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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 15, 2022 11:00am-11:31am GMT

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. novak djokovic has been detained in australia for a second time, ahead of a court hearing to decide whether the unvaccinated tennis star can stay in the country for the australian open — which starts on monday. if he is playing finally, 0k. if he is playing finally, ok. if he is not playing, the australian open will be a great australian open with or without him. more details emerge about further lockdown parties in downing street, as some conservative mps say they're being inundated with complaints from angry constituents. lawyers for virginia giuffre, who's accused the duke of york of sexual abuse, are calling for two people based in the uk to give evidence in her civil case. prince andrew denies
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all the allegations. washington and kyiv accuse russia of preparing to carry out "false sabotage operations" — to create a "pretext" for an invasion of ukraine. the kremlin denies the claims. hello, and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. a prominent conservative mp has told the bbc that borisjohnson must "lead or step aside." tobias ellwood, who chairs the defence select committee, said leadership was required. it comes as some conservative mps say they've been inundated with emails from constituents, angry about reports that downing street staff held parties during lockdowns.
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speaking this morning, the labour leader sir keir starmer reiterated his call for the prime minister to resign — saying borisjohnson lacked the "moral authority" to lead. the government has urged people to reserve judgment until the outcome of an inquiry. it comes a day after officials apologised to buckingham palace for two parties held on the eve of prince philip's funeral. our political correspondent ione wells reports. "it is the expectation that more and more will come out" — the fear of one brexiteer tory mp, who previously backed borisjohnson, who is worried about the stream of allegations about parties that took place behind these doors during covid restrictions. one former minister said the prime minister was "toast". another said their email inbox was "horrendous". one senior tory said they have had more than 200 angry emails against the prime minister and said many colleagues now believe boris won't be leader at the next general election. "for many of us, this feels terminal." borisjohnson admitted this week that he attended drinks
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in the downing street garden on the 20th of may, 2020. for the government minister guy opperman, this revelation felt personal. he could not support his wife and twins at the time in hospital, and his two sons died shortly after their birth. i don't think it's acceptable and i feel pretty emotional about the fact that i wasn't able to support my kids and my wife and go to the hospital at pretty much exactly the same time they were making these difficulties. on friday, downing street also had to apologise to buckingham palace, after reports downing street staff held two parties in number ten on the eve of prince philip's funeral, leading foreign secretary liz truss to admit "mistakes were made." ministers have urged people to reservejudgement until an inquiry into downing street parties by the civil servant sue gray has reported what happened. while police have also said they will await the results of this inquiry, the former chief constable of durham, mike barton, told bbc radio 4's week in westminster that the police
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should now be involved in this investigation. if there is a cause celebre, causing widespread public outrage, then the police should act. because the primary objective of encouraging people to follow the rules without police intervention would be lost. many mps are now waiting with bated breath to see just how bad or not this report ends up looking for the conservatives. but some have already told the bbc they will be congregating next week to work outjust how they are going to bring this to an end. ione wells, bbc news. our political correspondent nick eardley is here. what's the latest this weekend? i think the really important thing happening today is tory mps around the country are engaging with their constituents. from the conversations i have had, it doesn't sound like it is good for the prime minister. it sounds like the mood is hardening,
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including among tory mps. just to give you a flavour, one formal cabinet minister said that the story yesterday about a party in downing street the night before the duke of edinburgh's funeral had made things worse, that the reception they were getting was terrible. a brexiteer ally of borisjohnson, someone who would have been beating the drum for him back in 2019, said they don't see any way now that he is thereby the next election. there are many mps who are being inundated with messages from their constituents. some are suggesting that those people are not natural allies of the conservatives anyway, but i think there is definitely a feeling that tory mps are under pressure from their constituents this weekend. what is that all mean? well, there is no doubt that next week is going to be tough to stop when mps get back to westminster, they will be talking about what to do next. there is a chance we will get the sue gray report on what went on, that top
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civil servant looking into it. what she says is going to be really crucial. there is still that question of how you get from now to borisjohnson not being prime minister, and that is not completely clear. others can be blamed for this. there is also quite a tricky process to remove a prime minister who does not want to leave. that said, opposition parties are going to keep hammering this and i would expect that they are going to keep saying that the prime minister, cannot be trusted, and is vulnerable. have a listen to the labour leader keir starmer this morning. labour leader keir starmer this morninu. ., ., ., ., , labour leader keir starmer this morninu. ., . ., ., , ., , morning. the moral authority matters in relation to — morning. the moral authority matters in relation to enforcing _ morning. the moral authority matters in relation to enforcing the _ morning. the moral authority matters in relation to enforcing the covid - in relation to enforcing the covid rules _ in relation to enforcing the covid rules we — in relation to enforcing the covid rules. we have a prime minister who is absent. _ rules. we have a prime minister who is absent, who is literally in hiding — is absent, who is literally in hiding at _ is absent, who is literally in hiding at the moment and unable to iead~ _ hiding at the moment and unable to iead~ and _ hiding at the moment and unable to lead. and so that is why i have concluded _ lead. and so that is why i have concluded that he has got to go. and of course _ concluded that he has got to go. and of course there is a party in advantage in him going, but now it is actually— advantage in him going, but now it
