Skip to main content

tv   BBC News at Ten  BBC News  January 24, 2022 10:00pm-10:30pm GMT

10:00 pm
tonight at ten... downing street admits that staff gathered inside during the first lockdown to wish borisjohnson a happy birthday. in the cabinet room at number ten it's claimed up to 30 people were present at a time when indoor gatherings of more than two people were banned. # happy birthday to you... it all happened just a few hours after this school visit and the latest revelations have been seized on by colleagues and critics. this is yet more evidence that we have got a prime minister to be who believes that the rules he made don't apply to him. this is a small group of staff who brought— this is a small group of staff who brought a — this is a small group of staff who brought a birthday _ this is a small group of staff who brought a birthday cake - this is a small group of staff who brought a birthday cake in - this is a small group of staff who
10:01 pm
brought a birthday cake in at - this is a small group of staff who brought a birthday cake in at thel brought a birthday cake in at the end of— brought a birthday cake in at the end of the — brought a birthday cake in at the end of the day— brought a birthday cake in at the end of the day and _ brought a birthday cake in at the end of the day and i— brought a birthday cake in at the end of the day and i don't- brought a birthday cake in at the end of the day and i don't thinkl end of the day and i don't think that wilt— end of the day and i don't think that will pass _ end of the day and i don't think that will pass the _ end of the day and i don't think that will pass the test - end of the day and i don't think that will pass the test of - end of the day and i don't think that will pass the test of beingi end of the day and i don't thinkl that will pass the test of being a party _ that will pass the test of being a la . �* ., that will pass the test of being a party. more clamour around the behaviour— party. more clamour around the behaviour of— party. more clamour around the behaviour of boris _ party. more clamour around the behaviour of boris johnson - party. more clamour around the behaviour of boris johnson and l party. more clamour around the i behaviour of boris johnson and his behaviour of borisjohnson and his staff when the whole country was locked down. we'll have the latest on a growing list of problems for the embattled prime minister. also tonight... in ukraine civil defence forces are in training as fears mount of a military invasion by russia. from the 11th of february people travelling to the uk will no longer have to take covid tests if they're fully vaccinated. unvaccinated, unvaccinated, unvaccinated and unvaccinated. we return to one of london's biggest hospitals to see how staff and patients are coping early two years on. and worldwide tributes to the prominent fashion designer thierry mugler who's died at the age of 73. and coming up in the sport on the bbc news channel, it's arrivederci, claudio, as watford sack ranieri afterjust ia games and less than four months in charge.
10:02 pm
good evening. downing street has admitted that staff gathered inside number ten during the first lockdown in june 2020 to wish borisjohnson a happy birthday. the rules at the time banned most indoor gatherings of more than two people. the prime minister's office, responding to a report by itv news that up to 30 people were present, said staff had "gathered briefly" and that mrjohnson was there "for less than ten minutes". it's the latest difficulty for the prime minister whose problems have been piling up. he's already waiting for an official report by sue gray, a senior civil servant, into several parties at downing street. he's ordered an inquiry into claims by the conservative mp nusrat ghani that she was sacked as a minister because of her muslim faith. and today in the house of lords a minister resigned saying the government was not serious about billions lost in fraud under
10:03 pm
the covid business loan scheme. with the latest on the prime minister's troubles here's our political editor laura kuenssberg. the list of problems for boris johnson gets longer and longer. the defences of what happened behind number ten�*s black door behind lockdown, during lockdown, get trickier and trickier. tonight this latest set of claims about what happened on borisjohnson�*s own birthday threaten to give downing street many miserable returns. what politicians want to talk about is not always the same as what the public and their fellow politicians want to know. how many times do you have to jab? "jabs, jabs, jabs," boris johnson's mantra. but this morning, was he sure there would be no other damaging claims about what went on in number 10 before the official report by sue gray? can you guarantee that no more embarrassing allegations about alleged breaches of lockdown
10:04 pm
within downing street will come out before that report is published? what i can guarantee is that this government is focused 100% on dealing with the big problems that we have. # happy birthday. ..# there was no guarantee, and there was more to come. borisjohnson�*s playground birthday greetings injune 2020 were not the only ones he received. well, what a wonderful way to spend my birthday! a couple of hours later, the prime minister was here. a source who was present told us as many as 30 of his staff were drawn together in the cabinet room. his wife carrie brought a cake, with the number 10 flat interior designer briefly in tow. there was picnic food and chatter for around half an hour. number 10 doesn't deny the event took place and says...
