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tv   The Papers  BBC News  November 29, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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the world health organization is warning that the global risk posed by the new omicron variant is "very high". it says covid surges could have severe consequences in some areas. after a briefing on the variant, president biden says it's cause for concern but not for panic. warning that it would arrive in the us sooner or later, he urged people to make sure they get vaccinated or get a booster. twitter has confirmed that its founder, jack dorsey, has stepped down as ceo with immediate effect. his successor will be twitter�*s chief technology officer, parag agrawal. the trial of the socialite, ghislaine maxwell has begun in new york on charges of sex trafficking. she denies claims that she conspired with the convicted paedophile, jeffrey epstein.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are sian elvin, deputy news editor at metro.co.uk, and kieran andrews, political editor of the times scotland. more from them in a moment. but for me, an update on the front pages. boosterjabs lead on the front of the financial times, reporting on the expansion of the vaccine programme in response to the omicron variant. as the programme is extended to all adults and teenagers, the mirror also leads on boosters, cutting the gap between second and third doses. the metro says fourth doses will be given to people at higher risk. the headline on the times is "scramble to getjabs in arms". the guardian says the government hopes to reach as many as half a millionjabs a day. it also reports that ministers want the nhs to reduce booster waiting time to three months.
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but on the telegraph, president biden says there's "no cause for panic", with new restrictions helping to deal with omicron. meanwhile, the express reports the booster programme extension will "buy time" and "protect the christmas festivities". meanwhile, away from jabs, the mail leads on ghislaine maxwell's trial, on charges linked to her relationship with the convicted six offender, jeffrey epstein. she denies trafficking and grooming under—age girls. let's begin, can you kick us off this time? let's begin on the metro. this is the metro's reading on the booster vaccine stuart ryan combat —— to try and combat the new variant that has arrived in the uk, there is
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now six cases in scotland, taking it to a total of about... it's very likely, all public health officials say it's very likely that there will be many more cases to be confirmed. the difference between now and last year, when the delta variant emerged around about this time, is we have a vaccine programme. it's rolled out for the vast majority of people with two jabs now across the uk, we will see governments step up their boosters for third and, in some cases for the most vulnerable, fourth doses of the vaccine in an attempt to maintain relative normality, so it can't cause the disruption that we saw last year with a potential knock on effects
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for people's health.— with a potential knock on effects for people's health. what's clear from all the _ for people's health. what's clear from all the papers _ for people's health. what's clear from all the papers is _ for people's health. what's clear from all the papers is this - from all the papers is this acceleration of the programme of firstjabs, than boosters. we are looking like we'll be using even more of these vaccine doses, and the problem remains for many parts of the world — something joe biden referred to in his statement — that they still aren't getting vaccinated. earlier today, we were speaking to him just earlier, he said it would only take us to pause, the western world, to pause for a month and they could get the rest of the world vaccinated. that's a shocking statistic in many ways, that we've scooped up that much of the vaccine programme. absolutely, and at the moment _ the vaccine programme. absolutely, and at the moment it's _ the vaccine programme. absolutely, and at the moment it's 11 _ the vaccine programme. absolutely, and at the moment it's 11 ks - the vaccine programme. absolutely, and at the moment it's 11 ks at -- i and at the moment it's 11 ks at —— cases_ and at the moment it's 11 ks at —— cases in_ and at the moment it's 11 ks at —— cases in the — and at the moment it's 11 ks at —— cases in the uk. the government wants_ cases in the uk. the government wants to — cases in the uk. the government wants to act now to deliver on this