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is actually in the national interest he goes — is actually in the national interest he goes it— is actually in the national interest he goes. it is very important now that the — he goes. it is very important now that the tory party does what it needs_ that the tory party does what it needs to — that the tory party does what it needs to do and gets rid of him. so needs to do and gets rid of him. sc thatis needs to do and gets rid of him. that is the needs to do and gets rid of him. sr that is the labour leader keir starmer. as i say, the way that tory mps find their constituents reacting this morning, plus what happens early next week, is going to be crucial in the next phases of this politically. but as we know, there have been a steady drip of stories over the last couple of weeks as well, and the fear that some tory mps have is that there to come. thank you very much, nick. tara button gave birth to her son dylan on the 20th of may 2020, the same day as the garden party in downing street — shejoins me now. obviously that state is now seared in so many of our minds. what are your thoughts, in so many of our minds. what are yourthoughts, knowing in so many of our minds. what are your thoughts, knowing what was going on in downing street while your giving birth? what was your experience giving birth under the
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restrictions? i experience giving birth under the restrictions?— experience giving birth under the restrictions? i only 'ust made the connecton h restrictions? i only 'ust made the connection, but — restrictions? i only 'ust made the connection, but it — restrictions? i onlyjust made the connection, but it really - restrictions? i onlyjust made the connection, but it really hit - restrictions? i onlyjust made the connection, but it really hit me . restrictions? i onlyjust made thej connection, but it really hit me in quite _ connection, but it really hit me in quite an— connection, but it really hit me in quite an emotionally powerful way. the rose _ quite an emotionally powerful way. the rose at — quite an emotionally powerful way. the rose at the time meant that my husband _ the rose at the time meant that my husband couldn't stay with me in hospitat — husband couldn't stay with me in hospitat i— husband couldn't stay with me in hospital. i had a c—section, so that was quite — hospital. i had a c—section, so that was quite hard already. and that moment— was quite hard already. and that moment where he had to leave was quite _ moment where he had to leave was quite scary~ — moment where he had to leave was quite scary. the night when this party— quite scary. the night when this party was — quite scary. the night when this party was happening and i was left alone _ party was happening and i was left alone in_ party was happening and i was left alone in hospital, sending videos of my new_ alone in hospital, sending videos of my new son— alone in hospital, sending videos of my new son to my husband. he was sitting _ my new son to my husband. he was sitting at— my new son to my husband. he was sitting at home, not able to hold his son, — sitting at home, not able to hold his son, bond with his son. it was really— his son, bond with his son. it was really hard — his son, bond with his son. it was really hard. and then of course, when _ really hard. and then of course, when we — really hard. and then of course, when we came out of hospital, my mother, _ when we came out of hospital, my mother, dylan's grandmother, couidh't— mother, dylan's grandmother, couldn't hold him for weeks. and it was so _ couldn't hold him for weeks. and it was so emotionally difficult. but the thing — was so emotionally difficult. but the thing that made it feel 0k was
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that we _ the thing that made it feel 0k was that we were all in it together and we were _ that we were all in it together and we were all doing the right thing. so, we were all doing the right thing. so. to— we were all doing the right thing. so. to hear— we were all doing the right thing. so, to hear it now that the people who make — so, to hear it now that the people who make those rules were breaking them _ who make those rules were breaking them in _ who make those rules were breaking them in this— who make those rules were breaking them in this way, in such a flippant way for— them in this way, in such a flippant way for such— them in this way, in such a flippant way for such stupid reasons, feels like a _ way for such stupid reasons, feels like a reat— way for such stupid reasons, feels like a real betrayal. the real betrayal _ like a real betrayal. the real betrayal-— like a real betrayal. the real betra al. �* , ., betrayal. and she said when you made the connection — betrayal. and she said when you made the connection it _ betrayal. and she said when you made the connection it hit _ betrayal. and she said when you made the connection it hit you _ betrayal. and she said when you made the connection it hit you in _ betrayal. and she said when you made the connection it hit you in an - the connection it hit you in an emotionally powerful way. as you say, what you experienced at the time was difficult. now, with the way that it is all playing out in terms of other things happening at the time, the people who are making the time, the people who are making the rules, where does that leave you feeling now? i the rules, where does that leave you feeling now?— feeling now? i feel like those --eole, feeling now? i feel like those people. boris _ feeling now? i feel like those people, boris and _ feeling now? i feel like those people, boris and the - feeling now? i feel like those - people, boris and the conservative government who took part in these parties. _ government who took part in these parties, have completely lost...
