver so why are we getting these _ lorry driver so why are we getting these flu — lorry driver so why are we getting these flu jab to practices so we can
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-et these flu jab to practices so we can get them _ these flu jab to practices so we can get them into patient split was arms and protect them? in get them into patient split was arms and protect them?— and protect them? in terms of the lo . istics and protect them? in terms of the logistics of — and protect them? in terms of the logistics of where _ and protect them? in terms of the logistics of where they _ and protect them? in terms of the logistics of where they are - logistics of where they are delivered and where they are stored, are there potential problems there? not really, the flu jab is quite easy— not really, the flu jab is quite easy to — not really, the flu jab is quite easy to store at a normal surgery fridge, — easy to store at a normal surgery fridge, so— easy to store at a normal surgery fridge, so we are ready for that, it isjust— fridge, so we are ready for that, it isiust that — fridge, so we are ready for that, it isjust that the fridge, so we are ready for that, it is just that the whole logistics of booking — is just that the whole logistics of booking people in, as i say in my practice — booking people in, as i say in my practice we — booking people in, as i say in my practice we were expecting 5500 injections to arrive this weekend, and now— injections to arrive this weekend, and now we're just in limbo and having— and now we're just in limbo and having to— and now we're just in limbo and having to appointments, cancel surgeries— having to appointments, cancel surgeries and tell patients that they are — surgeries and tell patients that they are going to have to wait for weeks _ they are going to have to wait for weeks on — they are going to have to wait for weeks on end for that important flu 'ab. ., ., ., , , weeks on end for that important flu 'ab. ., ., , , ., jab. royal college of gps have raised concerns _ jab. royal college of gps have raised concerns about - jab. royal college of gps have raised concerns about the - jab. royal college of gps have i raised concerns about the impact jab. royal college of gps have - raised concerns about the impact on patient confidence, do you worry about that? i patient confidence, do you worry about that?— patient confidence, do you worry about that? i feel really sorry for my patients. _ about that? i feel really sorry for my patients. they _ about that? i feel really sorry for my patients, they have - about that? i feel really sorry for my patients, they have had - about that? i feel really sorry for my patients, they have had two l about that? i feel really sorry for - my patients, they have had two body blows _ my patients, they have had two body blows in _ my patients, they have had two body blows in the space of two weeks, and it really— blows in the space of two weeks, and it really knocks the confidence of nhs and — it really knocks the confidence of nhs and actually we're getting flak as well— nhs and actually we're getting flak as well from patients because understandably they are feeling anxious— understandably they are feeling anxious and our practice staff and
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patients— anxious and our practice staff and patients do get aggression, and that is unacceptable but we do see that. it is is unacceptable but we do see that. it is outside — is unacceptable but we do see that. it is outside of our control, we are hearing _ it is outside of our control, we are hearing nothing from politicians and the bma _ hearing nothing from politicians and the bma is actually calling for the government to have a covid meeting because _ government to have a covid meeting because in— government to have a covid meeting because in the last two weeks we have _ because in the last two weeks we have had — because in the last two weeks we have had two major crises and we want _ have had two major crises and we want to _ have had two major crises and we want to hear from our politicians and why— want to hear from our politicians and why there are no contingency plans, _ and why there are no contingency plans, why— and why there are no contingency plans, why they don't have stock of blood _ plans, why they don't have stock of blood bottle is ready to contribute, so we _ blood bottle is ready to contribute, so we don't — blood bottle is ready to contribute, so we don't have to cancel blood test and — so we don't have to cancel blood test and why don't they have plans in place _ test and why don't they have plans in place to— test and why don't they have plans in place to distribute the flu jabs? we want — in place to distribute the flu jabs? we want our politicians to step up and speak— we want our politicians to step up and speak out. | we want our politicians to step up and speak out-— and speak out. i want to ask you about the _ and speak out. i want to ask you about the decision _ and speak out. i want to ask you about the decision that - and speak out. i want to ask you about the decision that has - and speak out. i want to ask you j about the decision that has been taken, the medical advice given to the government about 12—50 —year—old is not taking the vaccine, that the risks outweigh the benefits in that age group, though they are minimal. how unusual would be if the government decided to press ahead with the vaccine for teenagers? if the government decides to press ahead with the vaccine rollout for with the vaccine for teenagers?
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teens? , , ., teens? the first thing is, we are very keen _ teens? the first thing is, we are very keen to _ teens? the first thing is, we are very keen to say _ teens? the first thing is, we are very keen to say that _ teens? the first thing is, we are very keen to say that vaccines i teens? the first thing is, we are l very keen to say that vaccines are safe, _ very keen to say that vaccines are safe, effective, they save lives. we do take _ safe, effective, they save lives. we do take our— safe, effective, they save lives. we do take our guidance from experts. we heard _ do take our guidance from experts. we heard from them in the last day or two _ we heard from them in the last day or two if— we heard from them in the last day or two. if politicians want to take a different — or two. if politicians want to take a different view, i feel it should be the — a different view, i feel it should be the chief medical officer that speaks — be the chief medical officer that speaks about that. we would like to hear from _ speaks about that. we would like to hear from the chief medical officer. we shouldn't have political decisions made about this, it should be based _ decisions made about this, it should be based on — decisions made about this, it should be based on science and evidence. and from — be based on science and evidence. and from the evidence you have seen it your practice, when you look at the way the illness is carried by school—aged children, for example, do you think it should happen? the risks are very, very low for children— risks are very, very low for children and for those who are at risk or— children and for those who are at risk or vulnerable and parents are very happy— risk or vulnerable and parents are very happy to go ahead with the injection— very happy to go ahead with the injection but we need more evidence. we need _ injection but we need more evidence. we need to— injection but we need more evidence. we need to hear from the experts and
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have all— we need to hear from the experts and have all the _ we need to hear from the experts and have all the evidence on the table so that— have all the evidence on the table so that they can advise doctors on the ground — so that they can advise doctors on the ground about what to do. these vaccines _ the ground about what to do. these vaccines are — the ground about what to do. these vaccines are safe but as i say, our children— vaccines are safe but as i say, our children are — vaccines are safe but as i say, our children are very low risk but we need _ children are very low risk but we need to— children are very low risk but we need to make sure everyone is protected _ need to make sure everyone is protected to the maximum as possible _ protected to the maximum as ossible. ., . , possible. doctor david wrigley, vice-chair _ possible. doctor david wrigley, vice-chair and _ possible. doctor david wrigley, vice-chair and president - possible. doctor david wrigley, vice-chair and president of - possible. doctor david wrigley, vice-chair and president of the | vice—chair and president of the medical association. thank you very much for the here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. people might have plans, sarah. how is it looking the next few days? well, charlie and nina emma king is not looking too bad at all through the course of the weekend was a bit of a subtle change —— charlie and nina. it is not looking too bad. we're looking at sunshine and warmer weather. not everywhere, they will some rain tomorrow but before we get there, leopards might look at today. beautiful, clear skies in cornwall. a few mist and fog patches here and there through the course of this morning. we're looking at a dry day
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and some spells of sunshine. this area of high pressure is nudging our way and this will allow winds to come in from a south—easterly direction. —— not only warmer but clearer. there is whether heading into the north—west later on tomorrow. for many places, starting the day on a dry note. some sunshine for parts of southern and western england, wales, northern ireland. there will be more cloud sticking around for parts of eastern england, eastern scotland, too. a few spots of drizzle coming out of the cloud at times, particularly where you have the breeze off the north sea but not as breezy for the likes of east anglia and the south—east. we may see the cloud breaking around the murray firth so some sunshine here but for aberdeen, 1a degrees today. contrast that with cardiff in the sunshine, up to about 23 celsius. this evening, late sunshine for many, especially for southern parts of england and wales and more cloud lasting for parts of
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north—east england and scotland as well. the odd spot of drizzle coming out of that. reasonably mild with temperatures overnight holding about 10- 15 temperatures overnight holding about 10— 15 degrees. that is how we start tomorrow morning, mild and bright with a largely dry day with sunshine and a few areas of cloud stubborn to clear for the likes of east anglia, for example. more sunshine for the east of england and eastern scotland so a bit warmer here. later in the day there will be some rain arriving for northern ireland and northern and western scotland, too. but ahead of that, highs of up to 2b and western scotland, too. but ahead of that, highs of up to 2a or 25 degrees. as we move to sunday night and into monday. the frontal system smooth —— moves south. perhaps one or two showers through the central slice of britain but either side of that looking drive from the word go. sunny skies developing through the day on monday and it will be warming up day on monday and it will be warming up so you will notice temperatures particularly in the south getting up to 26 and possibly 27 degrees so it
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will look like we have higher temperatures in september then we had through the whole of august. beautiful. the map is making a welcome change after the past few weeks, sarah, thank you. police patrolling one of the longest coastlines in the uk have been gifted a jetski to help them tackle antiocial behaviour on the water. the watercraft donated to essex police's marine unit is already making a difference, according to officers, giving them better and faster access to hard—to—reach areas. let's get more on this now from brightlingsea's harbour master james thomas. very good morning to you, james. i wonder if you could give us a sense of what you have witnessed or had reported to you by way of antisocial behaviour. ~ ., ~' behaviour. well, working with the olice, we behaviour. well, working with the police. we carry — behaviour. well, working with the police, we carry out _ behaviour. well, working with the police, we carry out patrols - behaviour. well, working with the police, we carry out patrols in - behaviour. well, working with the police, we carry out patrols in the j police, we carry out patrols in the area as well. obviouslyjetskis are capable of enormous speed but it is not necessary that the speed that is
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the worst thing, it is when they are bouncing in and out of the beaches, mixing in with the swimmers and bathers, small paddle boards or other small little rama —— rubber dinghy. hitting abaydi, it can cause serious injury or worse so these are the things that we are most feared of and that is what we are mainly looking for. of course, speeding jetskis are dangerous as well because many of the people using the jetskis aren't natural mariners and they don't have, not all of them but they don't have, not all of them but the majority of them don't have a huge understanding of the rules of the road, as it were. which isn't too bad if you're paddleboard because you will probably get away with it but if you are going at 75 miles an hourand with it but if you are going at 75 miles an hour and you don't know
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which way to turn because you don't know what the other guy's going to do, it could end up quite catastrophic.— do, it could end up quite catastrohic. ., ., , ., , catastrophic. part of the problem, as i understand _ catastrophic. part of the problem, as i understand it, _ catastrophic. part of the problem, as i understand it, you _ catastrophic. part of the problem, as i understand it, you talked - catastrophic. part of the problem, | as i understand it, you talked about the rules of the road, you canjust get on a jet ski, can't you? and what are the rules?— get on a jet ski, can't you? and what are the rules? well, there are no restrictions _ what are the rules? well, there are no restrictions but _ what are the rules? well, there are no restrictions but that _ what are the rules? well, there are no restrictions but that applies - no restrictions but that applies across the whole of the leisure marine industry. we have chosen not to regulate and that process —— that has probably been quite a good thing and many sailors out there are not qualified but they are probably able and knowledgeable. you can go and buy a jet ski, they are not cheap, about £15,000. that is your only qualification, the money in your pocket. you can get on the jet ski and get out of the water and of course you can look at the surf, it is like a lake and crank up the
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hammerand off you is like a lake and crank up the hammer and off you go. taste is like a lake and crank up the hammer and off you go. we are lookin: hammer and off you go. we are looking at _ hammer and off you go. we are looking at some _ hammer and off you go. we are looking at some of _ hammer and off you go. we are looking at some of the - hammer and off you go. we are looking at some of the images | hammer and off you go. we are l looking at some of the images of hammer and off you go. we are - looking at some of the images of the police jetskis. looking at some of the images of the policejetskis. what looking at some of the images of the police jetskis. what does looking at some of the images of the policejetskis. what does it looking at some of the images of the police jetskis. what does it mean? in a way it sends out a signal that you can be out there and keep an eye on people in practical terms, what is it change in terms of what they will be able to do? the is it change in terms of what they will be able to do?— is it change in terms of what they will be able to do? the first thing, if ou will be able to do? the first thing, if you relate _ will be able to do? the first thing, if you relate it _ will be able to do? the first thing, if you relate it to, _ will be able to do? the first thing, if you relate it to, say, _ will be able to do? the first thing, if you relate it to, say, the - if you relate it to, say, the military, where they have helicopters. they have a multiplayer because it can jet —— helicopters. they have a multiplayer because it canjet —— inject because it can jet —— inject at force into another area very quickly. if it happens, police can get there in very quick time. i think it is quite important because the marine unit itself is, slight judgement likely to be reasonably small in relation to other departments. they are also hidden in plain sight so anotherjet ski is unlikely to notice it is a police jet ski until it is effectively on them so they can observe the behaviour. if a prosecution is
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required they can get to them and do that. i think it is a reasonable benefit but it is one of the tools in the toolbox of dealing with it. simply we're not going to prosecute our way out of this. it is going to be a bit strategic than that. i our way out of this. it is going to be a bit strategic than that. i dare sa as be a bit strategic than that. i dare say as well— be a bit strategic than that. i dare say as well given _ be a bit strategic than that. i dare say as well given so _ be a bit strategic than that. i dare say as well given so many - be a bit strategic than that. i dare say as well given so many more i say as well given so many more people will be staying at home, because of the lack of travel, you have had a probably a busy time, maybe with some people not used to being around the water.— being around the water. yeah. they are more people — being around the water. yeah. they are more people staying _ being around the water. yeah. they are more people staying within - being around the water. yeah. they are more people staying within the | are more people staying within the uk. possibly the worst time i had with jetskis was last year when everybody was working from home or staying at home or in lockdown. but they are all able to get out and of course the waterway was filled with all the jet ski people that had been furloughed and it was horrendous and
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my staff had to be significantly reduced and it was the perfect storm, but yes, more people had stayed in this country and therefore they have spent their holiday money on something a little bit exciting, get down to the beach and enjoy themselves. get down to the beach and en'oy themselveafi get down to the beach and en'oy themselves. ., . , themselves. good to catch up with ou this themselves. good to catch up with you this morning, _ themselves. good to catch up with you this morning, james. - themselves. good to catch up with you this morning, james. i - themselves. good to catch up with you this morning, james. i know. you this morning, james. i know there are a few warm days on the way so you might have a busy patch. nice to see you. if you spent lockdown in tattyjogging bottoms, thinking there was no point in getting dressed up, you're probably not alone. but two friends who decided to glam up every weekend to lift their spirits became a social media sensation. now their "frock up friday" idea has become a real—life festival. claudia sermbezis dusted off her dancing shoes and went along. free unique, fabulous. that is their
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ethos. many of these people have only ever met online so today they are meeting for the first time by having a good old dance in the window. # it don't matter what you wear... i # it don't matter what you wear... i have just one of our famous frockers. i am overwhelmed. have just one of our famous frockers. lam overwhelmed. it have just one of our famous frockers. i am overwhelmed. it is overwhelming getting to meet these people who we have shared our thoughts over the past weeks —— 76 weeks. it all began at the beginning of lockdown last munch. two friends decided to dress up on fridays and post their photos on a facebook group they created. a few weeks later they had 13,000 members worldwide. i’m later they had 13,000 members worldwide. �* ., later they had 13,000 members worldwide-—
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later they had 13,000 members| worldwide._ they worldwide. i'm a cover girl! they even made _ worldwide. i'm a cover girl! they even made a _ worldwide. i'm a cover girl! they even made a book— worldwide. i'm a cover girl! they even made a book featuring - worldwide. i'm a cover girl! they - even made a book featuring pictures and stories about their members. emma said she survived chemotherapy due to the support of the group. this is my all dress, i'm wearing this for the ball so i wanted to try it out because it feels a bit tight. haley is autistic and has always loved rainbow colours. share haley is autistic and has always loved rainbow colours. are used to be in a wheelchair _ loved rainbow colours. are used to be in a wheelchair and _ loved rainbow colours. are used to be in a wheelchair and people - loved rainbow colours. are used to| be in a wheelchair and people used to stare at me anyway on the bus so ijust to stare at me anyway on the bus so i just thought to stare at me anyway on the bus so ijust thought 0k, to stare at me anyway on the bus so i just thought 0k, well they are staring at me so do you know what? i'm going to dress like this, i'm going to dress howl i'm going to dress like this, i'm going to dress how i want to give them something to stare at! 1110thr them something to stare at! holly wants to be _ them something to stare at! holly wants to be a _ them something to stare at! holly wants to be a costume _ them something to stare at! holly wants to be a costume designer. them something to stare at! holly| wants to be a costume designer. it is inspired by the movie cruella and i is inspired by the movie cruella and l was _ is inspired by the movie cruella and i was inspired by the outrageous costumes— i was inspired by the outrageous costumes as ijust decided i have -ot costumes as ijust decided i have got to— costumes as ijust decided i have got to make one of my own. we celebrate _ got to make one of my own. we celebrate everyone's beauty, celebrate eve ryone's beauty, everyone _ celebrate eve ryone's beauty, everyone we _ celebrate everyone's beauty, everyone. we have _ celebrate everyone's beauty, everyone. we have seen- celebrate everyone's beauty, i everyone. we have seen people celebrate everyone's beauty, - everyone. we have seen people when they are _ everyone. we have seen people when they are first — everyone. we have seen people when they are first posted, _ everyone. we have seen people when they are first posted, they— everyone. we have seen people when they are first posted, they are - everyone. we have seen people when they are first posted, they are like - they are first posted, they are like mice, _ they are first posted, they are like mice, doing — they are first posted, they are like mice, doing a— they are first posted, they are like mice, doing a selfie, _ they are first posted, they are like mice, doing a selfie, then- mice, doing a selfie, then eventually— mice, doing a selfie, then eventually they— mice, doing a selfie, then eventually they are - mice, doing a selfie, then
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eventually they are doing | mice, doing a selfie, then- eventually they are doing this great photos. _ eventually they are doing this great photos. they— eventually they are doing this great photos. they have _ eventually they are doing this great photos, they have got _ eventually they are doing this great photos, they have got really- eventually they are doing this great photos, they have got really good i eventually they are doing this great i photos, they have got really good at dressing _ photos, they have got really good at dressing up — photos, they have got really good at dressing up and _ photos, they have got really good at dressing up and wearing _ photos, they have got really good at dressing up and wearing what - photos, they have got really good at dressing up and wearing what they. dressing up and wearing what they want to— dressing up and wearing what they want to and — dressing up and wearing what they want to and people _ dressing up and wearing what they want to and people have _ dressing up and wearing what they want to and people have said - dressing up and wearing what they want to and people have said they| want to and people have said they have changed _ want to and people have said they have changed how— want to and people have said they have changed how they _ want to and people have said they have changed how they look - want to and people have said they have changed how they look now. have changed how they look now because — have changed how they look now because they _ have changed how they look now because theyjust _ have changed how they look now because theyjust feel— have changed how they look now because theyjust feel confident. the frock— because theyjust feel confident. the frock up _ because theyjust feel confident. the frock up friday— because theyjust feel confident. the frock up friday festival- because theyjust feel confident. | the frock up friday festival book will be a celebration featuring fashion parades, music and a shopping trail throughout the town all weekend. claudia sermbezis, bbc news, hastings. that is so lovely, isn't it? the relationship they have developed because of lockdown, virtually. developed because of lockdown, virtuall . ., developed because of lockdown, virtuall . . , ., ., , _ virtually. that will be one happy occasion. but _ virtually. that will be one happy occasion. but at _ virtually. that will be one happy occasion. but at some - virtually. that will be one happy occasion. but at some point - virtually. that will be one happy occasion. but at some point we| virtually. that will be one happy i occasion. but at some point we will be cuite occasion. but at some point we will be quite nostalgic— occasion. but at some point we will be quite nostalgic about _ occasion. but at some point we will be quite nostalgic about lockdown i be quite nostalgic about lockdown and those efforts that we made with our immediate family... and those efforts that we made with our immediate family. . ._ our immediate family... when you literally couldn't _ our immediate family... when you literally couldn't leave _ our immediate family... when you literally couldn't leave your - our immediate family... when you literally couldn't leave your home. j literally couldn't leave your home. and with a bit of that on friday night we would make the effort... we will be talking to some of the founders later on in the programme this morning so we will find out a bit more. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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hello, this is breakfast with nina warhurst and charlie stayt.