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booster_ wants to act now to deliver on this booster drive. but we are discussing a third _ booster drive. but we are discussing a third jah— booster drive. but we are discussing a third jab and a does for the most vulnerable —— fourth dose. but how will that _ vulnerable —— fourth dose. but how will that look? at the moment we are 'ust will that look? at the moment we are just trying _ will that look? at the moment we are just trying to get through this current— just trying to get through this current wave. if you look across the world, _ current wave. if you look across the world, this — current wave. if you look across the world, this focus on western countries _ world, this focus on western countries having to go back into iockdowrt — countries having to go back into lockdown. some people are having to have their— lockdown. some people are having to have their third or fourth doses— where _ have their third or fourth doses— where will— have their third or fourth doses— where will that stop if that's a third — where will that stop if that's a third or— where will that stop if that's a third or fourth dose after a three month— third or fourth dose after a three month wait? will there be a fifth or sixth? _ month wait? will there be a fifth or sixth? as_ month wait? will there be a fifth or sixth? as you say, we've scooped up all these _ sixth? as you say, we've scooped up all these vaccines, and that remains a problem — all these vaccines, and that remains a problem. as experts have previously said many times, the world _ previously said many times, the world needs to come together — it's a global— world needs to come together — it's a global issue and, in order to overcome _ a global issue and, in order to overcome the virus, or at least get
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it down— overcome the virus, or at least get it down to — overcome the virus, or at least get it down to a — overcome the virus, or at least get it down to a point where the world can live _ it down to a point where the world can live with it, the focus definitely needs to be notjust on the uk _ definitely needs to be notjust on the uk in — definitely needs to be notjust on the uk in the western world, but looking _ the uk in the western world, but looking to — the uk in the western world, but looking to those countries that are worse _ looking to those countries that are worse off, — looking to those countries that are worse off, and going forward that will he _ worse off, and going forward that will he a — worse off, and going forward that will be a worry.— will be a worry. now and you get a look at yours. _ will be a worry. now and you get a look at yours, you _ will be a worry. now and you get a look at yours, you get _ will be a worry. now and you get a look at yours, you get a _ will be a worry. now and you get a look at yours, you get a look- will be a worry. now and you get a look at yours, you get a look at. look at yours, you get a look at his, the front page of the times scotland. i his, the front page of the times scotland. ~ his, the front page of the times scotland. ,, ., �* , his, the front page of the times scotland. ~ ., v ., ,, , scotland. i think what's absently clear, scotland. i think what's absently clear. what _ scotland. i think what's absently clear, what he _ scotland. i think what's absently clear, what he mentioned - scotland. i think what's absently| clear, what he mentioned earlier that there — clear, what he mentioned earlier that there is a scramble to get this thing _ that there is a scramble to get this thing which the country has above last year— thing which the country has above last year - — thing which the country has above last year — last year around this time, _ last year — last year around this time, there _ last year — last year around this time, there were concerns over the delta _ time, there were concerns over the delta variant, and it is very reminiscent of this omicron variant. it's reminiscent of this omicron variant. it's been _ reminiscent of this omicron variant. it's been described by the health
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secretary and jonathan van tam earlier— secretary and jonathan van tam earlier as — secretary and jonathan van tam earlier as this new kid on the block. — earlier as this new kid on the block. we _ earlier as this new kid on the block, we don't exactly freddy tyiicki — block, we don't exactly freddy tylicki know what effect it will have — tylicki know what effect it will have on — tylicki know what effect it will have on the effectiveness of vaccines _ have on the effectiveness of vaccines on how ill this makes people — vaccines on how ill this makes people. but this is the one thing this country has ahead of last year. and of— this country has ahead of last year. and of course, the thing that everybody is concerned about is christmas, and whether people will be able _ christmas, and whether people will be able to— christmas, and whether people will be able to spend it with their families, _ be able to spend it with their families, as it was of course cancelled _ families, as it was of course cancelled last minute last year. the thin that cancelled last minute last year. tie: thing that struck me cancelled last minute last year. tte: thing that struck me in this piece by your whitehall editor, i think it appears on the scotland edition of the times, as well, under this very striking picture of sarah ranson, one of the women who alleges that calin maxwell was involved in the trafficking of people —— ghislaine maxwell. there's no danger of her
