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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 22, 2022 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. our headlines today. president biden says putin "has his back to the wall" and may be preparing to use chemical and biological weapons in ukraine. he's already used chemical weapons in the past and we should be careful about what's about to come. help with fuel costs or risk losing key workers. that's the warning to the chancellor from the royal college of nurses. they say some carers are paying £100 more per month to see their patients and that it can't go on. a 17—month—old girl has died after being attacked by a dog in her home in st helens. fresh developments in the battle to take over chelsea. british investment firm centricus
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has joined the race to buy the club with bidders now waiting to hear if they've made the short—list. good morning from stjames�*s park in london. we are surrounded by beautiful daffodils, spring is certainly in the air. after a chilly start, the sun will come out and we are looking at highs of up to 20 degrees today. all of the details throughout the programme. it's tuesday 22nd march. our main story. president biden has warned there are clear signs russia is preparing to use chemical and biological weapons in ukraine. mr biden said president putin "had his back to the wall" as a result of ukrainian military resistance, meaning there was a danger he would resort to more severe tactics. meanwhile, president zelensky has again appealed for direct talks with mr putin in an attempt to try to end the conflict, as hywel griffith reports. russian repression
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against ukrainian resolve. people in kherson say they were fired on as they protested against occupation. there are reports of injuries. president zelensky said it was a rally for freedom. something the russian military hasn't experienced. saying they were sent here as if sentenced to death, and sentenced to shame. in kyiv, eight people are reported dead after shelling on a residential area. russia said it was because rockets were stored here. mariupol in the south has become a shell. a further 3000 people were evacuated from here yesterday. satellite images show smoke rising across the city. america has warned that president putin may soon turn to using chemical weapons, following false claims that ukraine was poised to use them. his back is against the wall.
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now he's talking about new false flags, he's asserting that we, america, have biological as well as chemical weapons in europe. simply not true. i guarantee you. there are also suggesting that ukraine has biological and chemical weapons in ukraine. that is a clear sign he is considering using both of those. the toll of this war is already hard to bear. sergei's brother igor was killed when ukrainian barracks at the east of 0desa were bombed. here, the russian invasion feels relentless. "this is our land," he says, "we live here. where should we run?". for many ukrainians, there is no choice, they stay and cling to daily rituals. president zelensky has called again for direct talks with vladimir putin to end the fighting. but for now, hopes of a ceasefire seem out of reach.
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hywel griffith, bbc news. let's speak now to our correspondent in kyiv, james waterhouse. good morning. good to see you. what is the latest news from overnight? well, a couple of sirens and the faint sound of artillery now counts as a quiet night to be honest. we are told by ukrainian forces that they have taken again at the town to they have taken again at the town to the west of kyiv, but we hear reports from a place called borispol to the south—east of kyiv where the bear is calling for people to leave. so it shows how things to leave —— the mayor is calling. western officials say the russian event is continuing to start with the exception of mariupol, mainly because of logistical issues. this is what president zelensky is hoping
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will bring president putin to the negotiating table. he has once again called for direct talks in any format. this is where it gets a bit vague. his team has said there have will be no compromise on ukraine's security and territorial integrity. he said any compromises if they were to be made in a peace deal would have to be put to a vote, a referendum across ukraine. time and time again, in decades gone by, when russia has demonstrated aggression towards ukraine, ukrainian�*s sense of national identity and political leaning towards the west is further strengthened. so what if the vote doesn't come through? both sides are relying on the brutality of this war for there to be some kind of solution. president zelensky wanting to engage with vladimir putin. he outwardly wants to make some kind of concession, what his people will accept is quite another thing. and they are relying on vladimir putin
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reflecting on the losses that the russians have already sustained in this war which has stretched for more than three weeks. that also comes with a worry as we have heard from the us and the rest of the west, that he might be considering to use chemical and biological weapons as well as creating a false justification for doing so with false claims that ukraine is doing the same thing.— false claims that ukraine is doing the same thin. . ~ ,, , . the same thing. thank you very much, james, live the same thing. thank you very much, james. live in — the same thing. thank you very much, james, live in kyiv _ the same thing. thank you very much, james, live in kyiv this _ the same thing. thank you very much, james, live in kyiv this morning. - let's get an update now from our correspondentjonah fisher, who joins us from the western ukrainian city of lviv. i think he is shaking his head, hopefully he can hear me 0k? i think he is shaking his head, hopefully he can hear me ok? i'm afraid we cannot hear, jonah cannot hear us. we will try and get him a little bit later on. but we can speak tojonathan little bit later on. but we can speak to jonathan blake, little bit later on. but we can speak tojonathan blake, our political correspondent. the transport secretary has admitted he was aware of plans to sack 800 p&0 workers the night before staff were informed. however, grant schapps insists he didn't know the full the scale of the mass redundancy plan
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until the following day. 0ur political correspondent, jonathan blake has more. thank you for speaking to us this morning. it could be an interesting fallout from this, couldn't it? good mornin: , fallout from this, couldn't it? good morning. it — fallout from this, couldn't it? good morning, it could _ fallout from this, couldn't it? good morning, it could be. _ fallout from this, couldn't it? good morning, it could be. we _ fallout from this, couldn't it? (13mm morning, it could be. we have heard this from exchanges in the house of commons yesterday where the transport secretary grant shapps admitted that he was aware of piano's plan to sack several hundred —— p&0 ferries's plan to sack several hundred workers last week, he said he learned about it on wednesday before the workers were made redundant the following morning. he is clearly claiming that he was not aware of the way that they were going to go about it. that is what has caused most of the criticism here, aside from the mass redundancies in themselves. it was the way in which it was done remotely via pre—recorded video message, in many cases, without any period of consultation and very
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little if any notice to those losing theirjobs. grant shapps told mps yesterday that the company had made many of its staff redundant throughout the pandemic but had done so with the right periods of notice and consultation in place. nevertheless labour are using this as a way to criticise the government, saying that it proves that ministers knew of the plan in advance but did nothing to attempt to stop it. and they have highlighted mmo which was sent to officials and ministers, they say at the department for transport —— highlighted a memo, which outlined the plan that p&0 was going to go ahead with the following day but we do not know who that was sent to and when the. since the redundancies happened, there has been a lot of anger and outrage and consternation in government about how the company could be allowed to get away with this and also from the government's political opponents suggesting they should have done something about it
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but there is very little suggestions so far that ministers are going to be able to bring the company to task over this, be able to bring the company to task overthis, orto be able to bring the company to task over this, or to do anything about the fact that the redundancies were handled in this way.— handled in this way. thank you very much, jonathan. _ a 17—month—old girl has died, after being attacked by a dog in her home in st helens. merseyside police say the animal was bought by the family only a week ago. 0ur reporter yunus mulla is at the scene this morning. yunus, what more do we know? merseyside police have described this as a tragic accident in which a 17—month—old girl has died. 0fficers 17—month—old girl has died. officers were called here yesterday, just before 4pm in the afternoon after reports that he had been attacked by the family's pet dog in her home here on this estate in the black brick area of sent tenants. when they arrived, —— in the blackbrook
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area, the girl sadly died of her injuries in hospital. the dog was humanely destroyed by officers. the investigation is in the early stages but they have carried out house—to—house inquiries, studied cctv footage, but they are also looking to determine the breed of the dog and to trace the history of the dog and to trace the history of the dog, especially as his previous owners. the family are said to be absolutely devastated by what has happened and police say that their thoughts are very much with the family here. what will happen now is that forensic tests will be carried out on the dog to determine the breed, and whether that breed is legal or illegal under the dangerous dogs act. legal or illegal under the dangerous dos act. . ~ legal or illegal under the dangerous dousact. ., ~ ,, legal or illegal under the dangerous dousact. ., , dogs act. thank you, yunus, live in st helens- — let's take a look at today's papers. the war in ukraine continues to feature prominently on the front pages. the i says russian troops have used gunfire against protestors in the occupied city of kherson. the paper also quotes ukraine's
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defence minister saying that small cities have now been "wiped off the face of the earth". the times reports that president putin has threatened civilians, to break the spirit of the besieged city of mariupol. the front page also carries a picture of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe and her husband richard, after she spoke to the media for the first time since her release from detention in iran. the guardian writes there are £13 billion worth of global assets, with alleged ties to president putin. the paper says vast collections of properties, yachts and offshore accounts have been linked to 35 oligarchs, alleged to be close to the russian leader. and the daily telegraph also focuses on russian money reporting that a £500 million superyacht allegedly owned by mr putin, faces seizure. that is serious money for a boat. are you in stjames's park this
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morning, carol, is that right? good morning. i certainly icertainly am, i certainly am, good morning, everyone. it is one of the royal parks in london and it is festooned with carpets of daffodils. between 50 or 70,000 daffodils are planted each year in stjames's park and green park in london and they look stunning. spring is in the air. i don't feel it quite so much this morning, temperatures four to 10 degrees at the moment. a few showers around in central and southern england into the south—west which will fade and then the full cost for us all today is one of warm sunshine and a few showers. the showers likely to be across the midlands and southern scotland but they will be hit and miss and most of us will miss them. this morning there is some patchy mist and fog across parts of scotland which will clear quite readily, and we will lose the showers that we have across central and southern england and the
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south—west, many of us are seeing some sunshine. a bit more cloud across parts of scotland and england through the afternoon but it will not spoil it. the sunshine is going to be the beautiful day. the average is 12 degrees for this time of year. this evening and overnight, we will see some fog patches from across yorkshire, the tay valley, and any showers tending to fade. temperatures in the rural areas could full as low as freezing. for some there will be a touch of frost but most will hold above freezing. tomorrow there is a chance of the odd shower in eastern scotland and england but hit and mist. the striker hit and miss. it is going to be another dry and sunny day for most of us and if anything temperatures will be higher
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tomorrow, we could get up to 21 degrees in parts of east anglia and the south—east. shorts on, carol! just for you, dan! not first thing _ shorts on, carol! just for you, dan! not first thing in _ shorts on, carol! just for you, dan! not first thing in the _ shorts on, carol! just for you, dan! not first thing in the morning, - shorts on, carol! just for you, dan! not first thing in the morning, it. not first thing in the morning, it is still chilly!— is still chilly! don't go too early with our is still chilly! don't go too early with your shorts. _ is still chilly! don't go too early with your shorts. 20 _ is still chilly! don't go too early with your shorts. 20 has - is still chilly! don't go too early | with your shorts. 20 has plenty! the duke and duchess of cambridge will travel to jamaica today, as their tour of the caribbean continues. yesterday, prince william paid tribute to ukrainians fighting for their homeland, during a visit to a british military training camp, in the jungles of belize. 0ur royal correspondent, jonny dymond reports. learning about another world, another civilisation, way up in the hills of belize. if you're looking for historical perspective, there are worse places to find it than a mayan temple. the british monarchy has been around for a thousand years, but this place, it's been around for 3000.
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think of what it's seen. and now, they came to see it. the army uses the jungle to teach its soldiers up up and up and up, to gain a better understanding of the catch sight of the country they are visiting. they are not the only brits enjoying belize's hospitality. the army uses the jungle to teach its soldiers and survival skills. the duke was here more than 20 years ago, but now was a chance to brush up his knowledge on how to trap a monkey in the wild. most of all, in the jungle, you need water. the couple were shown ingenious ways to gather the stuff. then given a chance to try out one of nature's water dispensers. fix,
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of nature's water dispensers. little bit of bark in it! of nature's water dispensers. a little bit of bark in it! arms - of nature's water dispensers. a little bit of bark in it! arms by i little bit of bark in it! arms by our little bit of bark in it! arms by your sides. — little bit of bark in it! arms by your sides, stand _ little bit of bark in it! arms by your sides, stand to - little bit of bark in it! arms by| your sides, stand to attention. little bit of bark in it! arms by - your sides, stand to attention. this was a reunion _ your sides, stand to attention. this was a reunion of _ your sides, stand to attention. ti 3 was a reunion of sorts. the commanding officer here was william's sergeant major when he trained at sandhurst. now his time to say thanks to his old trainee. you are 5500 miles from the uk here, you can feel slightly isolated, we are in the middle of thejungle. the fact that they take time out of their busy schedules which are extremely busy to come and visit us means a lot. you can sense the buzz of excitement around the place. it's not everyday young soldiers get to interact with royals. last not everyday young soldiers get to interact with royals.— interact with royals. last night, at a reception _ interact with royals. last night, at a reception for — interact with royals. last night, at a reception for the _ interact with royals. last night, at a reception for the couple, - interact with royals. last night, at| a reception for the couple, william directly address the invasion ukraine. he quoted the queen, talking about the vigilance needed
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to protect democracies. sadly, elsewhere in the world, that vigilance is being tested today in ukraine. belize hasjoined many others in condemning the invasion and standing up for the principles of international law, peace, and security. today we think of those struggling in ukraine and we stand with them in solidarity. from the royals, it doesn't get much blunter than that. the couple head for their next stop, jamaica, later today. jonny dymond, bbc news, belize. the royal college of nurses have warned that the government needs to help with fuel costs or risk losing key workers. they say some carers are now paying £100 more a month to see their patients. nina's here with the details. we can cut down lots of us but not
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if you need your car to get to work, but if patients need you, they are essential. here are the latest average prices at the pumps. a litre of petrol now sets you back around £1.67. diesel is almost £1.79. according to the rac, that's a rise of 16p for petrol and 22p for diesel since the start of the month. now a warning from the royal college of nurses that thousands of nurses and care staff, who use their own cars to make home visits, are paying an extra £100 a month. we spoke to chucks, a specialist community nurse and team leader. he told us it could force some key workers off the road. and that it's patients who could end up paying the price. nurses are having to dip into their own pockets now to fill up their tanks, go out and see patients. yesterday, one of my staff approached me and said it's really getting difficult for her because she usually uses £75 to fill up her tank every week
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but when she went out to fill up her tank yesterday, she paid £95. i'm really worried that if nothing's done about this, it will increase. in the nearfuture, two months or so, we will have some nurses leaving the profession because they cannot afford to fill up the tank. nhs staff can claim mileage at 56p per mile for the first 3,500 miles, and 20p for each additional mile. but health care professionals say it's just not enough. we've mentioned before the pressure growing on the chancellor to provide support for drivers in his spring statement tomorrow. currently, fuel duty is almost 58p a litre for petrol and diesel and drivers also pay standard vat of 20% on top of that. in all, that makes up more than half of what you pay at the pump. the road haulage association is calling for a cut in fuel duty and a 15 pence per litre rebate for haulage firms
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and coach operators. the rac says it would welcome a cut in fuel duty or vat but that a vat reduction might have a bigger impact. we desperately need the chancellor to take action to help drivers and businesses up and down the country. that's probably most likely going to be by fuel duty, but cutting vat would also be extremely beneficial. vat, of course, is very much a tax on a tax, because it's charged at the end of the transaction at the forecourt, on top of 58p per litre fuel duty which in turn brings in 27 billion for the government. vat then is added at the end on top of delivery, compounding that at the moment in a situation where there are very much higher prices at wholesale level. this issue isn't going away. we understand that shell is reconsidering its decision to withdraw from the cambo oil field 75 miles off the west coast of shetland. a sign ofjust how worried they are about their supply long term.
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the government points to the fact that fuel duty has been frozen since 2011, and that households are being provided with relief this year on energy bills and council tax. it would be brilliant if we could hear from you this morning, it would be brilliant if we could hearfrom you this morning, how it would be brilliant if we could hear from you this morning, how are you absorbing these incremental increases that we are getting when you go to check out at the supermarket or filling up at the pump? would you like to hearfrom the chancellor tomorrow? the thing is, this isn't the budget, people are calling it a mini budget, it's traditionallyjust an are calling it a mini budget, it's traditionally just an update are calling it a mini budget, it's traditionallyjust an update on how finances are looking but there is increased pressure. the mood music from the weekend is not to expect very much for the chancellor. people will be looking back at the support schemes over covid but he will be saying that is a one—off. we cannot spend that way but labour says he has to because we are still in emergency mode. me has to because we are still in emergency mode.— has to because we are still in emergency mode. we will find out tomorrow. — emergency mode. we will find out tomorrow, thank _ emergency mode. we will find out tomorrow, thank you. _ having your life turned
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into a film or a play is usually a right reserved for celebrities or politicians. but it was neil baldwin's heart—warming approach to life that saw him make friends in high places and have his story told to the world. actor tobyjones played neil in the bafta award winning film marvellous and now it's being adapted for the stage. i think it's one of the best bits of film i have ever seen. as our arts correspondent david sillito has been finding out. and it's a fine day here on the south coast and oh, my goodness, what is this? what is this, george? thank you, george, it seems to be a chicken, george! what you're watching is a scene from a show that's become rather a hit here at the new vic in stoke. marvellous. the life of neil baldwin. baldwin is the one in a chicken suit. and the real neil is also sitting next to me in the audience, as he does every night. and are you introduced each night? every night, a light comes on to me and i get up and wave and be happy. we don't want any more injuries.