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grassroots rugby leagues kick—off this weekend, and it's the first time since the start of the pandemic that players have been allowed full contact. so that means scrums, rucks and mauls are on the cards for matt graveling, who's at wimbledon rugby club for us this morning. good morning to you, you have a big turn out so early in the morning, it is an important day, isn't it? i is an important day, isn't it? i have never been on a job where so many people have come out this early in the morning, it shows the excitement here. if you can read that, the return to rugby. because the game has been away in its contact state, the last full contact and was held in march 2020. to save his people are excited here at wimbledon rugby club is an understatement. this club is 156 years old, my first guest has been here for about a third of that he won't mind me saying, jim green is
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the president here at the club, what a day, you must be so excited. we are incredibly excited, returning to rugby, full contact, competitive games, just wonderful. there has been real buzz about club for the past few weeks, building up to these games. mt; past few weeks, building up to these names. ~ , , past few weeks, building up to these names. 3 , ., past few weeks, building up to these names. g , ., ., past few weeks, building up to these names. 3 , . ., , games. my first team are playing awa in games. my first team are playing away in their— games. my first team are playing away in their first _ games. my first team are playing away in their first league - games. my first team are playing away in their first league game, | games. my first team are playing i away in their first league game, we have a mill —— women's 30th birthday anniversary game this afternoon and all that mini and youth is back, it just feels really good.— just feels really good. what is it to ou just feels really good. what is it to you personally, _ just feels really good. what is it to you personally, you - just feels really good. what is it to you personally, you have - just feels really good. what is it i to you personally, you have played just feels really good. what is it - to you personally, you have played a game here at wimbledon, what is it you think people here will have been missing the most? taste you think people here will have been missing the most?— missing the most? we are a big famil , it missing the most? we are a big family. it has — missing the most? we are a big family, it has been _ missing the most? we are a big family, it has been like - missing the most? we are a big family, it has been like missing| family, it has been like missing yourfamily actually, family, it has been like missing your family actually, because the children, their teammates are their friends and their mates, we have dads and mums, sons and daughters all playing together, and that kind of banter and camaraderie is what has been missing as well as the fun of playing, it is a great game. thank youjim. of playing, it is a great game. thank you jim. i will move over here because a survey was done by
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england, wales and scotland rugby union is in the national lottery looking into how much aside from the game here at grassroots level, rugby mentor people. there was a few percentages about which we have a few volunteers here. i can tell you that 86% of people said that rugby, grassroots rugby benefited their mental health. if we go to my next two people, 27% of people said it help them feel less isolated. and finally, 51% of people said that the thing they miss most about rugby wasn't necessarily the game, but actually the camaraderie and their friends. thank you to my willing volunteers, they will be playing a little more. let's talk as other people who are involved and delighted to be backing on grass. first, what is the thing you are most looking forward to getting back out there? i most looking forward to getting back out there? ~ , most looking forward to getting back out there? ,, , ., ., most looking forward to getting back out there? ,, , ., , out there? i think it is good to be with our out there? i think it is good to be with your teammates _ out there? i think it is good to be with your teammates and - out there? i think it is good to be with your teammates and work i out there? i think it is good to be | with your teammates and work as out there? i think it is good to be i with your teammates and work as a team, and bring back friends that were lost in march, i think it is really good. were lost in march, i think it is really good-— were lost in march, i think it is reall aood. �* , ., , really good. and 'ust tell me a bit about, really good. and 'ust tell me a bit about. what — really good. and 'ust tell me a bit about, what is _ really good. and just tell me a bit about, what is your _ really good. and just tell me a bit
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about, what is your position, - really good. and just tell me a bit i about, what is your position, where do you play? taste about, what is your position, where do you play?— do you play? we haven't started ositions do you play? we haven't started positions yet — do you play? we haven't started positions yet but _ do you play? we haven't started positions yet but i _ do you play? we haven't started positions yet but i would - do you play? we haven't started positions yet but i would love i do you play? we haven't started positions yet but i would love to j do you play? we haven't started i positions yet but i would love to be a centre like my dad when he played rugby. a centre like my dad when he played ru. b _ ., a centre like my dad when he played ru.b _ ., �*, a centre like my dad when he played rub. ., �*, , a centre like my dad when he played ru.b _ ., �*, , rugby. sofia, let's bring you in. what is it _ rugby. sofia, let's bring you in. what is it you _ rugby. sofia, let's bring you in. what is it you missed _ rugby. sofia, let's bring you in. what is it you missed the - rugby. sofia, let's bring you in. what is it you missed the most| rugby. sofia, let's bring you in. - what is it you missed the most when you couldn't come down and play? i you couldn't come down and play? i actually quite missed playing with my friends and being able to interact with them, working as a team. against another team, and it is actually quite fun when you do that. �* ., ,., ,., , is actually quite fun when you do that. �* ., , , that. and we have somebody very secial that. and we have somebody very special here _ that. and we have somebody very special here today, _ that. and we have somebody very special here today, have - that. and we have somebody very special here today, have you - that. and we have somebody veryj special here today, have you seen him yet? special here today, have you seen him et? ., , , ., him yet? no, he is still over there in the van- — him yet? no, he is still over there in the van- we _ him yet? no, he is still over there in the van. we will— him yet? no, he is still over there in the van. we will mention - him yet? no, he is still over there in the van. we will mention him i him yet? no, he is still over there j in the van. we will mention him in him yet? no, he is still over there i in the van. we will mention him in a minute. in the van. we will mention him in a minute- he — in the van. we will mention him in a minute. he might— in the van. we will mention him in a minute. he might be _ in the van. we will mention him in a minute. he might be behind - in the van. we will mention him in a minute. he might be behind you. i in the van. we will mention him in a i minute. he might be behind you. and matteo, you are in the younger age group, but what are you looking forward to about being back here playing? i forward to about being back here -la in: ? ., forward to about being back here .la in.? ., forward to about being back here -la inc? ., ., ., forward to about being back here .la in.? ., ., ., ., playing? i am looking forward to bein: playing? i am looking forward to being back _ playing? i am looking forward to being back here, _ playing? i am looking forward to being back here, yes, _ playing? i am looking forward to being back here, yes, and - playing? i am looking forward to l being back here, yes, and playing with my friends. like, scoring tries and... it isjust...— and... it is 'ust... basically everything— and... it isjust... basically everything for _ and... it isjust... basically everything for him. - and... it isjust... basically. everything for him. basically everything. _ everything for him. basically everything, thank _ everything for him. basically everything, thank you - everything for him. basically everything, thank you very l everything for him. basically - everything, thank you very much. you guys probably can't see behind me but the special guest we can talk
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about, just behind that flag, we will speak to him later, is the head coach of england rugby, eddiejones. we will find out what grassroots level really means to him and how maybe you can progress through to the pros. thank you matt, you can sense the excitement there this morning. that is a bit of a — excitement there this morning. that is a bit of a buzz _ excitement there this morning. that is a bit of a buzz to _ excitement there this morning. that is a bit of a buzz to have the england coach just tucked away having a look around. bind england coach just tucked away having a look around.— england coach just tucked away having a look around. and they don't cuite know having a look around. and they don't quite know it — having a look around. and they don't quite know it yet. — having a look around. and they don't quite know it yet, some _ having a look around. and they don't quite know it yet, some of— having a look around. and they don't quite know it yet, some of them - quite know it yet, some of them haven't— quite know it yet, some of them haven't realised.— quite know it yet, some of them haven't realised. you will catch up with him later— haven't realised. you will catch up with him later on? _ haven't realised. you will catch up with him later on? that— haven't realised. you will catch up with him later on? that is- haven't realised. you will catch up with him later on? that is pretty i with him later on? that is pretty secial, with him later on? that is pretty special. he _ with him later on? that is pretty special. he is — with him later on? that is pretty special, he is getting _ with him later on? that is pretty special, he is getting involved i with him later on? that is pretty special, he is getting involved in the coaching, to start your new season — the coaching, to start your new season with the head coach of england _ season with the head coach of encland. �* , ., ~ season with the head coach of encland. �* , ., ,, ., england. but first, talking about the paralympics. _ england. but first, talking about the paralympics. hannah - england. but first, talking about. the paralympics. hannah cockcroft, the paralympics. hannah cockcroft, the fact that you can overcome a bit of adversity in the warm—up. basically, she got her hand stuck in the moving wheel of her wheelchair. it was pretty messy but bandaged up and she still went on to smash it and she still went on to smash it and win the race, incredible. that is amazing- _ and win the race, incredible. that is amazing. what _ and win the race, incredible. that
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is amazing. what strength - and win the race, incredible. that is amazing. what strength and i is amazing. what strength and determination _ is amazing. what strength and determination to _ is amazing. what strength and determination to overcome i is amazing. what strength and - determination to overcome setbacks like that. one reason why hannah cockcroft has dominated her sport since the london paralympics, and today in tokyo, she won her seventh gold medal overall. she set a new paralympic record too, in the t34 800 metres, in what was a british, one—two, as kare adenegan took silver. cockcroft dominated the race from the start, to secure her second gold of these games. she broke her own world record to retain the 100 metre crown last sunday. she joked afterwards that she was gutted that she was unable to get the world record today. her team mate kare adenegan, recorded a personal best as she won the silver. there has also been success on the water overnight — in another british one—two, charlotte henshaw won the kl—2 200 metres para—canoe gold, with emma wiggs clinching silver. henshaw won silver at london 2012, and bronze in rio but as a swimmer,
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but switching sport has worked and means she got hold of the medal she always wanted. and there was another gold in the para—canoe, with laura sugar becoming kl—3 champion. she has also made a sport switch, from athletics, when she was spotted by a talent id process in 2018. three years later, she won gold, with a paralympic—best time. capping off a brilliant games for the british para—canoe team — putting them top of the sport's medal table. britain's dan evans could hardly believe it, but a stunning fightback means he's now through to the fourth round of the us open for the first time. he was staring at defeat when australian alexei popyrin surged into a 2 set lead, but he showed the world he's recovered now from the after—effects of having covid—19 with great strength and character, as he dug in to level the match at 2
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sets all. both players were now exhausted, but evans summoned the energy to take the match, in a nail—biting 5th set tie—break sealed as popryin double faulted on match point. evans faces the 2nd seed daniil medvedev next. so evans marches on, unlike naomi osaka — the women's defending champion, who's been knocked out, losing in one of the great upsets to the canadian teenager, leylah fernandez. osaka was in tears afterwards and said she will now take a break from the sport. you just can't call which way the 3rd test between england and india is going to go — it's so crucial, sorry, the fourth test. it is so crucial with the series level at 1—1 and with only one more match after this one. having looked in control
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on day two at the oval, england lost two early wickets yesterday, with craig 0verton and dawid malan both falling to umesh yadav. but then ollie pope came to the rescue, guiding england to a first innings lead. he looked set for a century but was bowled out for 81. england were eventually dismissed for 290, but despite the celebrations around pope, india finished the day on 43 without loss, so only 56 runs behind. they've crept back into it. revenge is in the air in leeds tonight, not warrington with that home crowd, marching on. ——josh warrington. fans are counting down the hours, the fight�*s promoter eddie hearnjoins us now. what has happened before and what is happening tonight? josh what has happened before and what is happening tonight?— happening tonight? josh warrington was the number _ happening tonight? josh warrington was the number one _ happening tonight? josh warrington was the number one featherweight l happening tonight? josh warrington l was the number one featherweight in the world, he was world champion, covid struck and he was out of the sport for 15 months, went back and was supposed to be having a warm—up fight against a mexican called
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maurizio lara, in a bubble environment, no crowd, and end up losing by a knockout in a thrilling fight. fast forward six months and tonight we transform headingley, the home of the leeds rhinos into a fortress forjosh warrington, 20,000 people at night for a must when rematch. it will be some atmosphere. what went wrong the first time around, was he complacent, did he think it would be a walkover? i think it would be a walkover? i think it would be a walkover? i think a little bit of that, coupled with inactivity and also no crowd. so we have fighters during the pandemic, anthonyjoshua was one of them had to go and fight in front of 800 900 people when they are used to fighting in front of 190,000. josh warrington did the same, looking to salute the faithful and there was no—one there, was a strange moment for boxing, doing a behind closed doors. the pressure is on, we had over a thousand people turn up to the way in, it was an incredible atmosphere and it is a must win
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final. the atmosphere in leeds is really special and to transfer a stadium like headingley into a fortress for a fight night will be really special.— really special. you said a lot is oane, really special. you said a lot is online. can — really special. you said a lot is online. can a _ really special. you said a lot is online, can a career— really special. you said a lot is online, can a career defining i really special. you said a lot is i online, can a career defining fight in many ways —— kind of. people react differently to pressure, what aboutjosh, is it inspiration or how does it work for him? he about josh, is it inspiration or how does it work for him?— about josh, is it inspiration or how does it work for him? he has to be careful because _ does it work for him? he has to be careful because he _ does it work for him? he has to be careful because he has _ does it work for him? he has to be careful because he has to - does it work for him? he has to be careful because he has to box - does it work for him? he has to be careful because he has to box to i does it work for him? he has to be careful because he has to box to a | careful because he has to box to a game plan tonight but when you walk out in front of 20,000 people it is very difficult to do, boxing is a unique sport. it is not like you are in that change room preparing for a game of tennis or a round of golf, you are about to go to battle with another man in a ring in front of 20,000 people at headingley and millions around the world, on dazn and on channel five live tonight, but lara is full of confidence, he beat him up and asked round and the team and coaches from mexico are so confident. we are going to walk him through, and knock him out in front
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of a home crowd. it will be spicy for him tonight on that ring. and of a home crowd. it will be spicy for him tonight on that ring. and it could no for him tonight on that ring. and it could go either— for him tonight on that ring. and it could go either way, _ for him tonight on that ring. and it could go either way, having - for him tonight on that ring. and it could go either way, having that i could go either way, having that home support, because yes, that is an advantage in some ways but then the expectation is he will make the most of it and then walk it yourself stop and he must win, so it is difficult. ., , stop and he must win, so it is difficult. . , ., , ., difficult. fight fans will want you to no difficult. fight fans will want you to to out difficult. fight fans will want you to go out there _ difficult. fight fans will want you to go out there and _ difficult. fight fans will want you to go out there and go _ difficult. fight fans will want you to go out there and go to - difficult. fight fans will want you to go out there and go to war i difficult. fight fans will want you i to go out there and go to war from the first round, he has to be clever in this fight. he is, or was the best featherweight in the world, we will find out if he still is tonight, but he has to box to a gameplan, has to be smart, because lara is dynamite in both hands, it is one of those fight you have to watch through your fingers because every time they exchange it is a potential fight.— every time they exchange it is a potential fight. tune in on 5live. rob burroughs _ potential fight. tune in on 5live. rob burroughs is _ potential fight. tune in on 5live. rob burroughs is going - potential fight. tune in on 5live. rob burroughs is going to - potential fight. tune in on 5live. rob burroughs is going to be - potential fight. tune in on 5live. i rob burroughs is going to be there. a good friend ofjosh warrington, reads lino is, it will be —— leeds rhinos. reads lino is, it will be -- leeds rhinos. ., reads lino is, it will be -- leeds rhinos. . ., , rhinos. katie taylor will be defending _ rhinos. katie taylor will be defending her _ rhinos. katie taylor will be defending her title - rhinos. katie taylor will be defending her title as - rhinos. katie taylor will be defending her title as well, rhinos. katie taylor will be -
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defending her title as well, tell us a bit about her. it is defending her title as well, tell us a bit about her.— a bit about her. it is a big car because _ a bit about her. it is a big car because we _ a bit about her. it is a big car because we have _ a bit about her. it is a big car because we have josh - a bit about her. it is a big car- because we have josh warrington and because we havejosh warrington and katie taylor and connor bennett as well in a big fight. katie taylor, the ultimate trailblazer for women's boxing, six european championships as an amateur, five world championship as an amateur, london olympic gold and now the undisputed lightweight champion as a pro. she has been a trailblazer mother has really inspired the next generation of female fighters. you saw another goal to great britain in tokyo with lauren price, a great performance, katie defends all her titles tonight againstjennifer hand, former world champion, mandatory challenger, she is a phenomenal athlete. she has changed the face of women's boxing, and don't forget many years ago she was the one who took women's boxing to the ioc and made them watch her in a box off to prove that women's boxing had a right and was deserving of a spot in the olympics. mould boxing had a right and was deserving of a spot in the olympics.— of a spot in the olympics. would it be an upset _ of a spot in the olympics. would it be an upset if— of a spot in the olympics. would it be an upset if she _ of a spot in the olympics. would it be an upset if she was _ of a spot in the olympics. would it be an upset if she was to - of a spot in the olympics. would it be an upset if she was to lose - be an upset if she was to lose tonight? it be an upset if she was to lose toniaht? ., , , ., ,, tonight? it would be. it is an upset if she ever — tonight? it would be. it is an upset
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if she ever loses, _ tonight? it would be. it is an upset if she ever loses, she _ tonight? it would be. it is an upset if she ever loses, she is _ tonight? it would be. it is an upset if she ever loses, she is in - tonight? it would be. it is an upset if she ever loses, she is in her- tonight? it would be. it is an upset if she ever loses, she is in her mid| if she ever loses, she is in her mid 30s now and still wants to carry on for many years, but she is an incredible athlete, herfather for many years, but she is an incredible athlete, her father is from leeds and she is a leeds united supporter, so it all works out really well, she will get a great reception tonight. taste really well, she will get a great reception tonight.— really well, she will get a great reception tonight. we were looking at the rugby _ reception tonight. we were looking at the rugby at _ reception tonight. we were looking at the rugby at wimbledon, - reception tonight. we were looking at the rugby at wimbledon, and i reception tonight. we were looking | at the rugby at wimbledon, and the contact is starting for the first time today. all spots have had to contend with, the individuals have, psychologically with lockdown and restrictions, but how has it been for boxing? this restrictions, but how has it been for boxing?— restrictions, but how has it been forboxinu? a, , ,, ., for boxing? as business, mattering works across _ for boxing? as business, mattering works across many _ for boxing? as business, mattering works across many sports - for boxing? as business, mattering works across many sports but - for boxing? as business, mattering. works across many sports but boxing being my main focus and i saw that clip from the rugby, —— matchroom sports. it has been difficult at the elite commercial end of sport but it has probably been even more damaging a grassroots because you experience 16 or 18 months of kids not going to their local clubs, not exercising, not being used to competing. and sometimes if you experience that through that period if you take the
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passion awake and take that schedule away from a young person. so i think it is great to see rugby back, when you talk about close contact, boxing, it doesn't get much closer than boxing. a lot of the abcs... abc meaning... than boxing. a lot of the abcs. .. abc meaning. . ._ than boxing. a lot of the abcs. .. abc meaninu... . . . , abc meaning... amateur boxing club. amateur boxing _ abc meaning... amateur boxing club. amateur boxing clubs _ abc meaning... amateur boxing club. amateur boxing clubs and _ abc meaning... amateur boxing club. amateur boxing clubs and grassroots| amateur boxing clubs and grassroots clubs are so vital because they develop young people in the community. my fellow politicians and the government directly understand the government directly understand the value of those clubs and community, but that is another conversation for another show, but with rugby and all spots, the foundations are to teach young people about discipline, respect, manners, winning and losing and it is so important to get grassroots bought back. you is so important to get grassroots bought back-— is so important to get grassroots bou~ht back. ., , , .,, bought back. you see it with people when they begin — bought back. you see it with people when they begin boxing, _ bought back. you see it with people when they begin boxing, the - bought back. you see it with people when they begin boxing, the way i bought back. you see it with people i when they begin boxing, the way they talk about it, how it changes their life completely, so very important it is back. lovely to see you, thank you. you can stream the fight on dazn and there'll be full commentary on bbc radio 5
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live from 9.30 tonight. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. for us this morning. good morning. if you are waking up this morning and looking out the window you might see seems a bit like this. for some of us, blue sky and sunshine from the word go. this is the picture in east sussex. in other areas we have got more cloud and mist and fog patches. it will be and mist and fog patches. it will be a largely dry day today with spells of sunshine on offer and establishes are going to be on the up. through the course of the weekend and into the course of the weekend and into the cause of next week, too. still have high pressure around but edging off to the east and that will allow the winds to come in from more of a south—easterly direction. bringing some slightly clearer and warmer weather our way. we have got a weather our way. we have got a weather front pushing into the south—west so a bit of rain but for today, most places are looking dry. across parts of north —— north england in eastern scotland, the cloud just thick enough. the breeze coming in of the north sea. further
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south, spells of sunshine on offer with quite long spells of sunshine and lighter winds especially for east anglia and the south—east. we will see the sunshine breaking through around the murray first, cumbria as well. it is in general further south that we will see the highest temperatures, 43 degrees for cardiff and typically the mid—teens around the east coast of scotland and north—east england. through this evening and overnight, most places are staying dry once again, perhaps the odd spot of drizzle in the east. patchy areas of cloud and clear skies in the south but it will be —— it won't be a cold night so milder air. two bridges to start the morning 12—15. tomorrow's weather another largely dry day for much of the day. have got some areas of cloud drifting around from central and eastern england. sunnis also most and later in the afternoon is when the rain pushes into northern ireland. —— 's sunny skies. attach warmerfor the likes of
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ireland. —— 's sunny skies. attach warmer for the likes of newcastle. —— a touch warmer. we still have the weather front that just slips its way further south, moving on into the one—day morning. the way well start monday with the odd shower around parts of northern england, north wales. either side of that, sunny spells from the word go on monday. as we head through the day, the showers fade away and lots of sunshine on offer with light winds and it is going to feel quite a bit warmer than it has done recently, particularly in the south. temperatures as high as about 26 or even 27 degrees for southern england and even 20 or 21 for scotland and northern ireland. the temperatures continue to rise to a spell of warm, summery weather on the cards before things turn a bit cooler and more unsettled towards the end of the week. .. . unsettled towards the end of the week. ,,. ., ., ~ unsettled towards the end of the week. ., ., ,, , ., now time for newswatch. hello, and welcome to newswatch
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with me, samira ahmed. coming up, journalists in afghanistan have been working in difficult circumstances, but has the bbc done enough to help its former staff leave the country? and what's happened to local news bulletins during breakfast over the summer? welcome to newswatch. unlike the traditional august news lull, the past month has seen journalists confronted with major international crises as us forces pulled out of afghanistan and the taliban quickly took control of the country. it's led to some powerful and emotional broadcasting. foreign nationals and some afghans are being evacuated. but huge crowds gathered after rumours even those without visas could travel. gunfire. outside the airport,
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even more chaos. taliban members firing in the air to assert their authority, trying to keep control. it's now the 31st of august in afghanistan, the day that presidentjoe biden said the american military mission, the 20—year engagement by us—led nato forces, would formally end, and this is what you are hearing now. gunfire in the background the eruption of celebrity gunfire. by taliban supporters in the city of kabul. newswatch viewers have been paying tribute to the work of bbc staff making reports such as those, with brian price awarding top marks to secunder kermani for his broadcasts from afghanistan. and in the view of andrew south:
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some viewers have expressed concern, though, for the safety of those staff, and also that of afghan journalists who worked at the bbc in the past. a group of the latter are still hiding from the taliban in kabul, and they have accused the corporation and the uk government of ignoring their cries for help. in response, the bbc stresses it is making every possible effort to get both current and former staff out of the country, but that it can only work within the permitted government frameworks. a bbc spokesperson said:
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that statement didn't satisfy this caller to our phone line. i believe the corporation's official response is ethically, let's say, highly questionable and troubling, and so i am leaving this message in support of the calls for help by ex—bbc journalists and presenters. the bbc does have responsibility for its ex—employees
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in this situation. now, occupying a lot of airtime over the summer was geronimo, the alpaca who twice tested positive for bovine tuberculosis and was ordered to be euthanised to stop the spread of the disease. for some, this was a classic silly season story, hyped up to fill sparse running orders. for others, it was a specific legal injustice and a cruel infringement of animal rights. on tuesday, the row over geronimo's fate was resolved once and for all. i want to bring you some breaking news just into the bbc here that geronimo the alpaca has been killed. now, that news comes after a court—ordered destruction warrant was carried out following the animal twice testing positive for bovine tuberculosis. some viewers objected to the tone used there and in the headlines online, with sally lester asking:
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other viewers were concerned that some of the footage shown on the news at six, and on the website, was unnecessarily upsetting. kirsten french wondered: but when almost 30,000 cattle are put down after contracting disease, was one alpaca's death worthy of a breaking news event on the bbc news and app? andrew thought not: now, what's the most popular news bulletin on uk television?
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you may be surprised to learn that it's the early evening regional news on bbc one, but recent cuts made to the bbc�*s local and regional budgets have led some to question the corporation's commitment to those services. take the local news, traffic and weather summaries shown twice an hour during breakfast untiljuly, when they disappeared. hundreds of viewers complained to the bbc and on social media and two of them join me now, vivian barth from manchester and martin burgess—moon from plymouth. thank you. i want to ask when both of you noticed the first time that the regional news wasn't on. vivian first. through the coverage of the olympics, which didn't worry me particularly because that was something different and it was important, but when it didn't come back on the week following the coverage of the olympics, and then not for the week after,
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that's when i contacted you. what about for you, martin, when did it become a concern for you? the same, really. i noticed that there was no local bulletin during the olympics coverage and then as soon as the normal bbc breakfast came back, i noticed pretty much from day one, at six o'clock, i watched as per normal and when the half—hour came i thought, that's a bit odd, but i thought there might have been a technical issue and of course, there was no second bulletin and i thought, this is odd that it's not come back after the olympics. can i ask what it is about those regional summaries in the mornings that is so important, that you missed? yes, well, it's everything, really. it's the local news, local views, events the travel in particular because i commute,
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so i'm going to work every morning and i want to know what the traffic's going to be like. i know there are other ways you can access local news but when you enjoy watching bbc breakfast every morning and the local news is an important part of that, every half— hour, when it's not there, you really notice it's not there. so, we did ask bbc management for an interview on why it's been off for so long and this is the statement we've got because no—one was available for interview. this is a statement from bbc england who made the decision about breakfast: what do you both think
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of the reasons given for that statement? martin first. it's nice to know that now but, at the time, when itjust wasn't there, it was like it had disappeared. it was just strange that there was no mention of it, it was almost like it wasn't important and i know that when i switched over to the other side, they are still doing local news bulletins at breakfast and in the evening as well, but not wanting to be interested in winning a caravan or anything, i don't really want to watch the other side. well, i did suspect, as in so many cases, it was to save money, but since they assure us it's not that — i accept their assurance and hope they will be able to bring it back as soon as possible. just so you know, that was the bbc�*s position injuly. they've now told us the regional morning bulletins are coming next week but i wonder if you both think the bbc
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undervalues local news perhaps, vivian? yes, i definitely think they undervalue it. the evening programme is usually very good, and gives quite a wide coverage but apart from that, we don't get an awful lot of news. the lunchtime one is quite often shortened a bit. if there is something more important nationally, then you perhaps only get about ten minutes at lunchtime. martin, what are your thoughts on how far the bbc values and appreciates the importance of regional tv news? well, i hope the bbc values local and regional news. we've got an excellent nightly bulletin at spotlight here in a here in the south—west, and they do an
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amazing job, and recently with what's been going on, the shootings, they've been incredible, and locally on the radio as well, on bbc radio devon, they've been amazing. it would be a shame if there were more cut backs and we lost so much more of that important local input because it is important to know what's going on locally. i know there's so much going on nationally and internationally but locally, it's right on your own doorstep and everybody needs to know what's going on on their own doorstep and i really hope those bulletins do come back. and that there is more investment in local news, because it is so important. martin burgess—moon and vivian bath, thank you so much. thank you for all your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions on bbc news and current affairs or even appear on the programme, do email newswatch. you can find us on twitter at @newswatchbbc, you can call us on 0370 010 6676 and do have a look at previous discussions on our website, bbc.co.uk/newswatch.
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that's all from us. we'll be back with your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. bye bye. good morning, welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and charlie stayt. our headlines today: a mass covid vaccine rollout for 12— 15—year—olds could still go ahead despite a decision by the government's scientific advisors not to support it. gps are forced to delay flu jabs because of a shortage of hgv drivers which has disrupted supplies. it was an image that shocked the world — desperate parents handing their baby over to american troops in afghanistan. but what happened next? we'll be talking to the british medic called in to help. reigning supreme for a third paralympics running — hannah cockcroft dominates on the track to win her seventh gold medal, in the t34 800 metres —
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the first of three golds already today for the british team in tokyo. good morning. it's been a bit cool and cloudy for some of us recently but you will be pleased to hear there's a bit more sunshine in the forecast and temperatures will be on the up over the next few days. some rain in the forecast tomorrow for the north, i'll have the details throughout the morning's programme. it's saturday, lith of september. our top story: the uk's four chief medical officers are expected to decide within days whether to recommend vaccinating healthy children against coronavirus. yesterday, thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation, which advises the government, decided against recommending the jabs for 12— to 15—year—olds, saying the health benefits were marginal. it's believed the government think there's a strong case for going ahead. here's our health correspondent catherine burns. america has been doing it since may.