10:05 pm
for the man who wants to sit in the prime minister's chair, it's more of a reason for him to go. we've got a prime minister who believes that the rules that he made don't apply to him. we can't afford to go on with this chaotic, rudderless government. the prime minister is a national distraction, and he's got to go. number 10's denied there was also a birthday bash in the flat that night, although mrjohnson did see a small number of his family in the garden, but these new claims, just as the tory party is trying to make up its mind over whether the prime minister should stay or go. the question that he should be asking himself every morning is, is me staying in office allowing me to run this office in a way that is making the country better? or am i a distraction? how, then, do ministers defend what happened — a gathering inside of around 30
10:06 pm
people on borisjohnson�*s birthday when, at the time, any social gatherings inside were strictly banned? i think some of these allegations have got a little bit out of hand. i mean, what really happened here is a group of staff, small group of staff, who been working closely with the prime minister brought him a birthday cake at the end of the day and there was ten minutes there sharing a piece of cake. i don't think that really constitutes a party in a way that some of the other more serious allegations that are being investigated maybe do. number 10's claim that all guidelines were followed at all times feels a lifetime ago. as the allegations have piled up, so the defence has shifted. and the danger to the prime minister moves closer still. live to westminster and laura. that minister's attempt to play it down in his own way, is that kind of defence going to work for boris johnson? , . ., .,
10:07 pm
defence going to work for boris johnson? , _, ., ., johnson? remember the context of all of this. johnson? remember the context of all of this- boris — johnson? remember the context of all of this. boris johnson's _ johnson? remember the context of all of this. boris johnson's allies, - johnson? remember the context of all of this. boris johnson's allies, who - of this. borisjohnson�*s allies, who have been working very hard to shore up have been working very hard to shore up support in the conservative party, have already been finding it quite tricky to persuade their colleagues that everything was above board and over time we have also seen downing street was back defence to all of this change. it is not so long ago that they were saying all guidelines were followed and now tonight for the first time we have downing street admitting that there was a gathering of a sword. they say was a gathering of a sword. they say was brief, but others will remember that at the time the rules were clear that gatherings, a part in limited circumstances, were not permitted under lockdown at all. quite aside of the claims tonight, things have already been very rocky, they have already been very chaotic, and that is increasing rather than fading. there has been discussion in the conservative party over claims of racism at the top with the former minister saying that she was discriminated against in that way. we have had a minister in the house
10:08 pm
of lords this afternoon resigning at the dispatch box. he said it was nothing to do with the current state of political woe for the tory party, but it all adds to the sense of instability and the sense that downing street is absolutely not in control of events. there are people who want to see borisjohnson stay on, absolutely, they are hanging on for two great�*s official report into what exactly happened behind closed doors during lockdown. yet at the same time the overall mood in the conservative party is a very serious discussion over whether boris johnson's problems are starting to outweigh the positive that he brings to the job. outweigh the positive that he brings to the 'ob. ., ., outweigh the positive that he brings to the “ob. . . , , , to the 'ob. laura kuenssberg with the to the job. laura kuenssberg with the latest at _ to the job. laura kuenssberg with the latest at westminster. - to the job. laura kuenssberg with the latest at westminster. let's l the latest at westminster. let's turn to the other main stories. we start with ukraine. we start with ukraine. borisjohnson has warned that invading ukraine would be a "disastrous" move by russia involving a "painful, violent and bloody business". washington has placed more than 8,000 us—based troops on a heightened state of alert and nato is sending more warships
10:09 pm
and fighterjets to member states in eastern europe. tension in the region has been building, with around 100,000 russian troops massed near ukraine's borders. president putin has publicly stated his belief that russia and ukraine are one people. he claims one of his key concerns is the expansion of nato, the military alliance of european states with the us and canada. many countries in eastern europe became members after the fall of the soviet union. mr putin's demand that ukraine never be allowed to join nato has been rejected. from kyiv our correspondent gabriel gatehouse reports. bell rings. this is a country in limbo, waiting for an invasion that looks more likely with every passing day, but may yet never come. to the east, 100,000 russian troops are massed, but the kremlin says talk of an invasion is hysteria.
