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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 14, 2022 3:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines: russia strikes an apartment block in the ukrainian capital kyiv — one person is killed. three people were taken to hospital and nine others treated at the scene after the attack. translation: we hid inside the closet. - we thought we were going to be captured, that the russians were getting in through the door — but we were wrong. we got out from the apartment and saw that the staircase was not there any more. everything was on fire. drone footage from the port city of mariupol show dozens of burning buildings after russian bombardment, but some cars have been able to leave the city this afternoon. russian and ukrainian officials will resume their negotiations on tuesday after a fourth round ends without a breakthrough. families who want to house ukrainian refugees in their homes wait for the government
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website to go live. 21 ukrainian children arrive in england to undergo life—saving cancer treatment on the nhs. how the war in ukraine is accelerating europe's search for alternative energy supplies to russian gas. ukraine's lead negotiator says peace talks with russia have been suspended for the day and will continue tomorrow. the ukrainians have been pressing for a ceasefire and a russian withdrawal, but moscow says it's holding open the possibility of capturing large cities. in the capital kyiv, a nine—storey block of flats was set on fire by shelling this morning. this is the latest map of russian controlled territory —
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with russian forces holding large parts of the south east of the country. the port city of mariupol — in the south—east — has been continually bombarded by russian strikes. recent footage captured by a drone over the city shows dozens of burning buildings and roads hit by shelling. the ukraine government says that some cars have been able to leave mariupol today. president zelensky said the ukraine delegation was trying to arrange direct talks between himself and vladimir putin — a meeting he said he was sure that people were waiting for. from kyiv our correspondent james waterhouse has this report. these days, air raid sirens form part of the morning routine. then you are reminded why they are there. this nine storey residential block was directly hit by a shell, killing at least one person. translation: we hid inside the closet. - we thought we were going to be captured, that the russians were getting in through the door,
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but we were wrong. we got out from the apartment and saw that the staircase was not there any more. everything was on fire. it happened in the north—west of kyiv, where we are continuing to see the most intense fighting the capital. that is not to mean the eastern flank of kyiv is avoiding shells, either. this morning, an assessment of the damage. it has been a day of much heavier artillery fire and we have seen a number of ground to air missiles launching into the sky. but even when these air defence systems work, they don't remove the danger. debris fell from the sky here from an intercepted missile, say authorities, killing a person. this war is expanding within ukraine and it is now reaching the doorstep of the european union and nato. this missile strike on a military base in yavoriv, which killed 35 people, was 15 miles from the polish border. it is why president zelensky
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is repeating his calls for the west to help police a no—fly zone in his country. translation: and now, | repeat| again, if you do not close our sky, it is only a matter of time before russian missiles fall in your territory, nato territory, on the homes of citizens of nato countries. the fighting is not letting up at all. this is mariupol, which has been surrounded by russian forces for 12 days, 12 days of being shelled, 12 days of little water, food or medicine for more than 400,000 people. at least 2000 are known to have died. this woman was rescued after a hospital was shelled last week. today, we learn she and her unborn baby later died. not one attempt at a temporary ceasefire has succeeded here. moscow has continually been accused of shelling agreed routes for people to escape and supplies to get in.
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there will be another go today. peace talks continue today, too, and there are more positive sounds, with ukraine claiming russia has stopped using ultimatums. translation: negotiations| with the russian delegation, round four, will begin injust a few minutes. 0ur positions remain unchanged, peace, immediate ceasefire, withdrawal of all russian troops and only after that will we talk about neighbourly relations. it does not mean expectations will suddenly rise. 19 days of a brutal war does not do wonders for optimism. james waterhouse, bbc news, kyiv. 0ur chief international correspondent lyse doucet is in kyiv and she said it's becoming clear to many the assault is closing in on the capital. well, this was one of the few mornings in this 19 day invasion where we didn't wake up, we weren't woken up by the sound of an air raid siren. �* , ._ .,,
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siren. but this white winter day has turned into — siren. but this white winter day has turned into one _ siren. but this white winter day has turned into one of _ siren. but this white winter day has turned into one of the _ siren. but this white winter day has turned into one of the noisiest - turned into one of the noisiest mornings since the invasion began. we havejust mornings since the invasion began. we have just heard a minute ago the rumble of explosions in the distance, and all morning there has been the sound of surface to air missiles being fired by the ukrainians, explosions coming from russian artillery, they are louder, they seem to be coming closer, and as we have been reporting, it is mainly on the north—west and the north—eastern approaches to the city, where we hear these increasingly louder explosions and fierce fighting in towns, and the suburbs that used to be charming suburbs that used to be charming suburbs of this capital, they have now been laid to waste. with every day, we see more and more of the fortifications in the city, fighting back against the russians isn'tjust a question of military might, we have visited some of what had been called humanitarian hubs in the city yesterday, where the city council is now stockpiling food because the
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people of this city have seen with frightening clarity the kind of sieges and shelling that are now being inflicted on other cities and many believe that it is just a matter of time before it comes to kyiv. matter of time before it comes to k iv. , , . matter of time before it comes to kiv. ,, . until this weekend, most of russia's attacks had been targeted on the south and the east of the country. but yesterday's strike just miles from the polish border suggested a change in strategy. 0ur defence correspondent jonathan beale has this analysis of the russian advance. it's day 19 of russia's invasion of ukraine, and there are still signs of limited advances over the past 36 hours. russian forces have been trying to tighten their stranglehold on key cities. they've been continuing their bombardment of kharkiv in the north—east, and mariupol further south. the uk's ministry of defence also says russian naval forces in the black sea have now established a blockade to cut ukraine off from maritime trade. but the most significant development over the past 2a hours has been
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russia stepping up its attacks on western ukraine — including long—range strikes on a military basejust 12 miles from the polish border. these were the scenes after the strikes on yavoriv — a military base which had been used by nato to train ukrainian forces before the invasion. russia has said it will target the supply lines of weapons from western nations coming across this border. 0ne ukrainian mp says it's an escalation that should worry nato members. the fact that this attack happened so close to the polish border should be setting off alarm bells and red flags for all of the nato member states. nato cannot stand aside from this war, and that war is going to hit nato one of these days very hard. taking the capital kyiv remains a main objective for russia forces — but again, they're making limited progress in the face of ukrainian resistance. russian forces have been
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reorganising and regrouping outside the city. but there is also evidence that they may need reinforcements too. there are reports of russia looking to bring in troops from other parts of the country — and even foreign fighters from syria and libya. us officials have also warned that russia's asked china for military assistance — though beijing has called that "fa ke news. " but it's clear that the early stages of this invasion has not gone according to plan for russia — and they're looking at ways of gaining the upper hand, which could widen the conflict and impact nations beyond ukraine's border. let's go to strasbourg where the prime minister of ukraine denys shmyhal is addressing the council of europe. the citizens are living through a devastating, due to the brutal
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aggression of russia against ukraine. what is written by ella toone of the statute of the council of europe, russia has been suspended from its right of representation in the council of europe. 0ur extraordinary session, which we started this morning and will last until tomorrow evening, will further discuss the consequences of this aggression by the russian federation against ukraine and formally, a statutory opinion at the request of our committee of ministers. mr prime minister, i now ask to give you the floor. . ~' , ., minister, i now ask to give you the floor. . ~ , ., minister, i now ask to give you the floor. . ~ i. .
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speaking ukrainian. i'm terribly sorry, we were expecting to have some live translation. we willjust try expecting to have some live translation. we will just try and find it for you for a second. but quite a few things happening live this afternoon regarding ukraine. just to let you know that the un secretary general, antonio guterres, is also going to be speaking about ukraine to the security council in new york this afternoon so we will be taking some of that live as well. we can go back to strasbourg and we can hear from the we can go back to strasbourg and we can hearfrom the ukrainian prime minister, who is speaking to the council of europe.
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i'm s o rry , i'm s o rry , i'm sorry, i was mistaken, we clearly do not have translation. he is speaking in some english and also, understandably, speaking in his own luggage of ukrainian, which is totally understandable but not much help to us, is a? we will try and take a snippet of what he's saying in little while. several unnamed us officials have told multiple news outlets that since invading ukraine, russia has asked china for military equipment and aid. the chinese embassy in the us said it wasn't aware of any such request. 0ur washington correspondent, barbara plett—usher, gave more details on where these reports are coming from. what we have our newspaper reports calling —— what an identified officials saying russia has asked china for assistance including military equipment. there are also saying russia is running low on
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certain weapons, although they don't say which weapons and they don't say what russia has requested from beijing exactly. there are reports that the white house is concerned that the white house is concerned that beijing might undermine western support for ukraine's defence but the white house hasn't publicly commented on these reports. what we have been hearing from the national security advisor, jake sullivan, is about economic sanctions and warnings to china not to bail russia out when it comes to trying to circumvent those sanctions. he has said there will be consequences if beijing throws a lifeline to russia from an economic point of view, and he has been meeting his chinese counterpart in rome today and has been conveying the message among others, the americans are also accusing the chinese of spreading russian disinformation that the us believes could be a pretext for a chemical or biological attack. analysts here have said if china would indeed send material support to russia, that would be a watershed
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moment which could affect us chinese relations. the intelligence community have been watching it closely and last week's book about it publicly to congress, saying they assessed that the relations were closer than ever, they thought there would be limits on china's behaviour but they didn't know what this would be but they also thought that the chinese leadership was unsettled by what was happening in ukraine and also watching closely the alliance between the us and europe because european relations are very important to beijing. let's have another try and see if we can find that a translation into english of the ukrainian prime minister, speaking in strasbourg at the council of europe. translation: every day we receive more nor news _ translation: every day we receive more nor news of _ translation: every day we receive more nor news of the _ translation: every day we receive more nor news of the of _ translation: every day we receive more nor news of the of freedom . translation: every day we receive more nor news of the of freedom of| more nor news of the of freedom of speech, _ more nor news of the of freedom of speech, the — more nor news of the of freedom of speech, the right to live, to labour, _ speech, the right to live, to labour, to— speech, the right to live, to labour, to have medical services, and education. all those actions
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have _ and education. all those actions have to — and education. all those actions have to be — and education. all those actions have to be fully assessed by the international community. direct —— dear_ international community. direct —— dear members of the summary, today russia _ dear members of the summary, today russia is— dear members of the summary, today russia is saying that there is no wan _ russia is saying that there is no was but — russia is saying that there is no war. but nobody has declared this was _ war. but nobody has declared this was they— war. but nobody has declared this war. they are just conducting it. they— war. they are just conducting it. they are — war. they are just conducting it. they are calling it a special military— they are calling it a special military operation. we have confirmed information that more than 12.000 _ confirmed information that more than 12,000 russian soldiers have been killed. _ 12,000 russian soldiers have been killed, 1249 apcs, 77 12,000 russian soldiers have been killed, 1249 apcs, 77 fighterjets, 90 helicopters, and convinced that there _ 90 helicopters, and convinced that there are _ 90 helicopters, and convinced that there are former military people, 'ust there are former military people, just ask— there are former military people, just ask them whether in the history there _ just ask them whether in the history there has— just ask them whether in the history there has ever been such a special military— there has ever been such a special military operations that would have such consequences for a country that initiates _ such consequences for a country that initiates this — such consequences for a country that initiates this code of military operation. those flows of lies and hatred _ operation. those flows of lies and hatred that are decided by the russian — hatred that are decided by the russian media, have to be stopped.