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more than 10 million 12— to 15—year—olds there have had a covid vaccine. other countries are, too, including canada, brazil, france, the netherlands, italy — but not the uk. regulators approved vaccines as safe and effective for this age group in the summer, but thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation's job is to decide if it's necessary. its answer — not for every 12—15—year—old. for the healthy children, the risk—benefit balance is really very uncertain and very tight. normally what we do when we recommend vaccination for children is we see a very clear benefit that clearly outweighs any possible risk. and in the absence of that clear blue water, if you like, between those two, we prefer to advise that healthy children should not for the moment he immunised. covid doesn't tend to make children very sick, so the benefits of vaccinating them have to be weighed up against the risks — like myocarditis,
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inflammation of the heart. it is a very rare complication from pfizer and moderna vaccines, and affects young people more. they tend to recover quickly, but thejcvi wants to know more about the longer term effects. but some of the 3 million 12— to 15—year—olds across the uk will be invited for a vaccine. 150,000 were already eligible because they have conditions including down's syndrome or immune problems. same, too, for another 111i,000 teenagers because they live with someone who is immunosuppressed. and now that has been extended to another 200,000 children with a wider range of conditions like heart problems, epilepsy or poorly controlled asthma. so as schools go back, teenagers who are most likely to be severely affected by coronavirus will be able to get a vaccine. the experts have made this call purely on the health of children,
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not other factors like missing time in education. the next step, the chief medical officers in england, scotland, wales and northern ireland have been asked to weigh up those other factors, which means this decision could change one way or another in the next week or so. our political correspondent helen cattjoins us now. in this paper this morning are reporting on the fact the government could well go against decisions of the van yes because we have set over again during _ yes because we have set over again during the _ yes because we have set over again during the pandemic advisors advise, ministers _ during the pandemic advisors advise, ministers decide. and the government have been— ministers decide. and the government have been pretty keen and suggested publicly— have been pretty keen and suggested publicly they are pretty keen to see children— publicly they are pretty keen to see children immunised, we know the preparations have already started to enable _
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preparations have already started to enable that sort of roll—out. ministers _ enable that sort of roll—out. ministers have always said this was if the _ ministers have always said this was if the jcvi _ ministers have always said this was if the jcvi approved it, and of course — if the jcvi approved it, and of course they have not recommended that _ course they have not recommended that so _ course they have not recommended that. so ministers have now gone to those _ that. so ministers have now gone to those chief— that. so ministers have now gone to those chief medical officers of the four nations to try to take a broader— four nations to try to take a broader view, four nations to try to take a broaderview, looking four nations to try to take a broader view, looking at other factors, — broader view, looking at other factors, notjust the benefits broader view, looking at other factors, not just the benefits to the person being vaccinated. the department of health and saying that vaccination for teenagers are still not off— vaccination for teenagers are still not off the — vaccination for teenagers are still not off the table. that one important thing that i think is worth— important thing that i think is worth mentioning is that the expectation is that there was four chief— expectation is that there was four chief medical officers will work together in unison, so the expectation is not that we would see, _ expectation is not that we would see, for— expectation is not that we would see, for example, teenagers being vaccinated — see, for example, teenagers being vaccinated in one part of the cape but not _ vaccinated in one part of the cape but not another. but what is interesting is that so far, it's been — interesting is that so far, it's been easy— interesting is that so far, it's been easy for ministers, the jcvi has made — been easy for ministers, the jcvi has made recommendations and they have been— has made recommendations and they have been followed. this is the first time — have been followed. this is the first time we've really seen that judgment, that fine balance coming into play _ judgment, that fine balance coming into -la . ., , judgment, that fine balance coming into .la _ ., , ., some gp surgeries in england and wales have begun cancelling appointments for the winter flu jab
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after delays to the delivery of doses of the vaccine. a shortage of lorry drivers is believed to be behind the problem. doctors have warned it will have a serious impact on workloads and patients. our correspondent helena wilkinson has this report. this year's flu campaign is set to be the largest in history. more than 35 million people in the uk will be offered the jab on the nhs. news of a delay to some flu vaccine deliveries is causing concern and cancellations. seqirus, which supplies vaccines to gp practices and pharmacies in england and wales, have told their customers supply would be disrupted due to unforeseen road freight challenges. it is believed to be because of a shortage of lorry drivers. the company warned of a delay of up to two weeks. it's advising gps not to book patients in until they have confirmation of delivery. a two—week delay has a massive impact on our flu vaccine
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programme because the clinics are already set up, many surgeries already have a lot of vulnerable patients booked in, we like to get going early on in september, ready for the winter. so this is really, really worrying. doctors are already dealing with a chronic shortage of blood test tubes. supply chain issues have been blamed for that. the british medical association said delays to flu vaccine deliveries caused a huge increase in staff's already unsustainable workloads, adding that it created unneeded anxiety for patients. helena wilkinson, bbc news. president biden has been visiting some of the areas of louisiana worst hit by hurricane ida last sunday. he praised the states' response, though he noted the frustration at the delay in restoring power. mr biden promised that the infrastructure would be "built back better" to withstand future storms.
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new evidence has emerged that people have put on weight during the pandemic. nhs data shows that people who signed up for a weight loss programme were, on average, more than five pounds heavier than three years before covid struck. there are concerns this could lead to an increase in the number of people at risk of developing type—2 diabetes. blackpool�*s famous illuminations are lighting up the seaside town again, after a star—studded switch—on last night. strictly come dancing's shirley ballas pulled the [ever at the iconic tower ballroom. the lights will stay on untiljanuary again this year. it's hoped the extra two months will bring more tourists to the area and give a boost to businesses. i was iwasa i was a brilliant show, isn't it? —— always a brilliant show.
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let's get more on our main story now — the decision by the uk's vaccine advisory body not to recommend vaccinating all 12— to 15—year—olds. we're joined now by professor anthony harnden, the deputy chair of thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation. professor, thank you for your time this morning. i wonder if it would be helpful, first of all, if you could outline, i know you have gone into enormous detail on this very important decision over 12 to 15—year—olds, could you outline for people who are listening, interested parties, young people, parents, what it is that's made you come to the decision you have?— it is that's made you come to the decision you have? first, we have come to a — decision you have? first, we have come to a decision _ decision you have? first, we have come to a decision to _ decision you have? first, we have come to a decision to advise - come to a decision to advise vaccination, as you set in your clip of an— vaccination, as you set in your clip of an extra — vaccination, as you set in your clip of an extra 200,000 children between the ages— of an extra 200,000 children between the ages of— of an extra 200,000 children between the ages of 12 and 15 with underlying health conditions. for well children, we felt there was a marginal— well children, we felt there was a marginal benefit in terms of vaccination but it wasn't big enough from a _ vaccination but it wasn't big enough from a health perspective. so to -ive from a health perspective. so to give you — from a health perspective. so to give you some figures, for example,
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you will— give you some figures, for example, you will prevent about two itu admissions per! million children, because _ admissions per! million children, because complications from covid are extremely— because complications from covid are extremely rare in children, and 15 cases— extremely rare in children, and 15 cases of— extremely rare in children, and 15 cases of a — extremely rare in children, and 15 cases of a multi—inflammatory conditions, and 18 hospital admissions which last for more than 24 hours. _ admissions which last for more than 24 hours, and yet the vaccine will -ive 24 hours, and yet the vaccine will give 17 _ 24 hours, and yet the vaccine will give 17 cases of myocarditis. these are come _ give 17 cases of myocarditis. these are come figures, but theyjust sort of demonstrate how much equipoise there _ of demonstrate how much equipoise there is— of demonstrate how much equipoise there is from a health perspective in terms _ there is from a health perspective in terms of— there is from a health perspective in terms of giving the vaccine. so we wanted — in terms of giving the vaccine. so we wanted to be really clear what the precise estimate of this heart inflammation post vaccination before it sat universally vaccinated 12 to 15—year—olds in this country. it may be that— 15—year—olds in this country. it may be that these cases of information are quite — be that these cases of information are quite mild and that they don't cause _
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are quite mild and that they don't cause any— are quite mild and that they don't cause any long—term effects, so if we were _ cause any long—term effects, so if we were to — cause any long—term effects, so if we were to be given that sort of information, which we haven't got yet, information, which we haven't got yet. i_ information, which we haven't got yet. ithink— information, which we haven't got yet, i think the balance would tip in favour— yet, i think the balance would tip in favour of— yet, i think the balance would tip in favour of giving vaccinations. however. — in favour of giving vaccinations. however, there are school and educational implications which have considerable impact on children, and we didn't— considerable impact on children, and we didn't feel we were constituted on the _ we didn't feel we were constituted on the committee to assess those properly — on the committee to assess those properly. there are pros of giving vaccination — properly. there are pros of giving vaccination from an educational point _ vaccination from an educational point of— vaccination from an educational point of view, of course there are negatives— point of view, of course there are negatives in— point of view, of course there are negatives in that if you vaccinate children — negatives in that if you vaccinate children and they get local side—effects, they may be off school for the _ side—effects, they may be off school for the vaccination, there is the disruption — for the vaccination, there is the disruption of the programme. so there _ disruption of the programme. so there are — disruption of the programme. so there are checks and balances within there are checks and balances within the educational question, as well. we didn't— the educational question, as well. we didn't feel we were properly constituted and therefore we recommended that that decision was reviewed _ recommended that that decision was reviewed by the chief medical officers — reviewed by the chief medical officers. ., , , officers. professor, help me with this one. officers. professor, help me with this one- as _ officers. professor, help me with this one- as i _ officers. professor, help me with this one. as i understand, - officers. professor, help me with| this one. as i understand, correct me if i'm wrong, thus far in this process, when thejcvi have made a determination, as a recommendation, over who should get vaccinated when,
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the government has gone along with that recommendation. they said, you have recommended it, we are going to do it. the understanding at this stage is that that is still being thought about. we haven't got a definitive that the government will put into place what you have recommended. now, it may be that this is the first time that changes. how do you calibrate that, given the work you have done?— work you have done? well, i think it's really important _ work you have done? well, i think it's really important to _ work you have done? well, i think it's really important to realise - it's really important to realise that _ it's really important to realise that the — it's really important to realise that the decisions we have made have been built— that the decisions we have made have been built on the government have listened _ been built on the government have listened to— been built on the government have listened to them and accepted them. -- the _ listened to them and accepted them. —— the decisions have been bold. and they have _ —— the decisions have been bold. and they have been cracked all the way through _ they have been cracked all the way through. but the previous decisions have been— through. but the previous decisions have been fairly clear—cut to us, this decision is not clear—cut, there — this decision is not clear—cut, there is— this decision is not clear—cut, there is equipoise here. —— michael they have _ there is equipoise here. —— michael they have been correct all the way through _ they have been correct all the way through i— they have been correct all the way through. i think it's correct for the government to seek advice for
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other— the government to seek advice for other aspects, which the committees, has got _ other aspects, which the committees, has got a _ other aspects, which the committees, has got a lot— other aspects, which the committees, has got a lot expertise but one thing _ has got a lot expertise but one thing it— has got a lot expertise but one thing it hasn't got expertise on its educational issues. i think it's quite — educational issues. i think it's quite reasonable that the government, given this equipoise that we _ government, given this equipoise that we have, go ahead and have a look at _ that we have, go ahead and have a look at it— that we have, go ahead and have a look at it from an educational point of view _ look at it from an educational point of view so— look at it from an educational point of view so i— look at it from an educational point of view. so i don't feel uncomfortable about this. i think we have done _ uncomfortable about this. i think we have done ourjob, we have looked at the data. _ have done ourjob, we have looked at the data. we — have done ourjob, we have looked at the data, we have not resisted, you know, _ the data, we have not resisted, you know. we've — the data, we have not resisted, you know, we've resisted a lot of pressure _ know, we've resisted a lot of pressure in terms of people make a pronouncement but we have actually looked _ pronouncement but we have actually looked at _ pronouncement but we have actually looked at the data, it's in front of us, we _ looked at the data, it's in front of us, we will— looked at the data, it's in front of us, we will publish it, and the health— us, we will publish it, and the health benefits for vaccinating well 12 to 15—year—olds from health perspective, for them themselves, is marginal _ perspective, for them themselves, is marginal. can perspective, for them themselves, is mar: inal. ., perspective, for them themselves, is maruinal. ., , perspective, for them themselves, is maruinal. . , , ., marginal. can i put this to you, then? if we _ marginal. can i put this to you, then? if we get _ marginal. can i put this to you, then? if we get to _ marginal. can i put this to you, then? if we get to a _ marginal. can i put this to you, then? if we get to a situation i marginal. can i put this to you, - then? if we get to a situation where you have your recommendations, they say a decision will be made, completely understand there may be other factors that come into play from the chief medical officers, and
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from the chief medical officers, and from the chief medical officers, and from the politicians. but there may be a point at which parents are faced with a choice. i see a choice, they are going to know on the one hand that you and your colleagues made one determination and then somebody else came on afterwards and potentially made a different determination. can you see that that might, for the first time, create quite a difficult decision for people when they are thinking, who do i go with? do i go with you and your colleagues, or the medics or politicians who stepped in and make a different decision? i get politicians who stepped in and make a different decision?— a different decision? i get that, but you're _ a different decision? i get that, but you're capturing _ a different decision? i get that, but you're capturing it - a different decision? i get that, but you're capturing it in - a different decision? i get that, but you're capturing it in blackl a different decision? i get that, i but you're capturing it in black and white _ but you're capturing it in black and white terms and what i am saying is that these _ white terms and what i am saying is that these are great times. —— agree terms~ _ that these are great times. —— agree terms~ there — that these are great times. —— agree terms. there isn't a right or wrong answer~ _ terms. there isn't a right or wrong answer~ i— terms. there isn't a right or wrong answer. i think parents need to understand what the risks and benefits — understand what the risks and benefits are and make up their own mind— benefits are and make up their own mind about— benefits are and make up their own mind about whether they offer consent — mind about whether they offer consent or not. it's not as cut and
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dried — consent or not. it's not as cut and dried as— consent or not. it's not as cut and dried as it _ consent or not. it's not as cut and dried as it is — consent or not. it's not as cut and dried as it is for the 6 million, for instance, adults in this country would _ for instance, adults in this country would haven't been vaccinated so far. would haven't been vaccinated so far~ to _ would haven't been vaccinated so far~ to me. — would haven't been vaccinated so far. to me, that's a black decision, they— far. to me, that's a black decision, they should — far. to me, that's a black decision, they should go and get the vote that would _ they should go and get the vote that would make ahead and get vaccinated. vaccinating _ would make ahead and get vaccinated. vaccinating 12 to 15—year—olds is not a _ vaccinating 12 to 15—year—olds is not a black—and—white decision. —— they— not a black—and—white decision. —— they should — not a black—and—white decision. —— they should go and get vaccinated. . so it's— they should go and get vaccinated. . so it's not— they should go and get vaccinated. . so it's not that the committee say, children— so it's not that the committee say, children should definitely not be vaccinated and the chief medical officers — vaccinated and the chief medical officers say, for instance, if they do say _ officers say, for instance, if they do say this. _ officers say, for instance, if they do say this, they should be vaccinated. it isn't as black and white _ vaccinated. it isn't as black and white as— vaccinated. it isn't as black and white as that. what we are saying is there _ white as that. what we are saying is there a _ white as that. what we are saying is there a marginal health benefits but we didn't— there a marginal health benefits but we didn't feel they were of the skin that we _ we didn't feel they were of the skin that we could recommend a universal vaccination _ that we could recommend a universal vaccination programme —— of the scale _ vaccination programme —— of the scale that— vaccination programme —— of the scale that we could recommend a universal— scale that we could recommend a universal vexation programme for 12 to 15—year—olds based on health grounds — to 15—year—olds based on health grounds alone. i to 15-year-olds based on health grounds alone.— to 15-year-olds based on health grounds alone. i totally understand that it's rrot — grounds alone. i totally understand that it's not black— grounds alone. i totally understand that it's not black and _ grounds alone. i totally understand that it's not black and white. - grounds alone. i totally understand
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that it's not black and white. i - that it's not black and white. i just want to ask what we have you, jcvi has a role in connection with flu jabs, another vaccination programme, you will be aware of the concerns about delays in logistics, effectively. i wonder if you hadn't thought about that and what the implications may be of that, because clearly it's something you recommend for a certain age groups and those numbers have grown, as well, who don't get the flu jab.— don't get the flu 'ab. clearly, influenza h don't get the flu jab. clearly, influenza immunisation - don't get the flu jab. clearly, influenza immunisation this i don't get the flu jab. clearly, i influenza immunisation this year don't get the flu jab. clearly, - influenza immunisation this year is really— influenza immunisation this year is really important and it's important because, — really important and it's important because, due to lockdowns, we've had very low _ because, due to lockdowns, we've had very low circulating influenza levels — very low circulating influenza levels last winter. we know when there _ levels last winter. we know when there are — levels last winter. we know when there are low circulating influenza levels _ there are low circulating influenza levels the — there are low circulating influenza levels the year before, often, we -et levels the year before, often, we get high — levels the year before, often, we get high infection rates in the following year. so it's quite possible _ following year. so it's quite possible that we will have high incidence of influenza this year. so it's with _ incidence of influenza this year. so it's with the — incidence of influenza this year. so it's with the important to get the influenza —
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it's with the important to get the influenza immunisation, and really important — influenza immunisation, and really important to get it as soon as possible. _ important to get it as soon as possible, so it is of concern there are delays — possible, so it is of concern there are delays. but hopefully this will be corrected soon and we get on. in general— be corrected soon and we get on. in general practice, we always do, and deliver— general practice, we always do, and deliver a _ general practice, we always do, and deliver a really good immunisation programme for flu, and deliver a really good immunisation programme forflu, and i deliver a really good immunisation programme for flu, and ijust that those _ programme for flu, and ijust that those who— programme for flu, and ijust that those who are eligible, which as you see is— those who are eligible, which as you see is a _ those who are eligible, which as you see is a much wider group, the over 50s, _ see is a much wider group, the over 50s. and _ see is a much wider group, the over 50s. and of— see is a much wider group, the over 50s, and of course those with underlying illnesses and children and young people between two and 18 years of— and young people between two and 18 years of age, take up the flu vaccine _ years of age, take up the flu vaccine when they are offered it. professor. — vaccine when they are offered it. professor, thank you so much for your time on a saturday morning. professor anthony harnden, deputy chair of thejoint professor anthony harnden, deputy chair of the joint committee professor anthony harnden, deputy chair of thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation, just talking about his latest recommendations. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. a bit of a change in the weather coming up over the next few days. it's been very settled over the past week or ten days or so, high pressure in charge, it has brought quite a lot of cloud and
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cool conditions but things will be turning a little warmer and brighter, particularly in the south. we have got some bits and folk around first thing this morning, that will gradually lift over the next few hours and we are looking at a dry day most places. spells of sunshine around but most of us will keep a little cloud around. still high pressure is driving our weather but its shifting position a little bit, so it moves a bit towards the east, and with winds rotating around that, they will start to come from more of a south—easterly direction, bringing notjust slightly more of a south—easterly direction, bringing not just slightly warmer but also some slightly clearer weather, especially in the south where it has been quite cloudy recently. we will still hold on to a fair amount of cloud for parts of eastern england and eastern scotland today, spots of drizzle for the north—east i think at times, best of the summer trying to be found south and west, a sunny afternoon to come across much of southern england, wales, sunny spell for northern ireland. and winds are lighter than recent days. they're coming off the north sea for the likes of newcastle
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and aberdeen, temperatures 14 or 15, but in the sunshine for the south, cardiff about 23 later this afternoon. later in the evening, quite a bit of late sunshine for most of us, still a bit gloomy around north—east coast. overnight, variable amounts of cloud, the odd spot of drizzle in the north—east but mostly clear and dry for the old mr patch developing but not particularly cold because of the milder air, temperatures 11—15. tomorrow starting not too bad, some cloud for parts of east anglia and southern england, but sunnier skies for the north—east of england and southern scotland, warmer here, the breeze not coming off the north sea on sunday, so about 20 or so for newcastle, 25 in cardiff and london. but you will notice the blue. this rain moving in across northern ireland in western scotland later in the afternoon. so that's a weather front which pushes its way south of night and into monday, bringing one or two showers into early monday
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morning, particularly through parts of northern england and wales at times as well. those showers fade away quite quickly so we are looking at a predominantly dry day again into monday, light winds and it will feel quite warm in that sunshine. in fact, in the south we are likely to see 26 or 27 on monday, so certainly a warm few days i had to start the working week before things turn a bit more autumnal later in the week. in a tense week of final evacuations from afghanistan, scenes of desperation have been viewed across the world. one moment which went viral showed a mother handing her baby over a barbed wire wall and into a us marine's arms. the baby was taken to hospital and treated by a british medical team. our reporterjohn maguire has the story. it was one of the most striking images of the chaotic withdrawal from afghanistan. such was the desperation of her family, from afghanistan. such was the desperation of herfamily, a baby girl was held high above their heads
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as a us marine grabbed her arm and hoisted her over barbed wire and into the arms of a waiting colleague. they were part of what british forces described as a sea of humanity, people crashed against the walls of kabul airport, often with little regard for personal safety, their only thought to escape the returning taliban.— their only thought to escape the returning taliban. when women and children are — returning taliban. when women and children are being _ returning taliban. when women and children are being crushed - returning taliban. when women and children are being crushed and, - returning taliban. when women and | children are being crushed and, yes, dying in some cases in your arms, your agency to deal with the situation and change it is very different than when you're on combat operations. there was emotions all the way through the operations. you can't see a young child, a baby, a woman, crushed to death in front of you and then you having to deal with the aftermath of that. you can't see any of that without being emotional. have there been tea's? {lit any of that without being emotional. have there been tea's?_ have there been tea's? of course there have _
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have there been tea's? of course there have been _ have there been tea's? of course there have been tears. _ have there been tea's? of course there have been tears. politicians continued to _ there have been tears. politicians continued to argue _ there have been tears. politicians continued to argue about - there have been tears. politicians continued to argue about who - there have been tears. politicians i continued to argue about who knew what and when, but the thousands outside the safety of the perimeter believed this to be a matter of life and death. the royal air force flew out 14,000 people, twice the number that had been anticipated. and for the british troops sent into form a thin line to enable people to leave country, the mission was exhausting, complex and often dangerous. in the airport's military hospital, british and coalition medics treated gunshot and coalition medics treated gunshot and blast injuries, a significant number of people who have been crushed in the crowds outside and an unexpectedly high number of children. among them, the baby girl he was reunited with her mother, and they left afghanistan. in common with all those who escaped so far, they now face a journey potentially
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even longer as they adapt to new lives in foreign lands far away from their home. we're joined by lieutenant colonel ben caesar, who was the orthopaedics consultant on shift while a number of children who were separated from their parents were being held at the medical facility. he helped look after the baby who was handed over the fence. good morning, extremely emotive pictures we so there of that baby being handed over. how was she when she came to you?— she came to you? good morning. the little airl she came to you? good morning. the little girl was — she came to you? good morning. the little girl was actually _ she came to you? good morning. the little girl was actually in _ she came to you? good morning. the little girl was actually in pretty - little girl was actually in pretty good health when she came to see us, obviously a little distressed from being separated from her family and being separated from her family and being handed over to strangers, but, yes, she was in relatively good health compared to a number of the others that we ended up looking after in the facility. and others that we ended up looking after in the facility.— others that we ended up looking
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after in the facility. and you have after in the facility. and you have a toddler yourself, _ after in the facility. and you have a toddler yourself, so _ after in the facility. and you have a toddler yourself, so you - after in the facility. and you have a toddler yourself, so you are - a toddler yourself, so you are experienced in settling a baby, and you did thejob? experienced in settling a baby, and you did the job?— you did the job? yes, i have a 14-month-old _ you did the job? yes, i have a 14-month-old and _ you did the job? yes, i have a 14-month-old and i _ you did the job? yes, i have a 14-month-old and i have - you did the job? yes, i have a | 14-month-old and i have done you did the job? yes, i have a - 14-month-old and i have done this 14—month—old and i have done this before. i have a 16—year—old lad, as well. so a little bit of experience of looking after toddlers and infants. so, yes, between us as a group, we managed to settle her down. one of my colleagues fed her and changed her, sol down. one of my colleagues fed her and changed her, so i knew she wasn't hungry or dirty, but she wasn't hungry or dirty, but she wasn't settling, so we walked her around until she was adequately winded and then she seemed to be little more happy. she winded and then she seemed to be little more happy-— winded and then she seemed to be little more happy. she needed a good old-fashioned — little more happy. she needed a good old-fashioned cuddle. _ little more happy. she needed a good old-fashioned cuddle. what _ little more happy. she needed a good old-fashioned cuddle. what i - little more happy. she needed a good old-fashioned cuddle. what i think. old—fashioned cuddle. what i think about when i see these pictures of you with the children and your team with the children is that you must in some way feel an attachment to them, and then it's time to pass them, and then it's time to pass them over and move on. what's that like? ., ., , ., , ., them over and move on. what's that like? ., ., , ., ., like? for many of us who have children and _ like? for many of us who have children and who _
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like? for many of us who have children and who were - like? for many of us who have children and who were there i like? for many of us who have | children and who were there on like? for many of us who have - children and who were there on this deployment, obviously it was heartbreaking to see these children in distress. but we knew they were going on to a better life and a better place. our norwegian and american colleagues were unbelievably welcoming and supportive of these children either moving on to norway or to the us, and often being reunited with their families that had already managed to escape. families that had already managed to esca e. , families that had already managed to esca e. y ., ., families that had already managed to escae. , ., �*, escape. very good morning, it's charlie here. _ escape. very good morning, it's charlie here. i— escape. very good morning, it's charlie here. iwonder— escape. very good morning, it's charlie here. i wonder if- escape. very good morning, it's charlie here. i wonder if you - escape. very good morning, it's i charlie here. i wonder if you could fill in _ charlie here. i wonder if you could fill in one — charlie here. i wonder if you could fill in one or— charlie here. i wonder if you could fill in one or two caps for us. we have _ fill in one or two caps for us. we have just — fill in one or two caps for us. we have just shown that extraordinary image _ have just shown that extraordinary image of— have just shown that extraordinary image of the baby being listed and held by— image of the baby being listed and held by one of the american troops. i am receiving when she came to you, you didn't _ i am receiving when she came to you, you didn't know that part of the story _ you didn't know that part of the story i— you didn't know that part of the story. i wonder, you didn't know that part of the story. iwonder, when you didn't know that part of the story. i wonder, when did you first realise _ story. i wonder, when did you first realise guite — story. i wonder, when did you first realise quite what had happened? we realise quite what had happened? realised... at realise quite what had happened? , realised... at that stage, we had about 27, 28 kids within the facility, many of whom were
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toddling, running around, some were babes in arms like her. when the picture from the media appeared, it was quite clearly her as she had a distinctive shaved patch on the back of her head and we immediately recognised her as the child within the viral picture that was being passed around on social media and on the american press. i passed around on social media and on the american press.— the american press. i know you guys alwa s 'ust the american press. i know you guys always just do _ the american press. i know you guys alwaysiust do a _ the american press. i know you guys alwaysjust do a job. _ the american press. i know you guys alwaysjust do a job. i _ the american press. i know you guys alwaysjust do a job. ijust _ the american press. i know you guys alwaysjust do a job. i just wonder i always just do a job. ijust wonder whether. — always just do a job. ijust wonder whether, did you have any contact with the _ whether, did you have any contact with the american troops who had been _ with the american troops who had been involved? i mean, someone took a decision, _ been involved? i mean, someone took a decision, didn't they, as she was handed _ a decision, didn't they, as she was handed to — a decision, didn't they, as she was handed to them and it was one of the american _ handed to them and it was one of the american troops to take her. did you have any— american troops to take her. did you have any contact with them? did they follow _ have any contact with them? did they follow the _ have any contact with them? did they follow the story through at all? we haven't follow the story through at all? haven't had follow the story through at all? , haven't had personal contact with the us marines but i know they have been tracking through their command from our perspective, when that story broke, it was about six to 12
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hours from when that huge ied blast went off at the abbey gate and to be honest, at that stage, we switched focus and we were busy looking after our american and marine brethren who had been severely injured in that attack. we ended up with over 60 casualties coming through the facility was in a very short space of time. so as with all of these things it's a very dynamic situation and we had to switch fast to doing our trauma job at that stage rather than the baby—sitting and daycare so we had been doing for a little while up we had been doing for a little while up until that point.— up until that point. when you describe it — up until that point. when you describe it like _ up until that point. when you describe it like that, - up until that point. when you describe it like that, it - up until that point. when you describe it like that, it bringsj describe it like that, it brings home — describe it like that, it brings home so, _ describe it like that, it brings home so, so well, it's a reality check— home so, so well, it's a reality check for— home so, so well, it's a reality check for all of us, looking at those — check for all of us, looking at those pictures and that little girl, and how— those pictures and that little girl, and how great that story is in terms of this— and how great that story is in terms of this result, then the reality of what _ of this result, then the reality of what you — of this result, then the reality of what you were coping with immediately on that day, and i know in your— immediately on that day, and i know in your normal work. can i ask a
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very— in your normal work. can i ask a very simple _ in your normal work. can i ask a very simple question, which is, how you? _ very simple question, which is, how you? because even, just as we were coming — you? because even, just as we were coming to— you? because even, just as we were coming to you, actually, we were having _ coming to you, actually, we were having a — coming to you, actually, we were having a conversation in the studio, asking _ having a conversation in the studio, asking that— having a conversation in the studio, asking that very question about, how much _ asking that very question about, how much help— asking that very question about, how much help to people like you get the kind of— much help to people like you get the kind of process the things you have been _ kind of process the things you have been through? so how are you doing? it's been through? so how are you doing? it's still— been through? so how are you doing? it's still early days, charlie. we have had a very comprehensive decompression programme in barracks at colchester for the last five days. the surface of these issues have been scratched, but as somebody who works with veterans, particularly veterans with ptsd, in my nhs practice, the reality is that for many of us, these scars will be deep, they will be invisible, and they will be there for a number of years. and there is support out
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there, and we have been signposted to that, but as yet, it's still early days, and people will take time to process what they have been through and what they have seen. and through and what they have seen. and it's kind of linked in a way, and you will— it's kind of linked in a way, and you will tell me what you wish to, but when — you will tell me what you wish to, but when you were reunited with your family. _ but when you were reunited with your family, given what you had seen and done, _ family, given what you had seen and done, what — family, given what you had seen and done, what was that like?— family, given what you had seen and done, what was that like? there were a few tears- — done, what was that like? there were a few tears- we _ done, what was that like? there were a few tears. we were _ done, what was that like? there were a few tears. we were just _ done, what was that like? there were a few tears. we were just pleased - done, what was that like? there were a few tears. we were just pleased to l a few tears. we were just pleased to be back together. it's been, and i know this, because we spoke about it last night, i only got home yesterday, it's been extremely hard for the other front line, which yesterday, it's been extremely hard for the otherfront line, which is our wives and partners who have been having to deal with the uncertainty that surrounds an operation like this, particularly when the media is filled with the images that have been all over the world, of the
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devastation that was caused at abbey gate and the horrific scenes of, as was described in the piece earlier, that sea of humanity squeezing into the airport, rushing onto the airfield, falling off aeroplanes. our wives and families have been through it, as much if not more than we have. �* ., . through it, as much if not more than we have. . ., ., ., through it, as much if not more than we have. �* ., . ., , ., we have. and on a human level, you talked about — we have. and on a human level, you talked about that _ we have. and on a human level, you talked about that relief _ we have. and on a human level, you talked about that relief of _ we have. and on a human level, you talked about that relief of being - talked about that relief of being able to take that baby and place it in a better place, a safer future. it's not possible for every afghan he wanted to get out and he was entitled to get out, so i am sure, naturally, you had moments where you've thought about those left behind? this is an ongoing process. yes, there are people who are still there, there are people who wish to leave. all the western governments who were there have made a
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commitment to continue to try to get these people who wish to leave out. currently, the process we were involved with has finished, but it sounds as if there are ongoing methods through the borders to third countries to try and get these people out to a place of safety. lieutenant colonel, tish army consultant trauma and orthopaedic surgeon, _ consultant trauma and orthopaedic surgeon, it— consultant trauma and orthopaedic surgeon, it has been a pleasure talking — surgeon, it has been a pleasure talking to — surgeon, it has been a pleasure talking to you this morning and i'm sure everyone is full of respect for the work— sure everyone is full of respect for the work you have done. thank you for taking _ the work you have done. thank you for taking us— the work you have done. thank you for taking us through everything you saw and _ for taking us through everything you saw and you know.— saw and you know. thank you. thank you- — saw and you know. thank you. thank you. the _ saw and you know. thank you. thank you. the top _ saw and you know. thank you. thank you. the top of - saw and you know. thank you. thank you. the top of his - saw and you know. thank you. thank you. the top of his cv i saw and you know. thank you. - thank you. the top of his cv should be capacity to settle a distressed baby because that is not easy.