10:10 pm
facing them are ukrainian soldiers who hear western leaders sounding the alarm in ever starker tones. and stuck in between are the people of kyiv who, frankly, don't know what to believe. i think something might happen. i think the probability is very high, but god knows. i think even putin doesn't know yet what kind of decision he is going to take. but the situation is horrible. at the weekend britain warned that russian was planning a coup to install a little—known, former mp as puppet ruler, suggestions that have been widely dismissed both in moscos dismissed both in moscow and here in kyiv. the uk began pulling staff out of its embassy today, saying an invasion could come at any time. the americans are doing the same. a senior politician told the bbc today such actions are not helpful. translation: if people start -
10:11 pm
panicking, that leaves our country in a very dangerous position. and it makes it easier for russia to manipulate us. the reality is, of course, that this country is already at war and has been since 2014 when russia annexed crimea and funded and provided weapons and sent in troops to support a separatist rebellion in the east. around 1a,000 ukrainians have already died in that conflict. these are some of their faces. and so for people here the question is not, will there be war? but, will this war escalate? for months now the ukrainians have been preparing a territorial defence force. volunteers like marta, a doctor in her 50s, is among those who are training for possible defence of kyiv. of course i am worried.
10:12 pm
becaise i am a peaceful woman, i don't want to have a war started, because i am a peaceful woman, i don't want to have a war started, but in any case if it starts i should be ready to defend the country. meanwhile, a kind of normal life continues as the people of this country wait nervously to see what fate and larger geopolitical forces have in store. gabriel gatehouse, bbc news, kyiv. this evening president biden led a conference call with european leaders to discuss the situation in ukraine and all day western leaders have been warning russia of the consequences of invading ukraine. there were statements from the pentagon in washington and from nato, but we start with borisjohnson. invading ukraine, from a russian perspective, is going to be a painful, violent and bloody business. and i think it's very important that people in russia understand
10:13 pm
that this could be a new chechnya. nato is a defensive alliance which does not threaten russia or any other country. but we will always do what is necessary to protect and defend all our allies, and i welcome that allies are stepping up. the united states will act firmly in the defence - of its national interests, in response to actions . by russia that harm us, | our allies, our partners. in a moment we'll talk to our moscow correspondent steve rosenberg, first to washington and our correspondent barbara plett—usher. barbara, acting firmly, said the pentagon spokesman, does that mean in economic terms with sanctions, or does it mean in military terms possibly? does it mean in military terms ossibl ? ~ ., , possibly? well it means both actuall , possibly? well it means both actually. they _ possibly? well it means both actually, they have _ possibly? well it means both actually, they have been - possibly? well it means both i actually, they have been saying there would be severe sanctions if
10:14 pm
there would be severe sanctions if the russians sent troops into ukraine, financial sanctions, export controls that are needed for key industries and the americans are not going to be sending troops to ukraine. they have made that clear. ukraine. they have made that clear. ukraine is not a nato ally, so they don't have that obligation. but they're sending weapons. they have announced they're prepared to send troops to nato allies in eastern europe as part of a reaction force, if one is called up on the border of russian. they are on alert. all of this is in the language of unity and resolve. there has been a push to again project unity between the united states and europe and nato and that was at least part of the impetus for the call thatjoe biden held with european leaders here this afternoon. in fact, there has been quite a ramp up of the rhetoric of alarm over the last couple of days,
10:15 pm
although the security situation hasn't changed that much. there has been criticism that the west is contributing to the escalation. but the state department rejected that when we asked about it today, they said no, it is about deterrence and defence. thank you.— defence. thank you. let's talk to steve rosenburg. _ defence. thank you. let's talk to steve rosenburg. the _ defence. thank you. let's talk to | steve rosenburg. the statements defence. thank you. let's talk to - steve rosenburg. the statements and the attempted projection of unity, deployment of troops, what is the reaction there in russia then? weill. reaction there in russia then? well, i mean the — reaction there in russia then? well, i mean the russians _ reaction there in russia then? well, i mean the russians already - i mean the russians already criticise what they call western hysteria over ukraine and they will apply the same label to any future western troop deployment. the problem for nato now is it sees a threat and wants to boost security for its allies and partner and that means more fighters and troops to eastern europe. but the danger of
10:16 pm
thatis eastern europe. but the danger of that is that it plays into the kremlin�*s narrative that the west threatens russia's national security and that is sparks more muscle—flexing by moscow and more instability. having said that, i think the kremlin could see that that the one thing muscle is bad for is the financial markets. we saw russian stocks falling sharply, the currency fell against the dollar and the dollar and the pound and that adds to a sense that many people are concerned about where all of this is leading. concerned about where all of this is leadinu. . ~ concerned about where all of this is leadinu. ., ~ i. people arriving in the uk from abroad will no longer have to take covid tests if they are fully vaccinated. the changes will come in on 11 february, in time for the half—term break. rules have also been eased for unvaccinated travellers, who will no longer have to take
10:17 pm
a day 8 test or self—isolate. 0ur transport correspondent katy austin has the details. even a day of less than glorious weather couldn't dampen the mood of tourism businesses in this corner of southern spain today. they hope a further easing of travel restrictions will mean more brits come over for half term. it's going to make such a difference to so many people, to the travellers, to the people with businesses over here and obviously other countries as well. from the 11th february, fully vaccinated people will no longer have to pay to take a covid test after arriving in the uk. to the relief of passengers we spoke to at gatwick airport. i'm just me, but if it was a family, oh, my goodness, the expense of it. it's pointless to have them, frankly, particularly- after all the palaver- we have been through with the vaccinations and the process. those who haven't had both jabs will no longer have to
10:18 pm
take a covid test on day eight after arriving. people planning holidays or other trips will still need to pay attention to the entry requirements and covid rules in the place they're visiting, but the travel industry sees today's announcement as a significant welcome move. airlines say it brings international travel back towards near normality for fully vaccinated travellers. every time that the government have removed these restrictions on travel as well that has been such a boost in the sales and i don't think that's going to be any different right now. the government says the vaccine roll out has made these latest changes possible, but one public health expert urged caution. we are not out of the woods in terms of numbers of people with covid and although this is welcome news for a sector, it shouldn't be seen general lip as yet another signal that it's all 0k. seen generally as yet another signal that it's all 0k.