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not being photographed going into court. the statistics of 17 point mine —— 17.9 million boosters — in other words, we are in some ways short of a 50% booster take up already, and now we will be accelerating the programme? it already, and now we will be accelerating the programme? it will be a massive _ accelerating the programme? it will be a massive job _ accelerating the programme? it will be a massive job of _ accelerating the programme? it will be a massive job of work _ accelerating the programme? it will be a massive job of work and - accelerating the programme? it ll be a massive job of work and a big test of the infrastructure within the nhs, both in england and wales, northern ireland with these booster vaccinations — i think it was said earlier that in scotland, there are around 800,000 people who are eligible for a booster jab around 800,000 people who are eligible for a boosterjab but have not had it yet. you know, a good step up in the programme and the way that all governments across the uk decide needs to be done, trying to clean this new variant, then it will
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need an incredible effort, but also quite incredible planning and strategy to make sure that that works, and to make sure that people are aware of where they can get theirjobs, and we are able to get them fairly quickly. in the summer, we saw a huge drop in vaccination centres — that doesn't work in the winter when you have weather conditions that we've seen in recent days. so it'll be a big, big test to see the infrastructure is in place, the facilities are open and people know exactly what they need to do, where to go, and when to go there some point take us to the front page of the express. some point take us to the front page of the “press— of the express. they can be relied on for upbeat. _ of the express. they can be relied on for upbeat, glass _ of the express. they can be relied on for upbeat, glass half-full - on for upbeat, glass half—full headlines. it has a porous johnsonian ring to it, let's go for
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it, "booster roll to save christmas." it it, "booster roll to save christmas. '— it, "booster roll to save christmas.“ , , , . christmas." it is very optimistic. we've talked — christmas." it is very optimistic. we've talked a _ christmas." it is very optimistic. we've talked a lot _ christmas." it is very optimistic. we've talked a lot about - christmas." it is very optimistic. we've talked a lot about the - we've talked a lot about the concerns and worries about this new variant, but there is a place for the optimism and the drive to encourage people to push them along the way, making sure that they are onside with the government's message which expresses —— the express is certainly doing here. it's the same story as other papers but it's driving its readers, some who might be sceptical vaccines, driving them towards the end goal of getting the boosters and doing what the medical professions and scientific experts
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believe is the key against this new variant. d0 believe is the key against this new variant. , ., ., ., believe is the key against this new variant. ., ., , , ., variant. do you want to pick up on that, the booster _ variant. do you want to pick up on that, the booster ring _ variant. do you want to pick up on that, the booster ring of- variant. do you want to pick up on that, the booster ring of the - that, the booster ring of the booster, as it were? i that, the booster ring of the booster, as it were?- that, the booster ring of the booster, as it were? i think the one thin i booster, as it were? i think the one thing i found _ booster, as it were? i think the one thing i found really _ booster, as it were? i think the one thing i found really interesting - thing i found really interesting about— thing i found really interesting about the express actually was the quote _ about the express actually was the quote they pulled from boris johnson saying _ quote they pulled from boris johnson saying that the return of the mask measures— saying that the return of the mask measures will buy time. and i think that's— measures will buy time. and i think that's something that is really important because last year, the government kind of tried to avoid addressing the delta variant directly, then it all got too late and they— directly, then it all got too late and they had to bring in. but now they are — and they had to bring in. but now they are basicallyjust trying to -et they are basicallyjust trying to get ahead so they can investigate it — it get ahead so they can investigate it - it may— get ahead so they can investigate it - it may not— get ahead so they can investigate it — it may not be as big a threat as the who — — it may not be as big a threat as the who and others fear, so we will have to _ the who and others fear, so we will have to see — the who and others fear, so we will have to see what happens, really, and if _ have to see what happens, really, and if that's enough time. it�*s and if that's enough time. it's interesting — and if that's enough time. it�*s interesting you picked up the mask wearing point, but because yesterday