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just completely lost trust. we cannot — just completely lost trust. we cannot trust them any more, and as soon _ cannot trust them any more, and as soon as— cannot trust them any more, and as soon as you — cannot trust them any more, and as soon as you lose the trust of people you cannot — soon as you lose the trust of people you cannot need them. they are just pretending _ you cannot need them. they are just pretending to lead now. i think his position— pretending to lead now. i think his position is— pretending to lead now. i think his position is untenable. so pretending to lead now. i think his position is untenable.— position is untenable. so they had our trust position is untenable. so they had your trust before? _ position is untenable. so they had your trust before? to _ position is untenable. so they had your trust before? to a _ position is untenable. so they had your trust before? to a certain - your trust before? to a certain extent, because _ your trust before? to a certain extent, because i _ your trust before? to a certain extent, because i felt - your trust before? to a certain extent, because i felt like - your trust before? to a certain extent, because i felt like we | your trust before? to a certain - extent, because i felt like we were all doing _ extent, because i felt like we were all doing the right thing for the country. — all doing the right thing for the country, to follow certain rules to keep _ country, to follow certain rules to keep people safe. but as soon as you find out _ keep people safe. but as soon as you find out that— keep people safe. but as soon as you find out that they are following different roles and they are breaking those rules. it is so tempting _ breaking those rules. it is so tempting to want to break the rules under— tempting to want to break the rules under those circumstances. you want to be _ under those circumstances. you want to be able _ under those circumstances. you want to be able to — under those circumstances. you want to be able to hand your newborn son to be able to hand your newborn son to your _ to be able to hand your newborn son to your mother and say, "oh, let's 'ust to your mother and say, "oh, let's just have _ to your mother and say, "oh, let's just have a — to your mother and say, "oh, let's just have a cuddle." you want to break— just have a cuddle." you want to break rules— just have a cuddle." you want to break rules but you don't because you think— break rules but you don't because you think you are doing the right
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thing _ you think you are doing the right thing for— you think you are doing the right thing. forthem you think you are doing the right thing. for them to break those rules under— thing. for them to break those rules under those — thing. for them to break those rules under those circumstances is a betrayal, — under those circumstances is a betrayal, and they have lost the right _ betrayal, and they have lost the right to — betrayal, and they have lost the right to the trust of the british people — right to the trust of the british people. do right to the trust of the british --eole. ,, right to the trust of the british --eole. . right to the trust of the british o-eole. . ., right to the trust of the british --eole. . ., ., people. do you reflect now on the very difficult _ people. do you reflect now on the very difficult decisions _ people. do you reflect now on the very difficult decisions that - people. do you reflect now on the very difficult decisions that you i very difficult decisions that you took at the time, the impact that they had, and have a feeling about whether you would do the same again in similar circumstances? i whether you would do the same again in similar circumstances?— in similar circumstances? i wouldn't chance in similar circumstances? i wouldn't change what — in similar circumstances? i wouldn't change what i _ in similar circumstances? i wouldn't change what i did, _ in similar circumstances? i wouldn't change what i did, because - in similar circumstances? i wouldn't change what i did, because i - in similar circumstances? i wouldn't change what i did, because i think. change what i did, because i think that we _ change what i did, because i think that we were doing what was right to keep people safe. i don't think the point _ keep people safe. i don't think the point is _ keep people safe. i don't think the point is that we should have been more _ point is that we should have been more tax — point is that we should have been more lax because they were being more _ more lax because they were being more tax — more lax because they were being more lax. the point is that they shouldn't— more lax. the point is that they shouldn't have been doing that when everyone _ shouldn't have been doing that when everyone else was trying so hard and going _ everyone else was trying so hard and going through such tough sacrifices. my mother— going through such tough sacrifices. my mother was in tears, my mother—in—law was in tears not being able to— mother—in—law was in tears not being able to hold _ mother—in—law was in tears not being able to hold their grandson. and it isjust_ able to hold their grandson. and it isjust appalling that able to hold their grandson. and it is just appalling that it able to hold their grandson. and it isjust appalling that it has
