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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 5, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines: social media giants facebook, whatsapp and instagram are back up and running, after a major global blackout lasting six hours the company says there is no evidence of user data was... was it nice to have some time of social media? please get in touch with me. the prime minister confirms that the government is struggling to fill lorry driver vacancies despite relaxing visa rules.
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they only produced 127 names so far and what that shows is the global shortage. courts will be given new powers to stop activists going to demonstrations following weeks of disruption by climate protesters the nhs says a landmark new treatment for sickle cell will keep thousands of people out of hospital over the next three years coming up on bbc news: with more teenagers make money as in certain on social media we asked whether the rules are strict enough. social media services facebook, whatsapp and instagram are back up and running, after a major global blackout.
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all three services, which facebook owns, could not be accessed over the web or on smartphone apps, for six hours. a staggering 3.5 billion people around the world use these three apps, a website which tracks outages says yesterday was the largest failure it had ever seen with 10.6 million problems reported around the world. .,, million problems reported around the world. , ., ., world. facebook has blamed an internal issue _ world. facebook has blamed an internal issue and _ world. facebook has blamed an internal issue and the _ world. facebook has blamed an internal issue and the ceo - world. facebook has blamed an internal issue and the ceo hasl internal issue and the ceo has apologised for the destruction. shares in facebook plunged by nearly 5%, the largest decline in nearly one year. our technology correspondent james clayton reports. the number of people that use facebook and its spin—offs whatsapp and instagram is nothing short of staggering — 3.5 billion people across the world, including tens of thousands of businesses.
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still, when something goes wrong, it goes very wrong. we want to make clear at this time we believe the root cause of this outage was a faulty configuration change. we also have no evidence that user data was compromised as a result of this downtime. the outage was said to have caused mayhem in facebook�*s headquarters here in silicon valley, as technicians scrambled to work out what was going on. facebook was losing over £100,000 a minute and its share price fell. mark zuckerberg personally lost around £4 billion. most of these kinds of outages last for around an hour. what made this so unusual was how long it took to fix. and the scale of it, too — the outage wasn't localised, it was global, affecting users across the world. you might see... this couldn't have happened
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at a worse time for facebook. today a whistle—blower who used to work for facebook, frances haugen, will tell us politicians that facebook�*s own research found that instagram was dangerous to teenagers' mental health. a bad week for the social network is getting worse by the day. james clayton, bbc news, san francisco. let's get more on this with chris stokel walker who's a technologyjournalist and author of tik tok boom. good morning. let's begin and lay person's terms if you would with what has caused this and what is facebook saying this?— facebook saying this? facebook themselves _ facebook saying this? facebook themselves are _ facebook saying this? facebook themselves are not _ facebook saying this? facebook themselves are not going - facebook saying this? facebook themselves are not going into i facebook saying this? facebook i themselves are not going into too much detail, but we have had a look at this and they think they have pinned down what it is. it is early in the morning and we are probably still figuring out what time of day it is never made breakfast, but we
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basically think this is called the border gateway protocol. i don't want to go into too much technical detail but imagine you are driving to its destination and you put a place name into your sat nav. the sat nav would essentially use longitude and latitude to try and find out where you want to go and then use a mapping system to try and identify which is the best and quickest way to get there. the border gateway protocol is essentially the map on the gps system that you use to navigate the internet. you type in facebook dot—com into your web browser or your app and dot—com into your web browser or yourapp and it dot—com into your web browser or your app and it uses the plaintext, the word to find out where you are. but the system is behind that use a load of numbers and locations that we don't use. that they went wrong. it is trying to navigate without a map which is why everything went so badly wrong. d0 map which is why everything went so badly wrong-— badly wrong. do you think that explanation — badly wrong. do you think that
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explanation is _ badly wrong. do you think that explanation is the _ badly wrong. do you think that explanation is the full - badly wrong. do you think that explanation is the full story? l badly wrong. do you think that| explanation is the full story? it badly wrong. do you think that i explanation is the full story? it is difficult timing _ explanation is the full story? it 3 difficult timing for facebook as was said in the report, there is no evidence so far that anything nefarious is going on here. it shows one of the fundamental misunderstanding that we have about technology. because it is so ubiquitous and always on and always working, wejust assume ubiquitous and always on and always working, we just assume that there is some greater power involved behind it. we think that this works tremendously easily when in actual fact, behind the smooth running of all of our services, whether it is facebook or other platforms, they are all coded and controlled by individual people and you and i make mistakes in ourjobs and it looks like someone at facebook has made a mistake which has had catastrophic consequences. tote mistake which has had catastrophic consequences-_ mistake which has had catastrophic consequences. we are going to hear from the facebook _ consequences. we are going to hear from the facebook whistle-blower l consequences. we are going to hear| from the facebook whistle-blower as from the facebook whistle—blower as well today on a separate issue, on response to the outage issue, mark
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sue backbed said he knew how much people relied on the services. people might be thinking in more detail how much social media power is concentrated with this one company. when you take these two things into account, how much of a dent is all this in facebook�*s armour? it dent is all this in facebook's armour? ., , ., dent is all this in facebook's armour?— dent is all this in facebook's armour? . , armour? it has a significant impact on what they _ armour? it has a significant impact on what they are _ armour? it has a significant impact on what they are doing _ armour? it has a significant impact on what they are doing day - armour? it has a significant impact on what they are doing day to - armour? it has a significant impact on what they are doing day to day. | on what they are doing day to day. it could not come at a worse time because of all the things that are swirling around at the moment. there are alternative apps that you can use for messaging, we always hear about the app signal and telegram that offered a lot of the functionality that whatsapp and facebook messenger do. but there is a fundamental issue that we rely significantly on these facebook apps for communication. when you lose that, you lose the ability to keep in touch with people.— in touch with people. what will facebook be _
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in touch with people. what will facebook be doing _ in touch with people. what will facebook be doing to - in touch with people. what will facebook be doing to try - in touch with people. what will facebook be doing to try and i in touch with people. what will i facebook be doing to try and stop something like less of this magnitude happening again? fine something like less of this magnitude happening again? one of the fundamental _ magnitude happening again? one of the fundamental things _ magnitude happening again? one of the fundamental things they - magnitude happening again? one of the fundamental things they will. magnitude happening again? one of the fundamental things they will be | the fundamental things they will be looking at is having redundancy, having people check work twice over. it does seem although its early stages and we do not know 100%, that this was someone typing in something incorrectly that ended up having a significant impact. this is going to be an indication that you need to check your work twice before someone pushes an update like this. thank ou ve pushes an update like this. thank you very much- — the prime minister has admitted the government is struggling to fill lorry driver vacancies despite relaxing visa rules. let's just talk to our chief political correspondent who is at the conservative party conference in manchester. good morning. a small