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i interviewed lisa nandi, she's now the shadow to michael gove, and she was making the clinical point by saying look at the labour benches, we are all wearing masks, look at the tory benches, no masks. i think it's fair to say most of the front bench, not all, but most now wear masks in the house of the chamber of commons. but there seems to be tension over the conservative party about this, and boris has tried to write up both horses. now it looks like he's come on this side of mask wearers? ~ , ,., y like he's come on this side of mask wearers? ~ , ,., , ., �* like he's come on this side of mask wearers? ~ ,,., , ., �* , wearers? absolutely, and we've seen re orts wearers? absolutely, and we've seen reorts in wearers? absolutely, and we've seen reports in recent _ wearers? absolutely, and we've seen reports in recent days _ wearers? absolutely, and we've seen reports in recent days of _ wearers? absolutely, and we've seen reports in recent days of boris - reports in recent days of boris johnson — reports in recent days of boris johnson not wearing his mask in settings — johnson not wearing his mask in settings where people believe it's really— settings where people believe it's really important to, such as hospitals. but now the advice is changed. — hospitals. but now the advice is changed, and he needs to set an example — changed, and he needs to set an example for that, as do other politicians. example for that, as do other politicians-— politicians. watch out for the olitician politicians. watch out for the politician who _ politicians. watch out for the politician who gets _ politicians. watch out for the politician who gets caught. politicians. watch out for the - politician who gets caught without their mask in any enclosed space like a shopper transfer area waiting
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on a platform in some remote part of the uk. someone there has a camera phone, you can always be sure. take us to the front of the telegraph, "biden says no cause for panic." absolutely, it's really interesting that he's — absolutely, it's really interesting that he's taken almost this opposite - over— that he's taken almost this opposite - over in _ that he's taken almost this opposite - over in the — that he's taken almost this opposite — over in the uk, the experts are also _ — over in the uk, the experts are also telling — — over in the uk, the experts are also telling us not to panic, these are just _ also telling us not to panic, these are just precautions, but biden is saying _ are just precautions, but biden is saying it's — are just precautions, but biden is saying it's not a cause for panic, has thrown _ saying it's not a cause for panic, he's thrown all his trust into the vaccine — he's thrown all his trust into the vaccine programme. and i think that contract _ vaccine programme. and i think that contract -- — vaccine programme. and i think that contract —— that contrast is very easy— contract —— that contrast is very easy to — contract —— that contrast is very easy to make it interesting, but over— easy to make it interesting, but over in— easy to make it interesting, but over in the _ easy to make it interesting, but over in the uk, what happened last christmas, — over in the uk, what happened last christmas, they're not wanting to see that — christmas, they're not wanting to see that again. i think that's
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potentially one of the reasons why we nray— potentially one of the reasons why we may be — potentially one of the reasons why we may be seeing these different tones _ we may be seeing these different tones between the leaders of the uk and the _ tones between the leaders of the uk and the us. | tones between the leaders of the uk and the us. ., ., , and the us. i thought was interesting _ and the us. i thought was interesting and _ and the us. i thought was interesting and quite - and the us. i thought was - interesting and quite striking, the telegraph picks up on that— when you look at whatjoe biden is saying, he's saying don't panic, there's actually the same message from uk leaders. where your mask and carry on with the vaccine programme. the practical measures that are being taken, there's not as much of a gap as it may appear from the language being used byjoe biden and the tape of the telegraph has written up on this. �* . , of the telegraph has written up on this. �* , , , of the telegraph has written up on this. d , , ,, this. it's very interesting because, as ou this. it's very interesting because, as you say. _ this. it's very interesting because, as you say. the — this. it's very interesting because, as you say, the measures - this. it's very interesting because, as you say, the measures are - this. it's very interesting because, as you say, the measures are not| as you say, the measures are not that different, and joe biden is enforcing a requirement for all federal workers to be vaccinated, or effectively be isolated from their colleagues. foranyone effectively be isolated from their colleagues. for anyone who gets a