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happened. isjust appalling that it has happened-— isjust appalling that it has hauened. . ~ ., ., isjust appalling that it has hauened. ., ~' ., ., , novak djokovic has been detained in australia ahead of a court hearing that will determine whether he can stay in the country. the serbian faces deportation after his visa was cancelled for a second time, with the government labelling the 34—year—old a threat to the public — because he's unvaccinated against coronavirus. djokovic is still scheduled to play in the australian open in melbourne on monday. with the latest from melbourne, here's our correspondent, shaimaa khalil. novak djokovic is back in detention. earlier today, he was at his lawyer's office while a procedural online hearing was taking place. we have a bit of clarity now about what to expect for sunday's hearing. we know it is going to be a full bench of three judges and we know that his legal team is going to challenge alex hawke, the immigration minister's, decision to revoke his visa. we understand from legal documents that were released later today that the immigration minister
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chose to cancel novak djokovic's visa because, according to him, the presence of the unvaccinated of the unvaccinated athlete could provoke anti—vaccination sentiments. the legal team says this is invalid, it's irrational, and deporting him could actually cause the very thing that the government is trying to avoid. remember, this is a very tight timeframe. the australian open is set to start on monday, and today we've heard from tennis star rafael nadal, who says this is not just about novak djokovic. tennis keeps going. and the australian open is much more important than any player. so if he is playing finally, ok. if he's not playing, the australian open will be a great australian open with or without him. that's my point of view. when djokovic is allowed to leave this hotel on sunday morning, it won't be to go to practice. he'll be at his lawyer's office while a court decided his fate.
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the controversy around djokovic's attendance at the australia open has divided people in the city of melbourne — where locals have lived through months of lockdown and restrictions. i would love for him to not be allowed to play, for him to go home, but the cynical part of me thinks that he will be allowed to play. i do feel that, to make a statement to the rest of the world, that we are sticking by what we've been calling for the last few years, i feel it's best if djokovic should probably sit out this one. i hope that, you know, - the government, the judges hold their ground and say, "no, you don't want to get _ "a vaccination and you don't want to follow our rules, i then you can't come in." let him play! there's been support for djokovic outside the venue where he's meant to play the australian open on monday — that's obviously if he's not deported. opponents to vaccination mandates took part in the rally and asked authorities to let the serbian compete on monday and keep alive his bid for a record 21st major title at the australian open.
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our correspondent, guy de launey is in belgrade and has more now on the reaction from there. outrage — that's where we're at here in serbia. and we're hearing outrage both on a sporting front and on a diplomatic front. so, on the sporting front, a nice little pithy quote from the serbian tennis federation, who said that preventing novak djokovic from playing was "unacceptable for the entire sports world on the planet and contradicts the sacred olympic principles, which are well known." i must admit, i've forgotten which the sacred olympic principles are to which they're referring, but i'll take their word for it. but there's also been a lot of political reaction now. the leaders of serbia's political... their political leaders, the government, have been quite quiet in the days running up to the ministerial intervention. i think they were hoping that, by standing back, they wouldn't do novak djokovic's case any harm. now, though, they've come out all guns blazing, with president aleksandar vucic blazing in particular, asking, "why do you mistreat him?