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number of drivers applying to work under the government emergency visa scheme. the prime minister's explanation was that it shows a global shortage. tell us more about what he said. global shortage. tell us more about what he said-— global shortage. tell us more about what he said. recapping the story so far, there what he said. recapping the story so far. there is — what he said. recapping the story so far. there is a _ what he said. recapping the story so far, there is a shortage _ what he said. recapping the story so far, there is a shortage of— what he said. recapping the story so far, there is a shortage of hgv - far, there is a shortage of hgv drivers in the uk as there has been historically, the haulage industry said an emergency visa scheme could bring in drivers from abroad, the government resisted it and then accepted it and said they would issue 5,000 visas over the next few months, and initially it would be 300. in the initial stages, less than half of that number of drivers have come forward as the prime minister explained earlier this morning. it’s minister explained earlier this morninu. v ., minister explained earlier this morninu. �*, . ., morning. it's a fascinating illustration _ morning. it's a fascinating illustration of _ morning. it's a fascinating illustration of the - morning. it's a fascinating| illustration of the problem morning. it's a fascinating i illustration of the problem of morning. it's a fascinating - illustration of the problem of the shortage — illustration of the problem of the shortage. what we said to the road haulage _ shortage. what we said to the road haulage industry was fine, give us the names— haulage industry was fine, give us the names of the drivers that you want _ the names of the drivers that you want to— the names of the drivers that you want to bring in, and we will sort
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out the _ want to bring in, and we will sort out the visas and we've got another 5,000 _ out the visas and we've got another 5,000 visas. they only produced 127 names— 5,000 visas. they only produced 127 names so_ 5,000 visas. they only produced 127 names so far. what that shows is the global— names so far. what that shows is the global shortage. i think, names so far. what that shows is the global shortage. ithink, there is a particular— global shortage. ithink, there is a particular problem in the uk, road haulage _ particular problem in the uk, road haulage should be a greatjob. if you invested in the truck stops, the carbs, _ you invested in the truck stops, the carbs, and — you invested in the truck stops, the carbs, and pay and conditions, it should _ carbs, and pay and conditions, it should he — carbs, and pay and conditions, it should be something that people in this country want to do. people have done _ this country want to do. people have done it— this country want to do. people have done it and _ this country want to do. people have done it and enjoyed it for many many years _ done it and en'oyed it for many many ears. �* ., , , done it and en'oyed it for many many ears. ~ . , , years. and he applied the same logic to basically all— years. and he applied the same logic to basically all the _ years. and he applied the same logic to basically all the issues _ years. and he applied the same logic to basically all the issues the - to basically all the issues the economy is facing at the moment. he described the stresses and strains, if you are worried about your energy bills, the answer is to invest in green energy and not rely on imports of gas from russia. if you are worried about housing, we should build more houses and reform the
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planning system. which i think maybe are worried about a bell coming in tomorrow or next week, they might wonder if that sort of solution is too far in the future.— wonder if that sort of solution is too far in the future. there seem to be a common _ too far in the future. there seem to be a common theme _ too far in the future. there seem to be a common theme in _ too far in the future. there seem to be a common theme in the - too far in the future. there seem to be a common theme in the case - too far in the future. there seem to be a common theme in the case of| be a common theme in the case of driver shortages, industry should sort that out, things that they should have done like more investment in truck stops and training and so on. when it came to a different subject, the subject of the safety of women after the murder of sarah everard, he said the government would not be producing any new laws but he wanted to see the police and the courts doing more with the existing laws.— with the existing laws. there are calls from campaigners - with the existing laws. there are calls from campaigners and - calls from campaigners and opposition mps to expand the statute and add more crimes to it to protect women. in society and women in the streets and people in general. the
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prime ministerfirmly streets and people in general. the prime minister firmly rejected that same that his focus is making the existing system work better and is is up to the police and prosecutors to prosecute existing crime is much better. this is he said. the to prosecute existing crime is much better. this is he said.— better. this is he said. the anger over saver _ better. this is he said. the anger over saver everard's _ better. this is he said. the anger over saver everard's murder- better. this is he said. the anger over saver everard's murder is i better. this is he said. the anger| over saver everard's murder is the wider— over saver everard's murder is the wider frustration people feel. what you to _ wider frustration people feel. what you to do. — wider frustration people feel. what you to do, misogyny and the attitudes— you to do, misogyny and the attitudes of the police dot—mac in nottingham they are logging catcalling and wolf whistling as a misogynistic hate crime. rather than expanding _ misogynistic hate crime. rather than expanding the range of crimes that we want _ expanding the range of crimes that we want to— expanding the range of crimes that we want to prosecute for, we need to prosecute _ we want to prosecute for, we need to prosecute the existing crimes. some --eole prosecute the existing crimes. some peeple may — prosecute the existing crimes. some people may contrast _ prosecute the existing crimes. some people may contrast what _ prosecute the existing crimes. some people may contrast what he - prosecute the existing crimes. fine people may contrast what he was saying in that interview with what the home secretary will see in her speech to the conference later on this morning when she will talk about expanding the statute book to
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prosecute a larger amount of crimes related to protests and demonstrations to deal with and surely britain and extension rebellion. let's pick up on the comments about the shortage of hgv drivers. joining me now is steve granite the ceo for abbey logisitics group which is a leading bulk tanker logistics service provider and one of the uk's most recognised transport brands some interesting comments from the prime minister and one of the things he said in response to the news that only 127 drivers have responded to the government's emergency visa scheme was that he had asked or the government had said to the road haulage association gave us the names of drivers you want and they have only produced 127 so far. you seem to be replacing their
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responsibility on the road haulage association.— association. they are deflecting their incompetence _ association. they are deflecting their incompetence onto - association. they are deflecting their incompetence onto the i association. they are deflecting i their incompetence onto the sector. we have asked for five year work visas. you have to think practically, who is going to leave their country in a two—week window to come and work in the uk for six months and then go back home after that? it was never attractive. 0ne, you are clearly saying this emergency visa scheme is not the right way to go about tackling the shortage, it is not attractive enough for drivers to come from abroad? it was never going to work. for someone to come here for six months and go back home, it is not going to work. we are asking for them to put the hgv drivers onto a workplace where they can come and workplace where they can come and work for a five year visa. the workplace where they can come and work for a five year visa.— work for a five year visa. the prime minister said _ work for a five year visa. the prime minister said hauliers _ work for a five year visa. the prime minister said hauliers needed i work for a five year visa. the prime minister said hauliers needed to i work for a five year visa. the prime minister said hauliers needed to do| minister said hauliers needed to do more to invest in facilities for drivers when they are at work, he said that was part of the problem
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about attracting and retaining drivers. do you accept that that is the case? ., . . drivers. do you accept that that is the case? ., ., ., ., , the case? not at all. there has been ma'or the case? not at all. there has been major investment _ the case? not at all. there has been major investment in _ the case? not at all. there has been major investment in facilities. - major investment in facilities. unfortunately the truck stops are not sufficient, they need further investment. pay rates have gone up ljy investment. pay rates have gone up by 20 or 30%, the sector cannot do much more than that. the problem is even when we attract drivers there is not enough testing capacity. the government grant skin of increasing testing capacity, i cannot get tests for 1h drivers who want to join the company. i cannot do a test for them. ~ ., , company. i cannot do a test for them. ~ . , . ., them. ware with the investment come from in the truck— them. ware with the investment come from in the truck stops? _ them. ware with the investment come from in the truck stops? private - them. ware with the investment come from in the truck stops? private and l from in the truck stops? private and ublic, it from in the truck stops? private and public. it is — from in the truck stops? private and public. it is not _ from in the truck stops? private and public, it is notjust _ from in the truck stops? private and public, it is notjust investments i public, it is notjust investments it is planning applications, we have a case now where the private sector want to make a really modern truck stop and the local council are blocking it. they are not allowing the private sector to invest infrastructure through planning. the