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contract, they will be able to get a contract, they will be able to get a contract if their staff on vaccinated, , contract if their staff on vaccinated,, or they are unlikely to get a contract, because of the whole question of how you would police the staff on a building site. the other story on the front of the telegraph is the barbados story, "barbados becomes a republic." effectively it's the end of the monarchy a link between that particular caribbean island in the uk. it between that particular caribbean island in the uk.— island in the uk. it is, and there island in the uk. it is, and there is two really _ island in the uk. it is, and there is two really important, - island in the uk. it is, and there| is two really important, symbolic things as part of that handover — prince charles is travelling to barbados for the handover, and he, as the telegraph knows, will acknowledge and apologise, for the first time as a member of the royal family, for britain's role in
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slavery and the horrors that were exacted by britain against countries like barbados. but as part of that, prince charles has a very strong relationship with the prime minister of barbados, and it does look like a big part of this is the attempt to acknowledge those sins of the past and shift into a new relationship that doesn't have to could be quite close between the uk and barbados, but one that allows, with any luck, both countries to feel a bit more comfortable in the way they move forward together with the acknowledgement of an apology for britain's previous actions. i’m britain's previous actions. i'm touched by — britain's previous actions. i'm touched by a _
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britain's previous actions. i'm touched by a number of nice details here. the queen is replaced by the president of the republic of barbados. this will be at midnight tonight, localtime, barbados. this will be at midnight tonight, local time, the queen's standard will be lowered for the last time, than the government house becomes a state house. this other little detail that never occurred to me, barbadian prisoners will no longer be held to her majesty's pleasure. longer be held to her ma'esty's leasure. ~ , , . ~' pleasure. absolutely, and i think these are the _ pleasure. absolutely, and i think these are the kinds _ pleasure. absolutely, and i think these are the kinds of— pleasure. absolutely, and i think these are the kinds of things - pleasure. absolutely, and i think| these are the kinds of things that are subtly— these are the kinds of things that are subtly in the background, not 'ust are subtly in the background, not just in— are subtly in the background, not just in this — are subtly in the background, not just in this country but over in barbados _ just in this country but over in barbados. and even though it's of bil barbados. and even though it's of big significance culturally, these subtle _ big significance culturally, these subtle changes will underpin barbados becoming a republic. and it might— barbados becoming a republic. and it might be _ barbados becoming a republic. and it might be things that some people might— might be things that some people might not necessarily even notice, but things— might not necessarily even notice, but things like the british crown disappearing from flags and uniforms, and buttons. it'sjust a
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really— uniforms, and buttons. it'sjust a really interesting detail which i hadn't — really interesting detail which i hadn't noticed. it�*s really interesting detail which i hadn't noticed.— really interesting detail which i hadn't noticed. �* . ., hadn't noticed. it's intriguing, who knows, hadn't noticed. it's intriguing, who knows. one _ hadn't noticed. it's intriguing, who knows. one day — hadn't noticed. it's intriguing, who knows, one day we _ hadn't noticed. it's intriguing, who knows, one day we may _ hadn't noticed. it's intriguing, who knows, one day we may have - hadn't noticed. it's intriguing, who knows, one day we may have a - knows, one day we may have a president sondra? briefly, i was going to mention the guardian, and that's yvette cooper returning, but there's the front of the mirror. just a word, sean, a word of somebody for those still without electricity? i somebody for those still without electrici ? ,., somebody for those still without electrici ? ., , electricity? i feel bad really, because i'm _ electricity? i feel bad really, because i'm sat here - electricity? i feel bad really, because i'm sat here in - electricity? i feel bad really, i because i'm sat here in london electricity? i feel bad really, - because i'm sat here in london and i havent— because i'm sat here in london and i haven't got— because i'm sat here in london and i haven't got any snow near me at all. but it— haven't got any snow near me at all. but it is— haven't got any snow near me at all. but it is still— haven't got any snow near me at all. but it is still very, very cold. but i'm but it is still very, very cold. but im very— but it is still very, very cold. but i'm very fortunate that i'm not having — i'm very fortunate that i'm not having those issues. you might have more _ having those issues. you might have more to— having those issues. you might have more to say— having those issues. you might have more to say about this from scotland's viewpoint, but we've got to hope _ scotland's viewpoint, but we've got to hope that people get their power