10:19 pm
passenger locator forms will still be required. the 0micron variant put yet another dampener on the travel sector's fortunes, today's news has fuelled hopes its recovery can take off again. katy austin, bbc news. let's take a look at today's coronavirus figures. there were almost 88,500 new infections in the latest 24—hour period. so there were just over 93,000 new cases on average per day in the last week. more than 17,500 people are in hospital with covid. another 56 deaths were reported, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test. on average in the past week, there were 263 deaths per day. 0n vaccinations, nearly 37 million people have had a boosterjab, that's 64.2% of those aged 12 and over. the plan b covid restrictions in england are due to be lifted later this week. the world health organisation says
10:20 pm
"light is at the end of the tunnel" for the uk, but officials here remain cautious, in part because of the number of unvaccinated people — estimated to be around 5 million. in the first of two special reports, my colleague clive myrie, cameraman david mcilveen and producer sam piranty, have returned to the royal london hospital to talk to staff and patients. at the royal london hospital, a multi—bed intensive care unit sits abandoned and silent. the worst has passed in this pandemic, but is it over? so this ward down here all the way along there, full of patients this time last year? correct, one of eight wards that we ran at the time. now there is just one ward, with six patients. those who are vaccinated. consultant nick bunker, who worked through the darkest times, points out what unites five of them. unvaccinated, unvaccinated, unvaccinated.
10:21 pm
unvaccinated and unvaccinated. does it makes you angry? it's, i think it's mixed emotions. covid isn't universally the only disease where people make poor decisions, but it's resources that we're using to treat people we don't have to. big breath in. covid vaccines have now allowed many millions to breathe easy in the pandemic. relieving pressure on the nhs. but this man, a once healthy 58—year—old, chose another path that nearly killed him. i was close to death. so why did you not take the vaccine? fear. fear of the unknown. so you were just worried about this thing being put in your arm?
10:22 pm
asif hussain would have had no qualms about getting a jab. still in his 20s, he is on his feet now — just about. we last saw him in hospital, a year ago, infected before the vaccine roll out. we didn't think we'd ever see him again. what did you think when you saw the video of you intubated, asleep at the royal london? what was that like when you saw it, what did you think? it was unbelievable. i had to watch it back a few times, just for it to register in my head, "no, that's you, that is you asleep, that is you, limp, laying there", so it was, it was shocking, and it did take a while for it, for it to register in my head, "do you know what, this is what you have been through." the rest of society is moving on. we've to live with this thing now, no suggestion that there's going to be another lockdown, potentially.