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other key point in the supply chain issue was the difficulties in recruiting drivers, the prime minister said it was down to a global shortage. minister said it was down to a globalshortage. is minister said it was down to a global shortage. is there a global shortage as far as you are aware or do you think that post brexit the uk as a less attractive place for drivers to come combined with the point you were making about the short emergency visas?- short emergency visas? there is definitely a _ short emergency visas? there is definitely a global— short emergency visas? there is definitely a global shortage, i short emergency visas? there is definitely a global shortage, butj definitely a global shortage, but the uk is in a far worse position than most other countries. i can tell you first—hand there is not a lack of interest in joining the sector, on a daily basis we get emails from drivers from the eu and beyond but we cannot give them a long—term prospect they would like. and, i want to ask you about the practical impacts of this in terms of the business you would normally be doing. give us a picture about what it is like right now. it is tough. every day you are fighting to
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recruit and retain. we are doing well on recruitment but we need to improve retention. we have probably got 30 trucks in dapple with no drivers but i have got plenty of work. there is lots of food we need to move. d0 work. there is lots of food we need to move. i. ., , ., work. there is lots of food we need to move. ., , ., ., ., to move. do you foresee an ongoing im act to to move. do you foresee an ongoing impact to christmas _ to move. do you foresee an ongoing impact to christmas and _ to move. do you foresee an ongoing impact to christmas and beyond? it| impact to christmas and beyond? ut definitely cannot go beyond christmas, if we had drivers, it would take government over 12 months to get them through the tests at best. they need to increase testing capacity extremely quickly. use the ministry of defence, use the private sector, look at putting drivers on a skilled waiting list.— skilled waiting list. thank you very much. the home secretary will unveil new powers today for courts in england and wales to stop protesters travelling to demonstrations. priti patel will also announce tougher sentences
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for obstrucing motorways, when she addresses the conservative conference in manchester. the justice secretary, dominic raab, will use his speech to say that more criminals in england and wales will be fitted with ankle tags. nick eardley reports. the home secretary is less than pleased about scenes like this. insulated breton activists are blocking major roads and angering motorists in their attempts to raise awareness of poorly insulated home. the government has revealed plans for a new court orders which would stop protesters with a history of causing disruption travelling to some protest. there are plans to introduce tougher sentences for obstructing highways to try and stop things like this. there are significant backlogs in the court system which could make a speedy action difficult. that is for entry of the newjustice secretary, he will say today that he wants to double the number of offenders who
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are tagged in england and wales. he will argue that will make communities more safe. but there are significant challenges for this government when it comes to the economy and the cost of living. there are not always easy answers. five people have been arrested after former tory party leader sir iain duncan smith was allegedly assaulted by being hit on the head with a traffic cone. he was pursued by chants of "tory scum" on his way to a brexit talk on the fringes of the conservative party conference in manchester on monday. greater manchester police said three men and two women were arrested after reports of an assault. more than 200,000 children have been victims of paedophile priests in france according to a report published in the last few minutes. the head of a commission into sexual
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abuse in the catholic church that the perpetrators were protected by a veil of silence with victims treated with it cruel indifference. 0ur paris correspondent has been listening to a news conference on the report this morning. i listening to a news conference on the report this morning.- the report this morning. i have been listenin: the report this morning. i have been listening to — the report this morning. i have been listening to the _ the report this morning. i have been listening to the head _ the report this morning. i have been listening to the head of— the report this morning. i have been listening to the head of the - listening to the head of the commission set up by the church to look into abuse in the last 70 years, the figure is going to hit everyone very hard, 216,000 victims over the last 70 years. that needs to be increased because if you include victims of paedophiles in church institutions whose vector misers were laypeople, people working in catholic schools or holiday camps and so on, if you add to people working under the protection of church institutions you get to a figure of one third of a million people who are victims of
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child abuse over the last 70 years. it is a shocking number which going to really have people reeling in france. it is hard to absorb. admittedly it is over a long, long period, 70 years, 50% of the abuse that they uncovered happened a long time ago, probably in the first 20 years, in the 1950s and 1960s, nonetheless, this is not behind us as he said. the build this as a very shocking report. we had a leak over the weekend of the number of priests involved, 3,000, slightly lower as a proportion of the priesthood ban and similar countries like germany, ireland, canada and australia where they have investigations of the same time. it is the number of victims which even they are saying is an underestimate which is very shocking and will grab the headlines. there is no doubt about it.
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the first new treatment for sickle cell disease in 20 years is be given to patients on the nhs in england. the condition is incurable, and mainly affects people from african and caribbean backgrounds. the drug involved has been described as revolutionary and could cut visits to a&e by a0%. here's more from our community affairs correspondent, adina campbell. daily medication and monthly visits to hospital have been a normal part of sarah—jane's life ever since she was a baby. i've always been quite a smiley child. she's one of 15,000 people living with sickle cell disease in the uk. i've spent a lot of my life in hospital. just simple things i can't do sometimes, like washing myself, or, you know, brushing my teeth. i need help to do that. and i'm 27 years old. sometimes i feel like i'm living in a hundred—year—old body. but change could be on the way. hundreds of patients in england will now be offered a new drug called crizanlizumab over the next
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three years which could reduce the number of trips to hospital to treat severe pain. the moment that a new drug is approved to be used, ourjob is to make sure we can do a deal that makes that affordable and then get it out as quickly as possible. sickle cell disease is the world's most common genetic blood disorder. it mainly affects people from african and caribbean backgrounds. there's a one in four chance you will have the disease if both parents are carriers. the announcement of this treatment could be life—changing, reducing the number of times a sickle cell patient needs to go to a&e by a0%. but senior health campaigners say this should have happened a long time ago. people have said to our staff, "oh, this is a black person's disease. unlikely to affect me." but i think race has played a part in thinking, well, it's over there,
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it doesn't affect the majority population. more data is needed to find out about the drug's potential long—term benefits. medical experts will continue to collect information through clinical trials. renewed hope for sickle cell patients and their families. adina campbell, bbc news. recent figures show 100,000 state schoolchildren were absent of the week during the 16th of september with suspected or confirmed coronavirus. fish with suspected or confirmed coronavirus.— with suspected or confirmed coronavirus. �* , ., ., , coronavirus. an update on these firures is coronavirus. an update on these figures is expected _ coronavirus. an update on these figures is expected today. - coronavirus. an update on these figures is expected today. our. figures is expected today. our education correspondent has been following the situation in west yorkshire. at this school in west yorkshire, the science class. these pupils are glad to be in school.