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who's that? new kit man. you may already know about him. he was the subject of a bafta award winning film starring tobyjones. talked a girl out of killing herself once. young student. dressed as a chicken? no, of course not. dressed as father christmas. but here's a quick rundown of some of the things he's done. when he was young, expectations around him were low but neil, aged 1a, was not put off. hello, i'm neil baldwin, welcome to keele university. 0ne venture was greeting every student at keele university. you'd shake their hands, and you were 14? and you carried on doing that for every year, 62 years? why? because it's nice to meet people and get to know them, other people in life.
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he then became a professional clown. and then when that came to an end, he bumped into stoke city manager lou mccarry who suddenly decided to give him a job. i didn't know what i was going to do, i didn't know whatjob i was going to give him. so i spent the weekend thinking, what betterjob can i give him than being the man who is going to keep everybody happy? because he told me he was always happy, never sad. he brought what i hoped he would bring to the football club, laughter, joy. ken dodd is a friend. the duke of edinburgh. prince william, you've met. neil also has a talent for making famous friends. everyone from tony benn and gary lineker to archbishops. you have got a collection of archbishops of canterbury over the years, who are all your pals. 0ne came to your recent service at keele?
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yeah, on saturdayjust gone. how do you do it? it's because it's neil. he was my best ever signing. you're here every night, aren't you, watching it, watching your own life unfold on the stage. but there's also a wider topic to all of this. happiness. when he was young, no one expected neil would achieve anything. but at the end of our day together, he invited us to his home to meet his budgies, and it was a chance to take it all in. and looking back now? it's been a great life and i'm happy all the time. it's about happiness, and bringing happiness to others? yeah, like ken dodd. watching the play, each night, what's its message?
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the message is, to be happy in life, happiness, like ken sang. ken dodd? and always think of everybody else. and i'm glad i've had a good life. david sillitoe, bbc news, the home of marvellous neil baldwin, newcastle—under—lyme. that's me sorted for the day. happiness! i that's me sorted for the day. happiness!— that's me sorted for the day. ha iness! . ., ., ., ., ., happiness! i am going to go and have to watch marvellous _ happiness! i am going to go and have to watch marvellous again, _ happiness! i am going to go and have to watch marvellous again, i - happiness! i am going to go and have to watch marvellous again, i think. i marvellous runs at the new vic theatre until the 9th of april. what a brilliant, happy life. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm alison earle. around 300 people who've survived terrorist attacks are calling for better access to mental health and financial support.
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the appeal by the group survivors against terror comes on the fifth anniversary of the attack on westminster bridge. four people were killed and 50 were injured when khalid masood drove into crowds and stabbed a policeman. the met says it's doing all it can to identify threats. london remains a safe city. we have, i'm absolutely confident, a world—class partnership with a range of organisations, most obviously our intelligence partners. but we should never take for granted that safety. a teenage girl has died after a collision involving an e—scooter and a van in east london. it happened just after 1.30 yesterday afternoon on green street in east ham. police are appealing for information. millions of tonnes of soil excavated for crossrail has been used to create a nature reserve. rspb wallasea is made up of london clay which was carried out
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to the essex coast by boat. it's now become a vital habitat for wildlife. it's a bit like the heathrow of the bird world, really, it's on the east atlantic flyway. there's literally millions of birds travelling up and down this flyway, and the dropping in stopping, wintering, passage birds, and all of these sites are vitally important. britain's fastest woman dina asher—smith will receive an honorary degree from the university of kent later. it's to celebrate her althetic achievements. as well as world championship gold, she's also the british record holder at 100 and 200 metres. travel now — this is how tfl services are looking right now. there are severe delays on the 0verground between highbury & islington and west croydon/crystal palace/clapham junction and new cross due to a points failure at new cross depot. there's also a reduced service on the 0verground from stratford to richmond/clapham junction. there are minor delays on tfl rail between liverpool street and shenfield.
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there's no service on the northern line between moorgate and kennington due to long—term upgrade works. a good service on all other lines. and for all the latest travel news where you are, tune into your bbc local radio station for regular updates throughout the morning. a quick check on the weather — it will be a dry and fine day. lengthy spells of sunshine are likely through the day and it will feel rather warm for most. temperatures could get up to 19 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to sally and dan. bye for now.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. let's bring you up—to—date with everything that has been happening in ukraine overnight. hywel griffith is here with us. morning sally, morning dan. let's start with news coming out of the united states overnight — president biden has warned that there are clear signs vladimir putin may be preparing to use chemical and biological weapons in ukraine. he said false claims by russia that ukraine had these types of weapons suggested it was considering using both. also suggesting that ukraine has biological and chemical weapons in ukraine. that is a clear sign he is considering using both of those. he
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has already used chemical weapons in the past, and we should be careful what is about to come. here in the uk, the focus is on russia's alleged use of hypersonic missiles, which the ministry of defence says is probably intended to "detract from a lack of progress" in its ground campaign. over the last week, russia has claimed to have fired these hypersonic missiles, which can travel at five times the speed of sound for the first time ever in combat — at targets in western ukraine. the mod says their impact is likely to be very limited, and unlikely to materially affect the outcome of the russian campaign. meanwhile, ukraine's president, volodymyr zelenksy, has repeated his call for direct talks with the russian leader to try to put an end to the fighting. but in an interview broadcast on ukrainian tv, he said that such a meeting would be unlikely to lead to an agreement on security guarantees or constitutional changes. he went on to say those decisions would need to be put to a referendum.
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translation: i believe that until such time as _ translation: i believe that until such time as we _ translation: i believe that until such time as we have _ translation: i believe that until such time as we have a _ translation: i believe that until such time as we have a meeting l translation: | believe that until. such time as we have a meeting with the president of the russian federation in any format, i have repeated this and offered this for a few years, i think that without this meeting you cannot truly understand what they are prepared to do in order to stop the war, and what they are prepared to do if we are not ready for this or that compromise. 0n the ground, there was no let—up in the violence, kyiv is under a new 35—hour curfew after russian strikes reduced this shopping centre to rubble. it's been confirmed that eight people died in the attack. the russian defence ministry said rockets were being stored there. the ukrainian government says a further 8,000 people were evacuated from conflict zones on monday, including around 3,000 people from the besieged city of mariupol. ukraine is still refusing to give up the city in the face of relentless russian assaults.
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we'll bring you the latest as it comes to use thought the morning. you may remember we spoke to elena on yesterday's programme as she waited desperately to hear from her family, who are still in mariupol. well, since then, she's been able to speak to her mum, and we can catch up with her now. morning, elena, lovely to see you this morning. just tell us what happened after we spoke to you yesterday, and what did you hear from your mum?— yesterday, and what did you hear from our mum? ., g .. from your mum? hello. my mum called me yesterday- — from your mum? hello. my mum called me yesterday- we _ from your mum? hello. my mum called me yesterday. we just _ from your mum? hello. my mum called me yesterday. we just had _ from your mum? hello. my mum called me yesterday. we just had a _ from your mum? hello. my mum called me yesterday. we just had a few - me yesterday. we just had a few minutes of conversation, and the connection was interrupted again, but she told me that she loves me and all my family, and and that they were still alive. but when i asked
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her about food, she started crying, so i can understand that there is no food, no gas, and no elytra today, and she is alive now, but it can be different tomorrow —— no gas and no electricity. i don't know about the future. nobody is helping still accept volunteers. that future. nobody is helping still accept volunteers.— future. nobody is helping still accept volunteers. future. nobody is helping still accet volunteers. . , , , accept volunteers. that must be “ust such a complicated i accept volunteers. that must be “ust such a complicated mix i accept volunteers. that must be “ust such a complicated mix offi accept volunteers. that must be justj such a complicated mix of emotions, being so relieved to hear from such a complicated mix of emotions, being so relieved to hearfrom her, and yet also so desperately worried about the situation that she is on. what more have you found out? what more do you know about the living conditions and how things are there? same conditions as they were about a
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week ago, nothing works, people eat snow and drink raindrops and try to explain to children that it is good and we need to survive. a lot of children are in basements and shelters. there is no food, it is critical, people are starving and they are just lying in the streets. nobody but volunteers trying to help. but i am appealing to the public, to both sides of the
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conflict, to stop the war, stop shelling, and let people get back to their work, their houses, if it is able to be called houses, because all of the city is ruined. let people out of the city. all the time, fighting, bombing, shelling. elena, sorry to interrupt you, i am just curious to know. when the phone rang and there was that moment when you realised it was her, and you had her voice, what was that moment like? i her voice, what was that moment like? ., , ~ her voice, what was that moment like? , , ., like? i was shocked because i have been waiting _ like? i was shocked because i have been waiting for— like? i was shocked because i have been waiting for the _ like? i was shocked because i have been waiting for the call— like? i was shocked because i have been waiting for the call for- like? i was shocked because i have been waiting for the call for such i like? i was shocked because i have been waiting for the call for such a | been waiting for the call for such a long time, and finally i heard her, my heartjumped really high, and of
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course i was the happiest woman in the world. i know a lot of people, they are in special groups, they send pictures in search of their relatives, they are in despair because it is too long, three weeks is too long not to be aware of the fate of their relatives. a lot of people trying to get to know some information, at least that their close people are alive and there still a chance to survive.- close people are alive and there still a chance to survive. elena, it is aood still a chance to survive. elena, it is good to — still a chance to survive. elena, it is good to talk— still a chance to survive. elena, it is good to talk to _ still a chance to survive. elena, it is good to talk to you _ still a chance to survive. elena, it is good to talk to you this - is good to talk to you this morning with at least some positive news about your mum. thank you so much for sharing that story with us this morning. that is elena, who finally heard from her mum yesterday for the first time in several weeks. so
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desperate, not knowing what is going on for so long. it is 6.37, we are going to talk about chelsea, another chapter in the potential takeover. they are hoping to get this over the line by the end of the month. they cannot sell tickets or shots at the moment, thomas tuchel thought about hiring a couple of seven seaters to drive them to their champions league game. thankfully that didn't happen. but this interview is that adversity on the pitch. the fa is in talks with the government about a half empty semifinal at wembley against crystal palace, that will not be the case. but as for the business side
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of things, there's a twist. there are fresh developments in the battle to take over at chelsea. britsh investment firm centricus, which overseas £29 billion in assets and features several chelsea season—ticket holders, confirmed its offer, saying it wants to "maintain and support existing "management to ensure chelsea's continued success." former captainjohn terry is also supporting a group which wants to buy 10% of the club to make sure it's held accountable by fans. and property developer nick candy has improved his bid, with the addition of another large international backer. we are expecting a shortlist by the end of the week, and as i say, chelsea want to get this over the line by the end of the month if they can. the fa cup semis take place at wembley next month, but liverpool and manchester city fans have called for the game to be moved from london. there will be no direct trains from liverpool or manchester on the weekend of april 16th and 17th due to engineering works, with fan groups calling for the game to be moved to a different ground. chelsea take on crystal place in the other semi.
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the fa in talks to see if they can still get that game played at wembley, but supporters wanted to be held up north. there's going to be a repeat of last season's women's fa cup final in the semis, with arsenal facing chelsea. the draw took place last night at bbc sport and was conducted by former arsenal player faye white. the top two teams in the wsl, arsenal and chelsea, face each other, with manchester city playing west ham. three—time champion phil mickelson is set to miss the masters next month for the first time in 28 years. he is taking a break from the game after his criticism of saudi arabia's regime. mickelson was involved with a saudi—backed golf series, which he hoped would reshape the pga tour, but faced a backlash for inflammatory comments he made during an interview in november, which he later called reckless. on monday, mickelson's name was removed from a list of active players competing at the tournament, which he last won in 2010. full—backs tyrick mitchell and kyle walker—peters have earned their first england call—ups after four players withdrew from gareth southgate's squad. crystal palace defender mitchell and southampton's walker—peters
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replace reece james and trent alexander—arnold, who are out with injury. aaron ramsdale and tammy abraham have also withdrawn from england's matches with switzerland and ivory coast. they're replaced by west brom's sam jonstone and aston villa striker 0llie watkins. england's interim head coach paul collingwood says he'll "wait and see" before making a decision on whether to go for the job on a more permanent basis. collingwood is currently in chage of the team for the tour of the west indies. it depends whatjobs are up for offer, we do not know until a managing director comes in. but i love being involved, i have always loved working for england, and as long as i make a difference, i will be happy. boris becker's trial in london continues. the former tennis start is accused of failing to hand over assets to settle his bankrupty debts. becker was declared bankrupt in 2017 and is alleged to have been hiding assets and transactions worth over £4.5 million. the 54—year—old's failed to hand over his trophies,
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including his 1985 wimbledon title, as well as silverware from his win at the australian open in 1991 and 1996. he denies all charges. and finally, have a look at this for a goal. this is from a game involving the gedling south bank panthers under 12s, with the team needing a goal to win it, this happened in the last minute. the goalkeeper charlie clarke with this incredible effort to seal the win. how his dad gary enjoyed that one. my my favourite bit, if you watch wrote to the end, the dad says, i got it, i taped it, which dates a little.