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they are _ russian media, have to be stopped. they are trying to establish those lies they are trying to establish those ties irr— they are trying to establish those ties in the — they are trying to establish those lies in the russian society. i can tell you — lies in the russian society. i can tell you that russia and president putirr— tell you that russia and president putin have started a full—scale war in the _ putin have started a full—scale war in the centre of europe that can become — in the centre of europe that can become a — in the centre of europe that can become a third world war. starting 2014. _ become a third world war. starting 2014, ukraine has asked not to bring the russian — 2014, ukraine has asked not to bring the russian delegation back. today the russian delegation back. today the russian delegation has stopped its work— the russian delegation has stopped its work with the case of europe and i'm its work with the case of europe and i'm sure _ its work with the case of europe and i'm sure that— its work with the case of europe and i'm sure that is put in's wish, to avoid _ i'm sure that is put in's wish, to avoid punishment and to restrict, to put an— avoid punishment and to restrict, to put an end — avoid punishment and to restrict, to put an end thousands of complaints and applications by the ukrainian citizehs_ and applications by the ukrainian citizens for all the crimes that he and his— citizens for all the crimes that he and his people have committed against — and his people have committed against ukraine for the past eight years _ against ukraine for the past eight years. and we all know that punishment for genocide and
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terrorism cannot be avoided. and we have to _ terrorism cannot be avoided. and we have to he _ terrorism cannot be avoided. and we have to be tough in our response. to demand _ have to be tough in our response. to demand that— have to be tough in our response. to demand that a decision is approved to immediately oust russia from the coundi— to immediately oust russia from the council of— to immediately oust russia from the council of europe. this unprovoked and unjustified aggression cannot stay in _ and unjustified aggression cannot stay in the same european family where _ stay in the same european family where human life has the highest value _ where human life has the highest value. ukraine is on fire. hundreds of houses — value. ukraine is on fire. hundreds of houses are bereft of water and heat _ of houses are bereft of water and heat we — of houses are bereft of water and heat. we need tojoin our efforts of houses are bereft of water and heat. we need to join our efforts to protect. _ heat. we need to join our efforts to protect. to — heat. we need to join our efforts to protect, to defend ukraine, but to defend _ protect, to defend ukraine, but to defend att— protect, to defend ukraine, but to defend all of europe. we need to stop the — defend all of europe. we need to stop the aggression. until a nuclear disaster— stop the aggression. until a nuclear disaster comes in, until all of europe — disaster comes in, until all of europe is— disaster comes in, until all of europe is on fire. so of course we are asking, — europe is on fire. so of course we are asking, we are demanding to dose _ are asking, we are demanding to close the — are asking, we are demanding to close the skies over ukraine to
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dose _ close the skies over ukraine to close the — close the skies over ukraine to close the sky for the sake of miiiions— close the sky for the sake of millions of people in ukraine, for the sake — millions of people in ukraine, for the sake of— millions of people in ukraine, for the sake of european security. and i would _ the sake of european security. and i would also _ the sake of european security. and i would also like to thank from the bottom _ would also like to thank from the bottom of— would also like to thank from the bottom of my heart all the neighbouring countries, slovakia, hungary, — neighbouring countries, slovakia, hungary, romania, moldova, lithuania and other— hungary, romania, moldova, lithuania and other countries of europe for their— and other countries of europe for their support, the support they have given— their support, the support they have given to _ their support, the support they have given to our— their support, the support they have given to ourwomen their support, the support they have given to our women and children. to all those _ given to our women and children. to all those who are on a temporary basis _ all those who are on a temporary basis have — all those who are on a temporary basis have helped to look for shelter— basis have helped to look for shelter in your countries. and those who have _ shelter in your countries. and those who have found shelter, who have had work, _ who have found shelter, who have had work, hospitality, all these values ~~ _ work, hospitality, all these values... thank you for your support, _ values... thank you for your support, thank you for our attention, thank you for the solidarity. forthe attention, thank you for the solidarity. for the solidarity that you are — solidarity. for the solidarity that you are showing. glory cherry crane, loi'y you are showing. glory cherry crane, gory to _ you are showing. glory cherry crane, gory to free — you are showing. glory cherry crane, gory to free and democratic europe.
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-- glory— gory to free and democratic europe. -- glory to — gory to free and democratic europe. —— glory to ukraine. gory to free and democratic europe. -- glory to ukraine.— -- glory to ukraine. well, we got to hear some — -- glory to ukraine. well, we got to hear some of— -- glory to ukraine. well, we got to hear some of what _ -- glory to ukraine. well, we got to hear some of what the _ -- glory to ukraine. well, we got to hear some of what the ukrainian - hear some of what the ukrainian promise to her to say, speaking in strasbourg to the council of europe. 0nce strasbourg to the council of europe. once again asking for international cooperation to stop russia's aggression against ukraine and also saying again that his country wants to see the skies over ukraine closed, something that the international community has so far resisted. he has received a standing ovation, as you can see, at the council of europe. waiting to hear a little later from the un secretary general antonio guterres, speaking to the security council about ukraine in new york, will take that life. shouldn't be a translation issue, hopefully. england's remaining travel rules expected to be scrapped. uk government ministers are expected to agree to scrap all england's remaining international travel restrictions this afternoon. katy austin is with me. remind us what is still in place
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that they are expected to get rid of. that they are expected to get rid of, , that they are expected to get rid of. , ., , , ., of. sometimes it has been quite hard to keep pp- — of. sometimes it has been quite hard to keep pp- it— of. sometimes it has been quite hard to keep pp- it has— of. sometimes it has been quite hard to keep up. it has been _ of. sometimes it has been quite hard to keep up. it has been quite - of. sometimes it has been quite hard to keep up. it has been quite a - to keep up. it has been quite a roller—coaster when it comes to international travel restrictions over the past two years. what is left at the moment is if you are coming into the uk and whether you are fully vaccinated or not, you have to fill in a passenger locator form, that has to be done within three days of eu setting off for the uk. if you are not fully vaccinated there are still some covid tests that have to be taken before departure and you have to pay for a pcr test upon arrival. what we are expecting is that those rules will 90, expecting is that those rules will go, which will mean we are back where we were in march 2020 if that is confirmed. england, we are expecting it to apply to, we don't quite know yet whether this will apply to all 4 uk nations, but previously scotland, wales and northern ireland have followed the uk government's rules for england. so it could be a situation where it is the whole of the uk, we will have to wait for final confirmation and also for confirmation of the date
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from which these rules will apply. i don't expect it is coming into effect immediately, it could be in a couple of days. the effect immediately, it could be in a coople of days— couple of days. the transport secretary _ couple of days. the transport secretary needs _ couple of days. the transport secretary needs to _ couple of days. the transport secretary needs to confirm i couple of days. the transport | secretary needs to confirm all couple of days. the transport i secretary needs to confirm all of that but how significant a moment will it be? the that but how significant a moment will it be? ., , , ., , will it be? the travel industry has been campaigning _ will it be? the travel industry has been campaigning for— will it be? the travel industry has been campaigning for these - will it be? the travel industry has been campaigning for these rules| will it be? the travel industry has i been campaigning for these rules to 90, been campaigning for these rules to go, they really want to take advantage of what they are really hoping will be a really big summer season, and they say any remaining restrictions still act as a bit of a deterrent to people, are still a barrier to people being able to travel freely. airlines and tour operators say there is a pent—up demand for easter and four summer so they will be happy with the timing of this, coming in time for people to take easter and summer holidays, it has to be said that this doesn't mean everything is back to normal as it was before the pandemic. there are other headwinds still coming at them now know we have the war in ukraine, the price ofjet fuel has gone through the ceiling and there is a bit of a question mark over the
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situation in ukraine would affect consumer confidence but those things, we will have to see. for now i think everyone in the travel industry will be celebrating. thank ou ve industry will be celebrating. thank you very much- — more than 2.5 million people have fled the fighting in ukraine to neighbouring countries since the war began. many of those have headed to poland — more than 1.8 million people have arrived in the country so far, with thousands more arriving overnight. mark lowen is in przemysl in poland and he explained the polish authorities are now feeling the pressure. these trends are beginning to show and meanwhile their rivals keep coming because we were last here at the train station in przemysl close to the border more than two weeks ago and yet there are pretty much the same numbers as there were back then because of the new arrivals come by train from ukraine, they are given food and supplies, there is a basic medical check and they are put on buses mostly to go out to other parts of poland. to give you a sense of the scale, last year poland was the 101st biggest host... i’m
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of the scale, last year poland was the 101st biggest host... i'm sorry, we have to — the 101st biggest host... i'm sorry, we have to cut _ the 101st biggest host... i'm sorry, we have to cut him _ the 101st biggest host... i'm sorry, we have to cut him off _ the 101st biggest host... i'm sorry, we have to cut him off in _ the 101st biggest host... i'm sorry, we have to cut him off in his - the 101st biggest host... i'm sorry, we have to cut him off in his prime j we have to cut him off in his prime and we will go back to his report in and we will go back to his report in a while but we need tojoin and we will go back to his report in a while but we need to join antonio guterres, the secretary general of the united nations, in new york. iikla the united nations, in new york. no winners, only losers. the united nations, — winners, only losers. the united nations, our humanitarian partners are working — nations, our humanitarian partners are working to ensure safe passage from besieged areas and to provide aid where _ from besieged areas and to provide aid where security permits. more than _ aid where security permits. more than 600,000 people have received some _ than 600,000 people have received some form _ than 600,000 people have received some form of aid. as millions of peopie _ some form of aid. as millions of peopie in— some form of aid. as millions of people in ukraine face hunger and dwindling — people in ukraine face hunger and dwindling supplies of water and medicine, i'm announcing today that the united _ medicine, i'm announcing today that the united nations will allocate a further— the united nations will allocate a further 40 million us dollars from the central emergency response fund to ramp _ the central emergency response fund to ramp up _ the central emergency response fund to ramp up vital assistance to reach the most _ to ramp up vital assistance to reach the most vulnerable as we wait for the most vulnerable as we wait for the nations— the most vulnerable as we wait for the nations to come. this funding, to help _ the nations to come. this funding, to help get — the nations to come. this funding, to help get critical supplies of food, — to help get critical supplies of food, water, medicines and other life-saving — food, water, medicines and other life—saving aids into the country,
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as well— life—saving aids into the country, as well as — life—saving aids into the country, as well as provide cash assistance for the _ as well as provide cash assistance for the needy. as well as provide cash assistance forthe needy. but as well as provide cash assistance for the needy. but the avenues in and out _ for the needy. but the avenues in and out of— for the needy. but the avenues in and out of of encircled cities are more _ and out of of encircled cities are more precarious by the day. and i underscore — more precarious by the day. and i underscore the crucial importance of respecting _ underscore the crucial importance of respecting international humanitarian law. at least 1.9 per million _ humanitarian law. at least 1.9 per million people are displaced inside the country, growing numbers are escaping — the country, growing numbers are escaping across borders. i'm deeply grateful— escaping across borders. i'm deeply grateful for the solidarity of ukraine's neighbours and other host countries _ ukraine's neighbours and other host countries who have taken in more than _ countries who have taken in more than 28— countries who have taken in more than 2.8 million refugees in the past _ than 2.8 million refugees in the past two — than 2.8 million refugees in the past two weeks. the vast majority of those _ past two weeks. the vast majority of those making the treacherous journey are women— those making the treacherous journey are women and children who are increasingly vulnerable. for predators and human traffickers, war is not _ predators and human traffickers, war is not a _ predators and human traffickers, war is not a tragedy, it is an opportunity. and women and children are the _ opportunity. and women and children are the targets. they need safety and support every step of the way. i
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will continue to talk about the disparate prick —— meant of the people — disparate prick —— meant of the people of— disparate prick —— meant of the people of ukraine is continuing to do today — people of ukraine is continuing to do today. yet there is another dimension _ do today. yet there is another dimension of this conflict that has been _ dimension of this conflict that has been yet — dimension of this conflict that has been yet obscure cost of this war goes _ been yet obscure cost of this war goes far— been yet obscure cost of this war goes far beyond ukraine, it is also an assault — goes far beyond ukraine, it is also an assault on the world's most vulnerable people and countries. while _ vulnerable people and countries. while war— vulnerable people and countries. while war reigns over ukraine, the sword _ while war reigns over ukraine, the sword of— while war reigns over ukraine, the sword of damocles hangs over the global— sword of damocles hangs over the global economy, especially in the developing world. even before the conflict, _ developing world. even before the conflict, developing countries were struggling to recover from the pandemic, with record inflation, rising _ pandemic, with record inflation, rising interest rates, and looming debt burdens. their ability to respond _ debt burdens. their ability to respond has been raised by exponential increases in the cost of financing _ exponential increases in the cost of financing. now their breadbasket is being _ financing. now their breadbasket is being bombed. russia and ukraine represent — being bombed. russia and ukraine represent more of —— than half of
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the world — represent more of —— than half of the world supply of sunflower oil and about 70% of the world's wheat. ukraine _ and about 70% of the world's wheat. ukraine alone provides more than half of— ukraine alone provides more than half of the — ukraine alone provides more than half of the world's food programmes which _ half of the world's food programmes which supply. food, fuel and fertiliser— which supply. food, fuel and fertiliser prices are skyrocketing. supply— fertiliser prices are skyrocketing. supply chains are being disrupted. and the _ supply chains are being disrupted. and the costs and delays of transportation of imported goods when _ transportation of imported goods when available are at record levels. and all— when available are at record levels. and all of— when available are at record levels. and all of this is hitting the poorest, _ and all of this is hitting the poorest, the hardest. and planting the seeds— poorest, the hardest. and planting the seeds for political instability and unrest around the globe. grain prices _ and unrest around the globe. grain prices have — and unrest around the globe. grain prices have already exceeded those at the _ prices have already exceeded those at the start of the arab spring, and the food _ at the start of the arab spring, and the food riots of 2007 and 2008. the global— the food riots of 2007 and 2008. the global food prices index is at its highest — global food prices index is at its highest level ever. 45 african and least _ highest level ever. 45 african and least developed countries import at least developed countries import at least one _ least developed countries import at least one third of their wheat from ukraine _ least one third of their wheat from ukraine and russia. 18 of those