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it's much more fun now.- pupils are glad to be in school. it's much more fun now. back at home we can't do — it's much more fun now. back at home we can't do the — it's much more fun now. back at home we can't do the practical _ it's much more fun now. back at home we can't do the practical is, _ it's much more fun now. back at home we can't do the practical is, we - we can't do the practical is, we write _ we can't do the practical is, we write down— we can't do the practical is, we write down the method, now we can actually _ write down the method, now we can actually do — write down the method, now we can actually do them. we write down the method, now we can actually do them.— actually do them. we can be more interactive _ actually do them. we can be more interactive. actually _ actually do them. we can be more interactive. actually see _ actually do them. we can be more interactive. actually see the i interactive. actually see the exueriments _ interactive. actually see the experiments happen. - interactive. actually see the experiments happen. for. interactive. actually see the experiments happen. for these --uils, a experiments happen. for these pupils. a sense _ experiments happen. for these pupils, a sense of _ experiments happen. for these pupils, a sense of normality, i experiments happen. for these l pupils, a sense of normality, but experiments happen. for these i pupils, a sense of normality, but an increasing number of classmates are at home with covid—19. igrate increasing number of classmates are at home with covid-19._ increasing number of classmates are at home with covid-19. we are moving towards the 200 _ at home with covid-19. we are moving towards the 200 mart _ at home with covid-19. we are moving towards the 200 mart are _ at home with covid-19. we are moving towards the 200 mart are currently i towards the 200 mart are currently out of school with a confirmed case of covid—19. the out of school with a confirmed case of covid-19-— of covid-19. the head teacher is concerned _ of covid-19. the head teacher is concerned that _ of covid-19. the head teacher is concerned that as _ of covid-19. the head teacher is concerned that as covid-19 i of covid-19. the head teacher is. concerned that as covid-19 keeps concerned that as covid—19 keeps children out of the classroom there are increasing risks for vulnerable pupils. are increasing risks for vulnerable --uils. ~ , , are increasing risks for vulnerable . u . ils, . , , , are increasing risks for vulnerable .u ils, . , , , ., are increasing risks for vulnerable --uils.~ , , , ., ., pupils. whilst we ensure they do not fall behind academically _ pupils. whilst we ensure they do not fall behind academically because i pupils. whilst we ensure they do not fall behind academically because we | fall behind academically because we have systems in place to provide work remotely, it is actually a concern for those children really need to be in school for their welfare and that is a concern given the numbers we are talking about. in
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schools and england social distancing and bubbles have been lifted by the government. here at this school because of the increase in cases, assemblies are cancelled and the wearing of face coverings is being encouraged. this group of pupils are worried about catching covid—19 and missing more time in school. covid-19 and missing more time in school. , ,, , , ., ., school. gcses next year, i have missed so _ school. gcses next year, i have missed so much, _ school. gcses next year, i have missed so much, and _ school. gcses next year, i have missed so much, and instead i school. gcses next year, i have| missed so much, and instead of revising what i've done, i have to scramble everything together, we are trying to rush through to get everything done.— trying to rush through to get everything done. many in the teachin: everything done. many in the teaching profession - everything done. many in the teaching profession are i everything done. many in the l teaching profession are feeling everything done. many in the i teaching profession are feeling the pressure. at the school, nearly one fifth of staff are off with covid—19. hf fifth of staff are off with covid-19-_ fifth of staff are off with covid-19. , ., ., , ., , fifth of staff are off with covid-19. ., , ., covid-19. if you have people often our covid-19. if you have people often your department, _ covid-19. if you have people often your department, you _ covid-19. if you have people often your department, you will- covid-19. if you have people often your department, you will feel i covid-19. if you have people oftenj your department, you will feel the pinch for that day, the site — make the supply teacher need support. there is definite additional stress when you come in in the morning and
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two or three people are off sick. the school is working closely with the local public health team, in a statement the department for education says it is about managing the risks with ventilation, testing and vaccination of older students and vaccination of older students and staff. for this school and many across the country, keeping pupils in school and covid—19 out of school continues to be a challenge. we have been asking you about the social media outage, all the social media sites were down for six hours yesterday. this merchant says that i was disappointed when social media came back online, and encourages negativity and the world would be a better place without that. we would love to have your thoughts on how it affected you, your business, your plans of family and friends or whether you are happy to have a break from social media for a while.