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hello, this is breakfast with nina warhurst and charlie stayt. coming up before 9am, sarah will have all the weekend's weather for you. for weeks now we've been hearing how a shortage of lorry drivers across britain has been hitting supermarket shelves, restaurant menus and even bin collections. the latest causality of the problem is flu vaccine supplies, with one of england and wales' biggest manufacturers warning of delays in delivering doses to some gp surgeries. let's find out what impact this might have — we'rejoined now by the director of public health for lancashire, dr sakthi karunanithi,
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and from chesham, dr nighat arif. a very good morning to you. have you had to break this news to your patients? had to break this news to your atients? , , , , ., , patients? yes. only yesterday. i was on duty doctor _ patients? yes. only yesterday. i was on duty doctor yesterday, _ patients? yes. only yesterday. i was on duty doctor yesterday, and - patients? yes. only yesterday. i was on duty doctor yesterday, and i - patients? yes. only yesterday. i was on duty doctor yesterday, and i got i on duty doctor yesterday, and i got an e—mailfrom our supplier saying an e—mail from our supplier saying they an e—mailfrom our supplier saying they would be a delay of two weeks, and this is on the back of meticulous planning. i have been on bbc breakfast a number of times over the summer saying the flu vaccine programme will be the most ambitious yet, 35 million people that we will be vaccinating to be prepared for winter after the pandemic will stop you know, being in the middle of a pandemic after the vaccination programme for coronavirus, which has been going so successfully, trying to make sure we are protecting our pair patients. we set out letters at the start of the week, encouraging our clinically vulnerable patients to start making appointments, talking to them, explaining to them the importance of having the vaccine, but only yesterday
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afternoon to then be sending out text messages and letters saying we were sorry at having to cancel it and we don't actually know when the clinics are going to open again. hagar clinics are going to open again. how serious can — clinics are going to open again. how serious can flu _ clinics are going to open again. how serious can flu be _ clinics are going to open again. how serious can flu be for some of your patients? serious can flu be for some of your atients? ., , , ., patients? some of my patients have underl inc patients? some of my patients have underlying health _ patients? some of my patients have underlying health conditions - patients? some of my patients have underlying health conditions so - patients? some of my patients have underlying health conditions so it i underlying health conditions so it is serious. it could mean the difference between going to hospital, having a hospitalisation stay, maybe even needing a ventilator, particularly if they get pneumonia or other health complications like organ damage due to having severe flu. we give the flu vaccine every year, but every year it has to be tweaked because there is a new crop of viruses that occur, so protection is vitalfor that. forsome occur, so protection is vitalfor that. for some of our patients, they could need it for work. for me as a health care professional, i have the vaccine every year, just so i can make sure that i am protecting my patients as well as my myself. there are bigger implications, notjust the impact on health. dr
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karunanithi, welcome to you. can you give us a snapshot of the concerns you have and the supply in your area? , ., , ., , you have and the supply in your area? , ., , .,, ., , area? yes, i really hope that it is area? yes, i really hope that it is a temporary _ area? yes, i really hope that it is a temporary issue. _ area? yes, i really hope that it is a temporary issue. we _ area? yes, i really hope that it is a temporary issue. we are - area? yes, i really hope that it is a temporary issue. we are not i a temporary issue. we are not picking _ a temporary issue. we are not picking up— a temporary issue. we are not picking up that this is a universal issue. _ picking up that this is a universal issue. so— picking up that this is a universal issue. so in— picking up that this is a universal issue, so in lancashire it does not appear— issue, so in lancashire it does not appear to — issue, so in lancashire it does not appear to be — issue, so in lancashire it does not appear to be effected on the scale we have _ appear to be effected on the scale we have seen in other areas, but this will— we have seen in other areas, but this will be — we have seen in other areas, but this will be serious if this is prolonged for more than two weeks. we are _ prolonged for more than two weeks. we are not— prolonged for more than two weeks. we are not onlyjust entering a phase — we are not onlyjust entering a phase in — we are not onlyjust entering a phase in the pandemic where we are lifting _ phase in the pandemic where we are lifting restrictions and the seasons are changing, but also we did not have _ are changing, but also we did not have flu _ are changing, but also we did not have flu last year like we usually have _ have flu last year like we usually have because of all the infection prevention and control precautions we have _ prevention and control precautions we have had, so this could potentially be very serious, if this issue _ potentially be very serious, if this issue continues. it potentially be very serious, if this issue continues.— potentially be very serious, if this issue continues. it sounds like you are on a watching _ issue continues. it sounds like you are on a watching brief, _ issue continues. it sounds like you are on a watching brief, but - issue continues. it sounds like you are on a watching brief, but how. are on a watching brief, but how does it work in practice? my understanding is it is individual gp surgeries that may be understanding is it is individual gp surgeries that may he would then report to you and say, we have got a problem. report to you and say, we have got a roblem. ., ., ~'
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problem. how will it work in practice? — problem. how will it work in practice? nhs _ problem. how will it work in practice? nhs england - problem. how will it work in practice? nhs england is i problem. how will it work in - practice? nhs england is responsible for coordinating and commissioning the flu _ for coordinating and commissioning the flu vaccination programme. we help with _ the flu vaccination programme. we help with the uptake. in practice what _ help with the uptake. in practice what will— help with the uptake. in practice what will happen is in the short term, _ what will happen is in the short term, these appointments will have to be _ term, these appointments will have to be rescheduled, but the more we delay. _ to be rescheduled, but the more we delay. the _ to be rescheduled, but the more we delay, the more we put the issues on a wider— delay, the more we put the issues on a wider implication because we want to get— a wider implication because we want to get as _ a wider implication because we want to get as many people having the flu vaccine, _ to get as many people having the flu vaccine, especially this year and now we — vaccine, especially this year and now we have expanded the cohorts, as quickly— now we have expanded the cohorts, as quickly as— now we have expanded the cohorts, as quickly as possible, given that we are in— quickly as possible, given that we are in the — quickly as possible, given that we are in the pandemic as well. you were talking _ are in the pandemic as well. you were talking about _ are in the pandemic as well. gm. were talking about persuading people to get the flu vaccine. is there any kind of pattern to the reasons people say for not getting it? i know the age groups have changed, more people are eligible than ever before. , ., ., , , before. yes, what we tend to see is older people _ before. yes, what we tend to see is older people do _ before. yes, what we tend to see is older people do get _ before. yes, what we tend to see is older people do get high _ before. yes, what we tend to see is older people do get high levels - before. yes, what we tend to see is older people do get high levels of i older people do get high levels of uptake _ older people do get high levels of uptake. as the age groups go down, the uptake _
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uptake. as the age groups go down, the uptake tends to be lower, but we have seen— the uptake tends to be lower, but we have seen quite an improved picture in the _ have seen quite an improved picture in the last— have seen quite an improved picture in the last few years, with the flu vaccine, — in the last few years, with the flu vaccine, especially health and care staff getting the vaccination and that is— staff getting the vaccination and that is incredibly important. they are not— that is incredibly important. they are not only protecting them, but also the _ are not only protecting them, but also the people they are caring for. how much — also the people they are caring for. how much does this add to your workload at the moment because you have had to put off blood tests because any shortage of vials, but now having to rebook, it is a lot of pressure on the office, isn't it? it pressure on the office, isn't it? it is a huge pressure on the back office. i'mjust is a huge pressure on the back office. i'm just the clinician at the front trying to make sure i see my patients face—to—face, doing video and telephone consultation. the demand on the practice has increased. there is a lot of animosity amongst patients saying they can't get into how face—to—face consultations, and that's because we do have a backlog already, and also we are having difficulties getting, for example, blood bottles. the
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difficulty is that we meticulously planned this. both in general practice, and we also work with other primary care providers, so it's notjust gps who are affected, it's notjust gps who are affected, it is also pharmacies and district nurses who will go out to vaccinate housebound patients, and those are extremely vulnerable patients. then we have got health visitors or midwives that need to vaccinate their pregnant patients. so it does have wider implications which then falls back onto the gp because if they get sick, that's something i need to plan for. i think a lot of my gp colleagues will say that they feel like they are firefighting and this has just added to this. blood bottles, in the past as a gp i have had difficulty with hrt and patches, so medicines, and i know that no one is saying it, but there is driver difficulties for lorries, but i'm going to use that brexit word, but i think this is something we need to
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be asking our leaders to be honest with us, what are the delays, how long will they last, can i practice in the way i need to? are there medical procedures i need to cancel customer if it is bottles now, what other consumables will i have difficulty getting into my practice? i need to prepare this so i can prepare for my patients, because otherwise the impact. my patients and that is not good enough. thank ou both and that is not good enough. thank you both for — and that is not good enough. thank you both forjoining _ and that is not good enough. thank you both forjoining us. _ you both forjoining us. we are back to go to wimbledon now for a very excited rugby club because it's not everyday you get the national coach, this time it is eddiejones, the england rugby coach, whojust turns eddiejones, the england rugby coach, who just turns up at your club for a bit of training on a saturday morning. the reason, of course, is because grassroots rugby is up and running again, as it would have been quite a long time ago.
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yes, it is back on its full contact form, 15 a side. they are back here at wimbledon rugby club in its 156 year. we have got a special guest but we will come onto that in a moment. the last competitive game was played in march 2020. it has been a long time coming. the pandemic, slowly easing with restrictions, so we are back here today. anna is the director of the women's team, celebrating a special birthday. plat women's team, celebrating a special birthda . ., , ., ., , birthday. not you, the team. yes, it is our 30th — birthday. not you, the team. yes, it is our 30th anniversary _ birthday. not you, the team. yes, it is our 30th anniversary today - birthday. not you, the team. yes, it is our 30th anniversary today of- is our 30th anniversary today of women's rugby being played at wimbledon. tell]! women's rugby being played at wimbledon-— wimbledon. tell me about the evolution of _ wimbledon. tell me about the evolution of the _ wimbledon. tell me about the evolution of the women's - wimbledon. tell me about the | evolution of the women's team through the ages. are you finding it easier now to attract young ladies into the team? i believe you have got three girls teams? absolutely, women's rugby _ got three girls teams? absolutely, women's rugby is _ got three girls teams? absolutely, women's rugby is growing - got three girls teams? absolutely, women's rugby is growing fast. - got three girls teams? absolutely, j women's rugby is growing fast. we have got our youth and girls coming through to senior rugby at the
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moment, which is great. we have seen people coming from the under 18 and into the senior team. we are playing a mixed game of people who have been playing throughout the years today. so a bit of rivalry! this is what it is all about. events are going on around the country by clubs who are basicallyjust around the country by clubs who are basically just celebrating around the country by clubs who are basicallyjust celebrating the fact that it basicallyjust celebrating the fact thatitis basicallyjust celebrating the fact that it is back. there was a survey done by england, wales and scotland rugby union is finding outjust how much people missed rugby, notjust the game, but also the sport itself. 86% of people said it was beneficial to their mental health. 27% of people said it helped them feel less isolated. 51% of people said it was not the game they missed, it was actually the camaraderie, the friends and the team—mates. here are a couple of young people who play the game. ellie, what do you miss
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about rugby? i the game. ellie, what do you miss about rugby?— the game. ellie, what do you miss about rugby? i have missed playing with my team-mates _ about rugby? i have missed playing with my team-mates and _ about rugby? i have missed playing with my team-mates and plain - about rugby? i have missed playing i with my team-mates and plain contact with my team—mates and plain contact matches against other teams. it has been elite are exciting to get back to that. ~ ., ,.,, ., ., been elite are exciting to get back to that. ~ ., ., ., ,~/ been elite are exciting to get back tothat.~ ., ., ., , to that. what position do you play? i normally play _ to that. what position do you play? i normally play the _ to that. what position do you play? i normally play the flanking - i normally play the flanking position because i like to pop off to the wing and do a support run, but i'm expecting a lot more contact than last year. you but i'm expecting a lot more contact than last year-— than last year. you are one of the older players _ than last year. you are one of the older players here. _ than last year. you are one of the older players here. we _ than last year. you are one of the older players here. we heard - than last year. you are one of the i older players here. we heard about what people missed during lockdown, but what does rugby bring to you? possibly not on the sporting level, but other than that? the friendship is what i missed _ but other than that? the friendship is what i missed the _ but other than that? the friendship is what i missed the most. - but other than that? the friendship is what i missed the most. the - is what i missed the most. the teamwork— is what i missed the most. the teamwork and the discipline. it is getting _ teamwork and the discipline. it is getting into that routine, everyday playing _ getting into that routine, everyday playing and training for something that you _ playing and training for something that you really love.— that you really love. that's what i missed the _ that you really love. that's what i missed the most. _ that you really love. that's what i missed the most. olivia, - that you really love. that's what i missed the most. olivia, how- that you really love. that's what i i missed the most. olivia, how about yourself? one of your first years at the club, how are you enjoying the sport? i the club, how are you en'oying the sort? ., , ~' ., sport? i really like it and the coaches are _ sport? i really like it and the coaches are really _ sport? i really like it and the coaches are really nice - sport? i really like it and the coaches are really nice as i sport? i really like it and the i coaches are really nice as well. what position are you? taste
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coaches are really nice as well. what position are you? we don't reall do what position are you? we don't really do positions, _ what position are you? we don't really do positions, but - what position are you? we don't really do positions, but i - what position are you? we don't really do positions, but i really i really do positions, but i really like wing attack.— really do positions, but i really like wing attack. there we go. if ou 'ust like wing attack. there we go. if you just come — like wing attack. there we go. if you just come over— like wing attack. there we go. if you just come over here, - like wing attack. there we go. if you just come over here, i'll- like wing attack. there we go. if. you just come over here, i'll keep my voice down, but see the gentleman there in the blue hat must mark? that is the head coach of england, eddiejones. i am that is the head coach of england, eddiejones. lam not that is the head coach of england, eddiejones. i am not going to disturb them because we will actually speak to him in a couple of minutes, in the next hour of bbc breakfast. we will hear what he has to say about the return of rugby, and possibly the progression of people coming here at grass roots going all the way to the professionals. you can really sense the excitement there. fantastic. we will speak to eddie jones there. fantastic. we will speak to eddiejones a bit later on. we all need a bit of inspiration on the way, as do the paralympian is. they keep on bringing in the medals. absolutely and it is the penultimate day. a brilliant day for the likes
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of hannah cockroft, but also for the para— canoe team, who now topped the medal table after two more gold medals today. it means hannah cockcroft has won her seventh overall paralympic gold medal, and her second of these toyko games. the only downside, she joked, was she hadn't broken the world record in the t34 800 metres overnight, even though her time was a new paralympic best. there has also been more british success on the water, in paracanoe. rounding up the action so far on this penultimate day, here's craig templeton. a golden smile, hannah cockroft, seven time paralympic champion. she is said not to be the biggest fan of the 800 metres. that's not what it looked like. she opened up a huge lead and by the home straight, there was no doubt who was bringing home the title. kare adenegan took silver, in a british 1—2, but it was cockroft�*s day.
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a title that was hers in rio is now hers in tokyo, a breathtaking performance and paralympic record. a feat even more impressive considering she'd injured her right hand in the warm up. she fought through the pain. this was her reward. from the track to the water, where there is also a battle of the brits as the swimmer charlotte henshaw won bronze in the silver at the two previous games. her desire to go one better propelled her to victory. emma wiggs pushed her all the way. 200 metres paracanoe gold and silver, the team spirit clear to see. and there was a first paralympic medal in the kl3 finalfor laura sugar. the fact it was gold made it even sweeter. after what's been a difficult year, britain's dan evans
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has finally hit his top form, and a stunning form, and a stunning fight back means he's now through to the fourth round of the us open for the first time in his career. he was staring at defeat when australian alexei popyrin surged into a two set lead, but he showed he's got his strength and confidence back after a long time struggling with the after effects of covid—19, as he dug in to level the match at two sets all. and in the thrilling final set, evans found that last drop of energy to take the match in the tie break as popryin double faulted on match point. evans said he could barely believe it and faces the second seed, daniil medvedev, next. but how about this? a teenager has knocked out naomi osaka, the women's defending champion, in one of the great upsets. she lost to the canadian leylah fernandez. osaka was serving for the match in the second set, but the 18—year—old fernandez hung in and fought back to win in three sets. you have to feel for osaka, who was in tears afterwards and says she doesn't know when she will play a tennis match again.
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it's so finely balanced in the fourth test between england and india, going into day three, and with the series level at 1—1, today at the oval could go a long way to deciding the outcome of both this match and series. having looked in control, england lost two early wickets yesterday, with craig 0verton and dawid malan both falling to umesh yadav. but then ollie pope came to the rescue, guiding england to a first innings lead. he looked set for a century but was bowled out for 81. england were eventually dismissed for 290, but despite the celebrations around pope, india finished the day on 43 without loss, so only 56 runs behind. they've crept back into it. i was pretty gutted when i got out. i had worked hard to get to 80, i felt really good. i was disappointed with the shot i play to get out, so i guess, yeah, it is bittersweet, especially at your home ground, i would have loved to get over the line. but i just want to help put the team in as good a position as i can,
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so i'm happy with my contribution. there was real controversy in the football as the women's super league returned. manchester united started with a 2—0 win over reading, and at first united were in control as kirsty hanson put them ahead towards the end of the first half. but reading came fighting back, and were left fuming that they were denied a goal here, with the ball deemed not to have crossed the line. replays suggest it did, but there was no goal—line technology available. and salt was rubbed into reading wounds when 0na batlle sealed the three points early in the second, in marc skinner's first game as manager, having replaced casey stoney. britain's dina asher—smith ran a personal best in the women's 200 metres at the diamond league in brussels. she was second with 75 metres to go behind jamaican shericka jackson, but a late surge from 18—year—old sensation christine mboma blew them both away to take first, with asher—smith coming third.