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countries — ukraine and russia. 18 of those countries import at least 50%. this includes _ countries import at least 50%. this includes countries like burkina faso, — includes countries like burkina faso, egypt, democratic republic of congo, _ faso, egypt, democratic republic of congo, lebanon, libya, somalia, sudan— congo, lebanon, libya, somalia, sudan and — congo, lebanon, libya, somalia, sudan and yemen. we must do everything possible to avert a hurricane _ everything possible to avert a hurricane of hunger and a meltdown of the _ hurricane of hunger and a meltdown of the global food system. in addition, _ of the global food system. in addition, we are seeing clear evidence _ addition, we are seeing clear evidence of this war draining resources from other troubled spots in different— resources from other troubled spots in different —— in desperate needs. i in different —— in desperate needs. i renew— in different —— in desperate needs. i renew my— in different —— in desperate needs. i renew my appeal for countries to find creative ways to finance increased humanitarian and developing recovery needs worldwide, to give _ developing recovery needs worldwide, to give generously and to immediately release pledged funds. my plea _ immediately release pledged funds. my plea to leaders is to resist the temptation of increasing military budgets — temptation of increasing military budgets at the expense of official development assistance and climate action~ _ development assistance and climate action in_
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development assistance and climate action in a — development assistance and climate action. in a world, developing countries _ action. in a world, developing countries are getting pummelled. they face — countries are getting pummelled. they face a crisis beyond ukraine work _ they face a crisis beyond ukraine work they — they face a crisis beyond ukraine work. they can also get covid and the impacts— work. they can also get covid and the impacts of, chains, in particular, droughts. against the backdrop — particular, droughts. against the backdrop of this immense interconnected challenges, i'm announcing today the establishment of a global crisis response group on food, _ of a global crisis response group on food, energy and finance in the un secretary— food, energy and finance in the un secretary is. i have also asked the deputy— secretary is. i have also asked the deputy secretary general to lead a steering _ deputy secretary general to lead a steering committee with partners to oversee _ steering committee with partners to oversee these efforts, and in the coming _ oversee these efforts, and in the coming days we will be consulting with member states including —— likeable — with member states including —— likeable the action is needed to carry— likeable the action is needed to carry forward the global emergency response _ carry forward the global emergency response that will be required for this looming crisis. make no mistake. _ this looming crisis. make no mistake, every day people, especially women and children, will bear the _ especially women and children, will bear the brunt of this unfolding tragedy — bear the brunt of this unfolding tragedy. the war so shows, on the global— tragedy. the war so shows, on the global addition to fossil fuels is placing — global addition to fossil fuels is placing energy security, climate action _
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placing energy security, climate action and the entire global economy at the _ action and the entire global economy at the mercy of geopolitics. finally, _ at the mercy of geopolitics. finally, further escalation of the war, _ finally, further escalation of the war, whether by accident or design, threatens— war, whether by accident or design, threatens all of humanity. raising the alert— threatens all of humanity. raising the alert of russian nuclear forces is a bone — the alert of russian nuclear forces is a bone chilling development. the prospect— is a bone chilling development. the prospect of— is a bone chilling development. the prospect of nuclear conflict, once unthinkable, is now back within the realm _ unthinkable, is now back within the realm of— unthinkable, is now back within the realm of possibility. the security and safety — realm of possibility. the security and safety of nuclear facilities must — and safety of nuclear facilities must also be preserved. it is time to stop _ must also be preserved. it is time to stop the — must also be preserved. it is time to stop the horror unleashed on the people _ to stop the horror unleashed on the people of— to stop the horror unleashed on the people of ukraine and get on with diplomacy and peace. i have been in contact _ diplomacy and peace. i have been in contact with — diplomacy and peace. i have been in contact with a number of countries including _ contact with a number of countries including china, france, germany, india. _ including china, france, germany, india. israel— including china, france, germany, india, israeland including china, france, germany, india, israel and turkey and mediation efforts to bring an end to this war _ mediation efforts to bring an end to this war. the appeals for peace must be heard _ this war. the appeals for peace must be heard. this tragedy must stop. it is never— be heard. this tragedy must stop. it is never too — be heard. this tragedy must stop. it is never too late for diplomacy and dialogue — is never too late for diplomacy and dialogue. we need an immediate cessation —
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dialogue. we need an immediate cessation of hostilities and serious negotiations based on the principles of the _ negotiations based on the principles of the un _ negotiations based on the principles of the un charter and international law. of the un charter and international law we _ of the un charter and international law. we need peace. peace for the people _ law. we need peace. peace for the people of— law. we need peace. peace for the people of ukraine. peace for the world _ people of ukraine. peace for the world we — people of ukraine. peace for the world. we need peace now. thank you. do we _ world. we need peace now. thank you. do we have _ world. we need peace now. thank you. do we have time for a couple of questions? _ do we have time for a couple of questions?— do we have time for a couple of cuestions? �* ,, . ., , , ., questions? becky, secretary general. do ou questions? becky, secretary general. do you sopport _ questions? becky, secretary general. do you support ukraine's _ questions? becky, secretary general. do you support ukraine's calls - questions? becky, secretary general. do you support ukraine's calls for - questions? becky, secretary general. do you support ukraine's calls for a i do you support ukraine's calls for a no—fly zone? == do you support ukraine's calls for a no-fly zone?— do you support ukraine's calls for a no-fl zone? ., ,, , ., ,, . ., , no-fly zone? -- thank you, secretary general. no-fly zone? -- thank you, secretary general- that — no-fly zone? -- thank you, secretary general. that is _ no-fly zone? -- thank you, secretary general. that is a _ no-fly zone? -- thank you, secretary general. that is a matter— no-fly zone? -- thank you, secretary general. that is a matter that - no-fly zone? -- thank you, secretary general. that is a matter that as - general. that is a matter that as you know — general. that is a matter that as you know has been analysed by number of countries, _ you know has been analysed by number of countries, that considered the possibility as a risk of escalation that could — possibility as a risk of escalation that could create further conflict and it _ that could create further conflict and it is — that could create further conflict and it is better on that analysis that i_ and it is better on that analysis that i think we need to be prudent, even if i _ that i think we need to be prudent, even if i understand the dramatic appeal— even if i understand the dramatic appeal of— even if i understand the dramatic appeal of the ukrainian government.
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thank— appeal of the ukrainian government. thank you _ appeal of the ukrainian government. thank you very much. donetsk authorities reported today that ukrainians had hit the heart of the city of donetsk by missile, and the warhead of the missile was filled by the cluster munitions. i was following the security council but i haven't heard anything about this, is the un aware of this incident? i have seen the news and i have to say that— i have seen the news and i have to say that our— i have seen the news and i have to say that our position is very clear, any attack— say that our position is very clear, any attack on civilians or civilian infrastructure is regrettable. if accidental and condemnable if done on purpose. let's be clear, the overwhelming of —— the overwhelming number— overwhelming of —— the overwhelming number of— overwhelming of —— the overwhelming number of civilian casualty and infrastructure was done in the context— infrastructure was done in the context of the war by the russian
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forces _ context of the war by the russian forces. . ~' , ., context of the war by the russian forces. ., ,, , ., ., ., ., context of the war by the russian forces. ., ,, ., ., ., �* ,, forces. thank you pamela from cbs news. forces. thank you pamela from cbs news- you — forces. thank you pamela from cbs news. you talk— forces. thank you pamela from cbs news. you talk about _ forces. thank you pamela from cbs news. you talk about mediation, i forces. thank you pamela from cbs| news. you talk about mediation, but the togs have adjourned for the day. is there anything you have done or will do and have you reached out to russia's president putin? thank you. yes, we russia's president putin? thank you. yes. we are — russia's president putin? thank you. yes, we are doing _ russia's president putin? thank you. yes, we are doing our _ russia's president putin? thank you. yes, we are doing our best. - russia's president putin? thank you. yes, we are doing our best. i - russia's president putin? thank you. yes, we are doing our best. i have i yes, we are doing our best. i have talked _ yes, we are doing our best. i have talked to— yes, we are doing our best. i have talked to a — yes, we are doing our best. i have talked to a number of leaders ima in contact _ talked to a number of leaders ima in contact with president putin and we can see _ contact with president putin and we can see that it is absolutely essential for an effort, an additional effort to make the russian _ additional effort to make the russian federation understand that this war— russian federation understand that this war is — russian federation understand that this war is becoming an absolute nightmare — this war is becoming an absolute nightmare and to create the conditions for war to be stopped and serious _ conditions for war to be stopped and serious negotiations to be put in place _ serious negotiations to be put in lace. . ~' ,. , serious negotiations to be put in lace. ., ~' , . place. thank you very much, everyone- — place. thank you very much, everyone. we _ place. thank you very much, everyone. we have - place. thank you very much, everyone. we have and i place. thank you very much, everyone. we have and twol place. thank you very much, l
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everyone. we have and two on place. thank you very much, i everyone. we have and two on the place. thank you very much, - everyone. we have and two on the old gutierrez addressing _ everyone. we have and two on the old gutierrez addressing the _ everyone. we have and two on the old gutierrez addressing the united i gutierrez addressing the united nations. talk about the crisis and thanking the neighbours of ukraine who have taken in so many ukrainians. he talked about how the war is having an impact far beyond ukraine, not least in terms of energy supplies and food supplies. the breadbasket of the world, he said, is being bombed just because of how reliant we all are on the produce that ukraine exports. set against the back drop of covid and climate change, he said he is setting up a emergency response group focusing on food, energy and finance. he said diplomacy and dialogue can still prevail. and there needs to be peace for the world. from today if you want to open up your home, you can register
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for the ukraine's —— home for ukraine schemes. we have this report. welcome, let me show ou have this report. welcome, let me show you around _ have this report. welcome, let me show you around my _ have this report. welcome, let me show you around my home. i have this report. welcome, let me show you around my home. this i have this report. welcome, let me i show you around my home. this couple are 0 enin: show you around my home. this couple are opening pp — show you around my home. this couple are opening up their— show you around my home. this couple are opening up their home _ show you around my home. this couple are opening up their home in _ are opening up their home in yorkshire as part of the new scheme to house those fleeing the fighting in ukraine. i to house those fleeing the fighting in ukraine. . , to house those fleeing the fighting in ukraine. .,, ., ,, ., ., in ukraine. i was homeless a long time ago- — in ukraine. i was homeless a long time ago- i— in ukraine. i was homeless a long time ago. i worked _ in ukraine. i was homeless a long time ago. i worked my _ in ukraine. i was homeless a long time ago. i worked my way i in ukraine. i was homeless a long time ago. i worked my way back. in ukraine. i was homeless a long i time ago. i worked my way back into what we would call this system. i own my own home, i'm very lucky. i would like to make it possible for somebody else to be comfortable and safe, that is the main thing, they need to feel safe.— safe, that is the main thing, they need to feel safe. since the russian invasion more _ need to feel safe. since the russian invasion more than _ need to feel safe. since the russian invasion more than 2.5 _ need to feel safe. since the russian invasion more than 2.5 million i invasion more than 2.5 million people have left ukraine in search of safety. 4000 visas have now been approved for those with family in the uk, but facing calls to go further, ministers say an unlimited number could come under the new scheme. l number could come under the new scheme. ~ , , number could come under the new scheme. ~' , , ., ., , scheme. i think it is very valuable for a ukrainian _ scheme. i think it is very valuable for a ukrainian refugee _ scheme. i think it is very valuable for a ukrainian refugee arriving i scheme. i think it is very valuable for a ukrainian refugee arriving in| for a ukrainian refugee arriving in the uk to have the british host that
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can help them in so many ways not at least with integrating into british life especially after they have come from somewhere that is in such a traumatic state.— from somewhere that is in such a traumatic state. under this scheme, ukrainians will _ traumatic state. under this scheme, ukrainians will be _ traumatic state. under this scheme, ukrainians will be able _ traumatic state. under this scheme, ukrainians will be able to _ traumatic state. under this scheme, ukrainians will be able to stay i traumatic state. under this scheme, ukrainians will be able to stay in i ukrainians will be able to stay in the uk for at least three years. host will receive £350 per month as a thank you payment. and councils will get £10,500 worth of funding per refugee housed in their area. there is concern about the level of support. i there is concern about the level of su ort. . ., there is concern about the level of su - ort, ., ., ., ., ., ., support. i am full of admiration for all of those — support. i am full of admiration for all of those across _ support. i am full of admiration for all of those across the _ support. i am full of admiration for all of those across the country i support. i am full of admiration for all of those across the country who have offered to provide room in their home for those fleeing ukraine. they will need support not just financially, but the wraparound support required. that is why we are asking the government not to simply speed up our really complex and cumbersome visa process, but also to provide the tangible assistance we will need. . , , ., provide the tangible assistance we will need. . , , ._ ., will need. charities will play a crucial part — will need. charities will play a crucial part in _ will need. charities will play a crucial part in the _ will need. charities will play a crucial part in the process, i crucial part in the process, matching accommodation with those
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who want to come. we matching accommodation with those who want to come.— who want to come. we are going to help connect _ who want to come. we are going to help connect people _ who want to come. we are going to help connect people here _ who want to come. we are going to help connect people here with i help connect people here with those in ukraine who want to come. there have and an outpouring of help. this is a practical way to help because without a sponsor, people cannot come. ., , , ., ., without a sponsor, people cannot come. .,, , come. protesters at a property in london believed _ come. protesters at a property in london believed to _ come. protesters at a property in london believed to be _ come. protesters at a property in london believed to be owned i come. protesters at a property in london believed to be owned by| come. protesters at a property in| london believed to be owned by a russian oligarch sanction for links of adam your —— to vladimir putin. legally it is easier said than done to seize such a place. details of exactly how the new scheme will work are being equally weighted for. were going to go straight to the house of commons now. liz truss is being asked for a statement on what is going on in saudi arabia. he will —— the prime minister is going to be in saudi arabia today and will be speaking on a range of issues. we do