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please get in touch with me on twitter. i would love to read out some more of your comments. there have been more incredible scenes overnight in la palma, in the canary islands where the volcano there continues to spew lava. it's now been almost three weeks since the beginning of the eruption. at least 870 buildings have been completely destroyed, and 6,000 people have been evacuated. heavy rain overnight has caused flooding in parts of the capital, these were the scenes in knightsbridge this morning. the london fire brigade has responded to dozens of calls and is also affected tube and rail services. just one inch of rain fell in one hour. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. i woke iwoke up i woke up during the night and i
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could hear the rain, it was pouring down. what is the forecast saying? we have had torrential rain in london. it is about to clear east anglia and also caned. if you follow the coral of ed we have heavy rain across north—east england and the south of scotland and it will extend over eastern scotland and northern england as we go through the day. we could see as much a 50 millimetres of rainfall for all of this. affecting east anglia and the midlands. it will not be as heavy as this morning. there is sunshine and showers across wales and south—west england, fewer showers about heavy showers in northern ireland and across scotland. strong winds, particularly around the bands of rain and it will feel cool. this
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evening and overnight, the band pushes towards the north sea coastline, accompanied by strong winds, clear skies and coastline, accompanied by strong winds, clearskies and in coastline, accompanied by strong winds, clear skies and in the highlands, temperatures will fall close to freezing. tomorrow we say goodbye to the area of low pressure, the wind and rain and there will be some sunshine but it will not last in the west. the cloud will be building and we will see some rain coming in and also strengthening winds. hello, this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh. the headlines... an internal technical issue is blamed after a global blackout lasting six hours hits facebook, whatsapp and instagram. the company says there is no evidence use a data was compromised. the prime minister confirms only a small number of people have applied for the new visas to drive hgvs in the uk after
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the government relaxed visa rules for up to 5000 drivers. it the government relaxed visa rules for up to 5000 drivers.— for up to 5000 drivers. it has only roduced for up to 5000 drivers. it has only produced 127 _ for up to 5000 drivers. it has only produced 127 names _ for up to 5000 drivers. it has only produced 127 names so _ for up to 5000 drivers. it has only produced 127 names so far, - for up to 5000 drivers. it has only produced 127 names so far, which | produced 127 names so far, which shows the global shortage. courts will be given _ shows the global shortage. courts will be given new _ shows the global shortage. courts will be given new powers - shows the global shortage. courts will be given new powers to i shows the global shortage. courts will be given new powers to stop i will be given new powers to stop activists going to demonstrations following weeks of disruption by climate protesters. the nhs says a landmark new treatment for sickle—cell will keep thousands of people out of hospital over the next three years. coming up, with more teenagers making money as social media influencers, we report on whether the rules for under 18s are strict enough. sport, and a full round—up from the bbc sports centre. katherine downes joins us. katherine downesjoins us. we katherine downes joins us. we will start with tennis, emma raducanu is getting ready for indian wells, her first tournament since winning the us open where she could potentially
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face one of her idols. the 18—year—old received a wild card and a bye into the second round. if she wins her second—round match she could face two—time grand slam winner simona halep, one of her tennis heroes. her stunning victory at flushing meadows in new york so raducanu jumped from 150th to 22nd in the world rankings. that gets under way later this week. liverpool say they have collected "substantial evidence" after manchester city alleged a home fan spat at their backroom staff during their 2—2 draw at anfield on sunday. liverpool are conducting a full investigation into the incident, and in a statement the club said witnesses had been interviewed while cctv and video footage was being analysed. tammy abraham and ben chilwell have been added to the england squad for their two upcoming world cup qualifiers. abraham — who moved from chelsea to roma in the summer — and his former blues team—mate chilwell will report to st george's park
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today, along with the rest of gareth southgate�*s squad for the games with andorra and hungary. britain's hannah barnes finished sixth as italy's marta bastianelli won the opening stage of the women's tour of britain in banbury. the 2007 road race world champion took a dramatic victory in a sprint finish. defending champion lizzie deignan was 26 seconds behind the leaders. stage 2 starts and finishes in walsall. sir ben ainslie is joining forces with the mercedes formula i catala ns catalans dragons catala ns dragons full—back catalans dragons full—back sam tomkins has won the man of steel award for this year, jody cunningham of st helens won the women's award. tomkins is one of only three players to win it twice, he got it in 2012 at wigan warriors. he would like to cap a fine season with grand final victory this weekend. kevin sinfield won the loch lomond spirit of the super league awards due to his
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fund—raising efforts to support former team—mate rob burrow is who is living with motor neurone disease. we will find out whether the ashes tour to australia this winter will go ahead. the players had been told what the likely protocols will be, many are concerned whether their families can travel with them and about the strict covid rules in australia. with the t20 world cup first, some players face spending four months away from home and may choose not to go. tyson fury and deontay wilder are getting ready to fight each other for the third are getting ready to fight each otherfor the third time are getting ready to fight each other for the third time this weekend. thiery knocked wild out the last time they fought in 2020 after the first ended in a draw, but tyson has admitted that while there is one of the most dangerous fighters out there. == of the most dangerous fighters out there. . , ., ._ of the most dangerous fighters out there. . , ., . of the most dangerous fighters out there. . , ., ~ , there. -- that deontay wilder is. i am dealing _ there. -- that deontay wilder is. i am dealing with _ there. -- that deontay wilder is. i am dealing with a _ there. -- that deontay wilder is. i am dealing with a guy _ there. -- that deontay wilder is. i am dealing with a guy that - there. -- that deontay wilder is. i am dealing with a guy that can - there. -- that deontay wilder is. i i am dealing with a guy that can knock you clean out with one punch, he is dealing with the same, basically.
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when you have to big heavyweights going at it on the world's bigger stage, you are always in for an exciting night because as we have seen lately, anything can change. the heavyweight landscape and change in seconds, as it has done many times in the past, and it is up to me to keep it on track and not let it change. me to keep it on track and not let it chance. , , me to keep it on track and not let itchanae. , , , , ., it change. tyson fury versus deontay wilder, it change. tyson fury versus deontay wilder. round — it change. tyson fury versus deontay wilder, round three _ it change. tyson fury versus deontay wilder, round three on _ it change. tyson fury versus deontay wilder, round three on saturday - wilder, round three on saturday night. paralympics ellie robinson has announced her retirement from the sport aged just 20. she won gold in the rio games when she was just 15 -- in the rio games when she was just 15 —— paralympic swimmer ellie robinson. after her race at tokyo she talked about her struggle just to reach the games this summer due to reach the games this summer due to an ongoing hip problem, you might remember that greater interview she gave to channel [i remember that greater interview she gave to channel 11 after that struggle, she has announced her retirement at the age of 20. that is all the sport, back to you, anita.
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survivors of institutions for unmarried mothers in northern ireland will find out what form of inquiry will be held into the abuse the experience. the independent investigation will examine mother and baby homes and work houses known as "magdalene laundries" which were run by religious orders. here's our ireland correspondent, chris page. the secrets of these institutions are being shattered by the stories of those who were once ashamed. more than 10,000 unmarried women were sent to mother and baby homes in northern ireland. they and their sons and daughters were the victims of a harsh morality. you have hundreds and thousands of children who haven't been claimed, who therefore have no voice. my brother didn't have a voice at the time, either. but i certainly will be his voice now. fionnuala was adopted from a home in belfast. she discovered her brother had died as a baby, and searched for his burial place. i wouldn't call it a grave. it was more of a pit.