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my my nephew, i am trying to get him, he is well built and a great goalkeeper, but there is no glory in being a keeper. that is what he needs to see.— being a keeper. that is what he needs to see. ~., ~ .,, ., , needs to see. make the most of every opportunity- — needs to see. make the most of every opportunity- thanks — needs to see. make the most of every opportunity. thanks very _ needs to see. make the most of every opportunity. thanks very much. - it is 6.43, it felt a bit like spring this morning. good to see you, carol. good morning, great to be back, and it is gorgeous this morning in stjames's park in london. as sally mentioned, we are surrounded as far as the eye can see by all of these lovely springtime daffodils, dewi does make you feel like spring has arrived. we are right next to the mall, you can
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probably hear some of the traffic noise. the mall is of course a grand processional route in order of queen victoria, but it has seen things like coronations, state openings of parliament, and state visits and the like. a chilly start to the day in london, but not as chilly as yesterday. across the uk, temperatures this morning roughly four to 10 celsius, with patriot mist unfold in scotland. the forecast for all of us today, warm sunshine. this morning, showers across parts of the south—west of england, northern england, and parts of central england, but they will tend to fade. high pressure is firmly in charge of our weather, it is in the east at the moment, but over the next few days, it will drift across as and drift towards the west. so for the next few days, the west. so for the next few days, the weather looking settled for most. patchy mist and fog in scotland, clifton, a wee bit more cloud in scotland and england then there was yesterday, but still breaking up and we will see some
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sunshine and fair weather cloud, maybe even the odd shower in the midlands and southern scotland, but that'll be the exception rather than the rule. temperatures eight and the north to a high of potentially 20 celsius somewhere in east anglia and the south—east. through the evening and overnight, the showers will fade, mist and fog forming especially around yorkshire generally, and also the tay valley. rural areas likely to see temperatures fall away to about freezing tonight, but for most of us, just above that. tomorrow, we start off with mist and fog, which will tend to play with time, but potentially lingering across parts of eastern scotland for much of the day. for most of us tomorrow, another dry day with a lot of sunshine. the risk of a shower perhaps across eastern england and eastern scotland, but again, the exception rather than the rule, with temperatures tomorrow maybe getting up temperatures tomorrow maybe getting up as high as 21 celsius, across
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east anglia and the south—east. 0n east anglia and the south—east. on thursday, a repeat performance, winds again a lot of dry weather, a lot of settled conditions, but weather fronts starting to make some inroads across north—west scotland, and here we will see some cloud, some patchy light rain and drizzle, temperatures about 12 celsius, but as we move away from north—west scotland, you can see the increase in temperatures up into the mid—teens at least. thank you very much, carol. ignoring the noise of the cars, it looks very nice there this morning. with millions facing a huge rise in the cost of living, attention will be focused on the chancellor tomorrow, as he delivers his much—awaited spring statement. we can speak now to the shadow business secretary, jonathan reynolds. the chance we has promised the
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government he will dry to make a difference to the gust of living crisis. what would you like to see? —— at the chance we has promised —— chancellor. -- at the chance we has promised -- chancellor-— chancellor. first of all, do not make things _ chancellor. first of all, do not make things worse, _ chancellor. first of all, do not make things worse, set - chancellor. first of all, do not make things worse, set to - chancellor. first of all, do not i make things worse, set to have chancellor. first of all, do not. make things worse, set to have a large rise in national insurance for employers and employees, no other country in the g7 is raising taxes on working people at this time. but after that, on working people at this time. but afterthat, he on working people at this time. but after that, he has to focus on energy bills, the price of energy, we were talking on this programme a few weeks ago about what it would mean for an energy bill of £2000, now we're talking about £3000 by october. we have set out a clear 0ctober. we have set out a clear cause of action, we would like to see a windfall tax on the north sea oil and gas operators, so take vat and some of the levies off bills, thatis and some of the levies off bills, that is about £200 saved for everyone. forthe that is about £200 saved for everyone. for the people most in need, give them the most help, and
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expand what is called the warm homes discount on nick at up to £400, and increasing the eligibility for that surround a third of the population would get it. so you will be offering something to everyone, but the most help for those most in need. i think the chancellor simply has to act because the pressures are so huge. has to act because the pressures are so hue. . ,., ., has to act because the pressures are so hute. ., ,., ., ., , has to act because the pressures are so hue. . ,., ., ., , ., so huge. that is a lot of help. how would you — so huge. that is a lot of help. how would you find _ so huge. that is a lot of help. how would you find all— so huge. that is a lot of help. how would you find all that? _ so huge. that is a lot of help. how would you find all that? the - would you find all that? the revenue for the help — would you find all that? the revenue for the help on _ would you find all that? the revenue for the help on energy _ would you find all that? the revenue for the help on energy bills - would you find all that? the revenue for the help on energy bills would i for the help on energy bills would come first of all because of the additional revenue that comes to the exchequer, because vat increases as the same time as well, as does the inconsistent level of tax on the north sea oil operators, so you have some increases there. energy intensive businesses are very strongly hit by the rising cost of energy, and if you start to see factories closing or not being able to expand, again that would hit
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jobs, very seriously indeed. would ou jobs, very seriously indeed. would you support _ jobs, very seriously indeed. would you support the — jobs, very seriously indeed. would you support the proposed - jobs, very seriously indeed. would you support the proposed cut - jobs, very seriously indeed. would you support the proposed cut in i jobs, very seriously indeed. would you support the proposed cut in fuel duty? lode you support the proposed cut in fuel du ? ~ you support the proposed cut in fuel du ? . , , , ., you support the proposed cut in fuel du ? ~ , , ., , . duty? we will support anything which has some sort _ duty? we will support anything which has some sort of— duty? we will support anything which has some sort of impact _ duty? we will support anything which has some sort of impact on _ duty? we will support anything which has some sort of impact on the i has some sort of impact on the pressure, but let's be clear, a 5p cut in fuel duty, it is not nothing but i would say it is not commensurate with the scale of the challenge. i think the chancellor could as well cut fuel duty by up to 7p, so i would like to see more than that, but if he does do that we will support it, but we will still make the case for real help on energy bills and not to proceed with the rise in lifting national insurance even higher. lode rise in lifting national insurance even higher-— rise in lifting national insurance even higher. we will see exactly what rishi _ even higher. we will see exactly what rishi sunak _ even higher. we will see exactly what rishi sunak has _ even higher. we will see exactly what rishi sunak has planned i even higher. we will see exactly i what rishi sunak has planned when he makes the statement tomorrow. i would like to also ask you about what has been happening with p&0 in the last few days, reports in the last 24—hour is that some government ministers were aware that moves
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would be made by a p&0 in terms of these sackings before they happen. what sort of key questions do you think particularly the transport secretary grant shapps has to answer around that? this secretary grant shapps has to answer around that?— around that? this is an absolute national disgrace, _ around that? this is an absolute national disgrace, everybody i around that? this is an absolute i national disgrace, everybody should reject what we have seen on p&0 ferries. good business do not want to see this kind of behaviour, if it is true that people are replacing the existing crew on £180 an hour, how can we build the economy we need on those kind of wages? i was in parliament on the urgent question we had yesterday, and i was there when the transport secretary revealed he did know the night before. i want to know what sort of questions the government were asking, it was clear when that memo was sent to the government this was something out of the ordinary, unfortunately businesses often have to restructure, i would not expect a cabinet minister to be told of every case of that, but to be told yesterday that they knew in advance what was going on, firstly they should have moved to stop that, and
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they still can. no good saying it will help people getjobs we have been sacked in this way. we cannot allow this to stand, because of this becomes the template how these things are done in the uk from now on, there is no future for good businesses and people who want to see the kind of economy most people should want if that is the case, so i still want to see the government make absolutely clear to p&0 ferries this is unacceptable behaviour, they will not be allowed to operate in this way, i think there is still a window for that and i hope they do so. ~ ., y ., window for that and i hope they do so. ~ ., , ., ., ., , so. would you support a move to help them trading — so. would you support a move to help them trading in _ so. would you support a move to help them trading in the _ so. would you support a move to help them trading in the uk? _ so. would you support a move to help them trading in the uk? -- _ so. would you support a move to help them trading in the uk? -- stop i so. would you support a move to help them trading in the uk? -- stop them them trading in the uk? —— stop them trading, to the sanctions need to be that strong? the trading, to the sanctions need to be that strong?— that strong? the finds of the action that strong? the finds of the action that may be — that strong? the finds of the action that may be coming _ that strong? the finds of the action that may be coming the _ that strong? the finds of the action that may be coming the way - that strong? the finds of the action that may be coming the way of i that strong? the finds of the action that may be coming the way of the | that may be coming the way of the company, they have simply priced it is the cost of doing business, so i would support anything which makes it clear that the cost of doing this will outweigh any sort of benefit they think their shareholders might accrue from operating in this way. so i would not rule anything out, because i'm so outraged by the way
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this is being done and i will not allow this kind of behaviour to become the norm in the uk. n am become the norm in the uk. i am interested _ become the norm in the uk. i am interested in _ become the norm in the uk. i am interested in what _ become the norm in the uk. i am interested in what sort _ become the norm in the uk. i am interested in what sort of - interested in what sort of sanctions should be used. if you look at the way p&0 do things, many companies register some parts of their company in different countries, some of the names of their ships, spirit of britain, pride of canterbury, pride of hull, those are some of the ferries they have got, should they not be able to have those british references on their ships? l not be able to have those british references on their ships? i have the transport — references on their ships? i have the transport secretary - references on their ships? i have the transport secretary say i references on their ships? i have the transport secretary say this. the transport secretary say this yesterday, and i understand that sentiment, but i do not think renaming the ships is the answer to this, i think renaming the ships is the answer to this, ithink it renaming the ships is the answer to this, i think it is the kind of behaviour we have we have seen is the answer to that. any company registered anywhere around the world operating on the mainland uk would still have to operate by our employment laws. that employment law is not there, so i would like to see
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that address. if a ferry is operating within the united kingdom, to me they should have the laws of the united kingdom are applied to them, the employment laws. i still think it is likely they have broken the law, therefore the sanctions should include criminal sanctions and be very severe. what worries me yesterday as the messages we are getting from cabinet ministers is that yes this is bad, but we will just help people find newjobs and prevented in future. just help people find new “obs and prevented in future._ just help people find new “obs and prevented in future. would you book a holiday on — prevented in future. would you book a holiday on a _ prevented in future. would you book a holiday on a p&o _ prevented in future. would you book a holiday on a p&o ferry _ prevented in future. would you book a holiday on a p&o ferry at - prevented in future. would you book a holiday on a p&o ferry at the i a holiday on a p&0 ferry at the moment? a holiday on a p&o ferry at the moment?— a holiday on a p&o ferry at the moment? ~ , , ., . ., . a holiday on a p&o ferry at the moment? ~ , .,. ., . m moment? absolutely no chance. can i ask as well about _ moment? absolutely no chance. can i ask as well about what _ moment? absolutely no chance. can i ask as well about what is _ moment? absolutely no chance. can i ask as well about what is happening i ask as well about what is happening in ukraine? we have seeing continuing calls from president zelinsky about a no—fly zone, how concerned are you about the escalation in the violence we are seeing? escalation in the violence we are seeinu ? ., .. , ., escalation in the violence we are seeinu? ., , ., ,, ., seeing? you can see that russia has failed on its — seeing? you can see that russia has failed on its objectives _ seeing? you can see that russia has failed on its objectives and - seeing? you can see that russia has failed on its objectives and is - failed on its objectives and is therefore resorting to the kind of tactics we have seen unfortunately russia use in the past, particularly
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in syria. the problem with a no—fly zone is that it is tantamount to a declaration of war by nato, and there has to be a way of increasing there has to be a way of increasing the pressure on russia without seeing the risk of further escalation. it is clear to me that the sanctions on russia are starting to bite, reports of shortages in supermarkets, what they have effectively been able to do as a global community is isolate the russian economy, for the first time an economy of that size from the global economy, so that is severe. russia will have problems supplying its forces in ukraine as it stands, but we have to continue every bit of support we can to the ukrainians while knowing the medium term pressure is one that russia cannot sustain. nobody can feel to be moved ljy sustain. nobody can feel to be moved by the images we are seeing from places like mariupol, and people have to be held to account, the russians will have to be held to account for the kind of war crimes we are seeing. fight! account for the kind of war crimes we are seeing-— account for the kind of war crimes we are seeing. and when you hear
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resent we are seeing. and when you hear present itiden _ we are seeing. and when you hear present biden saying _ we are seeing. and when you hear present biden saying he _ we are seeing. and when you hear present biden saying he has i we are seeing. and when you hear i present biden saying he has concerns about the potential use of chemical weapons by vladimir putin, do you share that concern? lode weapons by vladimir putin, do you share that concern?— share that concern? we have seen aaain share that concern? we have seen again unfortunately _ share that concern? we have seen again unfortunately russia - share that concern? we have seen again unfortunately russia has i share that concern? we have seen i again unfortunately russia has used tactics like this or been part of those in syria, so we know that has been part of the game plan. i think what we are all concerned about is, is vladimir putin at this stage a rational actor, and is he getting the true information from his military as to what the situation is? i think we have to be absolutely clear that the response to any further escalation on the russian side particularly the use of chemical or biological weapons again would see a further ratcheting up of the pressure of the action we take against russia, but clearly that is the danger. and because russia has failed already on its own terms, it wanted this invasion over in 48 hours, a completely unrealistic picture of its objectives and indeed of its own capabilities, because they have failed in that, the danger is we do not know what was planned, there probably was no plan for the conflict to reach a stage like this.
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so yes we have to be vigilant, but we also have to have faith and continue to move away from our dependence on the rest of europe's dependent on russian fossil fuel. jonathan reynolds, thank you for your time this morning, good to talk to you. we will be live in ukraine injust a few to you. we will be live in ukraine in just a few minutes. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alison earle. around 300 people who've survived terrorist attacks are calling for better government support. survivors against terror will meet with the home secretary to call for a scheme which includes immediate financial help. it comes on the fifth anniversary of the attack on westminster bridge. four people were killed and 50 were injured when khalid masood drove into crowds and stabbed a policeman. the met says it's doing all it can to identify threats. london remains a safe city. we have, i'm absolutely confident, a world—class partnership
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with a range of organisations, most obviously our intelligence partners. but we should never take for granted that safety. a teenage girl has died after a collision involving an e—scooter and a van in east london. it happened just after 1:30 yesterday afternoon on green street in east ham. police are appealing for information. millions of tonnes of soil excavated for crossrail have been used to create a nature reserve. rspb wallasea is made up of london clay which was carried out to the essex coast by boat. it's now become a vital habitat for wildlife. it's a bit like the heathrow of the bird world, really, it's on the east atlantic flyway. there's literally millions of birds travelling up and down this flyway, and the dropping in stopping, wintering, passage birds, and all of these sites are vitally important.
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travel now, this is how tfl services are looking right now. there are severe delays on the 0verground between highbury & islington and west croydon, crystal palace, clapham junction and new cross. there's also a reduced service on the 0verground from stratford to richmond/ claphamjunction. there are minor delays on tfl rail between liverpool street and shenfield. there's no service on the northern line between moorgate and kennington due to long term upgrade works. 0nto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. the springlike weather is set to continue across the capital for the rest of this week. there's a lot more sunshine to come in the forecast and with high—pressure dominating, then it's looking dry or mostly dry. just a small chance of a few isolated showers. some dramatic temperature contrasts as well, between the daytimes and the night times. that's fairly usual to see at this time of year. but temperatures by day will be well above the average. this morning it is a milder start to the day that we saw this time yesterday, and it's frost free out there. temperatures overnight between five and seven celsius in central london. a bit more cloud around but that cloud is going to be clearing. there could just be one or two
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isolated showers around today but they will be very few or far between. for the vast majority of us, it will be a completely dry day with a light south—easterly wind again and top temperatures peaking at 19 or maybe even 20 celsius. a chillier night tonight, temperatures will drop very close to freezing. clear skies and light winds, a bit of mist around may be into wednesday. and the sunshine is set to continue. as high—pressure moves way westwards as we head through thursday and friday, it will turn a bit cloudier and consequently a touch cooler too. that's it for now. you'll find more updates on our website at the usual address. i'm back in around half an hour.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. 0ur headlines today. president biden says putin "has his back to the wall" and may be preparing to use chemical and biological weapons in ukraine. he's already used chemical weapons in the past and we should be careful about what's about to come. a 17—month—old girl has died after being attacked by a dog in her home in st helens. five years on from the westminster bridge terror attack, we find out about the campaign for better support for survivors. good morning from stjames's park in london where we are surrounded by lots of springlike daffodils. the
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weather today is springlike with some of us seeing temperatures as high as 20 degrees. all of the details throughout the programme. the secret to 70 years of marriage. in the run up to the queen's platinum jubilee we speak to cyril and muriel who say they've never had an argument. it's tuesday 22nd march. president biden has warned there are clear signs russia is preparing to use chemical and biological weapons in ukraine. mr biden said president putin "had his back to the wall" as a result of ukrainian military resistance, meaning there was a danger he would resort to more severe tactics. meanwhile, president zelensky has again appealed for direct talks with mr putin in an attempt to try to end the conflict, as hywel griffith reports. russian repression against ukrainian resolve. people in kherson say they were fired on as they protested against occupation. there are reports of injuries. president zelensky said
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it was a rally for freedom. something the russian military hasn't experienced. saying they were sent here as if sentenced to death, and sentenced to shame. in kyiv, eight people are reported dead after shelling on a residential area. russia said it was because rockets were stored here. mariupol in the south has become a shell. a further 3000 people were evacuated from here yesterday. satellite images show smoke rising across the city. america has warned that president putin may soon turn to using chemical weapons, following false claims that ukraine was poised to use them. his back is against the wall. now he's talking about new false flags, he's asserting that we, america, have biological as well as chemical weapons in europe. simply not true. i guarantee you.