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not believe the _ speaking on a range of issues. we do not believe the timing _ speaking on a range of issues. we do not believe the timing of _ not believe the timing of the executions was coincidental, taken place while the world is focusing attention elsewhere. talking about the killings, we have stated that... this demonstrates just how low the bar is for execution in the kingdom where individuals can be sentenced to death for exercising their right to death for exercising their right to free speech. the mass execution comes in a week where the prime minister plans to travel there. we have seen what happens when human rights abuses go unchecked. so i ask of the minister, what steps have the government take into make sure that human rights are at the four with any trade agreements with saudi arabia? and what assurances will the government be seeking to make sure that such mass executions never
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happen again? i that such mass executions never happen again?— that such mass executions never hauenaaain? ~' ., ., happen again? i think the honourable rentleman happen again? i think the honourable gentleman for— happen again? i think the honourable gentleman for his _ happen again? i think the honourable gentleman for his questions - happen again? i think the honourable gentleman for his questions and i happen again? i think the honourable gentleman for his questions and as i l gentleman for his questions and as i say, we _ gentleman for his questions and as i say, we were deeply shocked by the execution _ say, we were deeply shocked by the execution of the 81 individuals on the 13th — execution of the 81 individuals on the 13th of march. as i stated already. _ the 13th of march. as i stated already, no aspect of our relationship with saudi arabia prevents us from eking out on human rights _ prevents us from eking out on human rights and _ prevents us from eking out on human rights and we do raise these issues through— rights and we do raise these issues through diplomatic issues including our missed stills —— our ministers our missed stills —— our ministers our concerns _ our missed stills —— our ministers our concerns in terms of human rights — our concerns in terms of human rights. particularly because of the use of— rights. particularly because of the use of the — rights. particularly because of the use of the death penalty as well as restrictions on women's rights, freedom — restrictions on women's rights, freedom of expression and religion or belief _ freedom of expression and religion or belief. in terms i... i will not speculate — or belief. in terms i... i will not speculate on— or belief. in terms i... i will not speculate on the prime minister
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visit~ _ speculate on the prime minister visit. ~ , , speculate on the prime minister visit. . , , ., . visit. will this bad news reinforce the urgency _ visit. will this bad news reinforce the urgency for— visit. will this bad news reinforce the urgency for the _ visit. will this bad news reinforce the urgency for the uk _ visit. will this bad news reinforce the urgency for the uk to - visit. will this bad news reinforce | the urgency for the uk to produce its own oil and gas to reduce its dependency on these places? wouldn't it be speeded up if they were given the royalty? in it be speeded up if they were given the royalty?— the royalty? in relation to this matter, the royalty? in relation to this matter. it _ the royalty? in relation to this matter. it is — the royalty? in relation to this matter, it is important - the royalty? in relation to this matter, it is important that i the royalty? in relation to thisj matter, it is important that all partners — matter, it is important that all partners work together to ensure the stability— partners work together to ensure the stability in _ partners work together to ensure the stability in energy markets and 0pec has a _ stability in energy markets and 0pec has a key— stability in energy markets and 0pec has a key role to play here. that was the tail— has a key role to play here. that was the tail end _ has a key role to play here. that was the tail end of _ has a key role to play here. that was the tail end of that - has a key role to play here. trust was the tail end of that urgent question about saudi arabia executing 81 men on one day last saturday. more than the whole of last year. according to the state news agency in saudi arabia, these
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men, had committed heinous crimes, mostly to do with terrorism according to reports. the suggestion they from the labour mp that it was no coincidence that this took place when the eyes of the world were turned elsewhere because of russia's invasion of ukraine. it was suggested time to try to reduce dependency on fuel supplies from saudi arabia. a group of more than... major uk businesses are lining up to offerjobs to ukrainian refugees when they start to arrive in the uk. a group of more than 45 large businesses including marks & spencer, asos and lush are pressing the government to make it easier for those driven out by russia's invasion to come to the uk. the initiative is being led by british entrepreneur emma sinclair, the chief executive of enterprise
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alumni. emma sinclairjoins me now. how did this come together? by accident. in the middle of last week, a lot of customers, friends in predominantly ftse properties were all keen to find a way to help and there was no direct way to do so. there was a lot of wandering around wanting to say we can offerjobs and resettlement and we'd like to help with language training, but no clarity on how to do that. the coalition is actually a group of people that came together on saturday and sunday. we are now well past the hundred large businesses who are keen to recognise that when somebody arrives here that a way to make sure they settle in is to provide a living.— make sure they settle in is to provide a living. that is great if ou have provide a living. that is great if you have the — provide a living. that is great if you have the vacancies - provide a living. that is great if you have the vacancies and i provide a living. that is great if you have the vacancies and are j you have the vacancies and are willing to help people settle. what do you need the government to do to make it happen?— make it happen? well, we clearly need the visa _ make it happen? well, we clearly need the visa system _ make it happen? well, we clearly need the visa system to - make it happen? well, we clearly need the visa system to be i
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need the visa system to be modernised overnight quite frankly. we are all waiting to hear how can people get here and on what basis can we employ them. i know there is news coming out from the comments imminently. we are waiting to see what they say. how do we find the people who have visas now? how do we settle them? that is what the coalition is trying to get to the bottom of as quickly as possible. we want to motivate the government to see that at the other end when these pieces are created, there are plenty of companies who are desperate to help people resettle here. ltrufhat of companies who are desperate to help people resettle here. what sort of tem - late help people resettle here. what sort of template is _ help people resettle here. what sort of template is this _ help people resettle here. what sort of template is this -- _ help people resettle here. what sort of template is this -- what - help people resettle here. what sort of template is this -- what sort i help people resettle here. what sort of template is this -- what sort of i of template is this —— what sort of template is there for this happening in the past? i template is there for this happening in the ast? ., �* ~' ., in the past? i don't know if there is one. i in the past? i don't know if there is one- i am _ in the past? i don't know if there is one. i am no _ in the past? i don't know if there is one. i am no expert— in the past? i don't know if there is one. i am no expert on - in the past? i don't know if there is one. i am no expert on this. i l is one. i am no expert on this. i don't know what the government has done previously and what i do know is we want to make sure whatever happens this time is better and brighter and more sustainable. ltrufhat brighter and more sustainable. what sort of timescale _ brighter and more sustainable. what sort of timescale are _ brighter and more sustainable. what sort of timescale are we looking at
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with regard to how long these jobs could be given to people? there are some anxieties about immigration into this country. of course, economic migration and asylum... nice to see you are joined there by a couple of friends, at least two. how would you envision these jobs being available to people? the reali is being available to people? the reality is there _ being available to people? tie: reality is there isn't a being available to people? ti2 reality is there isn't a single employer i know who he is not desperately keen to hire, whether it is trade skills, warehousing, staffing and retailers all the way through the technical expertise and engineering. there is a dearth of jobs available. i think the goal here is to make sure that this is good for everyone. these jobs are vacant at the moment, it is good for the british economy and suppliers and will be good for people coming over to resettle and notjust be sitting wherever they are house, but frankly to be contributing. that is a way for them to feel, i think, the most settled as well for us to
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benefit. in most settled as well for us to benefit. , ., ., ., benefit. in terms of all the other nuts and bolts _ benefit. in terms of all the other nuts and bolts of _ benefit. in terms of all the other nuts and bolts of getting - benefit. in terms of all the other nuts and bolts of getting this i benefit. in terms of all the other nuts and bolts of getting this to | nuts and bolts of getting this to happen, it is notjust about a job. as great as that is. there needs to be a coordinated effort in terms of housing, schools, hospitals, it is quite complex really.— housing, schools, hospitals, it is quite complex really. yes, 100%. i don't envy — quite complex really. yes, 10096. i don't envy the _ quite complex really. yes, 10096. i don't envy the government. i quite complex really. yes, 10096. i don't envy the government. the i don't envy the government. the coalition has come together in a couple of those areas. we've got a large group of recruiters who are used to placing people at scale. we've got companies that are used to teaching english. we have got a lot of the private sector who do these jobs day in and day out they already have the infrastructure and know—how. part of us coming together is we don't want to see government recreating the wheel, there are people who already know how to do that. my cat obviously wants to be a part of that. we want to make sure that that expertise is put into the right place in the government. the
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government need to provide infrastructure, leadership, logistics. but the jobs, infrastructure, leadership, logistics. but thejobs, the know—how is already there. logistics. but the jobs, the know-how is already there. those eo - le know-how is already there. those people might _ know-how is already there. those people might not _ know-how is already there. those people might not feel— know-how is already there. those people might not feel so - know-how is already there. those people might not feel so much i know-how is already there. those | people might not feel so much like refugees if they already had a job to come to. we will follow this with interest. criminal barristers in england and wales will take industrial action unless the government meets their demands to increase investment in legal aid. almost 2,000 members of the criminal bar association voted to stop taking on last—minute work from next month. let's speak tojo sidhu, qc, chair of the criminal bar association. thank you forjoining us. why have you got to this point that you feel strike action is necessary?- you got to this point that you feel strike action is necessary? where we reach today — strike action is necessary? where we reach today is _ strike action is necessary? where we reach today is the _ strike action is necessary? where we reach today is the end _ strike action is necessary? where we reach today is the end of _ strike action is necessary? where we reach today is the end of a _ strike action is necessary? where we reach today is the end of a very i reach today is the end of a very long process where the criminal system has been deteriorating year after year because it may lack of
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investment in our buildings and in the people who prosecute and present cases. the criminal bar, the men and women who work in the court day in and day out, have been diligently working through this pandemic, they have been doing their best, but for years and years they have been neglected by government despite the fact that we have been saying that if you do not do something about our earnings and about improving our working conditions, you are going to continue to lose people from the ranks and we are now seeing the consequences of that. and it is becoming a real problem for our criminaljustice becoming a real problem for our criminal justice system. becoming a real problem for our criminaljustice system. to give you an idea, we still have got about 50,000 trials back logged in the system. the government is working at snails pace to reduce that level. the reason why they are having that difficulty because there are not a lot of men and women on the ground to prosecute and defend the cases. the reason for that is because the
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very same people who have been working so hard the last ten, 15, 20 years have been saying that we cannot keep working at this pace doing a lot of work for no pay. because some of the work we actually do is unpaid. and we are working seven days a week for relative low money. to give me an idea, the first three years of practice for a junior barrister, the average pre—tax median earnings are is just over £12,000. that is below minimum wage. so the public may have a perception sometimes that barristers and lawyers do quite well, in reality, criminal law is the cinderella of the justice system. criminal law is the cinderella of thejustice system. it criminal law is the cinderella of the justice system. it is the place that people go to work because they want to make money but because their heart is in it and they want to make a contribution to public service. and we are losing those very same people sadly. we have shrunk to 2400
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barristers who are full—time to every single day —— and every single day we are losing more. we have said to the government you are going to have to find a solution to this crisis. you cannot ignore it any longer and unless... crisis. you cannot ignore it any longer and unless. . ._ crisis. you cannot ignore it any longer and unless... dominic raab was ridin: longer and unless... dominic raab was riding in _ longer and unless... dominic raab was riding in the _ longer and unless... dominic raab was riding in the times _ longer and unless... dominic raab was riding in the times last i longer and unless... dominic raab was riding in the times last week. was riding in the times last week saying that a strike would derail this team effort to get rid of the court backlogs. another minister said it is regrettable that your organisation has chosen to move to disruptive action after a constructive meeting last week. what does this do to the rule of law and access to justice if the money that is paid and invested into legal aid is paid and invested into legal aid is not increase? the is paid and invested into legal aid is not increase?— is not increase? the reality is in the government _ is not increase? the reality is in the government recognise i is not increase? the reality is in the government recognise that| is not increase? the reality is in i the government recognise that they
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have failed and they have done so year after year. the review has demonstrated the crises in the system. and it is because of the lack of investment in the system and in the people that we are in the situation we are in today. talking about constructive engagement needs to be supported by real practical measures to try and arrest... the 2400 figure of full—time practitioners will shrink even more. that means that when you think about all the victims of crime and the people who are waiting to have their cases heard and we know the average length of time that it takes for a case to go from the defence to the completion of that case in the ground court is now over 700 days. for many people victims of rape or
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serious sexual crimes that can be as long as 1500 days. those people cannot be abandoned because there are not enough prosecutors and defenders to go to court to deal with the cases. we told them very clearly you have to do something more than the minimum.- clearly you have to do something more than the minimum. thank you so much. we appreciate _ more than the minimum. thank you so much. we appreciate you _ more than the minimum. thank you so much. we appreciate you joining i much. we appreciate you joining us this afternoon. let's go back to our top story. thousands of people are now living in the ukrainian capital's metro system to escape russian shelling. the kyiv network has underground stations decorated with marble friezes, chandeliers and vaulted ceilings but they also have bathroom facilities and drinking water. now it's become a waiting room as locals prepare for what might happen next. 0ur chief international correspondent lyse doucet has more when russia invaded ukraine on february 24, metro stations like this deep underground immediately became a bomb shelters. they were built in the 1960s for this kind of purpose.