10:23 pm
but is there a sense, because of the long covid, that you will always be blighted by this thing? of course. i haven't been able to go back to work. i was a gas engineer by trade, so a very physicaljob. with my condition at the moment, i don't think i'll be going back to work, that type of physical work any time soon. i remember my wife telling me they called her, and they told her and mum to come and say their goodbyes to me, and i can't imagine how difficult it must have been for them, you know, but, you know, it's all thanks to god i've made it through. the pandemic has forced much self examination. what are our thresholds for lockdowns and mandates and covid rules? we all looked within, appraising our own capacity to cope, and the nhs has had do the same. scanning forensically and examining its practises and procedures and one of the biggest questions
10:24 pm
is with whether covid vaccines should be mandatory for staff. the government says yes. actually, yes. please. it is fairly urgent. consultant marie healy, who helped lead the nhs troops at the royal london in the battle against covid, thinks differently. i think the difficulty with the mandatory vaccine is some, we are going to lose staff, and i think we can't afford to. do you know staff who have made it clear they are going to leave? yes, definitely. i believe that true and we have already lost some. it's a bit of a numbers game isn't it, tonight. staffing pressures made worse by the highly infectious 0micron variants. i am six nurses down. fears over rising cases after plan b restrictions are lifted and long—term ever growing waiting lists, all mean tough times ahead. so make no mistake, the worst of the covid pandemic may be over, with fewer patients needing
10:25 pm
the more intensive care. it won't be painful. but the pressure is still on the nhs, in so many other ways. today, 48—hours after we first met gonan, he is having his artificial airway removed. he'd spent over a month on a ventilator. it's a miracle. covid didn't beat him, can the nhs say the same? i'm alive. clive myrie, bbc news. wikileaks founderjulian assange has won the right to ask the uk's supreme court to block his extradition to the united states.
10:26 pm
the ruling is likely to mean months of legal argument, stalling attempts to take him to the us to face charges over the publication of classified documents. thierry mugler, one of the most influentialfashion designers of the past half—century, has died at the age of 73. mugler was best known for theatrical designs, some inspired by the 1940s and �*50s, which were worn by stars including david bowie, lady gaga and beyonce. mugler was born in strasbourg and by the 1970s had opened his first boutique in paris. 0ur correspondent lucy williamson looks back at his life. "fashion," thierry mugler used to say, "isn't enough on its own — it needs music and theatre." his clothes were extravagant, even surreal. his shows, magical worlds where superstars like james brown mingled with models on the catwalk. anything could be possible with thierry, really. as a man, he was really gentle, but very
10:27 pm
perfectionist and always without limit. i mean, he can make us wear things that you can't even imagine, you know? but he loved it. it is like, "play with it enjoy it, just have fun." at his height in the 1980s and �*90s, mugler influenced a generation, including stars like david bowie and diana ross. his perfume, angel, became a rival to chanel no 5. he has been rediscovered in the past few years by new celebrities like beyonce, lady gaga and kim kardashian. today, the museum of decorative arts in paris waived entry fees for its retrospective of mugler�*s work. designs inspired by robots, insects, even motorbikes. thierry mugler made his name with fantastical futuristic designs that exaggerated
10:28 pm
the form of the human body. his strong shoulders, plunging neck lines, helmets and harnesses came to dominate 1980s fashion. for him, everything is a centre, everything that is a body. he was genderfluid, before genderfluid, he was, as a man and a citizen, very attached to woman's rights, gay�*s rights queer culture, a very open—minded personality. thierry mugler created clothes that tested the limits of human body, his vision, many say, will stand the test of time. the tributes to the fashion designer thierry mugler, who's died at the age of 73. that's it. now on bbc one, time for the news where you are. have a very good night. hello there. tuesday promises more of the mostly
10:29 pm
dry but rather cloudy weather we've become so used to of late. high pressure still firmly in charge, keeping us mainly dry but trapping extensive cloud. some mist and fog patches around through the morning as well. the fog should tend to lift, i think, as the day wears on, but the gray skies will cling on across many parts of england and wales. a better chance of seeing some sunshine through northern ireland and scotland, although we will see some patchy rain pushing into the far northwest. the breeze strengthening across the northern half of the uk, temperatures 8 or 9 degrees in northwestern areas, maybe just 3 or 4 where you get stuck under cloud down towards the southeast. now, as we move through tuesday night into wednesday, our big sheet of cloud will tend to retreat southwards. we'll see another band of cloud, a very weak weather front, moving a little further south. some clear spells. temperatures, ithink, typically holding just above freezing. could be a few pockets of frost here and there. as we look further ahead into wednesday and thursday, it does turn a little bit milder. we will see more in the way of sunshine as well, but some outbreaks of rain, especially in the north and west.
10:30 pm
this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines... as russia continues to mass troops on the ukraine border, the pentagon has said 8,500 us—based troops are at a heightened readiness to deploy. president biden has spoken with european leaders to discuss a common response to the standoff. downing street admits that staff gathered inside number ten during the first lockdown in june 2020 to wish borisjohnson a happy birthday. the rules at the time banned most indoor gatherings of more than two people. the army in burkina faso has announced on television that it's removed the country's president from office and suspended the constitution. the governing party said the president and a government minister had survived assassination attempts. bob dylan has sold the master recordings to his entire back catalogue to sony music. the musician had previously sold his publishing rights to universal music for a reported $400 million.

58 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on