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back as _ to hope that people get their power back as soon as possible because some _ back as soon as possible because some people haven't had power since sunday _ some people haven't had power since sunda . ., . some people haven't had power since sunda . .,, ., , some people haven't had power since sunda . ., , ., is sunday. last words on this? is somebody _ sunday. last words on this? is somebody who _ sunday. last words on this? is somebody who is _ sunday. last words on this? is somebody who is without - sunday. last words on this? is. somebody who is without power sunday. last words on this? is - somebody who is without power for almost any four hours friday through to saturday tee time, i've got immense sympathy for people in aberdeenshire and other parts of the uk in the northwest, in particular. they must be struggling after almost three days without power in this sort of weather, just trying to stay warm and look after themselves. it's a monumental effort, and you'vejust got to hope that the power comes back as soon as possible.- got to hope that the power comes back as soon as possible. thank you both very much- _ back as soon as possible. thank you both very much. i'm _ back as soon as possible. thank you both very much. i'm very _ back as soon as possible. thank you both very much. i'm very glad - back as soon as possible. thank you both very much. i'm very glad it's i both very much. i'm very glad it's been back on, we would have been deprived if you had not been, so thank you very much, lovely to see you both. that's it for the papers tonight. martine croxhall will be here with the papers tomorrow evening, along with jane merrick and jamie njoku—goodwin. dojoin us then if you can
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but for now, goodnight. hi there, good evening. i'm chetan pathak with your sports news. lionel messi's been named the world's best footballer again tonight, winning the ballon d'or for a record—extending seventh time. the 34—year—old helped argentina win the copa america earlier this year, his first international honour. his children were delighted to see him collect his award tonight. messi's scored a0 goals so far this year — 28 of them for barcelona, who he left in the summer to join paris st—germain. bayern munich striker robert lewandowski came second, chelsea midfielder jorginho was third. and barcelona captain alexia putellas won the women's ballon d'or — she scored in barca's
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4—0 win over chelsea in the champions league final, and ended last season as the highest—scoring midfielder in europe with 26 goals in all competitions. staying with women's football — there was another big win for northern ireland's women tonight, as they thrashed north macedonia 9—0 in world cup qualifying. they registered their biggest win when they beat the macedonians 11—0 away last week. tonight in north belfast, rachel furness scored twice, grabbing her 37th international goal and, in doing so, became northern ireland's record goal—scorer, breaking the record previously held by david healy. next, to an update on the rugby union teams that have been affected by the tightening travel restrictions, following the new coronavirus variant identified in south africa. scarlets have made it out and are in isolation at a hotel in belfast. munster can leave cape town to isolate back home, minus one of their players that tested positive and a close contact. but cardiff are still stuck
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there, with two positive cases in the squad. their chairman, alunjones, says there's concern in the camp. there's obviously concern to get home, there's obviously concern around the new variant, and it's obviously very difficult to be doing, in effect, self—imposed quarantine, you know, in south africa so far from home. so, you know, the paramount importance to us is to get them home. the former flat jockey freddy tylicki's £6 million high court case against the fellow ex—jockey graham gibbons got under way today. tylitski is suing gibbons for the "life—changing injuries" he suffered when his horse and three others fell during a race at kempton in october 2016. tylitski claims gibbons' riding was "dangerous in the extreme" — gibbons denies causation and negligence. here's our senior sports news reporter, laura scott.