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the first day, this was absolutely packed. some 700 people spent the night here. and now, last night, there were only 80. people have either left kyiv or found shelter elsewhere. but as russian forces slowly move closer to the capital, what kind of preparations are they making here? svetlana is in charge in this station. translation: we are ready to host | all people who want to come here. | we can host 1300 people. this is the capacity of our station or even maybe more if needed. maya has been living here since the invasion began. do you think you will stay in kyiv? we hear reports the russians are coming closer to the city.
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translation: we plan to stay. i don't know where to go. i don't want to leave. my house is here, my home is here. i was born here. where am i supposed to go? i'm so sorry. translation: my husband died here, his grave is here. - but god help us, if they invade, we will fight back. preparing for a possible siege and shelling, they call this a humanitarian hub. food supplies to feed a city, including tonnes of potatoes. this food is for civilians, for our self—defense and also for our hospitals. from this hub, we have help from other cities of ukraine and we also have help from poland
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and we are thankful to our brothers... polish people. and does it feel to you like a certainty that russian forces will try to lay siege to this capital? in my opinion, they do not have enough troops to blockade the entire city. but they also can attain by missile the city and we can have a big problem like in other cities in ukraine. we need to prepare, we need to help our army to win this war because we are fighting not or something, we are fighting for our freedom, for our land, for our kids, and for our future also. i am from crimea. i know for what i am fighting here. this is kyiv, kitted out for war. the city of lviv has — so far — been a relatively safe haven for many ukrainians fleeing the violence. but yesterday's attack on a ukrainian military training base about 40 miles from there is the most westerly
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so far and a sign the fighting is spreading across the country. 0ur correspondentjonah fisher has this report on life in the city of lviv. they sing ukraine national anthem. "ukraine's glory and freedom have not yet perished. luck will still smile on our fellow ukrainians." in lviv's rynok square, the first two lines of the national anthem have an added poignancy. 0utmanned and alone, ukraine resists russia's bloody, steady advance. under attack from land and air, more than two million people have left. vera and svenislava are still very much here. vera, will you stay or will you go? translation: i will stay. we will all stay.
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translation: my husband and i are 78. we will keep standing until the end, on what is our land. for the first two and a half weeks of this war, this western part of ukraine has been relatively calm, a safe haven and a route out for those trying to flee the conflict. but there have been signs in the last few days that that might be changing. 0ver over the weekend, preparations were stepped up as an army training base near poland was hit and last night a communications tower. russia may be trying to squeeze ukraine's supply routes from europe. in lviv, the statues have been wrapped as the tension rises and the strikes get closer. 0ne tension rises and the strikes get closer. one of ukraine's most
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beautiful cities is bracing for the arrival of war. just to let you know that we are going to be answering your questions at 5:30pm on bbc news. answering questions from an immigration lawyer and one of our home affairs correspondence about this scheme to have people host ukrainian refugees. if you have a question you can use the hashtag. now it is time for a look at the weather. a lot of sunshine today, but also some rain. earlier on in the day we had the rain in northern ireland. it has now moved into parts of scotland and northern england. it is a bit of a mixed bag today, but i think the majority of us are actually enjoying the fine and the dry weather. now here's the band of cloud that brought the showers earlier on to northern ireland. it has been crossing the irish sea, now spreading across northern areas and i think at the end of the afternoon we are talking
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about rain in central scotland, moving through the lowlands with some showers there in northern england too, but generally speaking, there is a lot of dry and even sunny weather to end the afternoon. this evening, it is going to be clear with light winds. the temperatures will drop. in fact, in many major towns and cities they will maybe be a couple of degrees above freezing and certainly out of town a frost on the way first thing on tuesday morning. the winds are increasing out towards the north—west. a weather front is approaching. that spells rain for the western isles of scotland and also the west of northern ireland in the morning. through the afternoon, very slowly that weather front will move further east. but elsewhere across the uk, it should be a bright, if not sunny day, and actually very mild indeed in the south—east with highs of up to around 16 celsius. so only slow progress, i think, with this weather front as we get into the evening hours tomorrow. just about nudging into glasgow by around 6.00pm, 7.00pm, 8.00pm, maybe 9.00pm.
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here is a look at wednesday's weather map and weather fronts crossing the country. that means a lot of cloud throughout the uk. outbreaks of rain expected, as well. this is what it looks like in the morning, so difficult to say where the heaviest of the rain is going to be because it isjust a mish—mash of cloud and rain, but you can see some heavier rain there in the south and south—east, perhaps a pulse of rain in eastern scotland, but towards the north—west in the afternoon the anticipation is that the sun will come out, so it could actually be a pretty decent second half of the afternoon here compared to the cloud and the rain elsewhere. so let's have a look at the outlook. the rest of the week is looking pretty quiet and, as we head into the weekend, it looks like high pressure is going to be building in, so the weather should dry out and there will be some sunshine around.
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this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines: russia strikes an apartment block in the ukrainian capital kyiv — one person is killed. three people were taken to hospital and nine others treated at the scene after the attack. translation: we hid inside the closet. i we thought we were going to be captured, that the russians were getting in through the door — but we were wrong. we got out from the apartment and saw that the staircase was not there any more. everything was on fire. drone footage from the port city of mariupol show dozens of burning buildings after russian bombardment, but some cars have been able to leave the city this afternoon. russian and ukrainian officials will resume their negotiations on tuesday after a fourth round ends without a breakthrough. the un secretary—general calls
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for an immediate ceasefire. ukraine is on fire. the country is being _ ukraine is on fire. the country is being decimated before the eyes of the world. 21 ukrainian children arrive in england to under—go life—saving cancer treat on the nhs. how the war in ukraine is accelerating europe's search for alternative energy supplies to russian gas. meanwhile — ministers are expected to scrap all of england's remaining international travel restrictions this afternoon. ukraine's lead negotiator says peace talks with russia have been suspended for the day and will continue tomorrow. the ukrainians have been pressing for a ceasefire and a russian withdrawal, but moscow says it's holding
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open the possibility of capturing large cities. in the capital kyiv, a nine—storey block of flats was set on fire by shelling this morning. this is the latest map of russian controlled territory — with russian forces holding large parts of the south—east of the country. the port city of mariupol — in the south—east — has been continually bombarded by russian strikes. recent footage captured by a drone over the city shows dozens of burning buildings and roads hit by shelling. the ukraine government says that some cars have been able to leave mariupol today. president zelensky said the ukraine delegation was trying to arrange direct talks between himself and vladimir putin — a meeting he said he was sure that people were waiting for. from kyiv our correspondent james waterhouse has this report. these days, air raid sirens form part of the morning routine. then you are reminded why they are there. this nine storey residential block
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was directly hit by a shell, killing at least one person. translation: we hid inside the closet. i we thought we were going to be captured, that the russians were getting in through the door, but we were wrong. we got out from the apartment and saw that the staircase was not there any more. everything was on fire. it happened in the north—west of kyiv, where we are continuing to see the most intense fighting the capital. that is not to mean the eastern flank of kyiv is avoiding shells, either. this morning, an assessment of the damage. it has been a day of much heavier artillery fire and we have seen a number of ground to air missiles launching into the sky. but even when these air defence systems work, they don't remove the danger. debris fell from the sky here from an intercepted missile, say authorities, killing a person. this war is expanding within ukraine and it is now reaching the doorstep of the european union and nato.
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this missile strike on a military base in yavoriv, which killed 35 people, was 15 miles from the polish border. it is why president zelensky is repeating his calls for the west to help police a no—fly zone in his country. translation: and now, | repeat| again, if you do not close our sky, it is only a matter of time before russian missiles fall in your territory, nato territory, on the homes of citizens of nato countries. the fighting is not letting up at all. this is mariupol, which has been surrounded by russian forces for 12 days. 12 days of being shelled, 12 days of little water, food or medicine for more than 400,000 people. at least 2000 are known to have died. this woman was rescued after a hospital was shelled last week. today, we learn she and her unborn baby later died. not one attempt at a temporary
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ceasefire has succeeded here. moscow has continually been accused of shelling agreed routes for people to escape and supplies to get in. there will be another go today. peace talks continue today, too, and there are more positive sounds, with ukraine claiming russia has stopped using ultimatums. translation: negotiations| with the russian delegation, round four, will begin injust a few minutes. 0ur positions remain unchanged, peace, immediate ceasefire, withdrawal of all russian troops and only after that will we talk about neighbourly relations. it does not mean expectations will suddenly rise. 19 days of a brutal war does not do wonders for optimism. james waterhouse, bbc news, kyiv. 0ur chief international correspondent lyse doucet is in kyiv and she said it's becoming clear to many the assault is closing in on the capital. well, this was one of the few mornings in this 19 day invasion where we didn't wake up,
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we weren't woken up by the sound of an air raid siren. but this white winter's day has turned into one of the noisiest mornings since the invasion began. we have just heard a minute ago the rumble of explosions in the distance, and all morning there has been the sound of surface—to—air missiles being fired by the ukrainians, explosions coming from russian artillery, they are louder, they seem to be coming closer, and as we have been reporting, it is mainly on the north—west and the north—eastern approaches to the city, where we hear these increasingly louder explosions and fierce fighting in towns, and the suburbs that used to be charming suburbs of this capital, they have now been laid to waste. with every day, we see more and more of the fortifications in the city — fighting back against the russians isn'tjust a question of military might, we have visited some of what had been called humanitarian hubs in the city yesterday,
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where the city council is now stockpiling food because the people of this city have seen with frightening clarity the kind of sieges and shelling that are now being inflicted on other cities and many believe that it is just a matter of time before it comes to kyiv. we are going to go live to the house of commons were michael gove is giving details of the sponsorship scheme. ., ., .., ., ., scheme. the foreign and common of the vomit of— scheme. the foreign and common of the vomit of his _ scheme. the foreign and common of the vomit of his and _ scheme. the foreign and common of the vomit of his and the _ scheme. the foreign and common of the vomit of his and the home i scheme. the foreign and common of} the vomit of his and the home office have also_ the vomit of his and the home office have also been providing humanitarian support on the ground to ukraine's— humanitarian support on the ground to ukraine's neighbours, helping them _ to ukraine's neighbours, helping them to— to ukraine's neighbours, helping them to cope with displacement of hundreds_ them to cope with displacement of hundreds of thousands of people. what _ hundreds of thousands of people. what more can and must be done. to that end _ what more can and must be done. to that end my— what more can and must be done. to that end my right honourable friend the home _ that end my right honourable friend the home secretary has already expanded the family route. she has also confirmed from tomorrow, ukrainians_ also confirmed from tomorrow, ukrainians with passports will be able ukrainians with passports will be abte to— ukrainians with passports will be able to apply uk visas entirely ontihe, — able to apply uk visas entirely online, without having to visit visa application — online, without having to visit visa application centres. as a result, the number of ukrainians now arriving — the number of ukrainians now arriving in_ the number of ukrainians now arriving in this country is rapidly increasing, _
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arriving in this country is rapidly increasing, and numbers will grow eveh _ increasing, and numbers will grow even faster— increasing, and numbers will grow even faster from tomorrow. we also now: _ even faster from tomorrow. we also now, however, that the unfailingly compassionate british public want to help further. which is why today we are answering that call with the announcement of a new sponsorship scheme, _ announcement of a new sponsorship scheme, homes for ukraine. i would like to— scheme, homes for ukraine. i would like to thank— scheme, homes for ukraine. i would like to thank my right honourable friend _ like to thank my right honourable friend the — like to thank my right honourable friend the home secretary, officials in the _ friend the home secretary, officials in the home office, in my own department and across government, for their— department and across government, for their work over the course of the last— for their work over the course of the last days and weeks in order to ensure _ the last days and weeks in order to ensure that — the last days and weeks in order to ensure that we can stand up the scheme — ensure that we can stand up the scheme as— ensure that we can stand up the scheme as quickly as possible. and in particular, i would like to thank my honourable friend richard harrington, now lord harrington of waterford — harrington, now lord harrington of waterford for his experience in ensuring — waterford for his experience in ensuring that the syrian refugee resettlement programme is a success, will prove — resettlement programme is a success, will prove invaluable in making sure that we _ will prove invaluable in making sure that we do— will prove invaluable in making sure that we do right by the people of ukraine — that we do right by the people of ukraine. this game that he has helped — ukraine. this game that he has helped us— ukraine. this game that he has helped us to design draws on the enormous — helped us to design draws on the enormous goodwill and generosity of the british— enormous goodwill and generosity of the british public and our proud history— the british public and our proud history of— the british public and our proud history of supporting the vulnerable in their— history of supporting the vulnerable in their hour of greatest need that of the _ in their hour of greatest need that