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despite this, she said she was just happy to be runnning that fast again elsewhere in brussels, britain 5 keely hodgkinson and jemma reekie finished second and third respectively in the women 5 800m behind the jamaican natoya goule. that's all for me. and i know now you are going back to one of the most amazing stories of the paralympics. yes, we will speak to ellie robinson in a moment. what happened for her was quite incredible and she talked about her win, effectively. she finished fifth in the final of her event earlier this week, but she has been through a lot. she has been
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praised for her honesty after she opened up about the struggles she endured just to get to tokyo at all. she has now returned to the uk and can speak to us from the olympic park in london. good morning. it must have been a roller—coaster since that interview went viral. it since that interview went viral. it has been lovely, really. i am massively grateful for all the support from the british public. i am really enjoying everything i am doing now i am back home, so it is great to chat to you guys. flan doing nowi am back home, so it is great to chat to you guys.- great to chat to you guys. can you remind viewers _ great to chat to you guys. can you remind viewers who _ great to chat to you guys. can you remind viewers who may - great to chat to you guys. can you remind viewers who may not - great to chat to you guys. can you remind viewers who may not havej great to chat to you guys. can you - remind viewers who may not have seen your post swim interview what that journey to tokyo was like, and by finishing fifth, in some ways some people might have thought it was a disappointment, but actually it was incredible. , ., incredible. yes, so i was diagnosed with disease _ incredible. yes, so i was diagnosed with disease in _ incredible. yes, so i was diagnosed with disease in my _ incredible. yes, so i was diagnosed with disease in my right _ incredible. yes, so i was diagnosed with disease in my right hip, - incredible. yes, so i was diagnosed with disease in my right hip, the i with disease in my right hip, the same condition alfie hewitt has in both hips. it is where the blood
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supply gets cut off to the hip and the hip collapses. my hip then rebuilt itself but in a really odd shape, so it doesn't fit into the socket and there's quite a few cysts, and not a lot of cartilage. that's the medicaljargon out of the way. but basically, it has a finite amount of time and unfortunately for me, my hip decided it was the end of this year and it was going to give up, and that was the amount of time. i basically decided, this is not the end, i have trained for five years and i'm not going to be told when to finish, i'm not going to go out this way, i'm going to finish on my own terms. i won gold in 2016, sol way, i'm going to finish on my own terms. i won gold in 2016, so i knew there would be an expectation for me to win gold again, but to be honest, everything about me was just the triumph of overcoming the past year. i barely trained, i didn't swim a length of butterfly between may and november and i was meant to be
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competing in the butterfly, so it was a real challenge. i had two further injections and there was no medication they could give me. it wasjust, i'm sorry, there's nothing you can —— we can do, just take the opportunity to train if it arises. so it was a very difficult year and it took its toll on me mentally as well. so i was immensely proud to get to where i did, to get to the games, to get to the final, and also due tojust get games, to get to the final, and also due to just get to that feeling of not being defeated and to say i triumphed over heartache and agony. that was where that pride came from. and it is about refraining what success and victory looks like, but i guess for lots of athletes and lots of us watching, there could have been an immense sense of bitterness that, had it been a year earlier, your hip would have had more time left and it would have been a very different situation, but you have not got an ounce of bitterness about it. quite the
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contrary. bitterness about it. quite the contra . , bitterness about it. quite the contra , �*, contrary. absolutely. it's quite funn , contrary. absolutely. it's quite funny. and _ contrary. absolutely. it's quite funny, and the _ contrary. absolutely. it's quite funny, and the start _ contrary. absolutely. it's quite funny, and the start of - contrary. absolutely. it's quite funny, and the start of the - contrary. absolutely. it's quite l funny, and the start of the 1920 season, i was flying. in my opinion, i was actually on track to go and win gold. had i —— would i have done that? i don't know. hindsight is a wonderful thing. that? i don't know. hindsight is a wonderfulthing. but that? i don't know. hindsight is a wonderful thing. but i am so glad that i ended where i did and it did end that way because the journey that i have been on is unbelievable. and actually, to see the reaction from the british public for finishing fifth, and overcoming that kind of story. i don't want to call it a story of struggle, i want to call it a story of triumph and that means more than any medal could have. i can't imagine going out in any other way. it has really touched
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any other way. it has really touched a chord with me.— a chord with me. good morning, ellie. charlie _ a chord with me. good morning, ellie. charlie here. _ a chord with me. good morning, ellie. charlie here. it— a chord with me. good morning, ellie. charlie here. it is- ellie. charlie here. it is inspiring, hearing the way you speak about what you have done. i completely get that. i am just wondering, for you, sometimes there's a pause when you have done something remarkable. you had a remarkable moment in your life, and then you don't quite realise the impact you have had on other people until, i don't know, maybe you are back here, and maybe you have a chance encounter with someone you didn't know before, and they say, aren't you ellie? has that happened because rock have you had any of those moments?— because rock have you had any of those moments? yes, i did actually. i'm now in — those moments? yes, i did actually. i'm now in the _ those moments? yes, i did actually. i'm now in the olympic _ those moments? yes, i did actually. i'm now in the olympic park, - those moments? yes, i did actually. i'm now in the olympic park, and i i'm now in the olympic park, and someone came up to me when i was at a set of traffic lights, a zebra crossing, and as i was crossing, someone said i saw you, you made us all cry. i don't know if that's a good thing or a bad thing. i don't know, but it really meant a lot that
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is notjust the medals that are getting recognised and remembered, it is the characters. and that's what i've been trying to say to my para— swimming friends. i got a good friend in italy who is an amazing athlete, he is unbelievable. i keep saying to him, you have got this amazing character. he puts a lot of pressure on himself to win medals. he sets high expectations for himself. i remember, keep saying to all my friends, it is about who you are as an athlete. medals are fantastic, but it is the personality and the characters that the public love and i have learnt that in the most amazing way possible. so thank you to the british public. $5 most amazing way possible. so thank you to the british public. am you to the british public. as i understand — you to the british public. as i understand it, _ you to the british public. as i understand it, tell— you to the british public. as i understand it, tell me - you to the british public. as i understand it, tell me a - you to the british public. as i understand it, tell me a little bit about the place you are at today. i think it is called a celebration of sport. what will happen there today? so it is basically an event put on by the national lottery and paralympics gb and we are inviting a lot of disabled children to
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basically showcase how amazing they are in sport. obviously, it is providing the opportunities for disabled people in sport, but i'm actually enjoying watching these children demonstrate just how fantastic their characters are. what is so great today is that we are not actually focusing on disability, we are focusing on showing the intrinsic value of these fantastic children, and we are allowing disabled children to show their true credibility. this is not an act of charity, this is a demonstration of the worth that these children have, and the mental strength that they possess. not for living with a disability, butjust for being these fantastic characters. ibe disability, butjust for being these fantastic characters.— fantastic characters. be in no doubt, ellie, _ fantastic characters. be in no doubt, ellie, you _ fantastic characters. be in no doubt, ellie, you will- fantastic characters. be in no doubt, ellie, you will be - fantastic characters. be in no - doubt, ellie, you will be affecting a lot of people in a very positive way. it has been lovely catching up with you today. enjoy your moment. thank you. thank you. we thank you. we have thank you. we have not thank you. we have not seen thank you. we have not seen the thank you. we have not seen the last thank you. we have not seen the last we have not of thank you. we have not seen the last of her, have we? that is without
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doubt my standout moment. and she is only 20 years old. let's have a look at the weather now. not a bad weekend ahead for most of us, and if you have been holding out for a bit of sunshine and warmth, particularly in the south, things are going to be warming up over the next couple of days to something a little bit summery. we have got some fog and low cloud around this morning. as we head through the day, there will be more spells of sunshine breaking through the cloud in most places, and largely dry conditions through the day. not completely dry, but a bit of drizzle physically close to the east coast. high pressure is still in charge, but will drift east through the weekend, allowing the south—easterly wind to pick up, so that will bring warm and clearair. wind to pick up, so that will bring warm and clear air. a weather front just push into the north north—west of the uk tomorrow, so if fair
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amount of cloud today for many places, further south and west longer spells of sunshine around. here, with lighter winds than of late, it will feel quite pleasant. we have still got a breeze off the north sea for parts of eastern scotland and northern england, so a little cooler for aberdeen towards newcastle will stop further south in the sunshine, we could see 23 or 24 celsius today. not a bad day. some late sunshine for many of us as we head into the evening. still quite a bit of cloud holding on for parts of eastern england into scotland as well through this evening and overnight. clearer skies further south, but it won't be a cold night because we have got that milder air, so temperature is 11—15 c. tomorrow, looking mostly dry for a good part of the day with some sunshine. a little bit more cloud drifting around across parts of east anglia,
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and later in the afternoon sun rain will arrive across northern ireland and the west of scotland. before that, a warmer day for many. up to 25 celsius for cardiff and london. through sunday into monday, we have got a weak front which pushes south, but just the odd got a weak front which pushes south, butjust the odd shower first got a weak front which pushes south, but just the odd shower first thing monday for central parts of the uk. sunny spells for some of us elsewhere from the word go on monday. so it will be a largely dry day with some sunshine on offer. light winds, and it will feel pleasantly warm. damages in the south up to 26 celsius. 20 across parts of scotland —— mac temperatures. pretty warm for the first few days of the working week, but then things turn more unsettled later in the week. we will have the headlines next.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and charlie stayt. our headlines today: a mass covid vaccine roll—out for 12— to 15 year olds could still go ahead despite a decision by the government's scientific advisors not to support it. gps are forced to delay flu jabs because of a shortage of hgv drivers which has disrupted supplies. us presidentjoe biden has warned about the dangers of climate change after visiting communities devastated by hurricane ida. reigning supreme for a 3rd paralympics running — hannah
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cockcroft dominates on the track to win her seventh gold medal, in the t34 800 metres — the first of three golds already today for the british team in tokyo. good morning. it's been a bit cool and cloudy for some of us recently but you will be pleased to hear that there's a bit more sunshine in the forecast and temperatures will be on the up over the next few days, too. some rain in the forecast for tomorrow in the north. i'll have the details throughout the morning's programme. it's saturday the 4th of september. our top story... the 4th of september. the uk's four chief medical officers are expected to decide within days whether to recommend vaccinating healthy children against coronavirus. yesterday, thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation, which advises the government, decided against recommending the jabs for 12—to 15—year—olds, saying the health benefits were marginal. it's believed the government think there's a strong case
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for going ahead. our political correspondent helen cattjoins us now. helen, we're expecting a decision from the uk's four chief medical officers in the coming days, but is there political support —— but growing speculation in the newspapers this morning that they will decide against the medical recommendation? we know that ministers have been keenin we know that ministers have been keen in recent weeks to say they would roll out if the jcvi keen in recent weeks to say they would roll out if thejcvi had come back and recommended it for all children aged 12 to 15. we know, actually, that labour has said there is a strong case, it believes there is a strong case, it believes there is a strong case, it believes there is a strong case for vaccination to avoid further disruption to education. that wasn't a factor that jcvi was able to take into account when it made its recommendation for stop it has a very narrow focus, it looks at the risks and benefits of vaccinating a child versus the risks and benefits of the child catching covid and the effects of covid on the person who is vaccinated, that's the person who is vaccinated, that's the criteria they look at, and on
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that basis they felt the benefit of mass vaccination was marginal. have a listen to professor anthony harnden, who sits on thejcvi. i harnden, who sits on the jcvi. i think parents need to understand what _ think parents need to understand what the — think parents need to understand what the risks are, what the benefits _ what the risks are, what the benefits are and make up their own mind— benefits are and make up their own mind about— benefits are and make up their own mind about whether they offer consent — mind about whether they offer consent or not. it's not as cut and dried — consent or not. it's not as cut and dried as— consent or not. it's not as cut and dried as it _ consent or not. it's not as cut and dried as it is — consent or not. it's not as cut and dried as it is for the 6 million, for instance, adults in this country which _ for instance, adults in this country which haven't been vaccinated so far. which haven't been vaccinated so far~ to _ which haven't been vaccinated so far~ to me. — which haven't been vaccinated so far. to me, that is a black—and—white decision, they should — black—and—white decision, they should go— black—and—white decision, they should go ahead and get vaccinated. vaccinating well 12 to 15—year—olds is not _ vaccinating well 12 to 15—year—olds is not a _ vaccinating well 12 to 15—year—olds is not a black—and—white decision. so not _ is not a black—and—white decision. so not a _ is not a black—and—white decision. so not a black—and—white decision, that's why it's not been referred to the chief medical officers, the four chief medical officers to look at the wide effects like the impact of disrupted education and take that into account as well. they will give their advice to ministers. it is expected they will give joint advice, if you like, so it is not expected we will end up with a
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situation where teenagers are vaccinated one part of the uk but not another, and it's thought that decision could happen within the next few days. ministers will decide how to proceed from thereon in. helen, many thanks. some gp surgeries in england and wales have begun cancelling appointments for the winter flu jab, after delays to the delivery of doses of the vaccine. a shortage of lorry drivers is believed to be behind the problem. doctors have warned it will have a serious impact on workloads and patients. our correspondent helena wilkinson has this report. this year's flu campaign is set to be the largest in history. more than 35 million people in the uk will be offered the jab on the nhs. news of a delay to some flu vaccine deliveries is causing concern and cancellations. seqirus, which supplies vaccines to gp practices and pharmacies in england and wales, have told their customers supply would be disrupted due to unforeseen road freight challenges.
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it is believed to be because of a shortage of lorry drivers. the company warned of a delay of up to two weeks. it's advising gps not to book patients in until they have confirmation of delivery. a two—week delay has a massive impact on our flu vaccine programme because the clinics are already set up, many surgeries already have a lot of vulnerable patients booked in, we like to get going early on in september, ready for the winter. so this is really, really worrying. doctors are already dealing with a chronic shortage of blood test tubes. supply chain issues have been blamed for that. the british medical association said delays to flu vaccine deliveries caused a huge increase in staff's already unsustainable workloads, adding that it created unneeded anxiety for patients. helena wilkinson, bbc news.
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the taliban say they're making advances in the panjshir valley, where there's been fierce fighting in the only remaining part of afghanistan not under the group's control. the area, north of the capital kabul, is one of the country's smallest provinces and battles there are reported to have left hundreds dead. the leaders of resistance forces have denied the taliban's claims. president biden has praised people in louisiana and mississippi for their response to hurricane ida last sunday. there's been anger at the delays in restoring power, and mr biden promised that infrastructure would be "built back better" to withstand future storms as nada tawfik reports. one week and a storm that brought america to its knees. look at that tornado! from new orleans to new york, it was a dramatic beating. record rainfall, life—threatening floods, destructive winds and tornadoes usually only seen in the midwest tore through communities with no mercy.
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in some places it was unprecedented, and sparked fear about the ferocity and frequency of future weather. oh, my god! the river is flooding! part of this newjersey town was abandoned after the nearby river crested and left cars and homes under 10 feet of water. four people died and about 600 were left homeless. gloria lost everything, but was lucky to escape with her life. she can't swim and had to be rescued by neighbours as the water rose inside her home. i started pounding... for somebody to come and help me so i won't die. i felt like i was dying. down these streets, people's belongings and memories are laid out for garbage pick—up. this family lost three cars and everything in their basement, but already the insurance company has told them they will not cover much of the damage. it's the first time that it happened, but if we stay in the house, what if it happens again?
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like, does it really pay to stay in this area any more? president biden has approved an emergency declaration for new york and newjersey. today, he traveled to meet victims in louisiana, where ida first made landfall as a category 4 hurricane. after surveying the damage, he highlighted the threat from climate change. things have changed. so drastically in terms of the environment. we've already crossed certain thresholds, we can't build - back a road, a highway, - a bridge to what it was before. you've got to build - back to what it is now, what's needed now. the cost to life, property and infrastructure has been staggering. still, climate change remains a divisive political issue. and so, over the years, america has ignored warnings and some would say this is the result. nada tawfik, bbc news, newjersey. new evidence has emerged that people have put on weight during the pandemic. nhs data shows that people who signed up for a weight loss programme were, on average,
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more than five pounds heavier than three years before covid struck. there are concerns this could lead to an increase in the number of people at risk of developing type—2 diabetes. blackpool�*s famous illuminations are lighting up the seaside town again, after a star—studded switch—on last night. here the lever that gets pulled, and then the lights switch on. the lights will stay on untiljanuary this year. it's hoped the extra two months will bring more tourists to the area and give a boost to businesses. always a brilliant show, can't wait. let's get more on our main story now — the decision by the uk's vaccine advisory body not to recommend vaccinating all 12— to 15—year—olds. so, what's the evidence behind this and why might the government decide to proceed
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with the rollout anyway? let's speak to our regular saturday panel — we're joined by linda bauld, professor of public health, and virologist dr chris smith. good morning to both of you. what i will try and do is, there's a lot for people to get their heads around this morning in connection with this jcvi decision. chris, i wonder if you can kind of pick up on some of the evidence in terms of the decision they have made? maybe, linda, you can pick up afterwards about some of the wider context, as in what the chief medical officers and government might do with that information. do you want to kick us up, chris? information. do you want to kick us u, chris? , g , up, chris? sure thing. the jcvi is the joint committee _ up, chris? sure thing. the jcvi is the joint committee on _ up, chris? sure thing. the jcvi is i the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation and their role is to appraise — and immunisation and their role is to appraise medicines, vaccines specifically, and work out whether the benefits conferred by using those _ the benefits conferred by using those vaccines outweigh the costs, not just _ those vaccines outweigh the costs, not just financial costs about cuts to health. — not just financial costs about cuts to health, because any medicine has a side _ to health, because any medicine has a side effect. so they are weighing up, if— a side effect. so they are weighing up. if we _ a side effect. so they are weighing up, if we take this group and give them— up, if we take this group and give
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them this— up, if we take this group and give them this vaccine and we know how well it— them this vaccine and we know how well it performs in that group in terms _ well it performs in that group in terms of— well it performs in that group in terms of preventing disease, severe disease, _ terms of preventing disease, severe disease, and how many at—risk people there _ disease, and how many at—risk people there are, _ disease, and how many at—risk people there are, does the use of that vaccine — there are, does the use of that vaccine in _ there are, does the use of that vaccine in that group actually justify— vaccine in that group actually justify using it in that group when you take — justify using it in that group when you take those costs into account? so the _ you take those costs into account? so the figures they will have been weighing — so the figures they will have been weighing up will be, what's the risk of severe _ weighing up will be, what's the risk of severe coronavirus disease in people — of severe coronavirus disease in people of— of severe coronavirus disease in people of that age group? the answer is, about— people of that age group? the answer is, about on— people of that age group? the answer is, about on par with the risk of being _ is, about on par with the risk of being hit— is, about on par with the risk of being hit by lightning, but one in a million _ being hit by lightning, but one in a million people will have a severe run-in— million people will have a severe run-in with — million people will have a severe run—in with coronavirus in that group — run—in with coronavirus in that group -- _ run—in with coronavirus in that group. —— about one in a million. there _ group. —— about one in a million. there is— group. —— about one in a million. there is also _ group. —— about one in a million. there is also to consider the risk of people — there is also to consider the risk of people he will become symptomatically infected but not so severely _ symptomatically infected but not so severely unwell, they make it long covid, _ severely unwell, they make it long covid, but — severely unwell, they make it long covid, but that doesn't seem to be involved _ covid, but that doesn't seem to be involved in— covid, but that doesn't seem to be involved in their thinking, they are looking _ involved in their thinking, they are looking specifically at severe disease _ looking specifically at severe disease. the account are bouncing that by— disease. the account are bouncing that by saying, what's the risk? we know— that by saying, what's the risk? we know the _ that by saying, what's the risk? we know the vaccine, will be using chiefly— know the vaccine, will be using chiefly rna vaccines like pfizer in this group, we know there is an incredibly— this group, we know there is an incredibly small risk of getting temporary, short lived inflammation
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in the _ temporary, short lived inflammation in the heart — temporary, short lived inflammation in the heart muscle called myocarditis, and they will be saying. — myocarditis, and they will be saying, when we use the vaccine, we -et saying, when we use the vaccine, we get about— saying, when we use the vaccine, we get about ten times as many cases of myocarditis _ get about ten times as many cases of myocarditis as we would prevent severe _ myocarditis as we would prevent severe disease in this group. and because — severe disease in this group. and because there is such a closeness in those _ because there is such a closeness in those numbers, it is very hard for them _ those numbers, it is very hard for them to— those numbers, it is very hard for them to say _ those numbers, it is very hard for them to say, therefore, just on the basis _ them to say, therefore, just on the basis of— them to say, therefore, just on the basis of disease prevention, it is justified — basis of disease prevention, it is justified to — basis of disease prevention, it is justified to protect this group. but what is _ justified to protect this group. but what is interesting about the verdict — what is interesting about the verdict yesterday, which is that they— verdict yesterday, which is that they are — verdict yesterday, which is that they are saying, we can't say that there _ they are saying, we can't say that there isn't— they are saying, we can't say that there isn't a — they are saying, we can't say that there isn't a benefit, there is a marginal— there isn't a benefit, there is a marginal benefit in this group, but we can't _ marginal benefit in this group, but we can't go — marginal benefit in this group, but we can't go as far as to recommend it, we can't go as far as to recommend it. but— we can't go as far as to recommend it. but what— we can't go as far as to recommend it, but what we can say is that chief— it, but what we can say is that chief medical officers across the four could — chief medical officers across the four could consider the wider societal— four could consider the wider societal benefits, they are offering a olive _ societal benefits, they are offering a olive branch back to ministers saying. — a olive branch back to ministers saying. you _ a olive branch back to ministers saying, you could make your mind up, because _ saying, you could make your mind up, because we _ saying, you could make your mind up, because we don't want to make a decision, — because we don't want to make a decision, because they could take into account what implications such
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as disrupted education, or more transmission through society to other— transmission through society to other individuals, and consideration around, _ other individuals, and consideration around, if— other individuals, and consideration around, if we have a limited supply of booster— around, if we have a limited supply of booster doses at any one moment, should _ of booster doses at any one moment, should they— of booster doses at any one moment, should they be going to other sectors — should they be going to other sectors of society or are they best used _ sectors of society or are they best used to— sectors of society or are they best used to treating young children? those _ used to treating young children? those are — used to treating young children? those are the factors they have been trying _ those are the factors they have been trying to _ those are the factors they have been trying to balance up.— trying to balance up. linda, it's very difficult. — trying to balance up. linda, it's very difficult, isn't _ trying to balance up. linda, it's very difficult, isn't it? - trying to balance up. linda, it's very difficult, isn't it? in - trying to balance up. linda, it's very difficult, isn't it? in some | very difficult, isn't it? in some ways you're comparing apples with oranges, cases of myocarditis against cases of going into it with covid, different conditions in different numbers, but still in both of them, pretty minuscule numbers in terms of danger.— terms of danger. absolutely, but i think if you're _ terms of danger. absolutely, but i think if you're a _ terms of danger. absolutely, but i think if you're a parent _ terms of danger. absolutely, but i think if you're a parent and - terms of danger. absolutely, but i think if you're a parent and aboutl think if you're a parent and about risks— think if you're a parent and about risks to _ think if you're a parent and about risks to your— think if you're a parent and about risks to your type, _ think if you're a parent and about risks to your type, risks - think if you're a parent and about risks to your type, risks of- think if you're a parent and about risks to your type, risks of covid,j risks to your type, risks of covid, even _ risks to your type, risks of covid, even a _ risks to your type, risks of covid, even a small— risks to your type, risks of covid, even a small risk— risks to your type, risks of covid, even a small risk of— risks to your type, risks of covid, even a small risk of a _ risks to your type, risks of covid, even a small risk of a very - risks to your type, risks of covid, even a small risk of a very rare i even a small risk of a very rare adverse — even a small risk of a very rare adverse event. _ even a small risk of a very rare adverse event, but— even a small risk of a very rare adverse event, but as - even a small risk of a very rare adverse event, but as chris - even a small risk of a very rare i adverse event, but as chris said, what _ adverse event, but as chris said, what the — adverse event, but as chris said, what the jcvi _ adverse event, but as chris said, what the jcvi was _ adverse event, but as chris said, what the jcvi was tasked - adverse event, but as chris said, what the jcvi was tasked to - adverse event, but as chris said, what the jcvi was tasked to do i adverse event, but as chris said, i what the jcvi was tasked to do was weigh— what the jcvi was tasked to do was weigh up— what the jcvi was tasked to do was weigh up risks _ what the jcvi was tasked to do was weigh up risks and _ what the jcvi was tasked to do was weigh up risks and benefits- what the jcvi was tasked to do was weigh up risks and benefits in- weigh up risks and benefits in relation — weigh up risks and benefits in relation to— weigh up risks and benefits in relation to young _ weigh up risks and benefits in relation to young people - weigh up risks and benefits in- relation to young people themselves and in _ relation to young people themselves and in relation — relation to young people themselves and in relation to _ relation to young people themselves and in relation to health. _ relation to young people themselves and in relation to health. i— relation to young people themselves and in relation to health. i think- and in relation to health. i think if you _ and in relation to health. i think if you look— and in relation to health. i think if you look at _ and in relation to health. i think if you look at wider— and in relation to health. i think if you look at wider factors, - and in relation to health. i think. if you look at wider factors, these are really— if you look at wider factors, these are really important. _ if you look at wider factors, these are really important. as - if you look at wider factors, these are really important. as you - are really important. as you vaccinate _ are really important. as you vaccinate more _