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they are also suggesting that ukraine has biological and chemical weapons in ukraine. that is a clear sign he is considering using both of those. the toll of this war is already hard to bear. sergei's brother igor was killed when ukrainian barracks at the east of 0desa were bombed. here, the russian invasion feels relentless. "this is our land," he says, "we live here. where should we run?". for many ukrainians, there is no choice, they stay and cling to daily rituals. president zelensky has called again for direct talks with vladimir putin to end the fighting. but for now, hopes of a ceasefire seem out of reach. hywel griffith, bbc news. let's get an update now from our correspondentjonah fisher, who joins us from the western ukrainian city of lviv. thank you for being on the programme
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with us this morning. it appears that some of those russian advances have slowed. what do we know about the way they might adjust their tactics in the coming days? yeah, the russian _ tactics in the coming days? yeah, the russian ground _ tactics in the coming days? yeah, the russian ground forces - tactics in the coming days? yeah, the russian ground forces have i the russian ground forces have certainly been stalled across most of ukraine, around kyiv, around kharkiv in the southern part of ukraine. the one place where they have been making some territory is in malleable, —— in memory —— in in malleable, —— in memory -- in mariupol. there is a in malleable, —— in memory —— in mariupol. there is a sign they have been shifting their tactical emphasis in the last week from trying to take cities on the ground to bombing them into submission, thatis to bombing them into submission, that is what we are seeing in mariupol and kharkiv. we could end “p mariupol and kharkiv. we could end up seeing that in kyiv over the next days and weeks. that's why we are
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having this renewed talk about biological, chemicalweapons attacks. the fear is that with ukrainians putting up such stiff resistance almost everywhere, that russia, president putin, may be reaching for the next level, if you like, in his arsenal and that could well be something like chemical or biological weapons which would of course be devastating for the civilians who live in any of the areas where that is used. thank you very much. — areas where that is used. thank you very much. the _ areas where that is used. thank you very much, the latest _ areas where that is used. thank you very much, the latest from - areas where that is used. thank you very much, the latest from lviv i areas where that is used. thank you very much, the latest from lviv life | very much, the latest from lviv life this morning. let's get the latest from russia now. 0ur correspondent caroline davies is in moscow this morning. we may have a problem with connecting with moscow at the moment? we are expecting to hear from our correspondent caroline davies, real concerns about what president biden said, the possibility that vladimir putin could be thinking of using chemical
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or biological weapons. i think we can talk to carolina. we are hearing more about a crackdown on the media and other organisations this morning, what more can you tell us? yes, more and more of these media institutions are being added to a banned list in russia, euronews added yesterday, they cannot broadcast here in russia. yesterday a russianjudge determined broadcast here in russia. yesterday a russian judge determined that mehta, the authorisation —— the operation of facebook, instagram and whatsapp, is now and extremist organisation, meta. facebook were accused of stopping russian media being put out so it was banned, and instagram was banned because they were accused of not taking down post inciting violence towards the president and russian troops. and also having troops calling for
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people to demonstrate, which is in violation of russia's anti—protest laws if these things are not sanctioned by the authorities which they very rarely are. at this stage, people who post on them, it's thought that those people are not going to be falling foul of the rules, but at the moment people are very concerned that that could change. if any businesses use links to their instagram pages or facebook pages, if they pay for an advert that could be on one of those channels, that could be considered to be funding an extremist organisation. this term, extremist organisation, has previously been used for groups like islamic state. but now more recently it has been used to describe things like alexei navalny�*s foundation, the anti—kremlin critic, who had his foundation determined to be an extremist organisation. surreal crackdown here in russia for anyone in russia to be able to see what the rest of the world is talking about
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about what is happening in ukraine. caroline, thank you, live in moscow. the transport secretary has admitted he was aware of plans to sack 800 p80 workers the night before staff were informed. however, grant schapps insists he didn't know the full the scale of the mass redundancy plan until the following day. 0ur political correspondent, jonathan blake has more. there could be some interesting fallout from this, jonathan reynolds from the labour party said there were some definite questions that still need to be answered. indeed, i think he called — still need to be answered. indeed, i think he called it _ still need to be answered. indeed, i think he called it a _ still need to be answered. indeed, i think he called it a national - think he called it a national scandal, the way p&0 had behaved towards those staff it made redundant last week in such controversial circumstances. the transport secretary grant shapps accepted in the house of commons yesterday in some heated exchanges with his labour opposite number, louise hay, that he was aware with the plans of p80 to sack staff before it happened, the evening before it happened, the evening before it happened, but he went on
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to say that p&0 had previously in the last couple of years made many staff redundant and clearly the assumption was in government that it would be done properly. at least following procedure and protocol, giving people notice and with the right checks and balances in place. he says his concern was not sparked until the he sought the manner at which's went about it, people were told on video link with very little notice and security staff were brought in with agency staff replacing those crew immediately. labour say a memo sent to the department for transport ministers on the day that this happens shows that the government was accepting what p&0 was doing and indeed made no efforts to challenge the way they were going about it. the government has said it is reviewing its contracts with p&0 has said it is reviewing its contracts with p80 and its parent company, dp world. it's asking the insolvency service to check again
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whether the company did everything it should have done before resorting to this last result of mass redundancies and also safety checks will be carried out on the boats to ensure the new crew can operate them safely. while there is a lot of anger at government about this, and from the government opponents as well, there is not any real sign that they are going to be able to do anything about it to take p&0 to task for what they have done or get anywhere near reversing those redundancies.— anywhere near reversing those redundancies. ., ~ , ., , . redundancies. thank you very much, jonathan itlake- _ a 17—month—old girl has died, after being attacked by a dog in her home in st helens. merseyside police say the animal was bought by the family only a week ago. 0ur reporter yunus mulla is at the scene this morning. yunus, what more do we know? sally, the investigation here is in its early stages. police have said this was a tragic accident in which a 17—month—old girl has died.
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0fficers a 17—month—old girl has died. officers were called here at this estate in the blackbrook area of st helens just before 40 yesterday afternoon after reports that the girl had been attacked by the family's pet dog. she was taken to hospital but sadly died of her injuries. the dog was handed into police and officers say it was humanely destroyed. so far officers have spoken to a number of people here and carried out house—to—house inquiries, had a look at cctv footage. but they are trying to establish the history of the dog. they say it was only bought last week by the family, they want to trace its previous owner. the family are said to be absolutely devastated by what's happened, and police say their thoughts are very much with their thoughts are very much with the family at this time. what will happen next is that tests will be carried out on that dog to determine its breed, and whether that breed is
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a legal or illegal under the dangerous dogs act. a legal or illegal under the dancerous dos act. . ~ , dangerous dogs act. thank you very much, dangerous dogs act. thank you very much. yunus. _ dangerous dogs act. thank you very much, yunus, live _ dangerous dogs act. thank you very much, yunus, live in _ dangerous dogs act. thank you very much, yunus, live in st _ dangerous dogs act. thank you very much, yunus, live in st helens i dangerous dogs act. thank you very much, yunus, live in st helens thisl much, yunus, live in st helens this morning. a very nice morning in parts of the uk, springlike, as carol is proving, out and about amongst the daffodils. good morning, yes, we are surrounded by daffodils. spring really does feel can hear the geese honking, there are canada and egyptian geese, and on the other side, beautiful weeping willows. there is a bit more cloud this morning in london, this will break, the sound will be out at the temperatures will soar. all of us have some warm sunshine today, the chart of a few showers. a few showers in northern, central and south—western england will fade this morning, and patchy fog across parts of scotland but most are seeing some
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sunshine. has favour the cloud develops through the day, we could see the art shower coming through across the midlands and southern scotland. the showers will be the exception rather than the rule. temperatures ranging from eight in the north to highs of 19 in the south—east. average temperatures at this time of year are ten in the north to 13 in the south. through the big and overnight, the showers will fade, we will cease and patchy mist and fog form, especially around the vale of york and the tay valley. a chilly night in rural areas with temperatures freezing, so they could be a touch of frost, but for cities, the temperature is will hold up. the mist and fog could linger across parts of the teesside region as we go through the day. across eastern scotland and england, it will be the exception rather than the rule, and for most it will be another sunny
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day. temperatures tomorrow potentially could reach... degrees across parts of east anglia and the south—east. this finely, settled weather continues into the weekend. good to know, well done, i wonder if that was a random leaf blower. $5 that was a random leaf blower. as soon that was a random leaf blower. s soon as that was a random leaf blower. is soon as it came on, it interfered with the signal!— with the signal! they are cutting the crass! with the signal! they are cutting the grass! tell— with the signal! they are cutting the grass! tell them _ with the signal! they are cutting the grass! tell them to - with the signal! they are cutting the grass! tell them to stop i with the signal! they are cutting i the grass! tell them to stop while ou are the grass! tell them to stop while you are on — the grass! tell them to stop while you are on the — the grass! tell them to stop while you are on the tv! _ the grass! tell them to stop while you are on the tv! please, - the grass! tell them to stop while you are on the tv! please, stop! i think we got _ you are on the tv! please, stop! i think we got the _ you are on the tv! please, stop! i think we got the gist _ you are on the tv! please, stop! i think we got the gist of _ you are on the tv! please, stop! i think we got the gist of that. i it's been five years since terrorist khalid masood drove his car into crowds on westminster bridge, before stabbing pc keith palmer to death outside the houses of parliament. five people were killed and 50 others were injured in the attack. travis frain suffered serious injuries but survived, and since that day he's been campaigning for better support
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for victims of terrorism. hejoins us now. good morning. thank you so much for talking to us this morning on the programme. i know this is a really difficult day for you in many ways, on many levels, how are you feeling about today?— about today? yeah, i'm feeling very mixed feelings _ about today? yeah, i'm feeling very mixed feelings i _ about today? yeah, i'm feeling very mixed feelings i think— about today? yeah, i'm feeling very mixed feelings i think today. - about today? yeah, i'm feeling very mixed feelings i think today. it i mixed feelings i think today. it doesn't feel like it has been five years. but at the same time, i am glad that we are finally able to gather in person in london and actually give the anniversary of the recognition it deserves a. haifa actually give the anniversary of the recognition it deserves a.— recognition it deserves a. how will ou be recognition it deserves a. how will you be marking — recognition it deserves a. how will you be marking the _ recognition it deserves a. how will you be marking the anniversary, i recognition it deserves a. how will. you be marking the anniversary, how will it work today? we you be marking the anniversary, how will it work today?— will it work today? we have organised _ will it work today? we have organised a _ will it work today? we have organised a couple - will it work today? we have organised a couple of- will it work today? we have i organised a couple of different events and i think the main thing really, and the main theme i would underline, is the fact of giving people an opportunity to gather together and form that sort of community, i guess. and support one another. ., ., , ., ., another. you have been on a mission to improve —
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another. you have been on a mission to improve care _ another. you have been on a mission to improve care for— another. you have been on a mission to improve care for terror _ another. you have been on a mission to improve care for terror attack i to improve care for terror attack survivors. tell us why that is so important to youdare and how that has been helping you and about the survivors charter.— survivors charter. shore. as you have mentioned, _ survivors charter. shore. as you have mentioned, over— survivors charter. shore. as you have mentioned, over the i survivors charter. shore. as you have mentioned, over the past i survivors charter. shore. as you i have mentioned, over the past few years i have been involved in campaigning for various improvements in the way in which survivors of terrorism are supported, because in the aftermath of the attack in which i was involved, i didn't feel that the support we received were sufficient in any way. today, we are survey —— launching the survivors charter, which is a document which has been a year in the making, around 60 pages long now and it is a result of research that myself and many other survivors of terrorism have done into eight different nations with the goal of comparing these eight different nations, to
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find the best practices, if you will, in ways in which they support victims of terrorism. this has formed a survivors charter which is to provide the government, potentially in other countries as well but primarily in this country, with a clear path forward for improving those eight key tenets which affect victims of terrorism the most. ~ . ., , , , which affect victims of terrorism the most. ~ . . , , , , the most. what was missing in terms of su- ort the most. what was missing in terms of support you _ the most. what was missing in terms of support you might _ the most. what was missing in terms of support you might have _ the most. what was missing in terms of support you might have needed i of support you might have needed after this attack? it is of support you might have needed after this attack?— after this attack? it is a range of areas. in particular, _ after this attack? it is a range of areas. in particular, i— after this attack? it is a range of areas. in particular, i always i areas. in particular, ialways harken back to the physiotherapy side of things, the fact that, and i should foreground this by saying that those eight days i spent in hospital in london, i received terrific care. the doctors and police were in and out of my ward pretty much on the hour. but the
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minute that i was discharged from hospital and travelled back home to lancashire, things dropped off quite considerably. and as i say, physiotherapy is a good example of this. there was an expectation that you essentially check in with your gp, when you can get an appointment, and they would coordinate the support. but we cannot expect that for example a gp surgery in a small town in lancashire would know how to deal with issues of national and potentially even international scale like this. and the physiotherapy for example in my own case, i was fed to the nhs and then i had to face several waiting lists and then inevitably, the support i was offered through nhs led physiotherapy services was not sufficient for the range of injuries i sustained. i used my student loan at the time to pay for private
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physiotherapy. that's something that i think quite obviously i should not have had to do. but it's also something that is quite a bad reflection on us as a country. and i think it's really important that we improve these services so that we can help people who might be affected in future. fight! can help people who might be affected in future.— affected in future. and also, travis, unbelievably, - affected in future. and also, travis, unbelievably, people affected in future. and also, i travis, unbelievably, people were not always kind to you, where they? as he recovered from this attack. i know at one point he was subjected to online abuse. at the worst point of your life, that must have made things even worse. {iii of your life, that must have made things even worse.— things even worse. of course. it's difficult, things even worse. of course. it's difficult. and _ things even worse. of course. it's difficult, and i _ things even worse. of course. it's difficult, and i think— things even worse. of course. it's difficult, and i think the _ things even worse. of course. it's difficult, and i think the thing i difficult, and i think the thing that i would say is, i'm a grown bad and i can deal with it in many ways as awful as it is, but these sort of people who send these messages are also sending them to young victims for example in the manchester arena attack. i will not touch a bit much more but that underlines exactly why
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we need to be paying attention to these issues. the reality is there are a range of different issues, including as you have said trolling, which can affect survivors of terrorism. and at the moment it is a critical gap in the way we as a country respond to terror attacks. we have terrific security services and counterterrorism policing and a whole range of people working in civil service and government, but it's that support for victims, because the reality is, the way in which we support victims, the way in which we support victims, the way in which we support victims, the way in which we ensure that they can make as full recovery is possible, inevitably demonstrate those people who have omitted acts like this that it is not going to go unheard and that we will support those affected and thus mitigate the effects of any form of terrorism. fight! and thus mitigate the effects of any form of terrorism.— form of terrorism. and as you have touched on. _ form of terrorism. and as you have touched on, one _ form of terrorism. and as you have touched on, one of _ form of terrorism. and as you have touched on, one of the _ form of terrorism. and as you have touched on, one of the most i touched on, one of the most important things you have been able to do is connect people who have been affected by terrorist attacks.
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how important is it that other people who have been through a similar experience can all talk to each other? it’s similar experience can all talk to each other?— each other? it's incredibly important _ each other? it's incredibly important. in _ each other? it's incredibly important. in november. each other? it's incredibly. important. in november 20 each other? it's incredibly - important. in november 20 in -- each other? it's incredibly _ important. in november 20 in -- 2021 important. in november 20 in —— 2021 we launched a project where survivors are leading the charge. i would like to think that the survivors charter, we have set out a road map. this is something that the government committed to in their manifesto back in the 2019 election, i believe, and we should hopefully have a clear path forward now. and i think personally we need a timescale, a timeline, if you will, to say when they are going to consult on the charter. because in the interim as you have mentioned, survivors are offering peer—to—peer support to one another. as much as thatis support to one another. as much as that is beneficial, we need those official state—run services as well, i think. official state-run services as well, i think. ., , official state-run services as well, ithink. ., , ., ~ official state-run services as well, ithink. ., , ., . i think. travis, thank you so much for talking — i think. travis, thank you so much for talking to _ i think. travis, thank you so much for talking to us. _ i think. travis, thank you so much for talking to us. thank _ i think. travis, thank you so much
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for talking to us. thank you - i think. travis, thank you so much for talking to us. thank you for i for talking to us. thank you for havin: for talking to us. thank you for having me- _ for talking to us. thank you for having me. travis _ for talking to us. thank you for having me. travis frain - for talking to us. thank you for having me. travis frain who i for talking to us. thank you for | having me. travis frain who will for talking to us. thank you for - having me. travis frain who will be attendin: having me. travis frain who will be attending the _ having me. travis frain who will be attending the ceremonies - having me. travis frain who will be attending the ceremonies to - having me. travis frain who will be attending the ceremonies to mark| having me. travis frain who will be i attending the ceremonies to mark the fifth anniversary of that awful terrorist attack today. as the country celebrates the queen's platinum jubilee this year, here at breakfast, we're marking the occasion by speaking to others who are toasting 70 years of something special. cyril and muriel sansom met at the end of the second world war and today is their 70th wedding anniversary. john maguire went to meet them. love you. after 70 years of marriage, muriel and cyril still hold hands whenever they can, and they say, never argue. i can honestly say, we have never rowed. we have had a difference of opinion, but we have never rowed. one or the other of us will give in. usually it's me. but, no, we like the same things. and cyril plucked up the courage to suggest a trip to the cinema
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which almost didn't happen. i came home and i said to my mum, he wants to take me, what was it, to the pictures, wasn't it? yeah, down in peckham. and i said, i don't think i'll go. "yes, you will, my girl, you promised the lad. you'll go." so thanks to muriel�*s mother, the rest is history. and a family that includes five grandchildren and five great—grandchildren. one of them, maddy, is helping her great—grandmother to maintain her famous sartorial standards. you would dress up, you liked your high heel shoes, didn't you? oh, yeah. and i liked everything that matched. if i'd got a green pair of shoes... gloves, hat, shoes. muriel was a hairdresser. she started work when the war was on still, and she worked for the same firm. it was the only hairdressing firm
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in the city of london. she left school when she was 13, 14. 14. as you did in those days. i was iii on the friday, and i started work on the monday. after the war, they were kept apart by cyril's national service in the raf. and for a time, their engagement was called off. and i had a phone call, and it was muriel. "cyril, i'd like to come back again with you, would you mind?" i said, i'll move in tonight! i'd already got a date with one of the girls at haringey. and when she phoned me, i knew straightaway, that's it. no good mucking about with other young girls. so, other young girls missed out, and seven decades later, their love is stronger than ever.