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of the scheme will allow ukrainians with no— of the scheme will allow ukrainians with no family ties to the uk to be sponsored — with no family ties to the uk to be sponsored by individuals or organisations who can offer them at home _ organisations who can offer them at home. there will be no limit to the number— home. there will be no limit to the number of— home. there will be no limit to the number of ukrainians that can benefit — number of ukrainians that can benefit from this scheme. the scheme will be _ benefit from this scheme. the scheme will be open _ benefit from this scheme. the scheme will be open to all ukrainian nationals and residents, there will be able _ nationals and residents, there will be able to— nationals and residents, there will be able to live and work in the united — be able to live and work in the united kingdom for up to three years — united kingdom for up to three years. they will have full and unrestricted access to benefits, health — unrestricted access to benefits, health care, employment and other support _ health care, employment and other support. sponsors in the uk can be of any— support. sponsors in the uk can be of any nationality, with any immigration status, provided they have at— immigration status, provided they have at least six months leave to remain _ have at least six months leave to remain within the uk. sponsors will have to _ remain within the uk. sponsors will have to provide accommodation for a minimum _ have to provide accommodation for a minimum of— have to provide accommodation for a minimum of six months, and in recognition _ minimum of six months, and in recognition of their generosity the government will provide a monthly payment _ government will provide a monthly payment of £350 to sponsors for each family— payment of £350 to sponsors for each family they _ payment of £350 to sponsors for each family they look after. these payments will be tax—free, they will not affect _ payments will be tax—free, they will not affect benefit entitlement, nor council _ not affect benefit entitlement, nor council tax — not affect benefit entitlement, nor council tax status. ukrainians arriving — council tax status. ukrainians arriving in _ council tax status. ukrainians arriving in the united kingdom will also have — arriving in the united kingdom will also have access to the full range
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of public — also have access to the full range of public services. doctors, schools and full _ of public services. doctors, schools and full local authority support. of course, _ and full local authority support. of course, we — and full local authority support. of course, we want to minimise bureaucracy and make the process as straightforward as possible, while also doing everything we can to ensure — also doing everything we can to ensure the safety of all involved. sponsors — ensure the safety of all involved. sponsors will therefore be required to undergo a necessary vetting checks — to undergo a necessary vetting checks and we are also streamlining processes— checks and we are also streamlining processes to security assess the status _ processes to security assess the status of — processes to security assess the status of all ukrainians who will be arriving _ status of all ukrainians who will be arriving in — status of all ukrainians who will be arriving in the united kingdom. from today, _ arriving in the united kingdom. from today, anyone who wishes to record their interest in sponsorship can do so on _ their interest in sponsorship can do so on the _ their interest in sponsorship can do so on the garment website, and that has gone _ so on the garment website, and that has gone live as we speak. despite the garment website. we will send any individual who registers for the information sitting at the next steps — information sitting at the next steps. we will outline what is required _ steps. we will outline what is required of a sponsor and will set out how— required of a sponsor and will set out how sponsors can identify a named — out how sponsors can identify a named ukrainian individual or family who can _ named ukrainian individual or family who can take up each sponsorship offer~ _ who can take up each sponsorship offer. because we want the scheme to be up _ offer. because we want the scheme to be up and _ offer. because we want the scheme to be up and running as soon as possible. _ be up and running as soon as possible, homes for ukraine will initially— possible, homes for ukraine will initially facilitate sponsorship between people with known connections. but we will rapidly
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expand — connections. but we will rapidly expand the scheme in a phased way to charities, _ expand the scheme in a phased way to charities, churches and community groups— charities, churches and community groups to — charities, churches and community groups to ensure minimal props —— perspective — groups to ensure minimal props —— perspective sponsors can be matched with ukraine's retail. and we are also _ with ukraine's retail. and we are also working closely with the devolved administrations to make sure that — devolved administrations to make sure that they're kind offers of help _ sure that they're kind offers of help are — sure that they're kind offers of help are oppo —— mike ross immobilise. i know all concerned want _ immobilise. i know all concerned want to— immobilise. i know all concerned want to play their part in supporting ukrainians who have been through— supporting ukrainians who have been through so— supporting ukrainians who have been through so much to ensure they feel at home _ through so much to ensure they feel at home in— through so much to ensure they feel at home in the united kingdom but i'm committed to working with everyone — i'm committed to working with everyone with good will to achieve this. everyone with good will to achieve this mr— everyone with good will to achieve this. mr speaker, our country has a lon- this. mr speaker, our country has a long and _ this. mr speaker, our country has a long and proud history of supporting the most _ long and proud history of supporting the most vulnerable during their darkest— the most vulnerable during their darkest hours. we took in refugees fleeing _ darkest hours. we took in refugees fleeing hitler's germany's, those fleeing _ fleeing hitler's germany's, those fleeing repression in uganda and those _ fleeing repression in uganda and those who fled the atrocities of the balkan _ those who fled the atrocities of the balkan wars. recently we have offered — balkan wars. recently we have offered support to those fleeing persecution in syria, afghanistan and hong — persecution in syria, afghanistan and hong kong. and we are doing so again— and hong kong. and we are doing so again with _ and hong kong. and we are doing so again with homes for ukraine. we are again with homes for ukraine. we are a proud _ again with homes for ukraine. we are a proud democracy, all of us in the south-mac— a proud democracy, all of us in the south—mac wish to see us defend and uphold _ south—mac wish to see us defend and uphold our— south—mac wish to see us defend and uphold our values and stand shoulder to shoulder— uphold our values and stand shoulder
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to shoulder with our allies and to offer— to shoulder with our allies and to offer a _ to shoulder with our allies and to offer a safe haven to people who have _ offer a safe haven to people who have been— offer a safe haven to people who have been forced to flee war and secretion — have been forced to flee war and secretion. the british people have already— secretion. the british people have already opened their hearts in so many— already opened their hearts in so many ways— already opened their hearts in so many ways and we are hopeful that many _ many ways and we are hopeful that many will _ many ways and we are hopeful that many will also be ready to open their— many will also be ready to open their homes and help those fleeing persecution find peace, healing and the prospect of a better future. that _ the prospect of a better future. that is — the prospect of a better future. that is why i commend this statement to the _ that is why i commend this statement to the house. that is why i commend this statement to the house-— to the house. shadow secretary of state. mr speaker, _ to the house. shadow secretary of state. mr speaker, we _ to the house. shadow secretary of state. mr speaker, we were - to the house. shadow secretary of state. mr speaker, we were so - state. mr speaker, we were so relieved to hear the secretary of state was going to and a scheme to allow ukrainian refugees a route to safety after weeks of delay, but a press release is not a plan and we are really deeply concerned about the lack of urgency. he went on tv yesterday to claim that ukrainians could be here by sunday but he has just told us that they will still need a visa under the current application process. these are 50 page forums that have to be completed online, asking people who have fled with nothing to find an internet cafe to upload documents they don't have, water bills, mortgage documents, to prove who
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they are. the home office has been incredibly slow in issuing these visas. as of this morning on a 4000 have been issued. we are lagging way behind the generosity of other countries. we could simplify this process today, we could keep essential checks but drop the excessive bureaucracy. he knows it. why hasn't it been done? for weeks the british people have been coming forward in large numbers to offer help, it has been moving, heart—warming to see the decency and spirit on display in every corner of this country. but can he clarify what is likely the government will be doing? especially in relation to the matching families to sponsors. because on his tour of the tv studios he suggested several times that people who are willing to sponsor a ukrainian family need to come to the government with the name of the family, who will then rubber—stamp it. he can't seriously be asking ukrainian families who are fleeing vladimir putin, who have left their homes with nothing, to get onto instagram and advertise
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themselves in the hope that a british family might notice them? is this genuinely the extent of the scheme? surely there is a role for the secretary of state in matching ukrainian families to their sponsors, notjust a diy assignment scheme were all he does is take the credit. can you please clarify what the government's is going to be? there has been a a lack of urgency to get people here and there is still a lack of urgency to ensure we support them when they do. my honourable friend, and i spoke with council leaders earlier today, they stand ready and willing to help. why hasn't anyone from his department picked the phone up to them? ito charities last week who people asked to act as sponsors, they are acutely aware that the people who are coming will be quite unlike previous refugees. 2 million people are on the march, children alone, mothers with young kids, older people, the brutal reality of what's happening in ukraine is that working age people have stayed behind to fight. they will have health care needs, they will need school places,
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maternity care, social care. one council leader said today that his city, which traditionally plays a major role in welcoming refugees, has only nine secondary school places available. is it not occurred to him until this point to pick up the phone to leaders like him before he went into the tv studios and promised the earth? charities and council leaders are the same people who stepped up during covid. they spin gold at a thread every single day and what is keeping them awake at night right now is how we do right by people and keep them safe. it was only a few months ago that the home office placed a child into a hotel in sheffield that they had been told was unsafe without even bothering to tell the council, and he fell out of a window and died. will he ensure that every counsel is contacted by close of play today? will he work with them to do the vetting checks that are needed, that experts in safeguarding children, were he notjust trust them but support them? label safety net in
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place in case a placement breaks down? his department over the weekend confirmed that families who are left homeless in that situation will not be able to claim the housing costs under universal credit. surely that can't be true. surely we are not going to ask people who have fled bombs and bullets to lie homeless on the streets of britain. i suspect, mr speaker, he has felt as ashamed as i have to watch how this government has closed the door to people who need our help. he shakes his head. people have been turned back at calais, they have been left freezing by the roadside with their children. we have had planes leaving neighbouring nato countries packed to the rafters, except those to london, because this government is turned people away. the british people, who have come forward, have shown that we are a far better country than the government. but unless he gets a plan together, a real plan, notjust a press release,
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all he is effectively announcing its plans to file the people of ukraine twice over. he said today that they have our total admiration, and they do. but they need more than that. they need our total support. secretary of state. i'm grateful to herfor secretary of state. i'm grateful to her for her questions on what was her for her questions on what was her support for our scheme, thing. she asked whether these application process and the length and bureaucracy associated with it. as was announced last week out by the home secretary, it is the case that for ukrainians who have a valid passport, it will be the case that they can have their application turned round within 2a hours, not in the way to which she refers. that was announced last week. it is time that instead of manufacturing the synthetic outreach she kept up with what the government and what my right honourable friend the home secretary is delivering. she asked
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about matching families and sponsors. we are moving as quickly as possible in order to ensure, working with ngos and local gunmen, that individuals in need can be found the families and sponsors whom they need in order to get people into this country as quickly as possible. i am grateful to the honourable lady for speaking to people in local gunmen. we were speaking, i was speaking to the people in local government ten days ago. in order to ensure that this scheme is capable of being delivered. she asked why it is and we are requiring matching in the way that we are. it's because our scheme has been developed in partnership with non—government organisations who have welcomed our approach. we have been doing the practical work of ensuring that refugee organisations on the ground can help to shape our response in order to help those most in need. i know that the honourable lady wants to help. i believe that everyone in this house wants to ensure that the scheme is
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successful. so she makes a number of valid points about the need for school places, that is why there is additional funding available to every local authority that will take refugees in order to ensure that school places are provided. she asks about wraparound care for that we are providing additional funding about wraparound care for that we are providing additionalfunding to local government in order to ensure that the equity required in order to provide those who have been traumatised with the support they need will also be there but we asked about the rapidity of the vetting checks but also the comprehensive nature of those checks can be guaranteed, we have been working with the home office to streamline that process so it is as quickly as possible but also to ensure, as she quite rightly pointed out, that we do not place vulnerable children and accommodation where they might be at risk. in all of these cases, every single one of the points that she has made has been addressed by officials, ngos and those in local government in order to make sure that our scheme works. it now falls to the honourable lady, her
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questions having been answered, to get behind the scheme, to support those open—hearted british people who want to ensure that we can do everything possible in order to help those in need. it is time to rise above partisan politics and to recognise that this is a united effort in which our colleagues in devolved administrations and those in ngos are working with the government to put humanity first. sir roger gale. my right honourable friend has generated a great deal of progress in the last few days, but he will understand that we still have a long way to go. i don't want to bore the house or you with the expenses i had in france last week, but i learnt a lot from them. i would be very grateful, because we need a meet and greet system. there are other things we need to put in place very quickly indeed if this is going to work. so would my right underfriend or lord harrington meet with me either today or tomorrow to make sure that we can avoid some of