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there's over 30 babies in, you know, the spot where he was buried. they were all just thrown in together like they didn't matter, in unconsecrated ground, in a hog at the bottom of a cemetery. she recently had a headstone put up to mark her siblings 50th birthday. finally he had his name emblazoned in marble. that's what he always should have had. ultimately it's the bravery of survivors who've broken the stigma by speaking out that has led to this inquiry. they want answers and accountability for what happened in these institutions, for the suffering of women and their children. the state violated women's rights to equality... un human rights experts have investigated the homes across the island of ireland. we have evidence and reports of systematic torture and ill—treatment of the girls
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and women who were involuntarily detained, stripped of their identities, forced to work constantly, not paid wages. unpaid labour was particularly exhausting in these institutions — magdalene laundries. there were four in northern ireland — over 3,000 women spent time in one. caroline was sent to a laundry in londonderry during her early teens. it was very frightening. very steamy, very warm. the constant machines, you could hear the machines always going, you know, at a very young age. and the women taught me how to use a presser. and i mean it was a presser as big as this table. so there were many women in there who had been there for many years. a long, long time. some of them women were in from their young years, and died in it. there's a lasting legacy of trauma. survivors hope the inquiry will
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expose wrongdoing and bring healing. the most important thing is the children that was took away. the women's identity that was took away. women was ashamed. shouldn't have been ashamed. that report from our ireland correspondent chris page. i am joined by a correspondent chris page. i am joined bya human correspondent chris page. i am joined by a human rights lawyerfrom phoenix law who represent some of the victims. thank you for your time today, claire. the stories that we have heard coming out of the magdalen laundry is seen to belong to another age very long time ago, yet they are relatively recent? it is a chapter of our very recent history. between 1922 and 1990 the very last mother and baby institution closed in northern
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ireland in 1990. these women and their children, grown up now, wait anxiously for this report which will direct ministers on what mechanism will be required to investigate the litany of crimes inflicted on them at their most vulnerable. what litany of crimes inflicted on them at their most vulnerable. what sort of mechanism. _ at their most vulnerable. what sort of mechanism, what _ at their most vulnerable. what sort of mechanism, what sort _ at their most vulnerable. what sort of mechanism, what sort of- at their most vulnerable. what sort of mechanism, what sort of inquiry| of mechanism, what sort of inquiry to the survivors and their families want to we represent birth mothers and by children forjustice, the only collective in northern ireland of birth mothers and adoptees. 0ur of birth mothers and adoptees. our clients have long campaigned for a statutory clients have long campaigned for a statuto j , ,., , statutory inquiry with full powers, the want statutory inquiry with full powers, they want to _ statutory inquiry with full powers, they want to see _ statutory inquiry with full powers, they want to see who _ statutory inquiry with full powers, they want to see who knew - statutory inquiry with full powers, they want to see who knew what i statutory inquiry with full powers, i they want to see who knew what and why they were treated in this way. they have had the most violent and horrendous human rights abuses perpetrated on them at a time when they needed support and love. today
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they needed support and love. today the report which will be given to our clients in moments time, actually, will be the keystone to the justice they have long campaigned for.— the justice they have long campaigned for. the justice they have long cam aimed for. ., ., , campaigned for. you are due this mornin: campaigned for. you are due this morning to _ campaigned for. you are due this morning to find _ campaigned for. you are due this morning to find out _ campaigned for. you are due this morning to find out the _ campaigned for. you are due this morning to find out the findings i campaigned for. you are due this| morning to find out the findings of this inquiry, but the type of inquiry you want to see into this scandal, that is very important and crucial because you need something that will compel the state, compel religious organisations to provide records and evidence? yes. religious organisations to provide records and evidence?— religious organisations to provide records and evidence? yes, and we had set we — records and evidence? yes, and we had set up a _ records and evidence? yes, and we had set up a very — records and evidence? yes, and we had set up a very detailed - records and evidence? yes, and we had set up a very detailed road - records and evidence? yes, and we| had set up a very detailed road map of this panel, the last six months have been engaging with the truth that recovery panel, setting out exactly what went wrong in inquiries before and how it needs to operate to ensure these women and their children are protected, but further
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that they get truth, answers and recompense that they deserve. we had seen another inquiries where the redress scheme comes many years later. some of these individuals do not have many years to wait so it must come in tandem. the first minister of northern ireland and the deputy first minister stood outside stormont injanuary deputy first minister stood outside stormont in january and deputy first minister stood outside stormont injanuary and said, we want to hear what the survivors want. this report is a co—design of what they want, it will be put back on the executive by our clients that we had said what we want and now is the time you have to deliver. this morning it will be a road map for what is needed and now these women and their children need ministers to act, to deliver the truth and recompense.— act, to deliver the truth and recomense. ., , recompense. you say this report will cive the recompense. you say this report will give the road — recompense. you say this report will give the road map — recompense. you say this report will give the road map of— recompense. you say this report will give the road map of what _ recompense. you say this report will give the road map of what is - recompense. you say this report will give the road map of what is needed| give the road map of what is needed and it is up to ministers at stormont to give the go—ahead, is that the process?
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stormont to give the go-ahead, is that the process?— stormont to give the go-ahead, is that the process? yes, we expect a series of recommendations - that the process? yes, we expect a series of recommendations set - that the process? yes, we expect a series of recommendations set out | series of recommendations set out with what the survivors had stated over these months, now our clients will impress on ministers. this was a report commissioned by the department of health, we will be impressing on the ministers for urgent action and await the ministerial sign off required to ensure that this will be brought for that without further delay. 0ur that without further delay. our clients have met with the mlas and have been given confidence they will take steps, today they will demand that. ., , ., take steps, today they will demand that. ., ., ,, that. compare if you would process in northern — that. compare if you would process in northern ireland _ that. compare if you would process in northern ireland as _ that. compare if you would process in northern ireland as compared i that. compare if you would process in northern ireland as compared to j in northern ireland as compared to the republic of ireland where the taoiseach made a full state apology to the victims of the magdalene laundries which ran in the republic of ireland? ~ , laundries which ran in the republic ofireland? ~ , , of ireland? way behind, way behind, sadl . of ireland? way behind, way behind, sadly- these — of ireland? way behind, way behind, sadly. these women _ of ireland? way behind, way behind, sadly. these women have _ of ireland? way behind, way behind, sadly. these women have been - sadly. these women have been campaigning since 2012 when they were left out of the inquiry which
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was the hia inquiry looking at residential child abuse in the homes. many of these women were over 18 so they were left out of that and have been campaigning ever since to get the answers and justice. today is the outcome of the culmination of many years of dedicated campaigning with a group of women who were shamed, marginalised and silenced in a misogynistic society who, let's face it, would prefer to forget this episode in history.— episode in history. human rights la er episode in history. human rights lawyer claire _ episode in history. human rights lawyer claire mckeegan, - episode in history. human rights lawyer claire mckeegan, thank l episode in history. human rights. lawyer claire mckeegan, thank you very much for your time. we expect that report to be issued this morning, we will keep a close eye on the latest developments. the nurses�* union is warning there could be immense pressure on health and social care services this winter. it says sickness rates in the nursing workforce have been rising, with the number of days lost to problems like depression and stress up by more than 30% since the start
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of the pandemic. 0ur health reporter jim reed has more details. sharon mason is a nurse consultant working in yorkshire. last year she caught covid. she says she is still dealing with the symptoms months later. something that's also damaged her mental health. so the impact mentally, i've not... not being able to go into work, isjust absolutely huge. mentally... you just want to be there. the latest figures suggest sickness rates among nurses in england have been rising since the pandemic began. the royal college of nursing says the most common reason to be off work is not covid itself, but a mental health condition like anxiety, stress or depression. it's warning that the nhs now faces a tough winter that could have an impact on patient care. and what we can say is that flu is going to be an issue. we know that other respiratory viruses are going to be a problem, and we know that the nhs is working over and above to try to catch up
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the two years it's lost during the covid pandemic. and we know that we already have a massive shortage of registered nurses and other health care workers and, on top of that, what we are now seeing is increasing sickness levels. the government said that the number of nurses in england has grown by almost 10,000 this year, and it plans to add 50,000 by the end of this parliament. jim reed, bbc news. the headline stance and internal technical issue explains after a global blackout lasting six hours hits facebook, whatsapp and instagram. the company says there is no evidence user data was compromised. the prime minister confirms only a small number of people have applied for new visas to drive in the uk after visa rules were relaxed hgv drivers. there will
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be new pelleted tackle protesters after weeks of disruption caused by climate protesters. —— there will be new powers to. children creating content online for other children to watch is a rapidly growing market. they're called kidfluencers and some can earn up to $30 million a year. here in the uk, the bbc�*s disclosure programme has been investigating whether the rules around online advertising to under 18s are strict enough. emily brown reports. 16—year—old nicholas from edinburgh has a following on tiktok of almost 800,000 people. in brand marketing terms, that makes him a macro influencer, and of great value to advertisers. i haven't actually done that many brand deals but, yeah, i've done a few. and they basicallyjust told me to make a video and tag them in the caption. concerns have been growing about the amount of personal data being gathered by social media companies and sold to advertisers. david scott is taking tiktok to court over it.