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are really important. as you vaccinate more adults, - are really important. as you vaccinate more adults, the. vaccinate more adults, the proportion— vaccinate more adults, the proportion of— vaccinate more adults, the proportion of positive - vaccinate more adults, the| proportion of positive cases vaccinate more adults, the - proportion of positive cases gets concentrated _ proportion of positive cases gets concentrated in _ proportion of positive cases gets concentrated in young _ proportion of positive cases gets concentrated in young people, i proportion of positive cases gets i concentrated in young people, and you can _ concentrated in young people, and you can see — concentrated in young people, and you can see that _ concentrated in young people, and you can see that in _ concentrated in young people, and you can see that in scotland - concentrated in young people, and you can see that in scotland full i concentrated in young people, andj you can see that in scotland full so we have _ you can see that in scotland full so we have had — you can see that in scotland full so we have had a _ you can see that in scotland full so we have had a 100%_ you can see that in scotland full so we have had a 100% increase - you can see that in scotland full so we have had a 100% increase in . you can see that in scotland full so i we have had a 100% increase in cases in 12 to _ we have had a 100% increase in cases in 12 to 15—year—olds_ we have had a 100% increase in cases in 12 to 15—year—olds over _ we have had a 100% increase in cases in 12 to 15—year—olds over the - we have had a 100% increase in cases in 12 to 15—year—olds over the past - in 12 to 15—year—olds over the past week— in 12 to 15—year—olds over the past week or— in 12 to 15—year—olds over the past week or so. — in 12 to 15—year—olds over the past week or so. and _ in 12 to 15—year—olds over the past week or so, and of— in 12 to 15—year—olds over the past week or so, and of course, - in 12 to 15—year—olds over the past week or so, and of course, that i in 12 to 15—year—olds over the past i week or so, and of course, thatjust because _ week or so, and of course, thatjust because more — week or so, and of course, thatjust because more of— week or so, and of course, thatjust because more of them _ week or so, and of course, thatjust because more of them are - week or so, and of course, thatjust because more of them are mixing, i because more of them are mixing, it's not— because more of them are mixing, it's notiust — because more of them are mixing, it's not just about _ because more of them are mixing, it's not just about schools. - because more of them are mixing, it's not just about schools. so - because more of them are mixing, it's not just about schools. so we i it's not just about schools. so we want _ it's not just about schools. so we want to _ it's not just about schools. so we want to push _ it's not just about schools. so we want to push that _ it's not just about schools. so we want to push that time, - it's not just about schools. so we want to push that time, though i want to push that time, though vaccination _ want to push that time, though vaccination cannot— want to push that time, though vaccination cannot prevent - vaccination cannot prevent transmission, _ vaccination cannot prevent transmission, it— vaccination cannot prevent transmission, it can - vaccination cannot preventl transmission, it can reduce vaccination cannot prevent - transmission, it can reduce it. so that is— transmission, it can reduce it. so that is the — transmission, it can reduce it. so that is the first _ transmission, it can reduce it. so that is the first wider _ that is the first wider consideration- that is the first wider consideration to - that is the first wider consideration to be i that is the first wider - consideration to be taken into account _ consideration to be taken into account the _ consideration to be taken into account. the second - consideration to be taken into account. the second wider- account. the second wider consideration, _ account. the second wider consideration, as - account. the second wider consideration, as chris - account. the second widerl consideration, as chrisjust account. the second wider- consideration, as chris just touched on, consideration, as chris just touched on. of— consideration, as chris just touched on. of course. _ consideration, as chris just touched on. of course. if— consideration, as chris just touched on, of course, if there _ consideration, as chris just touched on, of course, if there is— consideration, as chris just touched on, of course, if there is infection i on, of course, if there is infection in younger— on, of course, if there is infection in younger people. _ on, of course, if there is infection in younger people, they - on, of course, if there is infection in younger people, they can - on, of course, if there is infection in younger people, they can still. in younger people, they can still pass— in younger people, they can still pass it _ in younger people, they can still pass it on — in younger people, they can still pass it on to— in younger people, they can still pass it on to older— in younger people, they can still pass it on to older adults, - in younger people, they can still pass it on to older adults, some j in younger people, they can still. pass it on to older adults, some of whom. _ pass it on to older adults, some of whom. even— pass it on to older adults, some of whom, even though _ pass it on to older adults, some of whom, even though the _ pass it on to older adults, some of whom, even though the vaccines i whom, even though the vaccines provide — whom, even though the vaccines provide good _ whom, even though the vaccines provide good protection, - whom, even though the vaccines provide good protection, they. whom, even though the vaccines i provide good protection, they don't provide _ provide good protection, they don't provide 100% — provide good protection, they don't provide 100% protection, _ provide good protection, they don't provide 100% protection, so - provide good protection, they don't provide 100% protection, so that'si provide 100% protection, so that's another— provide 100% protection, so that's another result— provide 100% protection, so that's another result in— provide 100% protection, so that's another result in potentially- provide 100% protection, so that's another result in potentially to - another result in potentially to provide — another result in potentially to provide vaccines— another result in potentially to provide vaccines to _ another result in potentially to provide vaccines to teenagers. j another result in potentially to - provide vaccines to teenagers. and the other— provide vaccines to teenagers. and the other is— provide vaccines to teenagers. and the other is huge _ provide vaccines to teenagers. and the other is huge disruption- provide vaccines to teenagers. and j the other is huge disruption caused to kids _ the other is huge disruption caused to kids are — the other is huge disruption caused to kids are unwell— the other is huge disruption caused to kids are unwell and _ the other is huge disruption caused to kids are unwell and missing - to kids are unwell and missing school. — to kids are unwell and missing school. or— to kids are unwell and missing school. or if— to kids are unwell and missing school, or if there _ to kids are unwell and missing school, or if there are - to kids are unwell and missing school, or if there are a - to kids are unwell and missing school, or if there are a close i school, or if there are a close contact — school, or if there are a close contact for _ school, or if there are a close contact for any _ school, or if there are a close contact for any reason. - school, or if there are a close contact for any reason. so - school, or if there are a close i contact for any reason. so these school, or if there are a close - contact for any reason. so these are factors— contact for any reason. so these are factors that — contact for any reason. so these are factors that other— contact for any reason. so these are factors that other countries, - factors that other countries, particularly _ factors that other countries, particularly with— factors that other countries, particularly with younger- particularly with younger populations, _ particularly with younger populations, like - particularly with younger populations, like israel, | particularly with younger. populations, like israel, for example. _ populations, like israel, for example, who _ populations, like israel, for example, who started - populations, like israel, for- example, who started vaccinating
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teenagers — example, who started vaccinating teenagers very— example, who started vaccinating teenagers very early, _ example, who started vaccinating teenagers very early, i— example, who started vaccinating teenagers very early, i have - example, who started vaccinatingl teenagers very early, i have taken into account _ teenagers very early, i have taken into account. so _ teenagers very early, i have taken into account. so the _ teenagers very early, i have taken into account. so the chief- teenagers very early, i have taken into account. so the chief medical| into account. so the chief medical officers _ into account. so the chief medical officers will — into account. so the chief medical officers will be _ into account. so the chief medical officers will be looking _ into account. so the chief medical officers will be looking at - into account. so the chief medical officers will be looking at all- into account. so the chief medical officers will be looking at all this. officers will be looking at all this evidence — officers will be looking at all this evidence now. _ officers will be looking at all this evidence now. i— officers will be looking at all this evidence now. i think— officers will be looking at all this evidence now. i think we - officers will be looking at all this evidence now. i think we have i officers will be looking at all this i evidence now. ithink we have had with bite _ evidence now. ithink we have had with bite get — evidence now. ithink we have had with bite get a _ evidence now. ithink we have had with bite get a decision— evidence now. ithink we have had with bite get a decision from - evidence now. ithink we have hadj with bite get a decision from them in the _ with bite get a decision from them in the coming _ with bite get a decision from them in the coming week. _ with bite get a decision from them in the coming week. —— _ with bite get a decision from them in the coming week. —— we - with bite get a decision from them in the coming week. —— we mighti with bite get a decision from them i in the coming week. —— we might get a decision— in the coming week. —— we might get a decision from — in the coming week. —— we might get a decision from them. _ in the coming week. —— we might get a decision from them. one— in the coming week. -- we might get a decision from them.— in the coming week. -- we might get a decision from them. one viewer has been in touch. — a decision from them. one viewer has been in touch, this _ a decision from them. one viewer has been in touch, this will _ a decision from them. one viewer has been in touch, this will be _ a decision from them. one viewer has been in touch, this will be going - been in touch, this will be going through the mind of lots of parents of children who have already had the vaccine because they are in one of the categories are vulnerable, and she says, my 13 year daughter has already had the vaccine as she suffers from severe asthma. so lots of anxiety for parents who will be where they made the wrong decision. i will be where they made the wrong decision. ., �* ~' will be where they made the wrong decision. ., �* ,, ,., will be where they made the wrong decision. ., �* ~' ,., ~' decision. i don't think so, i think the 've decision. i don't think so, i think they've made — decision. i don't think so, i think they've made absolutely - decision. i don't think so, i think they've made absolutely the - decision. i don't think so, i think| they've made absolutely the right decision. — they've made absolutely the right decision, many other countries have already— decision, many other countries have already gone down this path. america has already— already gone down this path. america has already vaccinated millions of young _ has already vaccinated millions of young people, israel, france, italy, other— young people, israel, france, italy, other countries are well ahead of us on this— other countries are well ahead of us on this front — other countries are well ahead of us on this front because theyjudge there _ on this front because theyjudge there to — on this front because theyjudge there to be a very low risk of side effect _ there to be a very low risk of side
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effect against the benefit of actually preventing severe disease in a subset of people. people who have _ in a subset of people. people who have underlying health conditions are at— have underlying health conditions are at much greater risk from coronavirus, that's the first point. i coronavirus, that's the first point. i would _ coronavirus, that's the first point. i would also — coronavirus, that's the first point. i would also ask people to bear in mind _ i would also ask people to bear in mind that — i would also ask people to bear in mind that while we do not know the long. _ mind that while we do not know the long. long — mind that while we do not know the long, long term effects of these new vaccines _ long, long term effects of these new vaccines in _ long, long term effects of these new vaccines in young people, we don't know— vaccines in young people, we don't know the _ vaccines in young people, we don't know the long, long term effects of coronavirus — know the long, long term effects of coronavirus infection in young people. — coronavirus infection in young people, whether they will have an underlying severe infection or not. so i underlying severe infection or not. so i think— underlying severe infection or not. so i think that on the balance of opinion. — so i think that on the balance of opinion, there is a benefit and the w opinion, there is a benefit and the jcvi did _ opinion, there is a benefit and the jcvi did say, we judge this to be of marginal— jcvi did say, we judge this to be of marginal benefit. so they are still saying _ marginal benefit. so they are still saying there is a clinical benefit to having — saying there is a clinical benefit to having these vaccines and i would certainly _ to having these vaccines and i would certainly reassure anybody whose child has— certainly reassure anybody whose child has had one and is find that they are — child has had one and is find that they are absolutely fine. to child has had one and is find that they are absolutely fine.- they are absolutely fine. to what extent will _ they are absolutely fine. to what extent will the _ they are absolutely fine. to what extent will the jcvi _ they are absolutely fine. to what extent will the jcvi have - they are absolutely fine. to what extent will the jcvi have taken i they are absolutely fine. to what extent will the jcvi have taken in extent will thejcvi have taken in consideration of long covid, because the data for that is almost too soon, isn't it? it the data for that is almost too soon, isn't it?— the data for that is almost too soon, isn't it? it is. and earlier this week _ soon, isn't it? it is. and earlier this week you _ soon, isn't it? it is. and earlier this week you will _ soon, isn't it? it is. and earlier this week you will have - soon, isn't it? it is. and earlier this week you will have seen i soon, isn't it? it is. and earlier- this week you will have seen reports of research — this week you will have seen reports of research from university college
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london. _ of research from university college london. a — of research from university college london, a paper looking at a significant group of people, as in thousands— significant group of people, as in thousands of young people who either have or— thousands of young people who either have or haven't had coronavirus infection— have or haven't had coronavirus infection in— have or haven't had coronavirus infection in a three month period early— infection in a three month period early this— infection in a three month period early this year, and it's critical they— early this year, and it's critical they looked at people who both have and haven't had it, because then they— and haven't had it, because then they could — and haven't had it, because then they could work out were the signal is downstream of coronavirus infection— is downstream of coronavirus infection that might be a long covid infection that might be a long covid in these _ infection that might be a long covid in these young people and to what extent _ in these young people and to what extent that was happening. and it was happening a lot. they reckon about— was happening a lot. they reckon about one — was happening a lot. they reckon about one in seven young people, is about one in seven young people, is a maximum. — about one in seven young people, is a maximum, one in seven were getting postviral— a maximum, one in seven were getting postviral syndromes after catching coronavirus, so that's not insignificant as a number and could continue _ insignificant as a number and could continue to— insignificant as a number and could continue to be very disruptive to those _ continue to be very disruptive to those people's education and life, so preventing that, if you have vaccine — so preventing that, if you have vaccine and you don't catch coronavirus, you can't have long covid _ coronavirus, you can't have long covid. . �* . coronavirus, you can't have long covid. . �* , , coronavirus, you can't have long covid. . 2 , ., ,. , covid. linda, let's focus on schools for a moment. _ covid. linda, let's focus on schools for a moment, it's _ covid. linda, let's focus on schools for a moment, it's a _ covid. linda, let's focus on schools for a moment, it's a really - covid. linda, let's focus on schools for a moment, it's a really hot - for a moment, it's a really hot topic this week. i know schools in scotland have been back for a while, but around the uk, either starting this week at the beginning of next week. so this question...
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thanks, really good question. the schools— thanks, really good question. the schools return _ thanks, really good question. the schools return has _ thanks, really good question. the schools return has gone _ thanks, really good question. the schools return has gone well - thanks, really good question. the schools return has gone well here| thanks, really good question. the i schools return has gone well here in scotland _ schools return has gone well here in scotland generally, _ schools return has gone well here in scotland generally, we _ schools return has gone well here in scotland generally, we have - schools return has gone well here in scotland generally, we have of- scotland generally, we have of course — scotland generally, we have of course seen _ scotland generally, we have of course seen a _ scotland generally, we have of course seen a rise _ scotland generally, we have of course seen a rise in— scotland generally, we have of course seen a rise in cases - scotland generally, we have of- course seen a rise in cases amongst young _ course seen a rise in cases amongst young people. — course seen a rise in cases amongst young people. as— course seen a rise in cases amongst young people. as was— course seen a rise in cases amongst young people, as was mentioned i young people, as was mentioned earlier. _ young people, as was mentioned earlier. and — young people, as was mentioned earlier, and also— young people, as was mentioned earlier, and also getting - young people, as was mentioned earlier, and also getting tests, i earlier, and also getting tests, because — earlier, and also getting tests, because they _ earlier, and also getting tests, because they were _ earlier, and also getting tests, because they were a _ earlier, and also getting tests, because they were a contact, i earlier, and also getting tests, i because they were a contact, and having _ because they were a contact, and having to — because they were a contact, and having to wait _ because they were a contact, and having to wait longer _ because they were a contact, and having to wait longer for - because they were a contact, and having to wait longer for a - because they were a contact, and having to wait longer for a test i having to wait longer for a test result— having to wait longer for a test result because _ having to wait longer for a test result because we _ having to wait longer for a test result because we have - having to wait longer for a test result because we have had . having to wait longer for a test result because we have had so| having to wait longer for a test - result because we have had so many cases _ result because we have had so many cases but _ result because we have had so many cases but for— result because we have had so many cases. but for colin, _ result because we have had so many cases. but for colin, i— result because we have had so many cases. but for colin, ithink- result because we have had so many cases. but for colin, i think many. cases. but for colin, i think many of my— cases. but for colin, i think many of my colleagues _ cases. but for colin, i think many of my colleagues have _ cases. but for colin, i think many of my colleagues have been - cases. but for colin, i think many- of my colleagues have been concerned there have _ of my colleagues have been concerned there have not — of my colleagues have been concerned there have not been _ of my colleagues have been concerned there have not been enough _ there have not been enough mitigations— there have not been enough mitigations in— there have not been enough mitigations in schools, - there have not been enough mitigations in schools, and| there have not been enough - mitigations in schools, and they've written _ mitigations in schools, and they've written to — mitigations in schools, and they've written to politicians _ mitigations in schools, and they've written to politicians about - mitigations in schools, and they've written to politicians about this - written to politicians about this and express _ written to politicians about this and express their— written to politicians about this and express their views - written to politicians about this and express their views very i and express their views very clearly _ and express their views very clearly but _ and express their views very clearly. but from _ and express their views very clearly. but from a - and express their views very clearly. but from a tsitsipas| and express their views very - clearly. but from a tsitsipas micro perspective. — clearly. but from a tsitsipas micro perspective, what _ clearly. but from a tsitsipas micro perspective, what can _ clearly. but from a tsitsipas micro perspective, what can he - clearly. but from a tsitsipas micro perspective, what can he do- perspective, what can he do practically. _ perspective, what can he do practically, even— perspective, what can he do practically, even if- perspective, what can he do practically, even if perhapsl perspective, what can he do- practically, even if perhaps some of the mitigations— practically, even if perhaps some of the mitigations in— practically, even if perhaps some of the mitigations in place _ practically, even if perhaps some of the mitigations in place that - practically, even if perhaps some of the mitigations in place that you - the mitigations in place that you like more — the mitigations in place that you like more bubbles _ the mitigations in place that you like more bubbles are _ the mitigations in place that you like more bubbles are not- the mitigations in place that you like more bubbles are not in- the mitigations in place that you i like more bubbles are not in place this term? — like more bubbles are not in place this term? -- _ like more bubbles are not in place this term? —— from _ like more bubbles are not in place this term? —— from a _ like more bubbles are not in place this term? —— from a tsitsipas - like more bubbles are not in place i this term? —— from a tsitsipas macro perspective — this term? —— from a tsitsipas macro perspective i—
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this term? —— from a tsitsipas macro perspective. i think— this term? —— from a tsitsipas macro perspective. i think my— this term? —— from a tsitsipas macro perspective. i think my point- this term? —— from a tsitsipas macro perspective. i think my point would i perspective. i think my point would be to— perspective. i think my point would be to follow— perspective. i think my point would be to follow the _ perspective. i think my point would be to follow the guidance _ perspective. i think my point would be to follow the guidance and - perspective. i think my point wouldj be to follow the guidance and place a mixture _ be to follow the guidance and place a mixture they— be to follow the guidance and place a mixture they are _ be to follow the guidance and place a mixture they are doing _ be to follow the guidance and place a mixture they are doing that. - be to follow the guidance and place a mixture they are doing that. the i a mixture they are doing that. the second _ a mixture they are doing that. the second is— a mixture they are doing that. the second is ventilation, _ a mixture they are doing that. the second is ventilation, practical- second is ventilation, practical thing — second is ventilation, practical thing all— second is ventilation, practical thing all school— second is ventilation, practical thing all school staff— second is ventilation, practical thing all school staff can - second is ventilation, practical thing all school staff can do i second is ventilation, practical thing all school staff can do is| thing all school staff can do is check— thing all school staff can do is check with— thing all school staff can do is check with their— thing all school staff can do is check with their school - thing all school staff can do is| check with their school spaces thing all school staff can do is - check with their school spaces are adequately— check with their school spaces are adequately ventilated. _ check with their school spaces are | adequately ventilated. mechanical ventilation— adequately ventilated. mechanical ventilation can _ adequately ventilated. mechanical ventilation can be _ adequately ventilated. mechanical ventilation can be as— adequately ventilated. mechanical ventilation can be as but- adequately ventilated. mechanical ventilation can be as butjust - adequately ventilated. mechanicalj ventilation can be as butjust good old—fashioned _ ventilation can be as butjust good old—fashioned opening _ ventilation can be as butjust good old—fashioned opening windows, i ventilation can be as butjust good i old—fashioned opening windows, and you will— old—fashioned opening windows, and you will get— old—fashioned opening windows, and you will get a — old—fashioned opening windows, and you will get a sense _ old—fashioned opening windows, and you will get a sense when _ old—fashioned opening windows, and you will get a sense when the - old—fashioned opening windows, and you will get a sense when the room i you will get a sense when the room is too _ you will get a sense when the room is too stuffy. — you will get a sense when the room is too stuffy, and _ you will get a sense when the room is too stuffy, and while _ you will get a sense when the room is too stuffy, and while we - you will get a sense when the room is too stuffy, and while we are - is too stuffy, and while we are still in — is too stuffy, and while we are still in better— is too stuffy, and while we are still in better weather, - is too stuffy, and while we are still in better weather, tryingi is too stuffy, and while we are i still in better weather, trying to do more — still in better weather, trying to do more outside. _ still in better weather, trying to do more outside. so— still in better weather, trying to do more outside. so those - still in better weather, trying to do more outside. so those are. still in better weather, trying to i do more outside. so those are two practical— do more outside. so those are two practical things _ do more outside. so those are two practical things. and _ do more outside. so those are two practical things. and if— do more outside. so those are two practical things. and if ventilationl practical things. and if ventilation is of concern. _ practical things. and if ventilation is of concern, most _ practical things. and if ventilation is of concern, most schools - practical things. and if ventilationl is of concern, most schools should be able _ is of concern, most schools should be able to — is of concern, most schools should be able to get— is of concern, most schools should be able to get carbon _ is of concern, most schools should be able to get carbon dioxide - be able to get carbon dioxide monitors. _ be able to get carbon dioxide monitors, which— be able to get carbon dioxide monitors, which will- be able to get carbon dioxide monitors, which will be - be able to get carbon dioxide monitors, which will be ablel be able to get carbon dioxide i monitors, which will be able to be able to get carbon dioxide - monitors, which will be able to test the quality— monitors, which will be able to test the quality of— monitors, which will be able to test the quality of the _ monitors, which will be able to test the quality of the air, _ monitors, which will be able to test the quality of the air, and _ monitors, which will be able to test the quality of the air, and finally, i the quality of the air, and finally, ithink— the quality of the air, and finally, i think distancing _ the quality of the air, and finally, i think distancing if _ the quality of the air, and finally, i think distancing if you _ the quality of the air, and finally, i think distancing if you can - the quality of the air, and finally, i think distancing if you can and i the quality of the air, and finally, j i think distancing if you can and if there _ i think distancing if you can and if there is— i think distancing if you can and if there is an — i think distancing if you can and if there is an outbreak _ i think distancing if you can and if there is an outbreak in _ i think distancing if you can and if there is an outbreak in schools i there is an outbreak in schools or around _ there is an outbreak in schools or around schools. _ there is an outbreak in schools or around schools, there _ there is an outbreak in schools or around schools, there are - there is an outbreak in schools or around schools, there are extra l around schools, there are extra steps _ around schools, there are extra steps schools _ around schools, there are extra steps schools can _ around schools, there are extra steps schools can take, - around schools, there are extra steps schools can take, for- around schools, there are extra - steps schools can take, for example, local director— steps schools can take, for example, local director of— steps schools can take, for example, local director of public— steps schools can take, for example, local director of public health - steps schools can take, for example, local director of public health may. local director of public health may suggest _ local director of public health may suggest face _ local director of public health may suggest face coverings _ local director of public health may suggest face coverings are - local director of public health may suggest face coverings are born . local director of public health mayi suggest face coverings are born in schools. _ suggest face coverings are born in schools. which_ suggest face coverings are born in schools, which is— suggest face coverings are born in schools, which is the _ suggest face coverings are born in schools, which is the case - suggest face coverings are born in schools, which is the case in- suggest face coverings are born in| schools, which is the case in some parts _ schools, which is the case in some parts of— schools, which is the case in some parts of the — schools, which is the case in some parts ofthe uk_ schools, which is the case in some parts of the uk but _ schools, which is the case in some parts of the uk but not _ schools, which is the case in some parts of the uk but not required i schools, which is the case in some parts of the uk but not required ini parts of the uk but not required in engtamt _ parts of the uk but not required in engtamt it's — parts of the uk but not required in encland. �* , , parts of the uk but not required in encland. �*, , g, ~ parts of the uk but not required in encland. h , ,, ~ england. it's been talked about a lot this week _ england. it's been talked about a lot this week ventilation, - england. it's been talked about a lot this week ventilation, which l england. it's been talked about ai lot this week ventilation, which if we go back a bit, i remember talking to both of you in the early days
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about your home and in the home environment. now, very much a lot of people are thinking, what about schools, what about classrooms? as we all know, not necessarily the best of environments in that respect. i best of environments in that resect. ~ ., , ., , respect. i think one should be reminded _ respect. i think one should be reminded that _ respect. i think one should be reminded that any _ respect. i think one should be l reminded that any environment respect. i think one should be - reminded that any environment which is poorly— reminded that any environment which is poorly ventilated and overpopulated is going to be a risk factor— overpopulated is going to be a risk factor for— overpopulated is going to be a risk factor for the transmission of any infectious — factor for the transmission of any infectious disease. and in previous years, _ infectious disease. and in previous years. we've — infectious disease. and in previous years, we've seen big seasonal surges— years, we've seen big seasonal surges in— years, we've seen big seasonal surges in many respiratory infections which we've previously dubbed _ infections which we've previously dubbed the common cold, and hopefully this new coronavirus will effectively be converted into the common— effectively be converted into the common cold as we go forward and everyone _ common cold as we go forward and everyone becomes immune to it, but those _ everyone becomes immune to it, but those sorts— everyone becomes immune to it, but those sorts of things do spread very well in _ those sorts of things do spread very well in these sorts of environments and what _ well in these sorts of environments and what this coronavirus pandemic has done _ and what this coronavirus pandemic has done is — and what this coronavirus pandemic has done is focus our attention on 'ust has done is focus our attention on just how— has done is focus our attention on just how much of a cruising for a biotogicat— just how much of a cruising for a biological bruising we've been going on for— biological bruising we've been going on for years, and getting away with it, on for years, and getting away with it. chiefly. — on for years, and getting away with it, chiefly, but actually not getting _ it, chiefly, but actually not getting away with it at same time. because _ getting away with it at same time. because if— getting away with it at same time. because if you look at how many days are lost _
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because if you look at how many days are lost through ill—health in the workplace — are lost through ill—health in the workplace in the uk every year, it adds— workplace in the uk every year, it adds up— workplace in the uk every year, it adds up to — workplace in the uk every year, it adds up to millions because of things— adds up to millions because of things probably people caught in public— things probably people caught in public transport settings, in work settings, — public transport settings, in work settings, and in leisure settings. and so— settings, and in leisure settings. and so the — settings, and in leisure settings. and so the fact that this is focusing _ and so the fact that this is focusing our attention on how to a tfetter— focusing our attention on how to a better environment that ultimately is healthier and keeps us healthy, i think— is healthier and keeps us healthy, i think actually, this is going to be the wake—up calland think actually, this is going to be the wake—up call and it will translate into a positive in the tong _ translate into a positive in the long term. that doesn't make the short— long term. that doesn't make the short term — long term. that doesn't make the short term and easier to digest, but what it— short term and easier to digest, but what it means is that at least now we have _ what it means is that at least now we have a — what it means is that at least now we have a stimulus to move the right direction, _ we have a stimulus to move the right direction, and people are justifiably beginning to ask the right— justifiably beginning to ask the right sort of questions, to encourage that to happen. i think --eole encourage that to happen. i think peeple will _ encourage that to happen. i think people will think _ encourage that to happen. i think people will think twice, _ encourage that to happen. i think people will think twice, won't - people will think twice, won't stake, about getting onto a train or going to the office if they have a sniffle? why not work from home? especially if they've got the option. 50 that could be a good thing. so we've talked about it converting towards the common cold.