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the elephant traps that face us if we don't get this right? i’m the elephant traps that face us if we don't get this right?— we don't get this right? i'm very crateful we don't get this right? i'm very grateful to _ we don't get this right? i'm very gratefulto him. _ we don't get this right? i'm very gratefulto him. over— we don't get this right? i'm very grateful to him. over the - we don't get this right? i'm very gratefulto him. over the course we don't get this right? i'm very i grateful to him. over the course of the last ten days he has been in touch with me daily in order to outline offers of help from his constituents and others. a model constituency mp and a humanitarian, and lord harrington will meet my honourable friend tomorrow in order to make sure that you can operationalise those offers of help. thank you very much. and i start also by thinking people across the uk who have come forward with incredibly generous offers of accommodation and support for ukrainians. of course, we will do whatever we can to support this initiative. we do very much regret that it initiative. we do very much regret thatitis initiative. we do very much regret that it is only phase one today, things are not going fast enough and will also continue to argue that the best response available is to stop asking ukrainians to apply for visas altogether. on that point, why are people accepted onto this scheme still going to have to apply for a visa as well? of course, some of these people may be able to apply
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online, but an online process is not necessarily fast one. on sponsorship we welcome that people with limited leave to remain will be able to be sponsors, but wendy's he anticipate the charges, choices —— churches and community groups can play their part with mckay's mind about the vetting processes, but how will sponsors be supported to undertake their role was matt that's notjust supported to undertake their role was matt that's not just a supported to undertake their role was matt that's notjust a question of cash. what happens if sponsorship does not work out? what support will be available? on financial support, £350 bond, will be available to community groups as well as to individuals? does access to public funds mean full access including the housing element of universal credit, and is there a £10,000 local authority support per person as reported in the press was not what about the most vulnerable people, the orphans and the elderly and others who will never know about the existence of the scheme, never mind how to apply? what support will be provided and finally, what
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discussions has he had with the scottish and welsh governments about the request to operate as a super sponsors and will he endeavour to make that work? hand sponsors and will he endeavour to make that work?— make that work? and eric refer to him for his _ make that work? and eric refer to him for his questions _ make that work? and eric refer to him for his questions and - make that work? and eric refer to him for his questions and i - make that work? and eric refer to him for his questions and i thankl him for his questions and i thank him for his questions and i thank him for his questions and i thank him for the support. he makes a point about making sure that we can speed up all of the security and visa quickly as possible. the home secretary has already acted in that regard. it is the case that from tomorrow, anyone with a ukrainian passport will be able to apply online and thanks to a surge in the number of caseworkers in the home office, they should be able to have permission very quickly granted, turned round, the pdf will be sent straight to them, they can fly into this country to a warm welcome. and it is the case as a result of that that in our visa application centres, the surge of staff there will be able to deal with those individual who for whatever reason do not have a passport or the capacity to secure one quickly, that means we can more quickly process the number of ukrainians who wish to
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come here, as was pointed out 4000 visas have been granted, the numbers are due to surge this week pay makes the point that charities, churches and community groups have all stepped up, we want to ensure we are working with all of them during the course of this week in order to facilitate their role notjust in matching individual sponsors and ukrainians who might benefit, but also extending the reach of support we give so it is notjust a roof over someone's head, also devalued personal support of which so many are capable. i was chatting to faith groups early today to talk notjust to representatives of the ukrainian churches but also the church of england has come, the roman catholic church, all of whom are anxious to ensure that we do everything we can to help. we will ensure that for those individuals who for whatever reason may find that a sponsorship solution doesn't work for them, that the local commit partners with whom we are working receive the resource they require, the £350 is there for
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individuals, but charities and community groups will have a vital role to play in helping to marshall individual offers. he makes a point about those unaccompanied minors, orphans and others who need support, we are working with those on the ground in order to ensure we have the right solution for them. he asked about working with the devolved administrations. i was grateful to the first ministers of scotland and wales for their generous offer to act as super sponsors, and we are doing everything we can in order to facilitate that, and my officials are working with those in the scottish and welsh governments in order that we can do so in a way that enables everyone to live up to their response abilities. i that enables everyone to live up to their response abilities.— their response abilities. i really welcome my — their response abilities. i really welcome my right _ their response abilities. i really welcome my right honourable l their response abilities. i really - welcome my right honourable friend because my statement and he has answered many of the questions that arose of the weekend but can i press him when he expects phase two to start and what work is really going on with ngos? they make a point that they have many people who are already dbs checked but the volunteers coming forward from my constituency tend not to be put up we know there are already backlogs
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in dbs checks so can he assure me that will be speeded up? and a practical question, what about somebody who is planning to move home over the course of the next six months, will they still be able to take part even if address changes? three very good points. we are working this week with civil society and ngos, in orderto working this week with civil society and ngos, in order to ensure we can expedite phase two as quickly as possible, we will update the house in real time over the next few days. the second point about safeguarding, we are working with the home office, we are working with the home office, we don't believe we need to have full dbs checks to make sure someone is an appropriate sponsor, it will often be the case that light—touch criminal checks will be sufficient in their local authorities can be supported to make sure that people are safe when lined with the questions from the opposition, points which were made much more sharply of course. if you are moving house, something which i have had to do recently, we will do everything possible to facilitate the support. thank you, mr speaker. i think in
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principle there will be some general support for a scheme that allows individuals to welcome refugees into their home. i think in principle thatis their home. i think in principle that is certainly accepted. he accepted that there would be costs to local authorities who will be key to local authorities who will be key to making this work, i'm sure he accepts that. has he agreed with the lga, the costs they are going to get to cover education and other wrapper and support services? will douse costs apply to people who come up on the community sponsorship kate scheme and in the family scheme as well? and what about individuals who come here as family members at the family cannot accommodate them in their homes because of the size of their homes because of the size of the refugees are coming over, the number involved, what are we going to do to accommodate those people, how will that accommodation be provided, what is the plan for that as well? �* ., ., as well? i'm grateful to the chairman — as well? i'm grateful to the chairman of _ as well? i'm grateful to the chairman of the _ as well? i'm grateful to the chairman of the select - as well? i'm grateful to the - chairman of the select committee as well? i'm grateful to the _ chairman of the select committee for those questions. it is the case that
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the amount of money were given to local government is based on the afghan resettlement scheme so the amount of money there will be given to local authorities for the early years, primary and secondary education matches exactly and indeed the overall local authority tariff will be exactly the same for that we are building on the arrangements we had with the lga and i have been in touch with james jamieson, the leader of the lga, as well as individual council leaders to act on the level of support. obviously we keep things under review to make sure local garment has what it needs. the second point about people who come under the family scheme, as ever there is case been between speed and competitiveness of an offer. the reason why the family scheme was introduced is that they knew this could be the speediest possible scheme but his question points to a particular challenge that we have. we still have in hotel accommodation, around 40,000 afghan refugees, we still have significant
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pressure on local authority accommodation and on housing overall, so as we look to meet our humanitarian needs, we need to be as flexible as possible and we will be saying more about how to mobilise other resources, either at the disposal of the state or local garment or the private sector to provide additional accommodation of the kind he mentions. abs, provide additional accommodation of the kind he mentions.— the kind he mentions. a three year visa but only _ the kind he mentions. a three year visa but only six _ the kind he mentions. a three year visa but only six months _ the kind he mentions. a three year| visa but only six months guaranteed accommodation. will they have any tenant rights and what is the back—up provision if the sponsor wants to terminate before the end of the visa? it wants to terminate before the end of the visa? , ., , . ., ., ., the visa? it is our expectation that those who commit _ the visa? it is our expectation that those who commit to _ the visa? it is our expectation that those who commit to have - the visa? it is our expectation that l those who commit to have someone the visa? it is our expectation that - those who commit to have someone in their home six months hard taking a quite significant commitment but it is already the case that expressions of interests suggests that there are many people who want to do exactly that. the experience of devious sponsorship schemes have been that those who have undertaken the commitment to find it a wonderful thing to have done, and the number of those who had dropped out or opted out has been small but it is the case, he is right, there may be
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occasions where relationships break down and in those circumstances we will be mobilising the support of central and local commit but also civil society in order to ensure that individuals who are here can move on. finally, many of those who come here of course will be women and children in the front nine, but many of those who want to come here will want to work and contribute, want to be fully part of society and it is the case already we have had offers from those in the private sector who are willing to provide training and jobs to people so that they can fully integrate in society for as long as they are here. i wanted to highlight go back to the point about highlighting the over 14,000 ukrainian refugees. accommodation that is unsuitable for people suffering from trauma and war. . how are we going to deal with
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that in the unsuitable accommodation? i that in the unsuitable accommodation? . _ , ., accommodation? i have sympathy for the honourable _ accommodation? i have sympathy for the honourable lady. _ accommodation? i have sympathy for the honourable lady. one _ accommodation? i have sympathy for the honourable lady. one of- accommodation? i have sympathy for the honourable lady. one of the - the honourable lady. one of the reasons why we are all working together is to make sure that we can get people out of hotel accommodation and into communities. and that requires us to make sure that those local authorities that are receiving individuals are supported. i will be more than happy to return to this house to outline the steps that we are taking. it comes back to the essential point which is as we show a warm welcome people who are fleeing persecution, we need to ensure that that welcome can be stable and secure and that means securing additional accommodation, moving beyond hotels. that is why the homes for ukrainian schemes harnesses the kindness of civil society and there's more that we must do and we will update the housein we must do and we will update the house in due course.— house in due course. thank you. i stronal
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house in due course. thank you. i strongly welcome _ house in due course. thank you. i strongly welcome the _ house in due course. thank you. i strongly welcome the scheme - house in due course. thank you. i | strongly welcome the scheme that house in due course. thank you. i - strongly welcome the scheme that has been set out. sir nicholas winters said if it is not impossible, there must be a way to do it. can i ask my right honourable friend if he would extend the scheme to offer, to make sure that britain hosts ukrainian or fans to make sure that these children are looked after. that they can be brought over? he children are looked after. that they can be brought over?— can be brought over? he makes it compassionate _ can be brought over? he makes it compassionate and _ can be brought over? he makes it compassionate and acute - can be brought over? he makes it compassionate and acute point. i can be brought over? he makes it. compassionate and acute point. and one great difficulty we have is what to do with unaccompanied children and we need to do more and we will do more. , , . ., do more. this is welcome. even thou:h i do more. this is welcome. even though i suspect _ do more. this is welcome. even though i suspect it _ do more. this is welcome. even though i suspect it leaves - do more. this is welcome. even though i suspect it leaves a - do more. this is welcome. even l though i suspect it leaves a short of our obligations under the 1951
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convention. can the secretary of state explain how this sponsorship scheme will interact with the rights of those who are already here, perhaps under a work visa? if their circumstances change, how will they then be able to obtain the same level of protection that will be given to refugees coming here under his scheme? this given to refugees coming here under his scheme?— his scheme? this scheme we are introducing _ his scheme? this scheme we are introducing today _ his scheme? this scheme we are introducing today is _ his scheme? this scheme we are introducing today is not - his scheme? this scheme we are introducing today is not perfect, | introducing today is not perfect, but we hope to work with him and others to make sure it is improved as it develops. one of the things we want to do is stress that anyone who has as six—month residency in the uk can act as a sponsor. there are ukrainians in this country some of whom for example our students and others who are here under a position where they do not have indefinitely to remain and we will seek to regularize their status. i to remain and we will seek to regularize their status. i welcome very much — regularize their status. i welcome very much the _ regularize their status. i welcome very much the conduit _ regularize their status. i welcome very much the conduit for - regularize their status. i welcome very much the conduit for the -
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very much the conduit for the immense generosity of the british public. as he has recognised what a ukrainian refugee needs is notjust a home, but also the services that go with that home. and local authorities will be providing those. can i ask him about the very substantial coordination challenges here? notjust his department and the home office, but also between the home office, but also between the refugees who are already here from other places and the services that are being provided to them and those who will arrive from ukraine and the fact that under the scheme he has described where people will go is where there is a home for them, not necessarily where there is service provision for them. he makes a ve , service provision for them. he makes a very. very — service provision for them. he makes a very. very good _ service provision for them. he makes a very, very good point. _ service provision for them. he makes a very, very good point. this - service provision for them. he makes a very, very good point. this is - service provision for them. he makes a very, very good point. this is a - a very, very good point. this is a cross government and beyond effort. as he says people who have come here from syria and afghanistan, we have welcomed in a compassionate fashion.