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the more you use tiktok, the it learns about you. the more you interact with the programme, the more data it is able to collect. so the algorithms are able to more specifically target you based upon what it is you are watching, what you like, what you didn't like. there are at least three different regulatory agencies governing this sort of content, but it is complex to navigate and nicholas�*s mother says she is concerned. when you start creating content that's paid for, that brings in a whole other sort of pressure that really needs to be handled very, very carefully. so far it has been a trickle, but if it develops more then we definitely are going to need to find him someone who can mentor him and navigate how to keep this something that is positive and fun. new rules came into force last month to restrict data gathering and improve children's privacy online. tiktok says it has made hold to product changes in the last 18 months to keep its platform a safe
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space for creative expression. emily brown, reporting scotland. is the high street bouncing back after the pandemic? retailers have been updating the city this morning on how they've been faring as customers return to shops, and offices. iamjoined by i am joined by our business correspondence. figs i am joined by our business correspondence.— i am joined by our business correspondence. i am joined by our business corresondence. �* , . ,, ., correspondence. as we get back to somethin: correspondence. as we get back to something more _ correspondence. as we get back to something more normal, - correspondence. as we get back to something more normal, retailers| something more normal, retailers really keen to get people back through their doors so they have updated the city on how they have been firing. it is worth remembering that footfall on the high street is not back to levels it was before, and there is concern that some of our behaviour might have changed forever, particularly the move to online, which we have got used to doing more during the pandemic maybe that has longer term implications
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for retailers. greggs the bakers telling us it is not immune from some of the disruption we had seen to labour, it is unable to get all the staff it needs, and also to supplies, we have talked about that particularly with relation to petrol and hgv drivers and retailers suffering, but nonetheless they are pressing ahead with plans to open 150 more stores across the uk even though they say costs could start rising which could affect their bottom line. another retailer but it's pretty confident his chocolate retailer hotel chocolat, it says it has returned to profit thanks largely to a huge shift to online. 70% of its sales were done online, overtaking store sales for the first time, so quite a significant shift as a result of the pandemic. let's join angus thirlwell, ceo of hotel chocolat, he is also the co—founder. a good set of figures and returning to
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profitability even during a pandemic, and it is online you have to funky? pandemic, and it is online you have to fun ? , . . ~ pandemic, and it is online you have tofun ? , . ., �* to funky? very much. thank you, ben. we started as — to funky? very much. thank you, ben. we started as an _ to funky? very much. thank you, ben. we started as an online _ to funky? very much. thank you, ben. we started as an online business - we started as an online business [on- we started as an online business long before we had any stores, so when _ long before we had any stores, so when we — long before we had any stores, so when we first created the hotel chocolat — when we first created the hotel chocolat store format we knew it would _ chocolat store format we knew it would have to bring something more than we _ would have to bring something more than we could already do online, which _ than we could already do online, which has — than we could already do online, which has really been borne out by what _ which has really been borne out by what we _ which has really been borne out by what we are, it is definitely not a zero _ what we are, it is definitely not a zero -- _ what we are, it is definitely not a zero -- micro— what we are, it is definitely not a zero —— micro zero—sum game for hotel— zero —— micro zero—sum game for hotel chocolat wire when stores are open people stop buying online and vice versa — open people stop buying online and vice versa. we know our branch can be vice versa. we know our branch can he of _ vice versa. we know our branch can he of service — vice versa. we know our branch can be of service to families in multiple _ be of service to families in multiple ways, some are served best by online _ multiple ways, some are served best by online and others more leisure and instant — by online and others more leisure and instant gratification driven behaviours are obviously better with popping _ behaviours are obviously better with popping into your local hotel chocolat. we are seeing both channels— chocolat. we are seeing both channels firing on all cylinders now — channels firing on all cylinders now it —
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channels firing on all cylinders now it is _ channels firing on all cylinders now. it is great to be at the other side of _ now. it is great to be at the other side of. .,, , ~ now. it is great to be at the other sideof. ,.. ,, , side of. closures. a success story that may come — side of. closures. a success story that may come out _ side of. closures. a success story that may come out of _ side of. closures. a success story that may come out of n. - side of. closures. a success story | that may come out of n. closures. side of. closures. a success story i that may come out of n. closures. i uninterested it but the pandemic has done two shopping habits, 70% of your sales were done online during the pandemic, overtaking store sales for the first time. do you worry that stores will look like an expensive overhead of people do not return to the stores?— return to the stores? definitely not. we return to the stores? definitely not- we are — return to the stores? definitely not- we are a _ return to the stores? definitely not. we are a long _ return to the stores? definitely not. we are a long way - return to the stores? definitely not. we are a long way from i return to the stores? definitely i not. we are a long way from being the retail— not. we are a long way from being the retail dinosaurs who try to pretend — the retail dinosaurs who try to pretend that the internet did not evist— pretend that the internet did not exist or— pretend that the internet did not exist or was not going to affect their— exist or was not going to affect their model. we started as an online brand _ their model. we started as an online brand and _ their model. we started as an online brand and so— their model. we started as an online brand and so we know what a hotel chocolat _ brand and so we know what a hotel chocolat store can deliver is a great — chocolat store can deliver is a great way _ chocolat store can deliver is a great way to welcome new customers into us, _ great way to welcome new customers into us, we — great way to welcome new customers into us, we have friendly teams he