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typified by their nightly routine. before we get into bed, she comes up and says, and we hold hands, and she gives me a little kiss and we then go to our sides of the bed. we both say, good night, good night. and we just hold hands like that. just one of the secrets of their success and 70 years of love and marriage. john maguire, bbc news, suffolk. well, they are adorable. i think i love them- _ well, they are adorable. i think i love them. cyril _ well, they are adorable. i think i love them. cyril and _ well, they are adorable. i think i love them. cyril and muriel, - well, they are adorable. i think i | love them. cyril and muriel, hand holding, the key to everything. as we lead up to the queen's platinum jubilee, bbc breakfast would love to hear from you. if you're celebrating 70 years of something special or have memories of meeting the queen please get in touch. you can email us at bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk or tweet using the hashtag #bbcbreakfast. we have set the bar quite high with cereal and muriel. we
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we have set the bar quite high with cereal and muriel.— cereal and muriel. we may have eaked cereal and muriel. we may have peaked too _ cereal and muriel. we may have peaked too soon! _ cereal and muriel. we may have peaked too soon! i'm _ cereal and muriel. we may have peaked too soon! i'm sure - cereal and muriel. we may have - peaked too soon! i'm sure someone out there has _ peaked too soon! i'm sure someone out there has got _ peaked too soon! i'm sure someone out there has got a _ peaked too soon! i'm sure someone out there has got a radiant - peaked too soon! i'm sure someone out there has got a radiant story - peaked too soon! i'm sure someone out there has got a radiant story to | out there has got a radiant story to share and we would like to share that with our viewers. so do get in touch. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm alison earle. people who've survived terror attacks are calling for better access to mental health and financial support. the appeal by the group survivors against terror comes on the fifth anniversary of the attack on westminster bridge. 5 people were killed and 50 were injured when khalid masood drove into crowds and stabbed a policeman. the met says it's doing all it can to identify threats. london remains a safe city. we have, i'm absolutely confident, a world—class partnership with a range of organisations, most obviously our intelligence partners. but we should never take for granted that safety.
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a teenage girl has died after a collision involving an e—scooter and a van in east london. it happened just after 1.30 yesterday afternoon on green street in east ham. police are appealing for information. millions of tonnes of soil excavated for crossrail has been used to create a nature reserve. rspb wallasea is made up of london clay which was carried out to the essex coast by boat. it's now become a vital habitat for wildlife. it's a bit like the heathrow of the bird world, really, it's on the east atlantic flyway. there's literally millions of birds travelling up and down this flyway, and the dropping in, stopping, wintering, passage birds, and all of these sites are vitally important. travel now — this is how tfl services are looking right now.
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there's no service on the 0verground between new cross gate and west croydon/ crystal palace and surrey quays and new cross and highbury & islington and dalstonjunction. there are severe delays between dalstonjunction and clapham junction. there are minor delays on tfl rail between liverpool street and shenfield. there's no service on the northern line between moorgate and kennington due to long—term upgrade works. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello. good morning. the spring warmth will continue for the rest of the week, there's a lot more sunshine to come in the forecast, and it's looking dry or mostly dry, with high pressure dominating. some dramatic temperature contrast between daytime and night—time temperatures, but daytime temperatures, but daytime temperatures well above average. a milder start today than we saw yesterday, and frost free out there, temperatures overnight between five and seven celsius in central london, and seven celsius in central london, a bit more clout around, but will be clear and, could be one or two isolated showers around today, but
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very few and far between. for the vast majority, a clear and dry day, with a live south—easterly wind, and top ten just peeking at 19 or maybe even 20 celsius. a cold night tonight, temperature is dropping close to freezing, clear skies and light winds, some missed around may be into wednesday, when the sunshine is set to continue, but as the high pressure moves westwards as we had through thursday and friday, it will turn cloudy and consequently a touch cooler, too. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to sally and dan. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. let's bring you up—to—date with everything that has been happening in ukraine overnight. hywel griffith is here with us. morning sally, morning dan. lets start with news coming out of the united states overnight — president biden has warned that there are clear signs
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vladimir putin may be preparing to use chemical and biological weapons in ukraine. he said false claims by russia that ukraine had these types of weapons suggested it was considering using both. they're also suggesting that ukraine has biological and chemical weapons in ukraine. that is a clear sign he is considering using both of those. he has already used chemical weapons in the past, and we should be careful what is about to come. this footage — verified by the bbc — shows thermobaric rockets, also known as vacuum bombs, are already being launched against ukraine. they are hugely destructive and their use against civilians is banned by the un. russia also claims to have launched hypersonic missiles — which can travel at five times the speed of sound — for the first time in combat in western ukraine. the ministry of defence here in the uk says that's intended to detract from a lack of progress on the ground.
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the mod says their impact is likely to be very limited, and unlikely to materially affect the outcome of the russian campaign. meanwhile, ukraine's president, volodymyrzelenksy, has repeated his call for direct talks with the russian leader to try to put an end to the fighting. but in an interview broadcast on ukrainian tv he said that such a meeting would be unlikely to lead to an agreement on security guarantees or constitutional changes. he went on to say those decisions would need to be put to a referendum. translation: i believe that until such time - as we have a meeting with the president of the russian federation in any format, i have repeated this and offered this for a few years, i think that without this meeting, you cannot truly understand what they are prepared to do in order to stop the war, and what they are prepared to do if we are not ready for this or that compromise. on the ground, there is no let—up in the violence as rescue teams race to put out
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fires and clear the rubble from destroyed buildings like this shopping centre in kyiv hit by russian air strikes and reduced to rubble, it's been confirmed that eight people died in the attack. the russian defence ministry said rockets were being stored there. the ukrainian government says a further 8,000 people were evacuated from conflict zones on monday, including around 3,000 people from the besieged city of mariupol. ukraine is still refusing to give up the city in the face of relentless russian assaults. and across the country, we're hearing remarkable stories of resistance — everyone from tennis players to actors and musicians — including this lute player in kyiv — joining the territorial army to defend their nation in the face of relentless russian assaults. when jockey rachael blackmore first took to the saddle, she only ever expected to compete as an amateur.
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but seven years later, she's made history by becoming the first female rider to win the coveted cheltenham gold cup. she described the victory as "fulfilling an impossible dream." bbc sport's patrick gearey takes a look at her astonishing career so far. i dreamt of riding in cheltenham one day, but never did i ever think i'd be riding favourites and riding winners. rachael blackmore's life isn't about breaking through barriers, but hurdling them at speed. here's the latest — the cheltenham gold cup, one of horse racing's biggest prizes never before won by a female jockey. in the past few years, she's got used to firsts. one of sport's biggest glass ceilings was smashed when irish jockey rachael blackmore became the first woman ever to ride the winner of the grand national.
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that helped her win the bbc�*s world sport star award for 2021. congratulations. there's your trophy! amazing. you made history this year, rachael. i know. incredible. you know, i definitely had people pulling out all the stops to get the votes in over here. and yeah, like you just feel this makes you feel very special. the girl from tipperary, who'd wanted to be a vet, is out racing her dreams, and for those willing to clear those fences, there's an example to follow, way out in front. patrick geary, bbc news. rachael joins us now. i saw the huge grin across your face when really what's the covers from the cheltenham gold cup last week. what a year you have had, rachael. have you had time to stop and reflect and think about things? it reflect and think about things? it has been an incredible 12 months, it
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really has. ifelt has been an incredible 12 months, it really has. i felt that in cheltenham, i wasjust really has. i felt that in cheltenham, i was just looking to myself, it is not even 12 months since the grand national at aintree. ijust since the grand national at aintree. i just feel incredibly lucky, since the grand national at aintree. ijust feel incredibly lucky, i really do. —— thinking to myself. can we talk through friday a little bit and that incredible race? because right at the end of the gold cup, you would not have been able to pick a winner, i think, maybe three fences out, and from somehow, that was a peach of a ride, did you know what you were going to do? talk us through the end of that race. h0. through the end of that race. no, absolutely _ through the end of that race. no, absolutely not. _ through the end of that race. mfr, absolutely not. the way my horse quickened up after the last, he was just incredible, he really was. so i think i could have done anything that race in the manner he finished, but i have ridden him in the race last year and finished second, so i wanted to do something tactically a
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bit different to change it, to see if that would work. i change things up if that would work. i change things up a little bit, and it works, and it is fantastic, the two courses were first and second again but the order reversed this year. incredible to be riding for such a good trainer as well. i to be riding for such a good trainer as well. . , , to be riding for such a good trainer as well. ., , , ., as well. i was the sum to the discussion — as well. i was the sum to the discussion from _ as well. i was the sum to the discussion from some - as well. i was the sum to the discussion from some of - as well. i was the sum to the discussion from some of the | as well. i was the sum to the - discussion from some of the pundits after the race, and they were saying that maybe the rachel blackmore of 12 months ago or a bit longer would not have come through the pack in the same way, you might have tried to come round the outside. they thought was that because you're so confident, that is why you did it and you pull that off. was that any part of your thought process when you were there, or was itjust what came to you? i you were there, or was it 'ust what came to yeah came to you? i think my thought rocess came to you? i think my thought process was _ came to you? i think my thought process was i — came to you? i think my thought process was i did _ came to you? i think my thought process was i did not _ came to you? i think my thought process was i did not want - came to you? i think my thought process was i did not want to - came to you? i think my thought process was i did not want to do | came to you? i think my thought i process was i did not want to do the same thing as last year, so head on down to the second last, i did not want to be in front of the horse, so
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i was kind of happyjust to sit and suffer and hope that a gap would come, and you are probablyjust working on your instinct at the time, and 50% of the time it doesn't work out, so you are lucky when it does. ! work out, so you are lucky when it does. ., ., work out, so you are lucky when it does. ., ._ , ., work out, so you are lucky when it does. ., i. does. i love the way you say 'ust sit and suffer. i does. i love the way you say 'ust sit and suffer. tells i does. i love the way you say 'ust sit and suffer. tells about i does. i love the way you sayjust sit and suffer. tells about the i sit and suffer. tells about the last few moments, because for people who have been to cheltenham, you know that hill at the end is brutal, you do not see it so much on the television, i don't think it shows up television, i don't think it shows up so clearly. what are those last few moments like?— up so clearly. what are those last few moments like? incredible, such a feelin: , few moments like? incredible, such a feeling. when — few moments like? incredible, such a feeling. when you _ few moments like? incredible, such a feeling, when you give _ few moments like? incredible, such a feeling, when you give a _ few moments like? incredible, such a feeling, when you give a horse - few moments like? incredible, such a feeling, when you give a horse a i feeling, when you give a horse a squeeze at the bottom of the hill after you jump the last fence and they take off. he is such a fantastic course, and he really enjoys what he is doing, and hejust accelerated up the hill, and to do that in front of the crowd was just
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fantastic, when you cross the line you are hit with so many different emotions, it is such a special race, and it wasjust emotions, it is such a special race, and it was just a fantastic feeling. many people have seen your mum jerking afterwards about you buying your dad a jcb. jerking afterwards about you buying your dad ajcb. is jerking afterwards about you buying your dad a jcb. is that actually going to happen? —— joking afterwards. l going to happen? -- 'oking afterwards.i going to happen? -- 'oking afterwards. ., , afterwards. i will not be getting fully involved _ afterwards. i will not be getting fully involved in _ afterwards. i will not be getting fully involved in the _ afterwards. i will not be getting fully involved in the process i afterwards. i will not be getting fully involved in the process ofl fully involved in the process of that, maybe partially. we fully involved in the process of that, maybe partially.- that, maybe partially. we will follow that — that, maybe partially. we will follow that story _ that, maybe partially. we will follow that story with - that, maybe partially. we will| follow that story with interest. that, maybe partially. we will. follow that story with interest. i think it is always fascinating to see some of who gets to the top of their sport, they must have been so many people you reflect on, all of those who have helped you along the way and made sacrifices to get you to the top, particularly those closest to you, like your family. my arents closest to you, like your family. m parents are incredible, closest to you, like your family. m1: parents are incredible, they spent years bringing my brother and sister and i to different pony club events and i to different pony club events and that kind of thing, we had a
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great upbringing to do with our ponies and gained a lot of experience doing that, so that is a big help when you want to pursue a career in riding horses. we big help when you want to pursue a career in riding horses.— career in riding horses. we are 'ust a coule career in riding horses. we are 'ust a couple of— career in riding horses. we are 'ust a couple of weeks i career in riding horses. we are 'ust a couple of weeks away i career in riding horses. we are 'ust a couple of weeks away nowi career in riding horses. we arejust a couple of weeks away now from | career in riding horses. we arejust- a couple of weeks away now from back to the scene of your previous glory, aintree, start releasing. how much are you focused on that now, or are you busy with other stuff between now and then? that you busy with other stuff between now and then?— you busy with other stuff between now and then? . , now and then? that is the next thing ou are now and then? that is the next thing you are looking _ now and then? that is the next thing you are looking towards, _ now and then? that is the next thing you are looking towards, and - now and then? that is the next thing you are looking towards, and a i now and then? that is the next thing you are looking towards, and a lot i you are looking towards, and a lot of questions after cheltenham, everybody wants to talk about aintree, and that is just the nature of racing i suppose, we are always looking forward, so i am very excited to be heading back to aintree. obviously had a fantastic day there last year, and really looking forward to the race again this year. it looking forward to the race again this ear. . , . looking forward to the race again this ear. ., , ., ., this year. it has all gone quite showbiz. _ this year. it has all gone quite showbiz, hasn't _ this year. it has all gone quite showbiz, hasn't it? _ this year. it has all gone quite showbiz, hasn't it? yeah, i showbiz, hasn't it? yeah, definitely. _ showbiz, hasn't it? yeah, definitely, doing - showbiz, hasn't it? yeah,
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definitely, doing morningj showbiz, hasn't it? yeah, - definitely, doing morning breakfast shows before work. i definitely, doing morning breakfast shows before work.— shows before work. i don't mean ours! but — shows before work. i don't mean ours! but how — shows before work. i don't mean ours! but how has _ shows before work. i don't mean ours! but how has life _ shows before work. i don't mean ours! but how has life changed? | ours! but how has life changed? there is more media interest, for sure, but essentially your life is the same, you're still trying to do yourjob, that is number one, and thatis yourjob, that is number one, and that is ride winners and try to get some good horses, and that will always be the number one focus. hoop always be the number one focus. how does the title — always be the number one focus. how does the title of _ always be the number one focus. how does the title of role model and game changer and trailblazer, how does that sit with you? do you feel like that? because that is how people talk about you now, rachel. it is a privilege to be that person, but i do not overthink that, i suppose ijust want but i do not overthink that, i suppose i just want to try to stay at doing what i'm doing is best i can, and hopefully that is why people are saying those things about you, so i suppose continuing to do thatis you, so i suppose continuing to do that is the most important thing.
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what you have managed to do, as i'm sure you are aware, as you have brought a buzz to the sport, and in the same people used to say, what is a peon, orfrustrates the same people used to say, what is a peon, or frustrates jockeys the same people used to say, what is a peon, orfrustratesjockeys of the same people used to say, what is a peon, or frustrates jockeys of the past, they are saying what is rachael on, they are only interested in what you are doing watching the big races, that is an amazing position to be in, carrying the sport forward. $5 position to be in, carrying the sport forward.— sport forward. as i said, it is a privileged _ sport forward. as i said, it is a privileged position, _ sport forward. as i said, it is a privileged position, and i sport forward. as i said, it is a privileged position, and to i sport forward. as i said, it is a privileged position, and to all| privileged position, and to all those people, the horses do not win all the time, i read a lot more losers, like everyjockey, then you do winners. so tread with caution. we saw pictures a little while ago of you and i at sports personality just a few months ago when we presented you with the award. i would just like you to remind everybody at home of what you went through to actually get through that event that night, because you turned up event that night, because you turned up to our studio in this beautiful long sparkly dress looking amazing
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and glorious and glamorous, but even that night was a challenge. talk us through the difficulties you have just getting there. that through the difficulties you have just getting there.— just getting there. that was robabl just getting there. that was probably one _ just getting there. that was probably one of _ just getting there. that was probably one of the - just getting there. that was probably one of the most i just getting there. that was i probably one of the most stressed just getting there. that was - probably one of the most stressed i have ever been. sitting on the runway on a plane, the steps are attached but we could not get off the plane, and time is ticking, so that was very frustrating. the fog that was very frustrating. the fog that they held up the plane, it was not meant to be for me to be there live in person to collect the award, but it was so incredibly special to receive that award, and i am still kind of amazed by the list of names of nominees that are on that list, it is hard to comprehend that he would be in the same bracket as those sporting people and everyone who has won the award in the past. it is hard to comprehend, to be honest. .,. . . it is hard to comprehend, to be honest. .. ., ., , it is hard to comprehend, to be honest. ., ., , ., honest. rachael, what is on your list of things _ honest. rachael, what is on your list of things you _ honest. rachael, what is on your list of things you want _ honest. rachael, what is on your list of things you want to - honest. rachael, what is on your list of things you want to do? i honest. rachael, what is on your list of things you want to do? do | list of things you want to do? do you want to repeat those winds in
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the big races, or other other things you want to add to your list of successes? i you want to add to your list of successes?— you want to add to your list of successes? ., , ., successes? i have never been one to sa , i successes? i have never been one to say. i want — successes? i have never been one to say. i want to _ successes? i have never been one to say. i want to win — successes? i have never been one to say, i want to win x, _ successes? i have never been one to say, i want to win x, y, _ successes? i have never been one to say, i want to win x, y, and - successes? i have never been one to say, i want to win x, y, and z, i say, i want to win x, y, and z, everyjockey wants to say, i want to win x, y, and z, every jockey wants to win the say, i want to win x, y, and z, everyjockey wants to win the big races and continue to do so. i do not set myself massive goals, ijust want to keep going as best i can. i will try my best to win today, and just take it day by day. we will try my best to win today, and just take it day by day.— will try my best to win today, and just take it day by day. we see this fantastic glorious _ just take it day by day. we see this fantastic glorious moments - just take it day by day. we see this fantastic glorious moments of i just take it day by day. we see this fantastic glorious moments of you | fantastic glorious moments of you in triumph. give us an idea of what your actual average working day is like, how hard it is on a normal day. like, how hard it is on a normal da . �* , ., , , like, how hard it is on a normal da . �*, ., , , day. it's hard, but it is something i love doing. _ day. it's hard, but it is something i love doing. i— day. it's hard, but it is something i love doing, i split _ day. it's hard, but it is something i love doing, i split myself- day. it's hard, but it is something i love doing, i split myself up i i love doing, i split myself up there and then head myself off to there and then head myself off to the races later this afternoon, but i feel lucky to wake up in the morning and get to do a job i love,
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so i do not think i can complain too much. it is not raining today. if it is raining, i might be complaining. iam memberspeaking is raining, i might be complaining. i am member speaking to ap mccoy talking about the coffee drinks, sitting in a hot bath, eating a lettuce leaf to try to make weight, is that all part of a jockey�*s life? is that something that you enjoy as well? is that something that you en'oy as well? . , . is that something that you en'oy as well? ., , ., ., well? that is a part of most jockeys" _ well? that is a part of most jockeys' lives, _ well? that is a part of most jockeys' lives, i— well? that is a part of most jockeys' lives, i am - well? that is a part of most jockeys' lives, i am lucky i well? that is a part of most i jockeys' lives, i am lucky that my weight is ok, i do not have to sweat to bring my weight down, as it is naturally just over to bring my weight down, as it is naturallyjust over nine stone, that is a perfect kind of weight, so that is a perfect kind of weight, so that is something i don't have to do, but mostjockeys are, the main focus of the day is keeping their weight down, and that is an extremely big commitment, ifeel very down, and that is an extremely big commitment, i feel very lucky i down, and that is an extremely big commitment, ifeel very lucky i do not have to get involved with that.