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frame—by—frame, overfive different camera angles, the high court today was shown replays of the race that left freddy tylicki paralysed from the waist down. the former jockey—turned—television pundit claims he made a shout for survival to graham gibbons before the second of two collisions between their horses, but there was no response. "i went down and it went black," he said. graham gibbons�*s defences that the fall was a result of a racing accident occasioned by the two horses coming together. topjockeys ryan moore and jim crowley are due to give evidence in the trial, which will examine the duty of care between jockeys. patrick lawrence qc representing graham gibbons warned there could be multiple ramifications if incidence of this kind end up in court, and warned this could create all kinds of difficulties for professional sport, notjust horse racing. next to boxing — kell brook says he's going to send amir khan into retirement, after their long—awaited clash was finally confirmed. after years of failed negotiations, the long—term rivals have finally
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agreed to the all—british showdown on 19 february, in manchester. brook hasn't fought since being stopped in the fourth round by terence crawford a year ago, while khan won a points decision over australia's billy dib injanuary. england captain, joe root, said he has spoken to his former yorkshire team—mate, azeem rafiq, and they plan to meet up after the ashes tour in australia. rafiq has said he thinks the english game is "institutionally racist" and he was hurt that root couldn't "recall" any instances of racism occuring whilst they played together at yorkshire. yeah, we've exchanged a couple messages since — quite recently, actually — and hopefully when we finish this tour, we'll get the opportunity to sit down and talk, you know, about this whole situation, about how we can move the game forward. and, you know, as i mentioned in my statement, as well, along with talking to azeem, i wanted to speak to
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lord patel at the club, and those dialogues have started, as well. so i think it's important that we keep finding ways of bettering the sport, finding ways how we can individually affect things for the better, and make a real change in this. seven—time champion ronnie o'sullivan is through to the last 16 of snooker�*s uk championship. he beat long—time rival mark king by six frames to three at the barbican, making a century and five 50—plus breaks in another excellent performance. he'll face noppon saengkham or stuart bingham in the next round. but three—time uk championship winnerjohn higgins is out. he lost to china's zhao xintong, 6—5. before we go, some sad news to bring you. a pioneer of the golfing world, lee elder, has died at the age of 87. the american was the first black man to play in the masters, making history in 1975 at a tournament many saw as an embodiment of the racism that was a large part of the sport
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in america at the time. the lpga have described him as "the definition of a trailblazer". that's all your sport for now. over on the bbc sport website, you can hearfrom tiger woods and why he doesn't expect to return to the tour full—time following his car accident in february. but from me and the team for now, goodnight. hello there. it certainly has been a cold few days across the uk. but in recent hours, things have been changing — more cloud has been rolling its way in from the west, and with that, we've seen some milder air pushing in, these westerly winds bringing those milder conditions for most of us, away from the far north of scotland. so for the majority, tuesday morning is starting with a very different feel — temperatures in liverpool, in plymouth, around 11 celsius. but with that, we have more
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in the way of cloud, and we have some outbreaks of patchy rain and drizzle. now through the day, that cloud should thin and break a little bit to give some sunny spells, particularly across england and wales. and then through the afternoon, we'll see a band of heavier rain pushing in from the west, getting into parts of northern ireland and western scotland with strengthening winds. but top temperatures 10—12 celsius in most places — it will stay quite chilly in the far north of scotland, just three there in loic. now through tuesday night, we're watching this area of low pressure — it's likely to deepen a little as it slides across the uk, so, as well as outbreaks of rain, we have the potential for some quite strong winds. now it certainly doesn't look like we'll see anything as windy as we have over the weekend, but still, the potential for some really strong winds for western coasts, perhaps for parts of eastern scotland and northeast england, those gusts could touch gale force in places. temperatures between 5—9 celsius — it's starting to drop away again, you'll notice, and that is a sign of things to come on wednesday
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because the winds will be coming down from the north. and that will reintroduce some relatively cold air — probably not as cold as it has been, but yes, a chillier day to come on wednesday. we'll see areas of showers along the spells of rain pushing southwards, wintery showers even to quite low levels across the northern half of scotland, so some more snow likely to settle here. temperatures by the afternoon between 3—10 celsius, an increasingly cold feel as we go through the day. now we have those northerly winds, they will ease a little as we get into thursday. as this ridge of high pressure builds in, some dry weatherfor a time. and then, this frontal system pushes in from the west, briefly maybe some snow — but, as milder air works in, that will tend to turn back to rain. so temperatures really up and down this week, quite a chilly day to come on thursday, a slightly milder one likely on friday.
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welcome to newsday. reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... more cases of the new coronavirus variant and more travel restrictions, but the us president urges people not to panic. this variant is a cause for concern, not a cause for panic. our medical editor will look at what's known so far about the variant. also in the programme... the trial of british socialite ghislaine maxwell gets under way in new york. she's accused of trafficking underage girls for former loverjeffrey epstein. on the eve of becoming a republic, barbados prepares to celebrate a new future without the queen as head of state.
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