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but there are delivery challenges that we need to work out. we expect, but we do not predict that many of those who will benefit in the first stages of the scheme will be people who will be moving to areas where there are already significant number of ukrainian ancestry, where some of the social networks will help. but we do need to make sure that as the scheme expand the support is there. thank you mr speaker. the secretary of state said the web page to volunteered to sponsor a ukrainian refugee has gone live. and itv journalist has just reported that it does not work. and the site cannot be reached. does not work. and the site cannot be reached-— be reached. well... i am very crateful be reached. well... i am very grateful to — be reached. well... i am very grateful to the _ be reached. well... i am very grateful to the honourable i be reached. well... i am very - grateful to the honourable gentleman for his real—time update. i'm sorry
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if paul brand's internet connection is wonky. it seems for my honourable friend, it is superior, she hasjust signed up. i friend, it is superior, she has 'ust signed up.— signed up. i welcome the announcement _ signed up. i welcome the announcement today - signed up. i welcome the announcement today and j signed up. i welcome the| announcement today and i signed up. i welcome the - announcement today and i have signed up. i welcome the _ announcement today and i have been inundated by offers for my old constituents. can i ask, one or two of my constituents have asked about set up because, things like cots and children's beds. and i wanted to know what steps are being taken to match up individuals and charities sold the initial equipment, clothes and all the things families need can be arranged at the start. i and all the things families need can be arranged at the start.— be arranged at the start. i know that she has — be arranged at the start. i know that she has been _ be arranged at the start. i know that she has been working - be arranged at the start. i know that she has been working with | that she has been working with her constituents to do everything to support those who may benefit from this game. it is the case that the charity and church groups and others with whom i have been in conversation with over the last few days are already making these
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connections to make sure that detailed, practical help can be there for those who are acting so generously. there for those who are acting so generously-— there for those who are acting so generously. there for those who are acting so aenerousl . ., ,, ,, ., , generously. thank you, like many i was confused _ generously. thank you, like many i was confused by _ generously. thank you, like many i was confused by the _ generously. thank you, like many i was confused by the secretary - generously. thank you, like many i was confused by the secretary of i was confused by the secretary of state's suggestion that sponsors could match with refugees using twitter and instagram. which has raised a number of challenges. can the secretary of state confirm if refugees will have access to specialist support and how will they be protected from exploitation in the uk? , be protected from exploitation in the uk? _,,, y be protected from exploitation in the uk? , y ., the uk? they absolutely will have access to that _ the uk? they absolutely will have access to that support. _ the uk? they absolutely will have access to that support. anyone i the uk? they absolutely will have i access to that support. anyone who acts as a sponsor will have checks and then will be visited from people in the local government for such
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safeguards. i in the local government for such safeguards-— safeguards. i welcome this announcement _ safeguards. i welcome this announcement and - safeguards. i welcome this announcement and i - safeguards. i welcome this announcement and i am i safeguards. i welcome this - announcement and i am grateful to the secretary of state for listening to the voices from all sides of this house who have been urging this action. i want to go back to the subject of local authorities, particularly lower tier authorities. we are going to leave the house of commons. we heard michael gove setting out how this sponsorship of ukraine refugees will work. they will be more on that and a little while. we are going to go straight to new york now where the ukrainian representative to ukraine is speaking. first it keeps getting worse. second whatever the outcome this war will have no winners, only losers. than the secretary—general also wisely said yet there is another dimension of this conflict that gets obscured.
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this war goes far beyond ukraine. eight is also an assault on the world's most vulnerable people and countries. while war reigns over ukraine, challenges loom over the developing world. developing compline —— developing countries were struggling to recover from the pandemic. the ability to respond has been erased by exponential increases in the cost of financing. now the bread basket which is ukraine, is being bombed, and of quote. dear colleagues, what is happening now is not only about ukraine's survival.
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unlike vladimir putin and his henchmen, ukraine will survive the russian invasion. it is about survival of both the un and the oac. and it is about russia becoming like the post... as vladimir putin pasek regime nears its end, it it will take decades to bring russia back to a level of democracy it achieved in the 19905. a level of democracy it achieved in the 1990s. in fact, a level of democracy it achieved in the 1990s. infact, moscow a level of democracy it achieved in the 1990s. in fact, moscow required 15 years to cover distance between the helsinki final act and its choice to be at a part of building
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the new europe. eventually moscow failed. and yet we deemed that now the oac should play a special role in getting ready to support post rosh —— post vladimir putin russia. with new leadership new ambassadors and new representatives. it is not and new representatives. it is not an easy task, but we will now be able to break the vicious circle of violence without restoring respect... i call upon the oc chair to start considering the modalities
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of this post vladimir putin russia. i think you. untranslated . we are going to leave the united nations for a moment. we might go back there depending on who speaks. we werejust hearing back there depending on who speaks. we were just hearing from the ukrainian representative who was talking about the fact that there are no winners in this conflict. he also claims that the putin regime is nearing its end, not how the kremlin would see it at all. the president of ukraine vladimir zielinski has posted something on twitter in the last ten minutes. he says discuss with the president of the european
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commission eu bath support for ukraine encountering aggression. increasing sanctions pressure on russia is important. we also appreciate significant financial assistance. ukraine continues to move towards membership in the eu. that is their aspiration, but it would be a long process tojoin. at 5:30pm we will be looking to answer some viewers questions on this new sponsorship scheme. if you would like to send your question in, get in touch with us on twitter. you can also use the hashtag. or you can e—mail. we will be trying to answer your questions about this homes for ukraine scheme that michael gove has been talking about this afternoon in the house of commons. thousands of people are now living in the ukrainian capital's metro system to escape russian shelling.
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the kyiv network has underground stations decorated with marble friezes, chandeliers and vaulted ceilings but they also have bathroom facilities and drinking water. now it's become a waiting room as locals prepare for what might happen next. our chief international correspondent lyse doucet has more. when russia invaded ukraine on february 24, metro stations like this deep underground immediately became bomb shelters. they were built in the 19605 for this kind of purpose. the first day, this was absolutely packed. some 700 people spent the night here. and now, last night, there were only 80. people have either left kyiv or found shelter elsewhere. but as russian forces slowly move closer to the capital, what kind of preparations are they making here? svetlana is in charge in this station. translation: we are ready to host | all people who want to come here. |
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we can host 1300 people. this is the capacity of our station or even maybe more if needed. maya has been living here since the invasion began. do you think you will stay in kyiv? we hear reports the russians are coming closer to the city. translation: we plan to stay. i don't know where to go. i don't want to leave. my house is here, my home is here. i was born here. where am i supposed to go? i'm so sorry. translation: my husband died here, his grave is here. - but god help us, if they invade, we will fight back. preparing for a possible siege and shelling, they call
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this a humanitarian hub. food supplies to feed a city, including tonnes of potatoes. this food is for civilians, for our self—defense and also for our hospitals. from this hub, we have help from other cities of ukraine and we also have help from poland and we are thankful to our brothers... polish people. and does it feel to you like a certainty that russian forces will try to lay siege to this capital? in my opinion, they do not have enough troops to blockade the entire city. but they also can attain by missile the city and we can have a big problem like in other cities in ukraine. we need to prepare, we need to help our army to win this war because we are fighting not or something, we are fighting for our freedom, for our land, for our kids,
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and for our future also. i am from crimea. i know for what i am fighting here. this is kyiv, kitted out for war. the city of lviv has — so far — been a relatively safe haven for many ukrainians fleeing the violence. but yesterday's attack on a ukrainian military training base about 40 miles from here is the most westerly so far and a sign the fighting is spreading across the country. our correspondentjonah fisher has this report on life in the city of lviv. they sing ukraine national anthem. "ukraine's glory and freedom have not yet perished. luck will still smile on our fellow ukrainians." in lviv�*s rynok square, the first two lines of the national anthem
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have an added poignancy. 0utmanned and alone, ukraine resists russia's bloody, steady advance. under attack from land and air, more than two million people have left. vera and svenislava are still very much here. vera, will you stay or will you go? translation: i will stay. we will all stay. translation: my husband and i are 78. we will keep standing until the end, on what is our land. for the first two and a half weeks of this war, this western part of ukraine has been relatively calm, a safe haven and a route out for those trying to flee the conflict. but there have been signs in the last few days that that might be changing.
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over the weekend, preparations were stepped up as an army training base near poland was hit and last night a communications tower. russia may be trying to squeeze ukraine's supply routes from europe. in lviv, the statues have been wrapped as the tension rises and the strikes get closer. one of ukraine's most beautiful cities is bracing for the arrival of war. we are going to pause for a second and talk about covid restrictions that are still in place in england. we are expecting to hear from the government today about the removal of the last few measures. the transport secretary has just tweeted about it. a travel update he says.
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gas is one of russia's most strategic assets, but it is becoming one of europe's biggest headaches. as the war in ukraine forces an overhaul of our energy supply, there could also be consequences for climate change. we can actually use this as a huge wake—up call, which we desperately need and say right, this is the moment to break our addiction to fossil fuels altogether. to move to renewables, to invest into renewables much more and that cuts our dependency of oil and gas from russia. russia is the largest gas exporter in the world. so where is russia's gas going? right now the eu gets 40% of its gas from russia, but some countries are more dependent like finland who imports nearly all of its gas. for germany, it is about half. for the uk, it is less than 5%, but our gas prices are directly affected by changes in the global markets. so what are the alternatives
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to russia's gas? one option is to get gas from elsewhere. instead of typing it, it comes in a handy, transportable form, liquefied natural gas or lng. the one thing we should not allowed to drive our energy policy is the assumption that the world is short of gas. lng is a key part of that. there is plenty of it, but it will take a bit of an investment cycle to get us from here to there, and that is why we've got this bumpy short—term period. and coal could make a comeback. countries like poland have plenty of it, but it is a short time fix. the longer term plan is to move away from fossil fuels and that means ramping up wind and solar energy. germany, for example, was planning to get all of its energy from renewables by 2040, now that target has been brought forward by 2035. there is also a big push for green hydrogen which could act as a replacement for gas. but the technology is not there yet
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and it is expensive. there are also changes we could make to our homes like better insulation and a mass roll—out of heat pumps. and another measure that european citizens will probably very thoroughly need to think about is reducing their own consumption by turning down the thermostats in winter by a couple of degrees. so what does it mean for climate change targets? un scientists recently warned there is only a brief window to avoid the worst impacts of global warming so now we may see more short—term use of fossil fuels, which would increase our emissions, but could a spring for renewables counteract this and actually take us closer to net zero? i think it might be a bit of a battle in a way between green and alternative fossil fuel sources, but i do have a feeling that this will actually accelerate zero carbon energy transition because the solutions offered by that make sense, but the technologies,
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available and are inexpensive. it is notjust gas that is a problem, there is oil too. russia exports about half of the oil it produces to europe. the uk says they will phase out russian imports by the end of the year, but it will need to find a replacement. for now, russia's gas is still flowing into europe and while there is uncertainty how long the war will last, it is highlighting the changes we need to make our energy more secure. there is some breaking news. julian assange nz wanted to appeal, but has not been granted permission. he is wanted in the united states over the publication of thousands of documents in 2010 and 2011. 21
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ukrainian children have arrived in the uk to receive cancer treatment. these children were met at the border by nhs staff. flillie these children were met at the border by nhs staff.— border by nhs staff. one team specialises _ border by nhs staff. one team specialises in _ border by nhs staff. one team specialises in the _ border by nhs staff. one team | specialises in the transportation border by nhs staff. one team - specialises in the transportation of critically ill children. the other team was from birmingham children hospital and they were cancer specialist. it was an extremely challenging situation. the teams had no information about the condition of the children before they actually met the children. the staff had promised themselves that no child would be turned away because they were too sick. so they had to be able to provide critical care treatment for 21 children on board an aeroplane. in the event some of
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the children needed the critical care, others needed chemotherapy. the children were allowed to bring siblings and a parent with them. many were very fearful at first. but upon landing in the uk, there was great applause from the families and some of the children were high—fiving the nhs staff. by the end of today, those children should each be in their destination hospitals being treated by the nhs. time for a look at the weather forecast now. a lot of sunshine today, but also some rain. earlier on in the day we had the rain in northern ireland. it has now moved into parts of gotland and northern england. it is a bit of a mixed bag today. i think the majority of us are actually enjoying the fine and dry weather. now here's the band of cloud that brought the showers earlier on to northern ireland. it has been crossing the irish sea, now spreading across northern areas
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and i think at the end of the afternoon we are talking about rain in central scotland, moving through the lowlands with some showers there in northern england too, but generally speaking, there is a lot of dry and even sunny weather to end the afternoon. this evening, it is going to be clear with light winds. the temperatures will drop. in fact, in many major towns and cities they will maybe be a couple of degrees above freezing and certainly out of town a frost on the way first thing on tuesday morning. the winds are increasing out towards the north—west. a weather front is approaching. that spells rain for the western isles of scotland and also the west of northern ireland in the morning. through the afternoon, very slowly that weather front will move further east. but elsewhere across the uk, it should be a bright, if not sunny day, and actually very mild indeed in the south—east with highs of up to around 16 celsius. so only slow progress, i think, with this weather front as we get into the evening hours tomorrow. just about nudging into glasgow by around 6.00pm, 7.00pm, 8.00pm, maybe 9.00pm.
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here is a look at wednesday's weather map and weather fronts crossing the country. that means a lot of cloud throughout the uk. outbreaks of rain expected, as well. this is what it looks like in the morning, so difficult to say where the heaviest of the rain is going to be because it isjust a mish—mash of cloud and rain, but you can see some heavier rain there in the south and south—east, perhaps a pulse of rain in eastern scotland, but towards the north—west in the afternoon the anticipation is that the sun will come out, so it could actually be a pretty decent second half of the afternoon here compared to the cloud and the rain elsewhere. so let's have a look at the outlook. the rest of the week is looking pretty quiet and, as we head into the weekend, it looks like high pressure is going to be building in, so the weather should dry out and there will be some sunshine around.
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5:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm martine croxall. the headlines at 5pm — russia strikes an apartment block in the ukrainian capital, kyiv. one person is killed, three people were taken to hospital and nine others treated at the scene after the attack. drone footage from the port city of mariupol show dozens of burning buildings after russian bombardment, but some cars have been able to leave the city this afternoon. the government launches its ukraine refugee scheme, offerng people £350 to people who wait to host a refugee. the scheme will allow ukrainians with no family ties to the uk to be sponsored by individuals or organisations who can offer them a home. there will be no limit to the number of ukrainians who can benefit from this scheme.

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