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thank goodness for that. rachael, congratulations, great to talk to you this morning, thank you for spending some time with us this morning, and we will see you at entry. morning, and we will see you at ent . ., ,, morning, and we will see you at entry._ rachaell entry. thanks, susan. rachael blackmore. — entry. thanks, susan. rachael blackmore, what _ entry. thanks, susan. rachael blackmore, what a _ entry. thanks, susan. rachael blackmore, what a superstar. | entry. thanks, susan. rachael- blackmore, what a superstar. what you did not tell you properly there, that night at sports personality of the year, she was stuck on a plane with her dress and a bag, and she made it somehow to the event, got changed on the way, and turned up looking like a film star. i changed on the way, and turned up looking like a film star.— looking like a film star. i know she does not see _ looking like a film star. i know she does not see herself _ looking like a film star. i know she does not see herself as _ looking like a film star. i know she does not see herself as a - does not see herself as a trailblazer and a role model, but she has made such a difference in that sport. did you see she also won over the weekend on a horse called gentleman's game. a very interesting victory on an appropriately named horse. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. it is lovely when i am, not as chilly as yesterday morning but
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still chilly, i am chilly as yesterday morning but still chilly, iam in chilly as yesterday morning but still chilly, i am in stjames's park, one of the royal parks in london, and between this park and green park, there are about 2 million daffodil bulbs in bloom, 50,000 to 70,000 of those planted each year, and as well as the daffodils, to come out in time for spring, there are about 52,000 tulips as well. the sun is coming out now, a bit of cloud earlier on, but temperatures slowly rising roughly at the moment north to south about four to 10 celsius. and the forecast for us all today is one of warm spring sunshine, and alsojust a few showers. now, we have high pressure dominating our weather, so the weather today will be settled for most, but what you will fine is the high pressure will be with us as we go through the rest of this week, so the forecast will remain fairly settled. having said that, starting
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off with a few showers across parts off with a few showers across parts of northern england and down towards the midlands and the south—west, but most of those tending to fade as we go through the morning. the other thing is, as fair—weather cloud develops through the day, we could catch the odd shower in the midlands and southern scotland later, but that will be the exception rather than the rule, and a temperature range today, eight in the north to about 19 as we come down towards the south. average at this time in march is roughly ten in the north to 13 in the south. through this evening and overnight come any showers will fade, we see some mist and fog patches form in yorkshire and also bt valley. in rural areas tonight, temperatures falling as low as freezing, a touch of frost for some, for most of us, holding up above freezing. tomorrow morning, then, we will lose the mist and fog, taking its time to clear, but it could well linger across parts of eastern scotland, potentially for much of the day. and it'll be another sunny
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warm day tomorrow, in fact tomorrow it could even be a little bit warmer than today, chance we could reach 21 celsius in east anglia or indeed the south—east. for thursday, celsius in east anglia or indeed the south—east. forthursday, high south—east. for thursday, high pressure south—east. forthursday, high pressure still with us, still a lot of settled conditions, but a weather front mightjust make some inroads across the north—east of scotland, and if it does, it will introduce for you a bit more cloud, some rain and drizzle, temperatures around 12 celsius. but for the rest of the uk in the sunshine winds again, temperatures perhaps a degree also lower than they are going to be, but still above average for this stage in march. thank you very much, carol, lovely to have you on the programme this morning. nice to be out and about. it looks properly like spring out there, truly glorious. beautiful. the time now is 7.48. scotland has recorded the highest number of patients in hospital with covid, since the start of the pandemic.
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the recent rise is thought to be driven by a more transmissible sub—variant of omicron. so, let's take a look at the numbers. overall, there were 9,533 positive cases recorded in the past 2a hours. there are currently 2,128 patients in hospital who have tested positive for the virus — that number is higher than the previous peak injanuary 2021. but the amount of people requiring icu treatment remains low, atjust 31. we're joined now by scotland's national clinical director, jason leitch. thanks for being with us today. give us an idea of how worried you are about the rise in cases and how worried we should be.— about the rise in cases and how worried we should be. good morning, thanks for having _ worried we should be. good morning, thanks for having me. _ worried we should be. good morning, thanks for having me. i _ worried we should be. good morning, thanks for having me. i went - worried we should be. good morning, thanks for having me. i went to i thanks for having me. i went to a few hospitals last week, trying to go around the country a little bit. one i went to as the massive glasgow hospital not far from my window here. at the peak, they have 36 people in intensive care ventilated,
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many of whom unfortunately died. they had two. so at the far end, it is transformed, completely different, this is vaccination that has done that. unfortunately, at the receiving end, we have not broken the chain quite as much as we would like, that is because of the more transmissible variants, which is why we have 2000 people in hospital. 1.6 million across the world court this virus yesterday, 1.6 million. the global pandemic not only is not over, the who are nowhere near declaring it over. 4000 deaths yesterday in the world after a covid infection, so we have to keep it in perspective, and the uk with its vaccination is now in a completely different place from a year ago. but the public health leaders around the world are still concerned. what world are still concerned. what about the pressure _ world are still concerned. what about the pressure on - world are still concerned. what about the pressure on the i world are still concerned. what about the pressure on the health service? not so much of the itu end of things, but still pressure elsewhere in the system. —— i
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-- icu. over 2000 icu beds are now occuied -- icu. over 2000 icu beds are now occupied by — -- icu. over 2000 icu beds are now occupied by covid _ -- icu. over 2000 icu beds are now occupied by covid cases. _ -- icu. over 2000 icu beds are now occupied by covid cases. some i -- icu. over 2000 icu beds are now occupied by covid cases. some have| occupied by covid cases. some have had a heart attack and have tested positive for covid on the way in, some are in with respiratory damage because of covid. care is getting longer, so we are seeing people stay longer. that is a good thing because we have good therapeutics now, anti—virals that help them stay, but that means they stay longer, and they do not have the bed for cataracts, but it means hospitals get a bit clogged up with that, so you have to use your whole system. social care, gps, treating people at home, we are trying to treat a lot more covid in the community than in
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the hospital. i saw a lady with a heart transplant getting an infusion of an anti—viral heart transplant getting an infusion ofan anti—viral drug, heart transplant getting an infusion of an anti—viral drug, as an outpatient, and then going back home, she will get a phone call tomorrow to see how she is. so all of those things to try to unblock the system but it will take a little while. with the eye of faith, scotland looks as though it is maybe just following northern ireland, northern ireland has had the speakers over the other end, we look as though we might be slowing. england and wales are coming behind us, i'm afraid, and they are still in the exhilaration phase. shall us, i'm afraid, and they are still in the exhilaration phase.- in the exhilaration phase. all of us, whatever _ in the exhilaration phase. all of us, whatever we _ in the exhilaration phase. all of us, whatever we are _ in the exhilaration phase. all of us, whatever we are living, i in the exhilaration phase. all of| us, whatever we are living, have experienced the lifting of restrictions. how nervous are you, for example, when you on a packed train or bus and nobody is winning a facemask, is and to you? it is. facemask, is and to you? it is, artl facemask, is and to you? it is, partly imagery _ facemask, is and to you? it is, partly imagery of _ facemask, is and to you? it is, partly imagery of it, _ facemask, is and to you? it is, partly imagery of it, i-
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facemask, is and to you? it is, partly imagery of it, i cannot l facemask, is and to you? it is, i partly imagery of it, i cannot want people yet to have forgotten us. we have been replaced a little on the news, with very good reason, for the misery in eastern europe, but it just means that people might have the impression that this is over, and i don't know about your friends and i don't know about your friends and family, but i know a lot of people with covid. it feels as though it is closing in again, as the waves excel at it, that is what happens. so i do get concerned, i am still willing a face covering on public transport because those are the rules in scotland. i came to london a couple weeks ago, and i wore a face covering on the way down on the big train, and then when i was wandering around london. i did notice it was a slightly less common there than it is here. i would suggest people, even when the law changes, in whichever country you are in, when the law changes, look after yourself, particularly look after yourself, particularly look after those around you who are vulnerable. you might not know that the person in the movies beside you or the theatre royal in front of you have actually had a kidney
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transplant, and are an anti—immunity drugs, some thinkjust a little bit more broadly thanjust drugs, some thinkjust a little bit more broadly than just your own position if you possibly can. so still do the vaccination, test for a little bit longer, particularly the areas where testing is available, and follow the guidance. and areas where testing is available, and follow the guidance. and what about those _ and follow the guidance. and what about those people _ and follow the guidance. and what about those people who _ and follow the guidance. and what about those people who might i and follow the guidance. and what about those people who might be | about those people who might be watching this morning and wondered about themselves are concerned about the rise in cases, you are in those vulnerable categories, what is your advice to them?— vulnerable categories, what is your advice to them? they have filled my inbox, my inbox _ advice to them? they have filled my inbox, my inbox is _ advice to them? they have filled my inbox, my inbox is flipped _ advice to them? they have filled my inbox, my inbox is flipped in - advice to them? they have filled my inbox, my inbox is flipped in the i inbox, my inbox is flipped in the last month from those yelling at us to release all the distractions to it now people coming on and saying, are you sure? i have got a 14—year—old child who is at school and is vulnerable, i have got an 85—year—old granny, so i want those people to go about their business as much as you indict, but it is really important that as a society, we try our best to look after them. we live
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with infectious diseases all the time, with norovirus, flu, all kinds of infectious diseases, and we are moving into a phase where we will live with covid, but that won't look a bit different for the rest of the next few months, probably the rest of the year, as we go through waves of the year, as we go through waves of this virus globally. so again, yourjob as public health, it is not that you have diabetes and you are looking after your own diabetes, your looking after the public health of the nation, and the street around you, the people on the bus on the people you share cars with. you, me, everybody else, we all have a responsibility to look after ourselves but also to look after those around us. and there are still simple things we can do. i imagine the bbc still has alcohol gel when you arrive in the morning. they are still suggesting that in crowded bits, and pinch points, you should be a bit careful. because this virus just needs a moment to spread from somebody to somebody to be heart transplant patient, and they will be
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the one who gets in trouble. i can confirm we _ the one who gets in trouble. i can confirm we still _ the one who gets in trouble. i can confirm we still have _ the one who gets in trouble. i can confirm we still have the - the one who gets in trouble. i can confirm we still have the alcohol hand gel under the desk at bbc breakfast, we are still using it. good to talk to you, have a lovely tuesday, see you soon.— good to talk to you, have a lovely tuesday, see you soon. the duke and duchess of cambridge will travel to jamaica today, as their tour of the caribbean continues. yesterday, prince william paid tribute to ukrainians fighting for their homeland, during a visit to a british military training camp, in the jungles of belize. our royal correspondent jonny dymond reports. learning about another world, another civilisation, way up in the hills of belize. if you're looking for historical perspective, there are worse places to find it than a mayan temple. the british monarchy has been around for 1,000 years, but this place, it's been around for 3,000. think of what it's seen.
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and now they came to see it... the army uses the jungle to teach its soldiers survival skills. the duke was here more than 20 years ago, but now was a chance to brush up his knowledge on how to trap a monkey in the wild. most of all in the jungle, you need water. they were shown ingenious ways to gather the stuff, then shown one of nature's water dispensers. arms by your sides, stand to
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attention. arms by your sides, stand to attention-— arms by your sides, stand to attention. _, ., .,' . attention. the commanding officer here was 1 billion's _ attention. the commanding officer here was 1 billion's sergeant i attention. the commanding officer here was 1 billion's sergeant major here was i billion's sergeant major when he trained at sandhurst. now it was time to say thank you to his old trainee. ., :: :: , ., trainee. your 5500 miles from the uk here, ou trainee. your 5500 miles from the uk here. you can — trainee. your 5500 miles from the uk here. you can feel— trainee. your 5500 miles from the uk here, you can feel slightly _ here, you can feel slightly isolated, we are in the middle of thejungle, so the isolated, we are in the middle of the jungle, so the fact they take time out of their busy schedules to come and visit us means a lot. you probably sense the buzz of excitement around the place. it is not everyday young soldiers get to interact with royals. last not everyday young soldiers get to interact with royals.— interact with royals. last night at a reception _ interact with royals. last night at a reception for _ interact with royals. last night at a reception for the _ interact with royals. last night at a reception for the couple, i interact with royals. last night at i a reception for the couple, william directly interest the invasion of ukraine —— directly addressed. he quoted the queen talking about the vigilance needed to protect democracies. sadly, elsewhere in the world, that vigilance is being tested l today in ukraine. belize's joined many others
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in condemning the invasion| and standing up for the principles of international law, _ peace, and security. today, we think of those struggling in ukraine, i and we stand with| them in solidarity. from the royals, it doesn't get much blunter than that. the couple head for their next stop jamaica later today. jonny dymond, bbc news, belize. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. our headlines today. president biden says putin "has his back to the wall" and may be preparing to use chemical and biological weapons in ukraine. he's already used chemical weapons in the past and we should be careful about what's about to come. help with fuel costs or risk losing key workers. that's the warning to the chancellor from the royal college of nursing. they say some carers are paying £100 more per monthjust to see their patients. a 17—month—old girl has died after being attacked by a dog in her home in st helens. fresh developments in the battle
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to take over chelsea. british investment firm centricus has joined the race to buy the club with bidders now waiting to hear if they've made the short—list. good morning from stjames's park in london where we are surrounded by beautiful daffodils. it's feeling very springlike and for most of us today, it's going to be sunny and warm, but there will be one or two showers. the secret to 70 years of marriage. in the run up to the queen's platinum jubilee we speak to cyril and muriel who say they've never had an argument. it's tuesday 22nd march. president biden has warned there are clear signs russia is preparing to use chemical and biological weapons in ukraine. mr biden said president putin "had his back to the wall" as a result of ukrainian military resistance, meaning there was a danger he would resort to more severe tactics. meanwhile, president zelensky has again appealed for direct talks
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with mr putin in an attempt to try to end the conflict, as hywel griffith reports. russian repression against ukrainian resolve. people in kherson say they were fired on as they protested against occupation. there are reports of injuries. president zelensky said it was a rally for freedom. something the russian military hasn't experienced. saying they were sent here as if sentenced to death, and sentenced to shame. in kyiv, eight people are reported dead after shelling on a residential area. russia said it was because rockets were stored here. mariupol in the south has become a shell. a further 3000 people were evacuated from here yesterday. satellite images show smoke rising across the city. the united states has warned that president putin may soon turn to using chemical weapons,
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following false claims that ukraine was poised to use them. his back is against the wall. now he's talking about new false flags, he's asserting that we, america, have biological as well as chemical weapons in europe. simply not true. i guarantee you. they are also suggesting that ukraine has biological and chemical weapons in ukraine. that is a clear sign he is considering using both of those. the toll of this war is already hard to bear. sergei's brother igor was killed when ukrainian barracks at the east of 0desa were bombed. here, the russian invasion feels relentless. "this is our land," he says, "we live here. where should we run?" for many ukrainians, there is no choice, they stay and cling to daily rituals.