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and this is coupled with, as we have learnt today, the fact that flu jabs are not being rolled out in the way they should have been, that's not running to schedule. how worried are you about that? i running to schedule. how worried are you about that?— you about that? i think probably one must bear in — you about that? i think probably one must bear in mind _ you about that? i think probably one must bear in mind that _ you about that? i think probably one must bear in mind that we _ you about that? i think probably one must bear in mind that we don't - you about that? i think probably one | must bear in mind that we don't know what the _ must bear in mind that we don't know what the long—term protection conferred by these vaccines will be. we are _ conferred by these vaccines will be. we are measuring antibodies in the bloodstream, there one product of the immune system and can be used as a proxy— the immune system and can be used as a proxy marker for how good your immunity— a proxy marker for how good your immunity is, _ a proxy marker for how good your immunity is, and how your level of antibodies, — immunity is, and how your level of antibodies, the more protected you are from _ antibodies, the more protected you are from being infected. —— the higher— are from being infected. —— the higher your— are from being infected. —— the higher your level. they are made by addict— higher your level. they are made by addict population of white blood cells called memory b cells and plasma — cells called memory b cells and plasma cells that are really long—lived. —— a big population of white _ long—lived. —— a big population of white blood — long—lived. —— a big population of white blood cells. when you encounter an infectious disease is seen _ encounter an infectious disease is seen in _ encounter an infectious disease is seen in the — encounter an infectious disease is seen in the past, you don't catch it or catch _ seen in the past, you don't catch it or catch it— seen in the past, you don't catch it or catch it as — seen in the past, you don't catch it or catch it as badly because your body— or catch it as badly because your body can— or catch it as badly because your body can use that immune memory, it already—
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body can use that immune memory, it already has— body can use that immune memory, it already has the memory of how to make _ already has the memory of how to make antibodies and other parts of the immune response much more promptly — the immune response much more promptly. one speculation is that once _ promptly. one speculation is that once everyone has a baseline level of protection against this new coronavirus and have that immune memory. — coronavirus and have that immune memory, where they to encounter it again. _ memory, where they to encounter it again. even— memory, where they to encounter it again, even years later, they would not have _ again, even years later, they would not have a — again, even years later, they would not have a severe disease running with it. _ not have a severe disease running with it. they— not have a severe disease running with it, they would have a much more trivial— with it, they would have a much more trivial infection. so that's probably what's happening with other members _ probably what's happening with other members of the coronavirus family that circulates easily and cause colds— that circulates easily and cause colds and — that circulates easily and cause colds and human but also other members — colds and human but also other members of the cold virus family and in fact— members of the cold virus family and in fact the _ members of the cold virus family and in fact the flu, you brought up the flu, the _ in fact the flu, you brought up the flu, the reason you have a fairly mild _ flu, the reason you have a fairly mild run-in— flu, the reason you have a fairly mild run—in with lewin many years outside _ mild run—in with lewin many years outside the — mild run—in with lewin many years outside the scope of this pandemic is because — outside the scope of this pandemic is because we have an underlying immunity— is because we have an underlying immunity to flu viruses in general and as— immunity to flu viruses in general and as a _ immunity to flu viruses in general and as a result tend to have a more mild infection when we meet them than when — mild infection when we meet them than when we meet them for the first time _ than when we meet them for the first time most _ than when we meet them for the first time. most of the population are meeting — time. most of the population are meeting this new coronavirus for the first time, _ meeting this new coronavirus for the first time, so unsurprisingly, we see more — first time, so unsurprisingly, we see more people with severe disease but as— see more people with severe disease but as we _ see more people with severe disease but as we keep re—encountering it in the future _ but as we keep re—encountering it in the future as —
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but as we keep re—encountering it in the future as we do with cold viruses. _ the future as we do with cold viruses, the severity of the illness does _ viruses, the severity of the illness does drop, — viruses, the severity of the illness does drop, so our anticipation is in the long _ does drop, so our anticipation is in the long run. — does drop, so our anticipation is in the long run, we are hoping this will be _ the long run, we are hoping this will be the — the long run, we are hoping this will be the case, the underlying immune — will be the case, the underlying immune memory in the population will io immune memory in the population will go up _ immune memory in the population will go up and _ immune memory in the population will go up and as— immune memory in the population will go up and as a result people will in future _ go up and as a result people will in future become much less severely infected — future become much less severely infected. it will have converted, effectively, a lethal infection for some _ effectively, a lethal infection for some into a lethal infection for some — some into a lethal infection for some injector of the —— into a trivial— some injector of the —— into a trivial infection for everyone. we know trivial infection for everyone. know there trivial infection for everyone. , know there are problems with the supply of flu jabs, what is the implication, it seems like a bit of a moment in time? sorry, for linda. it does seem like a bit of a moment in time _ it does seem like a bit of a moment in time as— it does seem like a bit of a moment in time. as chris _ it does seem like a bit of a moment in time. as chris pointed _ it does seem like a bit of a moment in time. as chris pointed out, - it does seem like a bit of a moment in time. as chris pointed out, there| in time. as chris pointed out, there are many— in time. as chris pointed out, there are many unknown _ in time. as chris pointed out, there are many unknown questions, - in time. as chris pointed out, there are many unknown questions, but i in time. as chris pointed out, there. are many unknown questions, but on boosters _ are many unknown questions, but on boosters and — are many unknown questions, but on boosters and flue. _ are many unknown questions, but on boosters and flue, the _ are many unknown questions, but on boosters and flue, the province - are many unknown questions, but on boosters and flue, the province then| boosters and flue, the province then reported _ boosters and flue, the province then reported today — boosters and flue, the province then reported today are _ boosters and flue, the province then reported today are obviously - boosters and flue, the province then reported today are obviously very i reported today are obviously very worrying. — reported today are obviously very worrying, particularly— reported today are obviously very worrying, particularly for- reported today are obviously very worrying, particularly for gps, . reported today are obviously very| worrying, particularly for gps, but delivering — worrying, particularly for gps, but delivering the _ worrying, particularly for gps, but delivering the two _ worrying, particularly for gps, but delivering the two in _ worrying, particularly for gps, but delivering the two in combinationi delivering the two in combination was discussed, _ delivering the two in combination was discussed, in _ delivering the two in combination was discussed, in fact, _
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delivering the two in combination was discussed, in fact, the - delivering the two in combination was discussed, in fact, the jcvi l was discussed, in fact, the jcvi offered — was discussed, in fact, the jcvi offered interim _ was discussed, in fact, the jcvi offered interim advice - was discussed, in fact, the jcvi offered interim advice saying. was discussed, in fact, the jcvii offered interim advice saying the two could — offered interim advice saying the two could be _ offered interim advice saying the two could be provided _ offered interim advice saying the two could be provided together. offered interim advice saying the| two could be provided together if offered interim advice saying the - two could be provided together if we had a _ two could be provided together if we had a booster— two could be provided together if we had a booster campaign— two could be provided together if we had a booster campaign and - two could be provided together if we had a booster campaign and a - two could be provided together if we had a booster campaign and a flue . had a booster campaign and a flue campaign— had a booster campaign and a flue campaign side _ had a booster campaign and a flue campaign side by— had a booster campaign and a flue campaign side by side. _ had a booster campaign and a flue campaign side by side. and - had a booster campaign and a flue campaign side by side. and therei had a booster campaign and a flue i campaign side by side. and there is a study— campaign side by side. and there is a study conducted _ campaign side by side. and there is a study conducted by _ campaign side by side. and there is a study conducted by my— campaign side by side. and there is| a study conducted by my colleagues at the _ a study conducted by my colleagues at the university— a study conducted by my colleagues at the university of— a study conducted by my colleagues at the university of bristol- a study conducted by my colleagues at the university of bristol which - at the university of bristol which is looking — at the university of bristol which is looking at _ at the university of bristol which is looking at combining - at the university of bristol which is looking at combining the - at the university of bristol which is looking at combining the ton at the university of bristol which i is looking at combining the two and their early— is looking at combining the two and their early results— is looking at combining the two and their early results were _ is looking at combining the two and their early results were really - their early results were really encouraging, _ their early results were really encouraging, what _ their early results were really. encouraging, what researchers their early results were really - encouraging, what researchers were trying _ encouraging, what researchers were trying to _ encouraging, what researchers were trying to do — encouraging, what researchers were trying to do was _ encouraging, what researchers were trying to do was they _ encouraging, what researchers were trying to do was they recruited - encouraging, what researchers were trying to do was they recruited over| trying to do was they recruited over 600 people. — trying to do was they recruited over 600 people. giving _ trying to do was they recruited over 600 people, giving the _ trying to do was they recruited over 600 people, giving the second - 600 people, giving the second covered — 600 people, giving the second covered tab _ 600 people, giving the second covered tab at _ 600 people, giving the second covered tab at the _ 600 people, giving the second covered tab at the same - 600 people, giving the second covered tab at the same time i 600 people, giving the second. covered tab at the same time as 600 people, giving the second - covered tab at the same time as flu, and they— covered tab at the same time as flu, and they were — covered tab at the same time as flu, and they were looking _ covered tab at the same time as flu, and they were looking at, _ covered tab at the same time as flu, and they were looking at, was - covered tab at the same time as flu, and they were looking at, was more| and they were looking at, was more of a side _ and they were looking at, was more of a side effect _ and they were looking at, was more of a side effect if— and they were looking at, was more of a side effect if you _ and they were looking at, was more of a side effect if you got— and they were looking at, was more of a side effect if you got the - and they were looking at, was more of a side effect if you got the two i of a side effect if you got the two together, — of a side effect if you got the two together, and _ of a side effect if you got the two together, and also _ of a side effect if you got the two together, and also how- of a side effect if you got the two together, and also how the - of a side effect if you got the two together, and also how the body| together, and also how the body responded, _ together, and also how the body responded, if— together, and also how the body responded, if the _ together, and also how the body responded, if the body - together, and also how the body responded, if the body might - together, and also how the body- responded, if the body might respond better— responded, if the body might respond better in— responded, if the body might respond better in terms — responded, if the body might respond better in terms of— responded, if the body might respond better in terms of immune _ responded, if the body might respond better in terms of immune response i better in terms of immune response to the _ better in terms of immune response to the covid — better in terms of immune response to the covid vaccine _ better in terms of immune response to the covid vaccine and _ better in terms of immune response to the covid vaccine and not - better in terms of immune response to the covid vaccine and not the - better in terms of immune response to the covid vaccine and not the flu. to the covid vaccine and not the flu vaccine _ to the covid vaccine and not the flu vaccine or— to the covid vaccine and not the flu vaccine or vice _ to the covid vaccine and not the flu vaccine or vice versa. _ to the covid vaccine and not the flu vaccine or vice versa. and - to the covid vaccine and not the flu vaccine or vice versa. and for- to the covid vaccine and not the flu vaccine or vice versa. and for the l vaccine or vice versa. and for the side _ vaccine or vice versa. and for the side effects. _ vaccine or vice versa. and for the side effects, they— vaccine or vice versa. and for the side effects, they found - vaccine or vice versa. and for the side effects, they found i- vaccine or vice versa. and for the side effects, they found i think. side effects, they found i think very— side effects, they found i think very promising _ side effects, they found i think very promising results - side effects, they found i think very promising results that - side effects, they found i think| very promising results that you could _ very promising results that you could deliver— very promising results that you could deliver the _ very promising results that you could deliver the two _ very promising results that you could deliver the two together. very promising results that you - could deliver the two together. this is unsurprising _ could deliver the two together. this is unsurprising because _ could deliver the two together. this is unsurprising because there - could deliver the two together. this is unsurprising because there are i is unsurprising because there are other— is unsurprising because there are other faxes — is unsurprising because there are other faxes we _ is unsurprising because there are other faxes we deliver— is unsurprising because there are other faxes we deliver in - other faxes we deliver in combination, _ other faxes we deliver in combination, like - other faxes we deliver in combination, like the . other faxes we deliver in . combination, like the ones other faxes we deliver in - combination, like the ones for diphtheria, _ combination, like the ones for diphtheria, tetanus— combination, like the ones for diphtheria, tetanus and - combination, like the ones for- diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis, would _ diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis, would think— diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis, would think of, _ diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis, would think of, and _ diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis, would think of, and also _ diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis, would think of, and also mmr. - diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis, would think of, and also mmr. so| would think of, and also mmr. so even _ would think of, and also mmr. so even though— would think of, and also mmr. so even though there _ would think of, and also mmr. so even though there are _
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would think of, and also mmr. so even though there are problems i would think of, and also mmr. sol even though there are problems at the moment— even though there are problems at the moment and _ even though there are problems at the moment and we _ even though there are problems at the moment and we are _ even though there are problems at the moment and we are waiting. even though there are problems atj the moment and we are waiting for w the moment and we are waiting for jcvi guidance — the moment and we are waiting for jcvi guidance on— the moment and we are waiting for jcvi guidance on boosters, - jcvi guidance on boosters, scientifically, _ jcvi guidance on boosters, scientifically, it— jcvi guidance on boosters, scientifically, it would - jcvi guidance on boosters, scientifically, it would be l jcvi guidance on boosters, - scientifically, it would be possible to do— scientifically, it would be possible to do the — scientifically, it would be possible to do the two— scientifically, it would be possible to do the two in— scientifically, it would be possible to do the two in combination. - scientifically, it would be possible to do the two in combination. is. to do the two in combination. always, lots of insight from to do the two in combination.- always, lots of insight from both of you. are you both well? i know we have already spoken, but everything 0k, have already spoken, but everything ok, are we all well? have already spoken, but everything 0k, are we all well?— 0k, are we all well? impeccable. very well. _ ok, are we all well? impeccable. very well, thank— 0k, are we all well? impeccable. very well, thank you. _ 0k, are we all well? impeccable. | very well, thank you. impeccable! what would _ very well, thank you. impeccable! what would you _ very well, thank you. impeccable! what would you have _ very well, thank you. impeccable! what would you have done - very well, thank you. impeccable! what would you have done if - very well, thank you. impeccable! what would you have done if they| very well, thank you. impeccable! - what would you have done if they had said no? i what would you have done if they had said no? ., ., , ., ., said no? i would have been around like a shot— said no? i would have been around like a shot to _ said no? i would have been around like a shot to check _ said no? i would have been around like a shot to check on _ said no? i would have been around like a shot to check on them - said no? i would have been around like a shot to check on them with l said no? i would have been around l like a shot to check on them with my medical expertise! good to see both of you this morning, thank you. always got to check at the end. find always got to check at the end. and fin . ers always got to check at the end. jinn. fingers crossed they always got to check at the end. fific fingers crossed they say they always got to check at the end. e"ic fingers crossed they say they are fine! sarah, with not asked you how you are, how are you? very well, thank you! beautiful sunshine for some of us to start the day, this will cheer you up, sunshine and sunflowers, taken by a weather watcher. for some of us, we will keep scenes a bit like this through the course of the weekend, but for others, there will
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be more clout, a bit stubborn to clear. so are mostly dry day today. spells of sunshine, high pressure in charge, its been with us for a long time now. high pressurejust shifting a little bit further towards the east. the changes that will bring are more of a south easterly breeze developing, warmer direction of wind moving in, clear with some more sunshine, also a weather front with some more sunshine, also a weatherfront pushing with some more sunshine, also a weather front pushing into the north—west tomorrow, so a bit of rain tomorrow for northern ireland and scotland later on. acted today, and scotland later on. acted today, a lot of dry weather, tickets cloud for parts of north—east england and eastern scotland, and here with the breeze coming off the north sea, we could see some spots of drizzle through the course of the day. further south, lighting winds and we have seen recently, particularly for east anglia, down towards kent and sussex. wales and northern ireland seeing sunny spells breaking through, sunny spells, too, for northern scotland. temperatures above ill in aberdeen to around 23 in cardiff. if you have plans for a
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barbecue this evening, things looking dry across the board, the odd spot of drizzle on the far north—east but most places dry and fine overnight, too. a bit of cloud and night drifting around here and there but temperatures staying on there but temperatures staying on the mild side, ii—is first thing tomorrow. tomorrow is shaping up to be not a bad day for most of us, a lot of dry weather. cloud here and there, you can see some of this sticking around through parts of central england, perhaps east anglia, but more sunshine for eastern scotland and north—east england, not as chilly here, the breeze coming off the sea. later we will see the rain arriving across northern ireland in western scotland. but before it gets there, temperatures up to about 25 for some of us, certainly warming up for the next few days. moving to sunday night into monday, weak weather front pushes its way bit further south but bumped into higher pressure so fizzles out, it could bring a bit of cloud and a few showers monday morning through the central slice of the uk. it looks like there's shero soon fade away,
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so are predominantly dry day with long spells of sunshine. —— of those showers fade away. and can produce up showers fade away. and can produce up to 26, possibly 27. we keep the warm weather for a few more days before things turned a bit more unsettled and autumnal later in the week. but it's likely we will see temperatures in september higher than we head through the whole of august.
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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and nina warhurst. after more than a year of delays, bond fans hope to finally cast their eyes on the long—awaited 007 film by the end of the month, as it hits the big screen. the final trailer for "no time to die" was released earlier this week, and it's hoped the film's debut will provide a much—needed boost for cinemas that have been hard hit during the pandemic. simon browning reports. the snacks, the drinks, the treats. cinema is open, and is slowly filling up again, but it is waiting forjust one man. james bond.
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delayed three times because of the pandemic, it is finally due at the end of the month. it is one of cinema 's biggest franchises, and it is worth more than £5 billion globally. the timing is perfect. last month, uk cinema box office takings were half their pre—pandemic levels. but can the new mission for 007 get people back to the cinema? since the restrictions have been lifted, there is a chance and now james bond is in the cinema. i definitely think it will bring people _ definitely think it will bring people back to the cinema. | definitely think it will bring people back to the cinema. i can't wait, i've been _ people back to the cinema. i can't wait, i've been waiting _ people back to the cinema. i can't wait, i've been waiting for - people back to the cinema. i can't wait, i've been waiting for this - people back to the cinema. i can't wait, i've been waiting for this a l wait, i've been waiting for this a long _ wait, i've been waiting for this a long time, — wait, i've been waiting for this a long time, probably— wait, i've been waiting for this a long time, probably about - wait, i've been waiting for this a long time, probably about five l wait, i've been waiting for this a - long time, probably about five years since _ long time, probably about five years since the _ long time, probably about five years since the last — long time, probably about five years since the last one. _ long time, probably about five years since the last one. i— long time, probably about five years since the last one.— since the last one. i can't wait. it is that sentiment, _ since the last one. i can't wait. it is that sentiment, coming - since the last one. i can't wait. it is that sentiment, coming back l since the last one. i can't wait. it. is that sentiment, coming back for bond, that fills this bass with excitement. i bond, that fills this bass with excitement.— bond, that fills this bass with excitement. ~ . . excitement. i think we will see a resurgence _ excitement. i think we will see a resurgence of—
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excitement. i think we will see a resurgence of audiences - excitement. i think we will see a resurgence of audiences of - excitement. i think we will see a resurgence of audiences of all i excitement. i think we will see a - resurgence of audiences of all ages. how much weight is there on daniel craig 's big, masterly shoulders to make sure people come back to the cinema? he make sure people come back to the cinema? . . make sure people come back to the cinema? , ., .., . a, cinema? he is an iconic bond. i haven't seen — cinema? he is an iconic bond. i haven't seen him, _ cinema? he is an iconic bond. i haven't seen him, but - cinema? he is an iconic bond. i haven't seen him, but for- cinema? he is an iconic bond. i j haven't seen him, but for those cinema? he is an iconic bond. i - haven't seen him, but for those who haven't seen him, but for those who have seen the film, it is a great movie. that's why i think it will drive some incredible numbers, and i think everyone is excited about it. enjoy the movie. but cinema needs more movies than bond, so we keep buying tickets. there is a new spider—man to come this autumn. a new ghostbusters, and west side story. film bosses are confident that films from the pandemic will stay on screens until christmas. but covid still looms large. just this
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week, films for tom cruise were delayed due to a surge in covid cases. but some are sure cinema has a long—term future, and this group recently opened 11 sides. i a long-term future, and this group recently opened 11 sides.— recently opened 11 sides. i think it is a robust — recently opened 11 sides. i think it is a robust industry. _ recently opened 11 sides. i think it is a robust industry. it _ recently opened 11 sides. i think it is a robust industry. it is - is a robust industry. it is something that something in this country love to do, and more than ever cinemas need to deliver a good experience. ever cinemas need to deliver a good experience-— ever cinemas need to deliver a good exerience. ~ ., , h experience. apart from james bond 's nuns and experience. apart from james bond 's guns and his — experience. apart from james bond 's guns and his guns. — experience. apart from james bond 's guns and his guns, what _ experience. apart from james bond 's guns and his guns, what do _ experience. apart from james bond 's guns and his guns, what do you - guns and his guns, what do you really need from that film? taste guns and his guns, what do you really need from that film? we need --eole really need from that film? we need eo - le to really need from that film? we need people to come _ really need from that film? we need people to come back, _ really need from that film? we need people to come back, and _ really need from that film? we need people to come back, and a - really need from that film? we need people to come back, and a slightly| people to come back, and a slightly more mature audience. we are seeing families and young people coming back to the cinema because they are the first people that have come out and really gone back to their old habits of going out, but there is an older demographic that is still a little bit more reluctant. lirrul’ith older demographic that is still a little bit more reluctant. with 'ust under a month i little bit more reluctant. with 'ust under a month untili little bit more reluctant. with 'ust under a month until release, h little bit more reluctant. with just i under a month until release, james bond is or may be his biggest mission ever, not only to confront another deadly villain and save the
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lives of millions, but to put millions back on the banks of cinemas who have never needed him more. we have never needed him more. that big cinemark moment. looking forward to that. joining us in the studio now is the film critic ali plumb. it is going to be a great film. how important is it for the industry, because takings are only 50% of what they were pre—pandemic. so it is a huge moment, isn't it? they were pre-pandemic. so it is a huge moment, isn't it?— they were pre-pandemic. so it is a huge moment, isn't it? yes, this is a massive — huge moment, isn't it? yes, this is a massive blockbuster— huge moment, isn't it? yes, this is a massive blockbuster adventure i a massive blockbuster adventure movie that is for everyone. it has that poll. it's like, what do you mean, you haven't seen the latest bond? it is a shame almost that it didn't come out earlier in the summer, cinemas would have loved it. this appeal to everybody. and also, the cinemas make a lot of their money, the core people who go once a month, that keeps them turning over, but it is these blockbusters where you spend a lot on the family and you spend a lot on the family and you get all the treats and make an occasion of it, that's where cinemas
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make their money, isn't it? yes. occasion of it, that's where cinemas make their money, isn't it? yes, and it reminds people — make their money, isn't it? yes, and it reminds people who _ make their money, isn't it? yes, and it reminds people who have - make their money, isn't it? yes, and it reminds people who have been - it reminds people who have been reticent to go back, this is great, the sound, the music, the experience, it has been close to six years since our last bond adventure and that's a massive gap, almost as long as between the likes of goldeneye and licensed to kill and they were two different actors. this is a long wait forjames bond fans and i can't wait to see it. 50. is a long wait forjames bond fans and i can't wait to see it.- and i can't wait to see it. so, we have not and i can't wait to see it. so, we have got quite — and i can't wait to see it. so, we have got quite a _ and i can't wait to see it. so, we have got quite a few _ and i can't wait to see it. so, we have got quite a few others - and i can't wait to see it. so, we i have got quite a few others waiting to go, haven't we?— have got quite a few others waiting to go, haven't we? yes, top gun has now been delayed _ to go, haven't we? yes, top gun has now been delayed for _ to go, haven't we? yes, top gun has now been delayed for the _ to go, haven't we? yes, top gun has now been delayed for the sixth - to go, haven't we? yes, top gun has now been delayed for the sixth or i now been delayed for the sixth or seventh time. it seems to be cursed, but 2022 is when that movie will come out. and we have got westside story, stephen spielberg 's interpretation of that well loved story. 50 interpretation of that well loved sto _ , , interpretation of that well loved sto ,, interpretation of that well loved sto ,_ ,, . story. so this is westside story. we have seen a — story. so this is westside story. we have seen a little _ story. so this is westside story. we have seen a little glimpses, - story. so this is westside story. we have seen a little glimpses, have i have seen a little glimpses, have we? .