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"why do you harass him as well as his family and a nation that is free and proud?" so this is now being very much cast here in serbia as an attack, notjust on one man, but on the entire serbian people. lawyers for virginia giuffre, who's accused the duke of york of sexual abuse, are calling for two people — based in the uk — to give evidence in her civil case, including one of his former aids. prince andrew denies all the allegations. our washington correspondent, nomia iqbal, reports. virginia giuffre's legal team here in america is seeking testimony from two people in the uk. one of those people is shukri walker, a woman who claims to have seen prince andrew at a nightclub in london in 2001 with a young girl. miss giuffre contends she was then abused by the prince after visiting that club. the second person is the prince's former assistant, major rob olney. and ms giuffre's lawyers say she has reason to believe that major olney has information that
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relates to the relationship between prince andrew and jeffrey epstein, the convicted sex offender who's now dead. virginia giuffre's legal team are clearly preparing for a court hearing, though they haven't ruled out a settlement, which means that it wouldn't go to trial. but they've also indicated that they wouldn't just want that settlement to be financial. as far as prince andrew is concerned, he has always consistently denied all these allegations and his team have said that this legal case is a marathon, not a sprint. but he is running out of legal manoeuvres and miss giuffre's legal team have him exactly where they want him. he's now in a position where he has said he will defend his name and he will be defending it as a private citizen, after losing his military titles and his royal patronagees, as well as his title, hrh. the pressure is increasing on him.
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tsunami waves caused by a giant underwater volcanic eruption have hit the pacific island of tonga. satellite images show the eruption which was followed by darkened skies as the volcano sent black ash shooting into the air. a tsunami warning sent residents of tonga scrambling to higher ground. a nearby inhabited island is reported to have submerged completely. today marks 25 years since princess diana walked through a minefield in angola to raise awareness of the lasting impact of conflict. diana captured global attention when she walked through the live minefield in 1997, escorted by the british landmine clearance charity, the halo trust. she never lived to see the full impact of her visit — such as the signing of an international treaty to outlaw the weapons — as she died later that year. louise vaughan joins us now from the halo trust. welcome. thank you forjoining us. it is such an iconic image of diana working through that minefield. how did it come about? did she suggest
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it? where did the idea come from? well, she was already very much involved — well, she was already very much involved with the international red cross _ involved with the international red cross and — involved with the international red cross and she was planning a trip to angola _ cross and she was planning a trip to angola to— cross and she was planning a trip to angola to highlight the terrible impact — angola to highlight the terrible impact that these weapons were having _ impact that these weapons were having on— impact that these weapons were having on normal people, particularly children. when we heard that she _ particularly children. when we heard that she wanted to visit eight minefield to showcase what was happening, we agree that we would accompany her. the minefield had very recently been cleared by my colleagues there. essentially, it was amazingly brave of her. when she visited, _ was amazingly brave of her. when she visited, the _ was amazingly brave of her. when she visited, the war was still raging. things— visited, the war was still raging. things were very dangerous there. she was— things were very dangerous there. she was clearly obviously quite nervous — she was clearly obviously quite nervous about walking through the minefield, but she was very shrewd. she knew— minefield, but she was very shrewd. she knew that those images of her would _ she knew that those images of her would absolutely become global front—page news everywhere, and that would _ front—page news everywhere, and that would make _ front—page news everywhere, and that would make it impossible to ignore that there — would make it impossible to ignore that there has to be a universal ban on these _ that there has to be a universal ban on these totally indiscriminate weapons. on these totally indiscriminate wea ons. , ., on these totally indiscriminate weaons. , ., ., ., weapons. tell us more about what flowed from _ weapons. tell us more about what flowed from that _ weapons. tell us more about what flowed from that visit, _ weapons. tell us more about what flowed from that visit, the -
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weapons. tell us more about what flowed from that visit, the impact | flowed from that visit, the impact of it? ~ ., , ,., flowed from that visit, the impact ofit? . , ., of it? well, as i said, the instant im act of it? well, as i said, the instant impact was _ of it? well, as i said, the instant impact was tremendous. - of it? well, as i said, the instant impact was tremendous. it - of it? well, as i said, the instant. impact was tremendous. it stopped global— impact was tremendous. it stopped global headlines. it is one of the most _ global headlines. it is one of the most iconic images of her life. within— most iconic images of her life. within months, there had been a grassroots — within months, there had been a grassroots campaign to ban landmines throughout the world for a number of years. _ throughout the world for a number of years. but— throughout the world for a number of years, but by making it front—page news _ years, but by making it front—page news she _ years, but by making it front—page news she made it impossible for governments to ignore. as you say, the anti—landmine treaty, the ottawa treaty. _ the anti—landmine treaty, the ottawa treaty, came into being by the end of that— treaty, came into being by the end of that year. that treaty is still one of— of that year. that treaty is still one of the _ of that year. that treaty is still one of the most successful of all times _ one of the most successful of all times 164— one of the most successful of all times. 164 signatories. landmines are virtually obsolete now, from production and use. and we have seen over 30 _ production and use. and we have seen over 30 countries cleared of landmines, including mozambique. so it has been— landmines, including mozambique. so it has been an extremely powerful treaty. _ it has been an extremely powerful treaty, and it is saved literally millions — treaty, and it is saved literally millions and millions of lives. and how much of _ millions and millions of lives. and how much of an _ millions and millions of lives. fific how much of an issue are millions and millions of lives. fific how much of an issue are landmines today? it how much of an issue are landmines toda ? . ., , how much of an issue are landmines toda ? _, , ., , how much of an issue are landmines toda ? , .,, ., how much of an issue are landmines toda? , today? it continues to be a problem.