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president zelensky has called again for direct talks with vladimir putin to end the fighting. but for now, hopes of a ceasefire seem out of reach. hywel griffith, bbc news. let's speak now to our correspondent in kyiv, james waterhouse. good morning, james. we had in that report their house suggestions from president biden that there are clear signs that putin is preparing to use chemical and biological weapons, people living in ukraine, that must be a terrifying prospect. you people living in ukraine, that must be a terrifying prospect.— be a terrifying prospect. you are exactly right- — be a terrifying prospect. you are exactly right. it's _ be a terrifying prospect. you are exactly right. it's added - be a terrifying prospect. you are exactly right. it's added to i be a terrifying prospect. you are exactly right. it's added to a i be a terrifying prospect. you are j exactly right. it's added to a pile of so many other worries, and fears, in this devastating conflict. i think the frustration of russia's forces, the way their advance is being slowed, is feeding two schools of thought. one is what president biden has repeated, that he is claiming that they could be
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preparing to use chemical and biological weapons with the false justification that ukraine is doing the same. then there is the other school of thought that president zelensky is hoping that very frustration will bring vladimir putin to the negotiating table where, in the ukrainian leader's words, everything will be on the table. however he said any concessions around ukraine's security, for example european union membership or nato membership, he said he would like to put that to a referendum, is owed to the ukrainian people. the problem with that is that in the past, the more aggressive russians are, the more lytic the ukrainians have their sense of national identity strengthened and the more they lean towards the west. so will the brutality of this war be enough to make people in vote in favour of
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peace above everything else? equally russia has sustained some heavy losses in this conflict. us intelligence says that every adult has been frustrated because of poor logistics and planning with the exception —— every advance has been frustrated because of poor logistics, with the exception of mall poll —— mariupol in the east. so for the ukrainian people, how much will they trade in return for their country? let's get an update now from our correspondentjonah fisher, who joins us from the western ukrainian city of lviv. good morning. we have seen russian advances appear to be slowing. i wonder what the tactical change might be from this point forward? the russian advances in all parts of ukraine have effectively stalled and that has been that way for the week, around kyiv, around kharkiv, and in
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some parts of the south they have made little progress. the only area they seem to be able to advance is in the suburbs of mariupol, this encircle city in the south—east. the tactical shift appears to be towards a war of attrition, shelling, striking cities from the air, hoping to effectively bomb them into submission which appears to be what they are attempting to do at the moment in mariupol. the discussion around chemical and biological weapons has risen up because that would be possibly the next step which russia might take in this scenario. frustrated by the continued ukrainian resistance, even, to the artillery and air bombardment, that the russians might be tempted to go to the next level in terms of munitions and opt to try and use chemical or biological weapons which will of course be devastating for the people living in those areas. devastating for the people living in those areas-— devastating for the people living in those areas. thank you very much,
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aood to those areas. thank you very much, good to talk _ those areas. thank you very much, good to talk to _ those areas. thank you very much, good to talk to you. _ the transport secretary has admitted he was aware of plans to sack 800 p&0 workers, the night before staff were informed. however, grant schapps insists he didn't know the full the scale of the mass redundancy plan until the following day. our political correspondent, jonathan blake has more. there could be some fallout from this, i'm guessing?— this, i'm guessing? there could, sall . this, i'm guessing? there could, sally- this _ this, i'm guessing? there could, sally. this was _ this, i'm guessing? there could, sally. this was revealed - this, i'm guessing? there could, sally. this was revealed during l this, i'm guessing? there could, sally. this was revealed during a debate in the house of commons yesterday, when, as you say, the transport secretary grant shapps admitted that he knew of p805 plans to make staff redundant the night before it happened but claimed he was not aware of the manner in which they were going to go about it all they were going to go about it all the scale of the redundancies that p&0 was going to make. it was only when he saw the reports of people being told by video link is no notice and security staff drafted in to escort people off of the vessels, that his consent was sparked. labour
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claim that a memo sent to ministers and officials in the department for transport makes it clear that what p&0 was doing was known about in government and ministers made no attempt to stop it. the fallout continues from this, there is no shortage of anger in government about what is happening with the business minister paul skelly saying this morning that covid —— that p&0 should get around the table with workers and try and bring them back to employment. there is little chance of that happening. labour says this is a national disgrace and ministers should not allow it to stand. the government is reviewing its contract with p&0, it has asked the insolvency service to check whether the company went to the right procedures before getting to the point of last resort and making workers redundant in this way, but there is absolutely no sign so far that there is going to be any way to redress what has happened, certainly
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not to get people back theirjobs, or necessarily to punish p&0 in any meaningful way for what has happened. meaningful way for what has happened-— meaningful way for what has ha ened. . ~' , . happened. thank you very much, jonathan blake _ happened. thank you very much, jonathan blake in _ happened. thank you very much, jonathan blake in westminster. l a 17—month—old girl has died, after being attacked by a dog in her home in st helens. merseyside police say the animal was bought by the family only a week ago. our reporter yunus mulla is at the scene this morning. good morning. police officers remain at the scene here after what has been described as extremely tragic accident which has claimed the life of a 17—month—old girl and left her parents and her wider family completely devastated. the investigation is in its early stages, but police say they arrived here just before 4pm yesterday afternoon after reports that the girl had been attacked by the family's pet dog. she was taken to hospital but later died as a result
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of the injuries that she suffered. the dog was handed in to police, and the dog was humanely destroyed. police have carried out house—to—house inquiries here, they have also been looking at cctv footage, but they are trying to establish the history of the dog, trying to trace the dog's previous owners. they say the dog was only bought the week before, the family had only had the dog for a week now. what they are trying to do now is to carry out tests on the dog to see what breed it was and whether it fell within the dangerous dogs act and whether it was illegal. in the meantime police say they will be here, and i have seen a number of officers behind me reassuring the neighbours here, clearly there is a lot of concern and a lot of people are distressed and shocked by what has happened. are distressed and shocked by what has happened-— has happened. thank you for that u date, has happened. thank you for that update, yunus. _ the former iranian detainee, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe has used her first media address to call for the release of other captives
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being held by the regime. during the press conference, ms zaghari—ratcliffe sat alongside the daughter of morad tahbaz, a british born man who's been imprisoned in the country for four years. our reporter louisa pilbeam has more. in herfirst address since her return to the uk, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe drew attention to the plight of other fellow detainees still being held in iran. i was the lucky one, who got to be recognised internationally, with the campaign that was running, but there are so many other people in prison that you don't know their names, and they have been in prison for longer years than i have. among them, morad tahbaz, a uk born try national with british, a uk born tri—national with british, iranian and american citizenship, who has been imprisoned there since 2018. i believe that the meaning of freedom is never going to be complete until such time that all of us who are unjustly detained in iran are
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reunited with our families. to begin with morad tahbaz, but also, the other dual nationals. morad was on a conservation mission four years ago when he and seven of his colleagues were held on charges of gathering classified information about the iranian regime. he was later sentenced to ten years in prison. the family of mr tahbaz, who has cancer and has twice tested positive for coronavirus, have called on the government to do more to secure his release, after believing he too would be included in any deal to release hostages in the country. every person has got the right to be free. and freedom is something which has to be given to people. and i think the world should unite together to make sure that there is no one held either hostage or imprisoned for something they haven't done. the hope will be that her influence may help shape the future of morad's case and bring him home too.
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we can speak now to morad's daughter roxanne. good morning. thank you very much for being on the programme this morning. if you can, just tell us the latest information on how your dad is? at}?! the latest information on how your dad is? .., , , the latest information on how your dad is? _, , , , dad is? of course. he is still in rison, dad is? of course. he is still in prison. he _ dad is? of course. he is still in prison. he is— dad is? of course. he is still in prison, he is on _ dad is? of course. he is still in prison, he is on day _ dad is? of course. he is still in prison, he is on day three i dad is? of course. he is still in prison, he is on day three of i dad is? of course. he is still in | prison, he is on day three of his hunger strike in reaction to his abandonment and treatment. and we await further news on any developments that can help bring him home. ., , ., ., . home. you must have watched yesterday's — home. you must have watched yesterday's press _ home. you must have watched yesterday's press conference l home. you must have watched i yesterday's press conference with the really mixed emotions. what signs do have, what hope do you have that you might be able to bring dad home soon? i that you might be able to bring dad home soon?— that you might be able to bring dad home soon? ., ., ., home soon? i mean, for the moment, it's been mostly _ home soon? i mean, for the moment, it's been mostly assurances _ home soon? i mean, for the moment, it's been mostly assurances that -
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it's been mostly assurances that everyone is doing every thing they can to bring him back. but at the moment, nothing that was promised to has has come to pass. he was not issued his furlough, as was expressed to us is a family, and my mum's travel ban is in place so she still within iran. find mum's travel ban is in place so she still within iran.— still within iran. and when did you last hear from _ still within iran. and when did you last hear from him _ still within iran. and when did you last hear from him or _ still within iran. and when did you last hear from him or speak- still within iran. and when did you last hear from him or speak to - still within iran. and when did you i last hear from him or speak to him? last hearfrom him or speak to him? i don't usually get direct contact, it's usually indirectly through my mother, who gets to speak to him relatively sporadically. but she very kindly, when she can, put him on speaker phone so we can at least hear his voice. we on speaker phone so we can at least hear his voice.— hear his voice. we know that your dad has been _ hear his voice. we know that your dad has been receiving _ hear his voice. we know that your dad has been receiving cancer- dad has been receiving cancer treatment, that he has had covid twice, what do you know about the treatment he is receiving in terms of his health?— of his health? i don't think it's enouah. of his health? i don't think it's enough. i think he really does| of his health? i don't think it's - enough. i think he really does need regular monitoring, and he needs constant treatment and care to be
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able to limit the competitions he's had. and that's one of the many reasons why we need him home, because his health, his health is failing him. i because his health, his health is failing him-— failing him. i know you thought, didn't you _ failing him. i know you thought, didn't you come _ failing him. i know you thought, didn't you come at _ failing him. i know you thought, didn't you come at one - failing him. i know you thought, didn't you come at one time, i failing him. i know you thought, i didn't you come at one time, that failing him. i know you thought, - didn't you come at one time, that he might be part of a deal that was going to bring nazanin and an osha —— and anoosha home, why do you think that his situation did not move on when there is dead? we have been told that — move on when there is dead? we have been told that it _ move on when there is dead? we have been told that it is _ move on when there is dead? we have been told that it is because _ move on when there is dead? we have been told that it is because the - been told that it is because the iranians decided he is american, that doesn't ring true to us because he was born here in england, he was born in hammersmith hospital in london and living in the us doesn't make him any less british so it is important that it is upheld and he is brought home to us.—
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is brought home to us. nazanin zaghari-ratcliffe _ is brought home to us. nazanin zaghari-ratcliffe has _ is brought home to us. nazanin zaghari-ratcliffe has criticised l zaghari—ratcliffe has criticised publicly the handling of her case. i wonder what you feel in terms of what happens to your father next and the government? we what happens to your father next and the government?— the government? we hope that they will keep their _ the government? we hope that they will keep their promise _ the government? we hope that they will keep their promise to _ the government? we hope that they will keep their promise to us - the government? we hope that they will keep their promise to us that. will keep their promise to us that they will at the very list get him an unrestricted furlough and get my mother's travel ban if did. it has been over four years that we have not seen our parents —— their ban lifted. as a family, that is devastating. we hope that promise to be kept. 50. devastating. we hope that promise to be ket, ., ~' devastating. we hope that promise to be ket. . ~ , ., be kept. so, talk us through the assurances _ be kept. so, talk us through the assurances that _ be kept. so, talk us through the assurances that you _ be kept. so, talk us through the assurances that you have - be kept. so, talk us through the assurances that you have had i be kept. so, talk us through the i assurances that you have had from the government so far. what have they said they might be able to achieve? i they said they might be able to achieve? w ., , they said they might be able to achieve? .. ., , ., �* they said they might be able to achieve? . , ., �* ., achieve? i actually haven't heard directly as _ achieve? i actually haven't heard directly as of _ achieve? i actually haven't heard directly as of yet. _ achieve? i actually haven't heard directly as of yet. but _ achieve? i actually haven't heard directly as of yet. but we - achieve? i actually haven't heard directly as of yet. but we have i directly as of yet. but we have nominated a member of the family who has been in direct constant contact. but the information has been quite
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limited. it's generally been focused around, we are doing every thing we will update you when we can but nothing of note that would express a significant amount of hope from our side, which is why we are here today. side, which is why we are here toda . ., ., i. side, which is why we are here toda . ., ., ., ., ., side, which is why we are here toda. ., ., ., ., ., today. how are you managing to cope in this incredibly _ today. how are you managing to cope in this incredibly stressful _ in this incredibly stressful situation that you are in? it’s situation that you are in? it's difficult. situation that you are in? it's difficult- i— situation that you are in? it's difficult. i think _ situation that you are in? it�*s difficult. i think you just rely on the support systems you have in place, and you just surround yourself with positive, positive people that believe in what we are doing and want my dad back as much as we do. but all you can do is wake up as we do. but all you can do is wake up in the morning, and carry on, and hope for the best and do what you can to be part of the solution. and can to be part of the solution. and what are your _ can to be part of the solution. and what are your plans now? talking about being part of the solution, what can you do? i
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about being part of the solution, what can you do?— about being part of the solution, what can you do? i think 'ointly as a famil , what can you do? i think 'ointly as a family. we * what can you do? i think 'ointly as a family, we have h what can you do? i thinkjointly as a family, we have decided - what can you do? i thinkjointly as a family, we have decided now- what can you do? i thinkjointly as a family, we have decided now is| what can you do? i thinkjointly as i a family, we have decided now is the time to speak out. we were originally advised to stay out of the media, to keep quiet, and to let the media, to keep quiet, and to let the politicians and everyone handle everything the way that they do, that they are expected to do. but at this juncture, that they are expected to do. but at thisjuncture, we that they are expected to do. but at this juncture, we felt that if we do not go public, if we don't get ahead of this, that he may be forsaken and left behind a second time again. which is why we have decided to get involved with the media and the press, and hopefully garner more support so that action can be expected and notjust words. roxanne, thank you so much for talking to us this morning. that is the daughter of morad tahbaz, talking to us live from london. the foreign office have given us a
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statement, saying we have urgently raised the case with the iranian government, he must be allowed to return to his family in london immediately as the iranian government has committed to earlier. you said earlier that you think that spring is in the air. confirmation, she has taken her coat off. good morning, carol. good morning, both! yes, the temperature in london is rising quite nicely now. we have got beautiful clear blue skies, earlier cloud has dissipated, and we are surrounded by gorgeous daffodils. between st james's park and green park in london, there are about 2 million daffodil bulbs in bloom. the full cost for us all today is one of warm sunshine and a few showers. showers will be hit and miss, we have had some this morning across northern england and into the south—west. they will tend to face and although we have started with
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more cloud, the cloud will break up and we will see some sunny spells. we will have a shower across the midlands and scotland, there is a chance of that, but few and far between. eight in the north or 19 and 20 in the south—east and in east anglia. overnight, any showers will fade and then we will see some patchy mist and fog forming, especially around the yorkshire area, the vale of york and around tayside. temperature wise, in the countryside under clear skies, we could see temperatures full to freezing. there will be some trust for some, freezing. there will be some trust forsome, but freezing. there will be some trust for some, but temperatures will hold up for some, but temperatures will hold up above freezing foremost in towns and cities. mist and fog tomorrow morning will clear except for in eastern scotland where it could linger for much if eastern scotland where it could lingerfor much if not eastern scotland where it could linger for much if not all of the day. tomorrow like today, dry weather, sunshine, the chance of a
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shower in scotland and eastern england but a fairly isolated. tomorrow prospect temperatures could be higher than today's. in the south —— record tomorrow prospect temperatures could be higher than today's. it could get to 21, the average north to south is ten to 13 degrees at the moment. this settled weather does continue. thank you, great to see carol out in the spring sunshine.— the spring sunshine. sunshine, daffodils, t-shirts, _ the spring sunshine. sunshine, daffodils, t-shirts, what - the spring sunshine. sunshine, daffodils, t-shirts, what more| the spring sunshine. sunshine, - daffodils, t-shirts, what more could daffodils, t—shirts, what more could you want! having your life turned into a film or a play is usually a right reserved for celebrities or politicians. ora hero! but or a hero! but he ora hero! but he is or a hero! but he is a ora hero! but he is a hero! but it was neil baldwin's heart—warming approach to life that saw him make friends in high places and have his story told to the world. actor tobyjones played neil in the bafta award winning film 'marvellous' and now it's being adapted for the stage. that film was one of the best things i have seen many years. our arts correspondent david sillito
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has been finding out more. and it's a fine day here on the south coast and oh, my goodness, what is this? what is this, george? thank you, george, it seems to be a chicken, george! what you're watching is a scene from a show that's become rather a hit here at the new vic in stoke. marvellous. the life of neil baldwin. neil is the one in a chicken suit. and the real neil is also sitting next to me in the audience, as he does every night. and are you introduced each night? every night, a light comes on to me and i get up and wave and be happy. we don't want any more injuries. who's that? new kit man. you may already know about him. he was the subject of a bafta award winning film starring tobyjones. talked a girl out of killing herself once. young student. dressed as a chicken? no, of course not. dressed as father christmas. but here's a quick rundown of some
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of the things he's done. when he was young, expectations around him were low but neil, aged 1a, was not put off. hello, i'm neil baldwin, welcome to keele university. one venture was greeting every student at keele university. you'd shake their hands, and you were 14? and you carried on doing that for every year, 62 years? why? because it's nice to meet people and get to know them, other people in life. he then became a professional clown. and then when that came to an end, he bumped into stoke city manager lou mccarry who suddenly decided to give him a job. i didn't know what i was going to do, i didn't know whatjob i was going to give him. so i spent the weekend thinking, what betterjob can i give him than being the man who is going
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to keep everybody happy? because he told me he was always happy, never sad. he brought what i hoped he would bring to the football club, laughter, joy. ken dodd is a friend. the duke of edinburgh. prince william, you've met. neil also has a talent for making famous friends. everyone from tony benn and gary lineker to archbishops. you have got a collection of archbishops of canterbury over the years, who are all your pals. one came to your recent service at keele? yeah, on saturdayjust gone. how do you do it? it's because it's neil. he was my best ever signing. you're here every night, aren't you, watching it, watching your own life unfold on the stage.