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have seen a little glimpses, have we? , ., , , have seen a little glimpses, have we? , , �*, . we? yes, absolutely. it's exciting for a number— we? yes, absolutely. it's exciting for a number of _ we? yes, absolutely. it's exciting for a number of reasons. - we? yes, absolutely. it's exciting for a number of reasons. but - we? yes, absolutely. it's exciting for a number of reasons. but how we? yes, absolutely. it's exciting - for a number of reasons. but how can you live up to the original? ads, lat you live up to the original? a lot of --eole you live up to the original? a lot of people ask — you live up to the original? a lot of people ask that _ you live up to the original? a lot of people ask that question. the music is of people ask that question. t"ie: music is undeniably fantastic. of people ask that question. t"i:e: music is undeniably fantastic. if they find a new way of doing it, maybe there's something, this is a bold move from steven spielberg. ii bold move from steven spielberg. if anyone can, steven spielberg can. was it one of those films that he always thought he could do something with customer unit, he has been in the industry for so long. it is with customer unit, he has been in the industry for so long.— the industry for so long. it is one of his favourites, _ the industry for so long. it is one of his favourites, this _ the industry for so long. it is one of his favourites, this is - the industry for so long. it is one of his favourites, this is a - the industry for so long. it is one of his favourites, this is a dream | of his favourites, this is a dream come true for him. i can't wait to see him on the red carpet. even more so than bond coming back, steven spielberg and leicester square, movies are back.— spielberg and leicester square, movies are back. there was a run of bad luck for— movies are back. there was a run of bad luck for top _ movies are back. there was a run of
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bad luck for top gun _ movies are back. there was a run of bad luck for top gun with _ movies are back. there was a run of bad luck for top gun with positive i bad luck for top gun with positive coronavirus tests and so on. yes. coronavirus tests and so on. yes, it's an interesting _ coronavirus tests and so on. yes, it's an interesting situation - coronavirus tests and so on. ie: it's an interesting situation where you are seeing movie—makers just change things almost at the last minute. if you go back to james bond, we arejust minute. if you go back to james bond, we are just under a minute. if you go back to james bond, we arejust under a month before the movie comes out and we have got a premiere to look forward to. the train is on the tracks, we can't stop that one. you have got the watch, the toys, so that seems, touch wood, that it is definitely coming to town. find touch wood, that it is definitely coming to town.— touch wood, that it is definitely coming to town. and they have said it is definitely _ coming to town. and they have said it is definitely the _ coming to town. and they have said it is definitely the final _ coming to town. and they have said it is definitely the final trailer. - it is definitely the final trailer. yes, it is a statement of intent. spider—man. yes, if you love the marvel movies, there have been 25 so far, this is possibly, again fingers crossed, a crossover event with lots of other different characters from different spider—man movies. so this is electric and tom holland, i think we can officially say, is the best spider—man ever. iie we can officially say, is the best spider-man ever.— we can officially say, is the best spider-man ever. he is so good on screen. spider-man ever. he is so good on screen- what _
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spider-man ever. he is so good on screen. what do _ spider-man ever. he is so good on screen. what do you _ spider-man ever. he is so good on screen. what do you mean? - spider-man ever. he is so good on screen. what do you mean? in - spider-man ever. he is so good onj screen. what do you mean? in this trailer, screen. what do you mean? in this trailer. you — screen. what do you mean? in this trailer, you will— screen. what do you mean? in this trailer, you will see _ screen. what do you mean? in this trailer, you will see an _ screen. what do you mean? in this trailer, you will see an actor - screen. what do you mean? in this trailer, you will see an actor from i trailer, you will see an actor from a different spider—man movie turning up, and this made me and my geeky mind explode. i up, and this made me and my geeky mind “plodd— up, and this made me and my geeky mind explode. i love it when they do that. we talked — mind explode. i love it when they do that. we talked briefly _ mind explode. i love it when they do that. we talked briefly about - mind explode. i love it when they do that. we talked briefly about cinema j that. we talked briefly about cinema etiquette. we all got used to being lazy, watching films on our sofa,... 0r stopping the film and nipping out for a moment for a cup of tea. yes, i understand why people have been reticent to return to the cinema. it has been a good cinema summer with quality stuff, but we've invested a lot in our home set up over the last 18 months. when you go back to the cinema, do me a favour, everyone, don't kick the seeds and please don't look at your phone, and just try not to bring in the smelliest food possible. 0r
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just try not to bring in the smelliest food possible. or the noisiest. yes, please. a curry, please don't. noisiest. yes, please. a curry, please don't-— noisiest. yes, please. a curry, please don't. so, there you are sittin: please don't. so, there you are sitting there. — please don't. so, there you are sitting there, the _ please don't. so, there you are sitting there, the screen - please don't. so, there you are sitting there, the screen is - please don't. so, there you are sitting there, the screen is up i please don't. so, there you are i sitting there, the screen is up and you are watching the film, and there is mumbling and conversations because people are used to being at home. quite a lot of people like to commentate on the film. certainly you do at home. what do you do? are you do at home. what do you do? are you one of those that says, excuse me? ~ ., you one of those that says, excuse me? . ., ., , ., you one of those that says, excuse me? . ., ., y., ., you one of those that says, excuse me? what do you do? have you ever seen the paddington _ me? what do you do? have you ever seen the paddington movies? - me? what do you do? have you ever seen the paddington movies? yes. i seen the paddington movies? yes. just give them the paddington stair. it is sinister and that's the best i can do. 0r really turn around and belt it out them, trust me, it works. . , belt it out them, trust me, it works. , , . ., , works. remind us why cinema is so secial. works. remind us why cinema is so special- we — works. remind us why cinema is so special. we have _ works. remind us why cinema is so special. we have the _ works. remind us why cinema is so special. we have the disney - special. we have the disney streaming we have had the option to have things a little bit cheaper at
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home, but why go back to the cinema? for me it is the immersion, you are there, it's all about what's on screen, you get the music and the surround sound, the enveloping eye line. it means so much to fully immerse myself in the story and not be distracted. just give in to the story and have the best time. it’s story and have the best time. it's like a rest — story and have the best time. it's like a rest from real life, isn't it? fantasy, escapism. who is the nextjames it? fantasy, escapism. who is the next james bond? it? fantasy, escapism. who is the nextjames bond? it is it? fantasy, escapism. who is the next james bond?— it? fantasy, escapism. who is the next james bond? it is me. i am so sor .it next james bond? it is me. i am so sorry- it is — next james bond? it is me. i am so sorry- it is a — next james bond? it is me. i am so sorry. it is a copout, _ next james bond? it is me. i am so sorry. it is a copout, but _ next james bond? it is me. i am so sorry. it is a copout, but i - next james bond? it is me. i am so sorry. it is a copout, but i want - next james bond? it is me. i am so sorry. it is a copout, but i want it i sorry. it is a copout, but i want it to be me. i wanted to be henry who played superman. he has done a bit of spying before in the man from uncle. he would be a nice fit. or me. . uncle. he would be a nice fit. or me, , ., ., uncle. he would be a nice fit. or me. , ., ., ., me. or there is another candidate over there- _ me. or there is another candidate over there. very _ me. or there is another candidate over there. very dapper. - over there. very dapper. if they are looking for the smallest bond ever. you have got the hair,
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charlie. overcoming set backs like that is one reason why hannah cockcroft has dominated her sport, since the london paralympics, and today in tokyo, she won her seventh gold medal, overall. she set a new paralympic record too in the t—31t 800 metres, in what was a british 1—2. as kara aden—egan took silver. cockcroft dominated the race from the start, to secure her second gold of these games. she broke her own world record to retain the 100m crown last sunday. she joked afterwards that she was gutted that she was unable to get the world record today. her team mate kara adenegan, recorded a personal best as she won the silver. there has also been success on the water overnight. in another british 1—2, charlotte henshaw won the kl—2, 200 metres para—canoe gold
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with emma wiggs clinching silver. henshaw won silver at london 2012 and bronze in rio as a swimmer, but switching sports has worked and means she got hold of the medal she always wanted. and there was another gold in the para—canoe with laura sugar becoming kl—3 champion. she has also made a sport switch from athletics when she was spotted by a talent id process in 2018. three years later she won gold with a paralympic best time. capping off a brilliant games for the british para—canoe team, putting them top of the sport's medal table. what a day it is for young rugby players across the country. competitive, full—contact rugby, kicks off this weekend across england, with grassroots leagues taking place with rucks and mauls included for the first time since the pandemic started. and the england head coach eddiejones has even been helping to coach some youngsters on their technique this morning. he joins us from wimbledon now. eddie, good morning.
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great to see you. what a moment for all those youngsters, having the england head coach, take a session, but also for you, having all that enthusiam and excitement to work with. how has it been for you today? it is fantastic for the sport. national lottery have supported this campaign, where kids and adults can play rugby in its full form for the first time in a long time, so it has been an exciting morning. i can see it on the faces _ been an exciting morning. i can see it on the faces of _ been an exciting morning. i can see it on the faces of those _ been an exciting morning. i can see it on the faces of those behind - been an exciting morning. i can see it on the faces of those behind you. j it on the faces of those behind you. as a former hooker in the thick of the scrum, you will know more than most the significance of that full contact, how important is it for this to return today?— contact, how important is it for this to return today? yes, it is the uniqueness _ this to return today? yes, it is the uniqueness of _ this to return today? yes, it is the uniqueness of our _ this to return today? yes, it is the uniqueness of our game. - this to return today? yes, it is the uniqueness of our game. we - this to return today? yes, it is the uniqueness of our game. we have j this to return today? yes, it is the i uniqueness of our game. we have a game that is based on a balance between contest and continuity and when you take the contest out of the
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game, it loses a lot of its shape. so to have a balance back between contest and continuity is fantastic. of course, grassroots is where it all starts. what do you think the impact will be on the development of this level of this 18 months without proper matches? could even deny a potential owen farrell of the future their chance for a career because they have missed so much? i don't think we need _ they have missed so much? i don't think we need to _ they have missed so much? i don't think we need to be _ they have missed so much? i don't think we need to be that _ they have missed so much? i don't think we need to be that dramatic. j think we need to be that dramatic. the good players will come through and there will be players whose well—being may have been affected by not playing rugby and now they will get the opportunity to play again. of course, we must not forget is not just the thing physical benefits. it is the mental health side and the friends you can make as part of a rugby club. friends you can make as part of a rugby club-— friends you can make as part of a ru:b club. , , , ., rugby club. yes, it is being part of a community- _ rugby club. yes, it is being part of a community. this _ rugby club. yes, it is being part of a community. this club _ rugby club. yes, it is being part of a community. this club in - rugby club. yes, it is being part of - a community. this club in wimbledon, it is the basis of part of the community here, and to be able to play with your mates is a really
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important part of being healthy. have you spotted any talent of the future that you might have in an england squad in the future? have you taken any names? thea;r england squad in the future? have you taken any names?— england squad in the future? have you taken any names? they could be a few surprises. — you taken any names? they could be a few surprises, you _ you taken any names? they could be a few surprises, you never— you taken any names? they could be a few surprises, you never know. - you taken any names? they could be a few surprises, you never know. we - few surprises, you never know. we are few surprises, you never know. e are looking ahead to the autumn internationals. talking to the senior side, internationals. talking to the seniorside, how internationals. talking to the senior side, how important are the matches against tonga, australia and south africa, especially after the six nations? the south africa, especially after the six nations?— south africa, especially after the six nations? the really important thin for six nations? the really important thing for us _ six nations? the really important thing for us now— six nations? the really important thing for us now is _ six nations? the really important thing for us now is the _ six nations? the really important thing for us now is the two - six nations? the really important thing for us now is the two years | thing for us now is the two years leading into the world cup. we have got five campaigns before the world cup and we want to make sure that in each campaign we improve, we put ourselves in a good position to wind the world cup, and that starts with the world cup, and that starts with the autumn tests. i the world cup, and that starts with the autumn tests.— the autumn tests. i could think of any revolution _ the autumn tests. i could think of any revolution in _ the autumn tests. i could think of any revolution in the _ the autumn tests. i could think of any revolution in the team, - the autumn tests. i could think of any revolution in the team, could| the autumn tests. i could think of. any revolution in the team, could we see new faces? i any revolution in the team, could we see new faces?— see new faces? i think the team will continue to — see new faces? i think the team will continue to evolve _ see new faces? i think the team will continue to evolve post-alliance - continue to evolve post—alliance series is almost like you draw a
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line in the sand, it's series is almost like you draw a line in the sand, its two years to the world cup. we have had a fairly settled team since 2016, and the abolition of the team will mean there will be some young players coming through. it is there will be some young players coming through.— coming through. it is nearly six ears coming through. it is nearly six years since _ coming through. it is nearly six years since you _ coming through. it is nearly six years since you took _ coming through. it is nearly six years since you took the - coming through. it is nearly six i years since you took the england job. i remember one of yourfirst session is when you taught me how to throw a ball around and we chatted about what was special about england and how much you loved it. what keeps driving you on?— and how much you loved it. what keeps driving you on? firstly, 'ust in terms of — keeps driving you on? firstly, 'ust in terms of the i keeps driving you on? firstly, 'ust in terms of the team, i keeps driving you on? firstly, 'ust in terms of the team, i i keeps driving you on? firstly, 'ust in terms of the team, i don't i keeps driving you on? firstly, just| in terms of the team, i don't think we have developed to our full potential yet. we obviously made the world cup final in 2019 and we have got the potential here and the talent here to win the world cup, so that's a driving force. secondly, it would have been easy for me to work walk away. the hard thing is coming back and i like those challenges. i remember you telling me how much you love the t. ==
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remember you telling me how much you love the t. . . remember you telling me how much you love the t. . , ., ., remember you telling me how much you love the t. . ,., ., ':: .., love the t. -- cup of tea. 100%, made. love the t. -- cup of tea. 100%, made- what _ love the t. -- cup of tea. 100%, made. what have _ love the t. -- cup of tea. 100%, made. what have you _ love the t. -- cup of tea. 100%, made. what have you been - love the t. -- cup of tea. 100%, i made. what have you been saying love the t. -- cup of tea. 100%, - made. what have you been saying to the talent behind _ made. what have you been saying to the talent behind you _ made. what have you been saying to the talent behind you in _ made. what have you been saying to the talent behind you in their - the talent behind you in their sessions? players are up and down the country are returning to full league matches today, and what is your advice? at, league matches today, and what is your advice?— your advice? a couple of things. one, your advice? a couple of things. one. work— your advice? a couple of things. one, work really _ your advice? a couple of things. one, work really hard _ your advice? a couple of things. one, work really hard on - your advice? a couple of things. one, work really hard on the - one, work really hard on the fundamentals of your game. your basic skills are the basis of how you play rugby, and then you can play it anyway. secondly, don't miss an opportunity to enjoy the game. you get to play with your team—mates, come to every training, see how you can get a little bit better, enjoy the camaraderie and make sure every game you play like it is your last game. find make sure every game you play like it is your last game.— it is your last game. and actually, it is your last game. and actually, it could be — it is your last game. and actually, it could be your— it is your last game. and actually, it could be your first _ it is your last game. and actually, it could be your first game. - it is your last game. and actually, it could be your first game. you i it could be your first game. you could be watching this and thinking, actually, i might either come back to the game having had time out, or come to it for the first time. charlie was saying this morning he will give it another go. we are talking touch rugby for some of us, but that is equally important to get involved in. ., �* . but that is equally important to get involved in. . �* , ., but that is equally important to get involved im— involved in. that's the great thing about rugby- _ involved in. that's the great thing about rugby. you _ involved in. that's the great thing about rugby. you can _ involved in. that's the great thing about rugby. you can play - involved in. that's the great thing about rugby. you can play it -
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involved in. that's the great thing about rugby. you can play it on i involved in. that's the great thing about rugby. you can play it on a | about rugby. you can play it on a number of different forms. there is rugby sevens, which is seven aside, with little contact in half the field. so kids of any ilk can play that game, whether it is a noncontact level or contact level. it is such a great game for developing teams and ship. absolutely. i better let you go because i think you are needed in that scrum behind you! thea;r because i think you are needed in that scrum behind you!— that scrum behind you! they are doint that scrum behind you! they are doing pretty _ that scrum behind you! they are doing pretty well _ that scrum behind you! they are doing pretty well without - that scrum behind you! they are doing pretty well without me. i that scrum behind you! they are i doing pretty well without me. it's been doing pretty well without me. it�*s been great to see you. thank you so much forjoining us. by. it's so finely balanced, in the ltth test between england and india, going into day 3, and with the series, level at one all, today at the oval, could go a long way to deciding the outcome of both this match and series. having looked in control yesterday england lost two early wickets, with craig
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0verton and dawid malan both falling to umesh yadav. but then ollie pope came to the rescue, guiding england to a first innings lead. he looked set for a century but was bowled out for 81. england were eventually dismissed for 290, but despite the celebrations around pope, india finished the day on 43 without loss, so only 56 runs behind. they've crept back into it. i was pretty gutted when i got out. i was pretty gutted when i got out. i worked hard to get to 80 and i felt good. i was disappointed with the shot i played to get out so it is bittersweet, especially on the home ground. ijust want is bittersweet, especially on the home ground. i just want to is bittersweet, especially on the home ground. ijust want to help put the team in as good a position as i can so i am happy with my contribution. after what's been a difficult year, britain's dan evans has finally hit form and a stunning fight back means he's now through to the fourth round of the us open for the first time. earlier he was staring at defeat,
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when australiam alexei popyrin, surged into a 2 set lead, but he showed he's got his strength and confidence back, after a long time struggling with the after effects of covid i9. he dug in to level the match at two sets all. in the thrilling final set, evans found that last drop of energy to take the match, in the tie break, as popryin double faulted, on match point. evans said he could barley believe it and faces the 2nd seed daniil medvedev next. i'm not sure it was a hurdle, but you don't want to lose that match. that would have hurt. you know, it just feels good to come through the match, really. a teenager has knocked out naomi osaka, of the great upsets — she lost
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to the canadian leylah fernandez. osaka was serving for the match in the second set, but the 18 year—old fernandez, hung in and fought back to win in 3 sets. you have to feel for osaka, who was in tears afterwards and says she doesn't know when she will play a tennis match again. she needs another break for her mental health so our thoughts go out to her. it is encouraging that that conversation is happening a lot more now. {3h conversation is happening a lot more now. , . conversation is happening a lot more now. , , , ., ., conversation is happening a lot more now. ,, , ., now. oh yes, it is important to be oen now. oh yes, it is important to be open about— now. oh yes, it is important to be open about it _ now. oh yes, it is important to be open about it because _ now. oh yes, it is important to be open about it because it - now. oh yes, it is important to be open about it because it does - now. oh yes, it is important to be| open about it because it does help other people dealing with similar issues. . other people dealing with similar issues. , ,., ., ,., issues. there is something about dan evans. he issues. there is something about dan evans- he keeps _ issues. there is something about dan evans. he keeps confounding - issues. there is something about dan evans. he keeps confounding things, | evans. he keeps confounding things, doesn't he? 50 evans. he keeps confounding things, doesn't he? ., evans. he keeps confounding things, doesn't he?— doesn't he? so delighted to see him live u- to doesn't he? so delighted to see him live up to his— doesn't he? so delighted to see him live up to his potential _ doesn't he? so delighted to see him live up to his potential this - doesn't he? so delighted to see him live up to his potential this year. - live up to his potential this year. such a difficult year, covid, missing the olympics, not getting as far as we think you can go, but now he has. �* ., . he has. and charlie is delighted, too. if you spent lockdown in tattyjogging bottoms, thinking there was no point in getting dressed up, you're probably not alone. but two friends who decided to glam up every weekend to lift their spirits
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became a social media sensation. now, their "frock up friday" idea has become a real—life festival. claudia sermbezis dusted off her dancing shoes and went along. # i'm gonna put on my shoes...# free thinking, unique, fabulous. that's their ethos. many of these people have only ever met online so today they're meeting for the first time by having a good old dance in the window! # it don't matter how you feel when you're wearin' your icy heels, # it don't matter what you wear...# well, i've just met one of our famous frockers out the front, and i've cried already this morning. laughs. i've already cried three times this morning 'cause it's overwhelming having a festival, but it's overwhelming getting to meet these people that we've shared our innermost thought with for the last 76 weeks.
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it all began at the beginning of lockdown last march. two friends, bev and suzie, decided to dress up on fridays and post their photos on a facebook group they created. a few weeks later they had 13,000 members worldwide. i'm a cover girl! they even made a book featuring pictures and stories about their members. emma says she survived chemotherapy due to the support of the group. this is my ball dress, i'm wearing this for the ball so i wanted to try it out 'cause it feels a bit tight. haley's autistic and has always loved rainbow colours. so, i used to be in a wheelchair and people used to stare at me anyway on the bus so i thought ok, well, they're staring at me so do you know what? i'm going to dress like this, i'm going to dress how i want to give them something to stare at! ollie wants to be a costume designer.
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so, it's inspired by the movie cruella and i was inspired by the outrageous costumes and fashion inside of it, so ijust decided i've gotta make one of my own. we celebrate everyone's beauty, everyone. - we've seen people when they are first posted, - they were like mice, i doing a selfie, and then eventually they're just doing these great photos now! - they've got really good at just dressing up and wearing - what they want to, and people have |said they've changed how they lookj now because theyjust feel confident. - the frock up friday festival will be a celebration featuring fashion parades, music and a shopping trail throughout the town all weekend. it is one of my favourite things of lockdown. let's speak to the founders of "frock up friday", bevali francis and suzie simms. girls, you could have made an
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effort! thank you very much. we made these last thursday. flan effort! thank you very much. we made these last thursday.— these last thursday. can you tell who we are? _ these last thursday. can you tell who we are? yes, _ these last thursday. can you tell who we are? yes, which - these last thursday. can you tell who we are? yes, which is - these last thursday. can you tell. who we are? yes, which is which? peole who we are? yes, which is which? people get — who we are? yes, which is which? people get confused. _ who we are? yes, which is which? people get confused. she - who we are? yes, which is which? people get confused. she is - who we are? yes, which is which? | people get confused. she is susie. this is— people get confused. she is susie. this is beth. what is it like, meeting the gang in real life? it is credible. meeting the gang in real life? it is credible- we _ meeting the gang in real life? it s credible. we have been crying because two of our members just walked through the door and we have just met them and it's so exciting. it is like meeting film stars. tes. it is like meeting film stars. yes, the are it is like meeting film stars. yes, they are our _ it is like meeting film stars. yes, they are our love _ it is like meeting film stars. yes, they are our love story. - it is like meeting film stars. yes, they are our love story. two - it is like meeting film stars. yes, they are our love story. two of. it is like meeting film stars. yes, they are our love story. two of them fell in _ they are our love story. two of them fell in love _ they are our love story. two of them fell in love through meeting in this group _ fell in love through meeting in this t-rou. ,, , fell in love through meeting in this ”foul ., , ., fell in love through meeting in this t-rou. ,, , ., ., group. susie, good morning. i am lookin: group. susie, good morning. i am looking behind _ group. susie, good morning. i am looking behind you _ group. susie, good morning. i am looking behind you and _ group. susie, good morning. i am looking behind you and i - group. susie, good morning. i am looking behind you and i am - group. susie, good morning. i am. looking behind you and i am seeing largely ladies who have dressed up, but also a gentleman behind your right shoulder, with a rather
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fetching hat on. {3h right shoulder, with a rather fetching hat on.— right shoulder, with a rather fetching hat on. oh yes, very inclusive- _ fetching hat on. oh yes, very inclusive. there _ fetching hat on. oh yes, very inclusive. there is _ fetching hat on. oh yes, very inclusive. there is every - fetching hat on. oh yes, very inclusive. there is every one | fetching hat on. oh yes, very i inclusive. there is every one you can think of in our group. latte can think of in our group. we include everybody. what - can think of in our group. we include everybody. what will| can think of in our group. we - include everybody. what will happen toda ? we include everybody. what will happen today? we have _ include everybody. what will happen today? we have got _ include everybody. what will happen today? we have got an _ include everybody. what will happen today? we have got an inspirational| today? we have got an inspirational seaker. today? we have got an inspirational speaker- we — today? we have got an inspirational speaker. we are _ today? we have got an inspirational speaker. we are having _ today? we have got an inspirational speaker. we are having a _ today? we have got an inspirational speaker. we are having a breakfast| speaker. we are having a breakfast now, _ speaker. we are having a breakfast now. and _ speaker. we are having a breakfast now, and then we will have a parade through— now, and then we will have a parade through hastings old town. put on your ball— through hastings old town. put on your ball gown and come along. that will be _ your ball gown and come along. that will be later— your ball gown and come along. that will be later on and a fantastic band — will be later on and a fantastic band. then we will have some bands on the _ band. then we will have some bands on the stage. i band. then we will have some bands on the stage-— on the stage. i will be playing my music on national— on the stage. i will be playing my music on national tv. _ on the stage. i will be playing my music on national tv. tonight - on the stage. i will be playing my music on national tv. tonight we j on the stage. i will be playing my - music on national tv. tonight we are having a ball. we have got djs and a 20 piece carnival ban. we are doing as much as we can. it will be sunglasses sunday tomorrow. i 'ust ut mine sunglasses sunday tomorrow. i 'ust put mine on — sunglasses sunday tomorrow. i 'ust put mine on because i sunglasses sunday tomorrow. i 'ust put mine on because we * sunglasses sunday tomorrow. ijust put mine on because we are going to
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need the _ put mine on because we are going to need the sunglasses on. we put mine on because we are going to need the sunglasses on.— need the sunglasses on. we are already tired — need the sunglasses on. we are already tired but _ need the sunglasses on. we are already tired but tomorrow - need the sunglasses on. we are already tired but tomorrow is i need the sunglasses on. we are i already tired but tomorrow is going to be ridiculous.— to be ridiculous. let's go back to early lockdown. _ to be ridiculous. let's go back to early lockdown. i— to be ridiculous. let's go back to early lockdown. i bet _ to be ridiculous. let's go back to early lockdown. i bet when - to be ridiculous. let's go back to early lockdown. i bet when you i early lockdown. i bet when you started doing this, you would never envisage it would become this big. but at that time, we all very quickly got sick of those zouma chats with our friends and family, we got sick of the quizzes, but you managed to not only maintain the momentum but keep the "frock up friday" growing. how much of that week was taken up by it? it friday" growing. how much of that week was taken up by it?- week was taken up by it? it has taken every _ week was taken up by it? it has taken every ounce _ week was taken up by it? it has taken every ounce of _ week was taken up by it? it has taken every ounce of time - week was taken up by it? it has taken every ounce of time and i taken every ounce of time and energy. it has built up into more and more time as the weeks and months went on. mostly because we were leading by example and we will try to comment on every photograph. there are ill,000 members in there, so it's a busyjob. it is there are14,000 members in there, so it's a busy job-— there are 14,000 members in there, so it's a busy job-— so it's a busy 'ob. it is like a full-time — so it's a busy job. it is like a full-time job, _ so it's a busy job. it is like a full-time job, we _ so it's a busy job. it is like a full-time job, we work - so it's a busy job. it is like a| full-time job, we work really so it's a busy job. it is like a - full-time job, we work really hard full—time job, we work really hard at doing _ full—time job, we work really hard at doing it — full—time job, we work really hard at doing it. we try and make sure we comment— at doing it. we try and make sure we
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comment on— at doing it. we try and make sure we comment on everyone 's photo. we do miss people. _ comment on everyone 's photo. we do miss people, i admit, comment on everyone 's photo. we do miss people, iadmit, but comment on everyone 's photo. we do miss people, i admit, but one week we did _ miss people, i admit, but one week we did have — miss people, i admit, but one week we did have 24,000 posts and likes. yes, we did have 24,000 posts and likes. yes. there's— we did have 24,000 posts and likes. yes, there's150,000 comments and yes, there's 150,000 comments and likes a month though it is staggering, the amount of people who are interactive on there. but we do different themes every week to keep people excited and keep them coming back. it people excited and keep them coming back. ., ., ,, people excited and keep them coming back. ,, y., �* people excited and keep them coming back. «e �* ., ., back. it looks like you're going to have a fantastic _ back. it looks like you're going to have a fantastic time. _ back. it looks like you're going to have a fantastic time. can - back. it looks like you're going to have a fantastic time. can you i back. it looks like you're going to | have a fantastic time. can you get everyone to give us a big wave? stand up, give us a wave? thank you so much. lovely to see you. i sense there will be some sore heads on sunday morning. enjoy it. that is it from us for today.
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breakfast will be back tomorrow from 6am. goodbye.
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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world: a mass covid vaccine roll—out for 12— to 15—year—olds could still go ahead in the uk despite a decision by the government's scientific advisors not to support it. this decision or this advice is not clear—cut, there is equipoise here, and i think it's quite reasonable for the government to seek further advice. us secretary of state, antony blinken, is scheduled to travel to qatar and germany for talks on the afghanistan crisis. gps in the uk are forced to delay flu jabs because of a shortage of hgv drivers which has disrupted supplies. wheelchair racer hannah cockroft wins her seventh paralympic title in the t34 800 metres, the first of three titles

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