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we still haven't _ today? it continues to be a problem. we still haven't cleared _ today? it continues to be a problem. we still haven't cleared angola. - today? it continues to be a problem. we still haven't cleared angola. we l we still haven't cleared angola. we are now _ we still haven't cleared angola. we are now working hard to clear some of the _ are now working hard to clear some of the very— are now working hard to clear some of the very precious conservation zones _ of the very precious conservation zones in — of the very precious conservation zones in the south of the country. there _ zones in the south of the country. there are — zones in the south of the country. there are people living side by side with landmines, people sending their children— with landmines, people sending their children to _ with landmines, people sending their children to school across minefield in places _ children to school across minefield in places like zimbabwe. we are also seeing _ in places like zimbabwe. we are also seeing improvised landmines, essentially ied is. in places like afghanistan, which is facing a terrible — afghanistan, which is facing a terrible famine and humanitarian crisis. _ terrible famine and humanitarian crisis. if— terrible famine and humanitarian crisis, if you have ie these and minds — crisis, if you have ie these and minds left _ crisis, if you have ie these and minds left behind from places... it continues— minds left behind from places... it continues to — minds left behind from places... it continues to be something that is a humanitarian imperative. it is the very first — humanitarian imperative. it is the very first step in recovery after conflict — very first step in recovery after conflict. and make sure development, security— conflict. and make sure development, security can _ conflict. and make sure development, security can take place. the treaty was really — security can take place. the treaty was really important because it made the tackling of landmines to be intrinsically linked with stability, development and security. and that is something the halo trust remains
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committed _ is something the halo trust remains committed to doing in some of the world's— committed to doing in some of the world's most dangerous places. thank ou ve world's most dangerous places. thank you very much — world's most dangerous places. thank you very much for _ world's most dangerous places. thank you very much forjoining _ world's most dangerous places. thank you very much forjoining us. - large crowds of hindu worshippers have gathered on the banks of india's ganges river for a holy bath in spite of a 30—fold increase in coronavirus cases in the past month. similar festivals are taking place across the country. doctors in west bengal applied to stop its festival this year, worrying it would become a super spreader event. india reported over 260,000 new coronavirus cases on friday. aru na iyengar reports. varanasi in the northern state of uttar pradesh. thousands of pilgrims throng the ganges river bank to take part in the mela festival. they believe bathing in these sacred waters will wash away their sins. translation: nobody - is following the guidelines. announcements are being made to urge people to wear masks. what can the government do? the mistake is on our part, that we should be
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following the rules. but nobody is following the rules. nobody is ready to listen to the rules. at the gangasagar festival in west bengal, officials try to enforce covid restrictions. pilgrims have to show their vaccine certificates, along with an rt pcr test report ta ken two days before arrival. but most here believe god will save them from covid. three million people are expected here. doctors ask the state high court to stop the festival, fearing it would become a super spreader event. but that was rejected. they're worried because last april there was a record rise in coronavirus cases after the government of a state in the north allowed the massive kumbh mela festival to go ahead. the indian prime minister says the festivals show india's vibrant cultural diversity. meanwhile, coronavirus
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cases are predicted to peak next week in new delhi and mumbai, as the country battles with the highest level of cases since may last year. aruna iyengar, bbc news. in the uk, the coastguard is celebrating a major anniversary. it was founded exactly 200 years ago. luxmy gopal reports search and rescue. for 200 years, the coastguard has been searching, rescuing and saving lives. it's such a feeling to be able to help people who've really been at a really low point, and just make that situation at the time a little bit better for them to bear, and then long—term it means somebody goes home who maybe wouldn't have done. originally set up to combat smuggling, her majesty's coastguard was formally established on the 15th of january, 1822. newsreel: there's a certain amount i of mystery about the coastguard - l who he is and what he does. it has worked to keep people safe at the coast and at sea ever since.