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was super— into us, we have friendly teams he was super knowledgeable about chocolate and a very friendly bunch, we make _ chocolate and a very friendly bunch, we make all— chocolate and a very friendly bunch, we make all our chocolate in the uk and there _ we make all our chocolate in the uk and there is— we make all our chocolate in the uk and there is no better way to welcome _ and there is no better way to welcome tens of thousands of new customers— welcome tens of thousands of new customers in a locality to the brand than through a store. 0nce customers -et than through a store. 0nce customers get to— than through a store. 0nce customers get to know— than through a store. 0nce customers get to know as they typically shop online _ get to know as they typically shop online to — get to know as they typically shop online to send gifts to others, to organise — online to send gifts to others, to organise big deliveries for example for christmas, quite often they want to buy— for christmas, quite often they want to buy so _ for christmas, quite often they want to buy so much that it is inconvenient to carry it all home. we are _ inconvenient to carry it all home. we are very— inconvenient to carry it all home. we are very grateful for that, obviously. we are very grateful for that, obviously-— we are very grateful for that, obviousl . �* , ., we are very grateful for that, obviousl. �* , ., ., , obviously. because there are so many thins obviously. because there are so many things facing — obviously. because there are so many things facing retailers, _ obviously. because there are so many things facing retailers, whether i things facing retailers, whether thatis things facing retailers, whether that is the cost of their labour, getting the staff and the supplies they need, i know you source a lot of your stuff overseas even though it is made in the uk, and just the general availability of labour, it is a huge problem and could push up costs. indie is a huge problem and could push up
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costs. ~ . , is a huge problem and could push up costs. ~ ., , costs. we are seeing some inflationary — costs. we are seeing some inflationary pressures i costs. we are seeing some i inflationary pressures coming our way. _ inflationary pressures coming our way, in _ inflationary pressures coming our way, in terms of making sure we have enough _ way, in terms of making sure we have enough chocolate to deliver a great christmas _ enough chocolate to deliver a great christmas for our customers we definitely— christmas for our customers we definitely have that under control, we have _ definitely have that under control, we have made virtually all of the chocolates that we need for christmas and we run our own delivery— christmas and we run our own delivery fleets within the uk, fully paid-up _ delivery fleets within the uk, fully paid—up members of the hotel chocolat— paid—up members of the hotel chocolat family so we are keeping it all very— chocolat family so we are keeping it all very tight as a manufacturer and retailer~ _ all very tight as a manufacturer and retailer~ we — all very tight as a manufacturer and retailer. we are managing to navigate _ retailer. we are managing to navigate our way through these pressures very well.— navigate our way through these pressures very well. good to talk to ou, pressures very well. good to talk to you. angus — pressures very well. good to talk to you, angus thirlwell, _ pressures very well. good to talk to you, angus thirlwell, thank - pressures very well. good to talk to you, angus thirlwell, thank you i pressures very well. good to talk to you, angus thirlwell, thank you for| you, angus thirlwell, thank you for being with us, the chief executive and founder of hotel chocolat. next fortunes for retailers but they are so dependent on getting people back into the high street, but as angus told us, some of that shift to
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online has really paid dividends. thank you, ben thompson. drama in hollywood, where the industry's off—screen workers have voted to strike if their union can't reach an agreement with producers on a new contract. this would be the first nationwide industry strike in the union's 128 year history and would halt nearly all film and tv production in america. we are we a re really we are really asking for working conditions that most workers take for granted, we are asking for meal breaks during the day, weekends, rest periods between shifts, a livable wage for some of the lowest paid crafts, sustainable benefits as we all learned during the pandemic, health benefits are essential and a pension to allow people to retire with dignity, we are asking that once fell what was once called new media be treated now like traditional media and the very profitable companies that produce
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that pay industry standard wages to our members for that work. nobody is looking to go on strike, but when 98% of your members step forward and say, we care enough about these issues to take a strike authorisation vote, what you have is authorisation vote, what you have is a moment in time that the pandemic led to riches people understand that health and safety are vital and these producers can, when they want to, create a culture that keeps people healthy and safe. rebecca rhine. carol has the weather. good morning. some others have had torrential downpours through the course of the morning. pembrey sands in carmarthenshire has had 36 millimetres of rainfall between 7pm last night and 7am. wattisham in
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suffolk, 27 millimetres, lots of rain. in saintjames is park, 26 millimetres of that fell in just one hour, so you have heard about the flash flooding. it has been driven ljy flash flooding. it has been driven by this low pressure, it is notjust rain, windy conditions, particularly around the rain. rain this morning has cleared into the north sea bed if you follow this curl around you can see happy posts across eastern scotland and northern england through the course of the day. something drier and brighter with one or two showers through the course of the day. showers across northern ireland, heavy but we will see sunshine, rain across northern england, lighter rain into east anglia and some showers across wales and the south—west, sunshine too. by the time we're finished with this rate we could have as much as an extra 50 millimetres or two
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temperatures 11 to 16, feeling cool in the winter drain. this evening and overnight the line of rain continued to journey towards the north sea, once again brisk winds around it. in parts of the highlands we could see temperatures dipping close to freezing but for the rest of us we are above freezing by quite a bit. tomorrow starts wet and windy in the east, that pulls away into the north see, a ridge of high pressure building so things settle down. there will be sunshine. cloud will already be gathering early in the day and we will see rain arrive across northern ireland in western scotland, sinovac getting into wales and south—west england. temperatures up to 17 degrees at best. into thursday weather french produces some rain, quite a bit of kylejohn thursday but there will be sunny spells equally. the crowd signifying coasts and hills to
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produce some drizzle, you will notice temperatures starting to rise in temperatures on thursday are roughly between 13 and 21 degrees.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. an investigation finds 200,000 children have been victims of abuse in catholic france. the prime minister confirms only a small number of people have applied for the new visas to drive hgvs in the uk after the government relaxed visa rules for up to 5,000 drivers. they only produced 127 names so far and what _ they only produced 127 names so far and what that shows is the global shortage — an internal technical issue is blamed after a global blackout lasting six hours hits facebook, whatsapp and instagram the company says there is "no evidence user data
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was compromised

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