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this is coastguard control. as illustrated in this video from 1972. ahoy there, coastguard here! we'll be down with you in a few minutes. hang on! when we started, it was horseback patrols, looking for smugglers and people like that. that's where the coast and the guard bit comes from. it's changed hugely. we still rely massively on our volunteers, as we have done for almost the entirety of the 200—year history of the organisation. the coastguard now has 3,500 volunteers across 310 rescue teams, in addition to ten helicopter bases. the way the coastguard saves lives at sea has changed almost beyond recognition since its creation 200 years ago, with a new updated radio network and with new technology such as drones and unmanned vehicles playing a growing part in its search and rescue operations. you've got to embrace new technology, you've got to look to improve. you can't sit still and think, "we're doing the best we can." there's always improvements
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to be made, so we have to look at technology. so we're looking at fibre communications, improving ourfleet to bring in electric vehicles, drone technology and how that can assist in searches, and speed up finding people that are in difficulty. so, really, we'vejust got to be open to change and embrace it and look to improve at any point that we can. to mark the organisation's milestone birthday, 200 throw lines are being cast into the seas around the four nations today, as a symbol of the coastguard's life—saving role, past and present, on our shores and at sea. luxmy gopal, bbc news. it's not time for the weather. it is time to say goodbye if you are watching us on bbc world. now it is time for the weather with. most of the fog should clear by
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lunchtime, and many of us are in for a bright if not sunny day. high pressure still with us. it is dominating the weather across much of europe. as in the atlantic, there are weather systems are gathering just to the west of art neighbourhood, and they will sneak in to bring a little bit of rain tomorrow. some of us, as early as tonight. here is the forecast for the coming hours. that mist and fog lingering for a time before clearing away, at least most of it will. and then we are in for sunny spells. the north and east of scotland, blue skies. perhaps in the lake district as well. around seven celsius. i mentioned weather fronts. as well. around seven celsius. i mentioned weatherfronts. here is one approaching scotland and northern ireland tonight. and through the small hours of sunday morning approaching the lake district. milderair, more of
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morning approaching the lake district. milder air, more of a breeze, so we are not expecting a widespread frost tonight. we are not expecting much fog on sunday morning either. you can see the weather front moving across northern and central england through the morning and early afternoon. rain for a time but not lasting very long. i think it will end up probably somewhere in the south in the middle of the afternoon. by then, very little rain associated with this weather front. for many of us, so there is going to be a bright, sunny day with temperatures around 8 degrees. the high pressure is back almost right on top of us on monday. certainly for southern england and northern france. that means windless conditions. i think a recipe for that fog to reform once again. but it won't reform until monday night, tuesday. monday itself is looking fine. similartemperatures tuesday. monday itself is looking fine. similar temperatures to what we have been used to. here is the
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summary for next week. you can see that very little changes. bright, sunny weather, and at times foggy in the morning. that's it from me. goodbye. hello this is bbc news with joanna gosling. the headlines: more details emerge about further lockdown parties in downing street, as some conservative mps say they're being inundated with complaints from angry constituents. novak djokovic has been detained
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in australia for a second time, ahead of a court hearing to decide whether the unvaccinated tennis star can stay in the country for the australian open — which starts on monday. lawyers for virginia giuffre, who's accused the duke of york of sexual abuse, are calling for two people based in the uk to give evidence in her civil case. prince andrew denies all the allegations. coronavirus restrictions are changing in wales. from today, the number of people allowed to attend outdoor events has been raised to 500, as part of a two week easing of rules. now on bbc news, it's time for dateline london. hello and welcome to dateline.

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