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but there's also a wider topic to all of this. happiness. when he was young, no one expected neil would achieve anything. but at the end of our day together, he invited us to his home to meet his budgies, and it was a chance to take it all in. and looking back now? it's been a great life and i'm happy all the time. it's about happiness, and bringing happiness to others? yeah, like ken dodd. watching the play, each night, what's its message? the message is, to be happy in life, happiness, like ken sang. ken dodd? and always think of everybody else. and i'm glad i've had a good life. david sillitoe, bbc news, the home of marvellous neil baldwin, newcastle—under—lyme.
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marvellous runs at the new vic theatre until the 9th of april. if you haven't seen the film, and a stage show is on, but if you haven't seen it, go and find it. get the family around, and watch it. we have got a strictly reunion, not now, after the show. getting it here, and sara is here! coming up on morning live. 1.5 million people in the uk have long covid, experiencing symptoms like extreme tiredness, brain fog and even chest pains. it's left so many struggling to get back to their day to day lives, months after having the virus. dr ranj is one of them, he explains the huge impact it's had on him and the best things you can do to help recover from it.
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i need to report a fire? can you see any flames? _ i need to report a fire? can you see any flames? yes. — i need to report a fire? can you see any flames? yes, there's _ i need to report a fire? can you see any flames? yes, there's so - i need to report a fire? can you see any flames? yes, there's so much l any flames? yes, there's so much smoke. it's the call you never want to make. panic, confusion and fear can stop us reporting an emergency situation accurately. we discover how a game—changing new system helps 999 operators see what's unfolding right in front of you and respond to life threatening situations much faster. and our queen of clean nancy birtwhistle will have you speeding through your spring cleaning in no time. she'll tell us how to get rid of grubby tiles and bathroom mould using her homemade cream cleaner and a bleach with just one ingredient! plus he's been a staple on our screen for decades. actor nigel havers will be telling us why 'the bidding room' is always full of surprises, and how to spot if your toilet seat is a worth a few quid! and his strictly fitness workouts are always worth it! graziano has a lower body work—out for us today. he'll show us how to do a] and kai's perfect quickstep. see you at 9.15.
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that will be like your�*s quickstep. i love you too but can i have a shot of graziano — i love you too but can i have a shot of graziano again he is such a beautiful— of graziano again he is such a beautiful human. sally was dancing for the _ beautiful human. sally was dancing for the first time at the weekend, she was— for the first time at the weekend, she was amazing, if i were you, i would _ she was amazing, if i were you, i would get — she was amazing, if i were you, i would get your request in early. i could really work with those hips! there is a promise! i5 could really work with those hips! there is a promise!— could really work with those hips! there is a promise! is she blushing? she doesn't — there is a promise! is she blushing? she doesn't know _ there is a promise! is she blushing? she doesn't know what _ there is a promise! is she blushing? she doesn't know what to _ there is a promise! is she blushing? she doesn't know what to say, - there is a promise! is she blushing? she doesn't know what to say, you l she doesn't know what to say, you have totally silenced her! have a lovely show, we will see at 9:15am. love you too!— time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london.
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i'm alison earle. people who've survived terror attacks are calling for better access to mental health and financial support. the appeal by the group survivors against terror comes on the fifth anniversary of the attack on westminster bridge. 5 people were killed and 50 were injured when khalid masood drove into crowds and stabbed a policeman. the met says it's doing all it can to identify threats. london remains a safe city. we have, i'm absolutely confident, a world—class partnership with a range of organisations, most obviously our intelligence partners. but we should never take for granted that safety. a teenage girl has died after a collision involving an e—scooter and a van in east london. it happened just after 1.30 yesterday afternoon on green street in east ham. police are appealing for information. millions of tonnes of soil excavated for crossrail has been used to create a nature reserve. rspb wallasea is made up of london
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clay which was carried out to the essex coast by boat. it's now become a vital habitat for wildlife. it's a bit like the heathrow of the bird world, really, it's on the east atlantic flyway. there's literally millions of birds travelling up and down this flyway, and the dropping in, stopping, wintering, passage birds, and all of these sites are vitally important. travel now — this is how tfl services are looking right now. there's no service on the 0verground between surrey quays and new cross and highbury & islington and dalston junction. there are severe delays between dalstonjunction and clapham junction/crystal palace/west croydon. there are minor delays on tfl rail between liverpool street and shenfield. there's no service on part of the northern line due to upgrade works. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello. good morning. the spring warmth will continue for the rest of the week,
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there's a lot more sunshine to come in the forecast, and it's looking dry or mostly dry, with high pressure dominating. some dramatic temperature contrasts between daytime and night—time temperatures, but daytime temperatures well above average. a milder start today than we saw yesterday, and frost—free out there, temperatures overnight between 5 and 7 celsius in central london, a bit more cloud around, but will be clearing, could be one or two isolated showers around today, but very few and far between. for the vast majority, a clear and dry day, with a light south—easterly wind, and top temperatures peeking at 19 or maybe even 20 celsius. a cold night tonight, temperatures dropping close to freezing, clear
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skies and light winds, some mist around maybe into wednesday, when the sunshine is set to continue, but as the high pressure moves westwards as we had through thursday and friday, it will turn cloudy and consequently a touch cooler, too. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to sally and dan. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. let's bring you up—to—date with everything that has been happening in ukraine overnight. hywel griffith is here with us. morning sally, morning dan. let's start with news coming out of the united states overnight. president biden has warned that there are clear signs vladimir putin may be preparing to use chemical and biological weapons in ukraine under the pretext that russia is under threat itself. they're also suggesting that ukraine has biological and chemical weapons in ukraine. that is a clear sign he is considering using both of those. he has already used chemical weapons in the past, and we should be careful what is about to come.
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this footage, verified by the bbc, shows thermobaric rockets, also known as vacuum bombs, are already being launched against ukraine. they are hugely destructive and their use against civilians is banned by the un. russia also claims to have launched hypersonic missiles, which can travel at five times the speed of sound, for the first time in combat in western ukraine. meanwhile, ukraine's president, volodymyrzelenksy, has repeated his call for direct talks with the russian leader to try to put an end to the fighting. but in an interview broadcast on ukrainian tv, he said that such a meeting would be unlikely to lead to an agreement on security guarantees or constitutional changes. he went on to say those decisions would need to be put to a referendum. translation: i believe that until such time - as we have a meeting with the president of the russian federation in any format, i have
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repeated this and offered this for a few years, i think that without this meeting, you cannot truly understand what they are prepared to do in order to stop the war, and what they are prepared to do if we are not ready for this or that compromise. on the ground, there is no let—up in the violence as rescue teams race to put out fires and clear the rubble from buildings that have been destroyed like this shopping centre in kyiv hit by russian air strikes. it's been confirmed that eight people died in this attack. the russian defence ministry said it was a target because rockets were being stored there. the ukrainian government says a further 8,000 people were evacuated from conflict zones on monday, including around 3,000 people from the besieged city of mariupol. according to the latest intelligence from ministry of defence here in the uk, ukrainian forces are still frustrating attempts to claim the city. elsewhere, russian progress has been
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limited and largely stalled. it's in the air that this war is being fought, with several locations suffering heavy daily bombardment. we are talking about chelsea now, the future owner has been been discussed for some time, but we are getting closer now, aren't we? yes. getting closer now, aren't we? yes, the american _ getting closer now, aren't we? yes, the american bank _ getting closer now, aren't we? yes, the american bank is _ getting closer now, aren't we? use: the american bank is hoping by getting closer now, aren't we? is: the american bank is hoping by the end of the week if it can to get a preferred bidder in front of the government for the green light. before that, we need a short list, which may come through today or tomorrow, the top three bidders. there have been developments there, we know have stifled chelsea at the moment, they need the server as quickly as possible, hoping for the sale to be done by the end of the month, they cannot sell tickets for that. fear is that there would be a
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half empty wembley for the fa cup semifinal against crystal palace, the government and the fa are talking about trying to get chelsea the tickets, although the money for that would of course have to go to the people of ukraine. there are fresh developments in the battle to take over at chelsea. britsh investment firm centricus, which overseas £29 billion in assets and features several chelsea season—ticket holders, confirmed its offer, saying it wants to "maintain and support existing "management, to ensure chelsea's continued success." former captainjohn terry is also supporting a group, which wants to buy 10% of the club to make sure it's held accountable by fans. and property developer nick candy has improved his bid, with the addition of another large international backer. the fa cup semifinals take place at wembley next month, but liverpool and manchester city fans have called for the game to be
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moved from london. there will be no direct trains from liverpool or manchester on the weekend of april 16th and 17th due to engineering works, with fan groups calling for the game to be moved to a different ground. chelsea take on crystal place in the other semi. there's going to be a repeat of last season's women's fa cup final in the semis with arsenal facing chelsea. the draw took place last night at bbc sport, and was conducted by former arsenal player faye white. the top two teams in the wsl, arsenal and chelsea, face each other with manchester city playing west ham. three—time champion phil mickelson is set to miss the masters next month for the first time in 28 years. he is taking a break from the game after his criticism of saudi arabia's regime. mickelson was involved with a saudi—backed golf series, which he hoped would reshape the pga tour, but faced a backlash for inflammatory comments he made
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during an interview in november which he later called reckless. on monday, mickelson's name was removed from a list of active players competing at the tournament, which he last won in 2010. full backs tyrick mitchell and kyle walker—peters have earned their first england call—ups after four players withdrew from gareth southgate's squad. crystal palace defender mitchell and southampton's walker—peters replace reece james and trent alexander—arnold who are out with injury. aaron ramsdale and tammy abraham have also withdrawn from england's matches with switzerland and ivory coast. they're replaced by west brom's sam jonstone and aston villa striker ollie watkins. england's interim head coach paul collingwood says he'll "wait and see" before making a decision on whether to go for the job on a more permanent basis. collingwood is currently in chage of the team for the tour of the west indies. it depends whatjobs are up for offer, we do not know until a managing director comes in. but i love being involved, i have always
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loved working for england, and as long as i make a difference, i will be happy. boris becker's trial in london continues. the former tennis start is accused of failing to hand over assets to settle his bankrupty debts. becker was declared bankrupt in 2017 and is alleged to have been hiding assets and transactions worth over 11.5 million pounds. the 54—year—old's failed to hand over his trophies, including his 1985 wimbledon title, as well as silverware from his win at the australian open in 1991 and 1996. he denies all charges. and finally, have a look at this for a goal. this is from a game involving the gedling south bank panthers under 12s, with the team needing a goal to win it, this happened in the last minute. the goalkeeper charlie clarke with this incredible effort to seal the win. how his dad gary enjoyed that one.
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hit it! it is on! what a goal! last—minute! i've taped it! that hit it! it is on! what a goal! last-minute! i've taped it! that is my favourite _ last-minute! i've taped it! that is my favourite bit, _ last-minute! i've taped it! that is my favourite bit, i've _ last-minute! i've taped it! that is my favourite bit, i've taped - last-minute! i've taped it! that is my favourite bit, i've taped it! - my favourite bit, i've taped it! look at them all getting round him at the end. it is great. a goalkeeper in the last minute of the match. you can see the linesman at the end, with his hands on his head, he can't believe it either. don't worry, he has got it on tape. and to remember it was the worst taped even in that moment, amazing. the royal college of nurses have warned that the government needs to help with fuel costs, or risk losing key workers.
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they say some carers are now paying £100 more a month to see their patients. nina's here with the details. all these incremental increases on your petrol, your shopping, your fuel at home, people are starting to feel the difference so they are all looking ahead to the spring statement tomorrow. here are the latest average prices at the pumps. a litre of petrol now sets you back around £1.67. diesel is almost £1.79. according to the rac, that's a rise of 16p for petrol and 22p for diesel since the start of the month. now, a warning from the royal college of nursing, that thousands of nurses and care staff, who use their own cars to make home visits, are paying an extra £100 a month. we spoke to chucks, a community nurse and team leader. he says it could force some key workers off the road. and that it's patients who could end
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up paying the price. nurses are having to dip into their own pockets to fill up their tanks. i spoke to inez yesterday who usually spends £75 to fill up a tank every week, but yesterday she paid £95. i am very worried that if nothing is done about this in the next couple of months, we will have some nurses leaving the profession because they cannot afford to fill their tanks. nhs staff can claim mileage at 56p per mile for the first 3,500 miles, and 20p for each additional mile. but health care professionals say it's just not enough. we've mentioned before the pressure growing on the chancellor to provide support for drivers in his spring statement tomorrow.
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currently, fuel duty is almost 58p a litre for petrol and diesel, and drivers also pay standard vat of 20% on top of that. in all, that makes up more than half of what you pay at the pump. the road haulage association is calling for a cut in fuel duty, and a 15 pence per litre rebate for haulage firms and coach operators. the rac says it would welcome a cut in fuel duty or vat, but that a vat reduction might have a bigger impact this issue isn't going away. vat is a tax on a tax, because it discharged — vat is a tax on a tax, because it discharged at the end of the transaction on top of 58p a litre fuel duty— transaction on top of 58p a litre fuel duty which brings in billions of pounds — fuel duty which brings in billions of pounds for the government. then with vat— of pounds for the government. then with vat added on top of that compound that in a situation was very much— compound that in a situation was very much higher prices at wholesale level~ _ very much higher prices at wholesale level. , , ., ., very much higher prices at wholesale level. ,, ., ., ., we understand that shell is reconsidering its decision to withdraw from the cambo oil field, 75 miles off the west coast of shetland.
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a sign ofjust how worried they are about their supply long term. the government points to the fact that fuel duty has been frozen since 2011, and that households are being provided with relief this year on energy bills and council tax. that comes to around £350 for most households. but i was just doing some maths, and i thought, what would it mean if you cut 5p a litre tomorrow? if you drove an average car like a ford focus, that would only save you around £2 50 each time you fill up your tank, so it is not going to make much difference. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. it is beautiful here in london this morning, i am in st james's park, look at the view,
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daffodils as far as you can see, and we are right next to the mall command at the bottom is buckingham palace. if you're wondering how many daffodils there are, between st james's park and green park, there are 2 million daffodil bulbs in bloom. they planned around 50,000 to 70,000 each year, that this intended plants and tulips as well, 52,000 tulips planted each year. a chilly start to the day, temperatures picking up nicely now, and the forecast for today is one of warm sunshine and just a few showers. a few showers already this morning across parts of northern england, in three parts of the midlands and the south—west, they will tend to fade. high pressure firmly in charge of our weather, and at the moment it is in the east, through the next few days it will drift across us towards the west. things remaining settled through the weekend, although we will see a bit more cloud around at
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the weekend. today, they sure as i mentioned are fading, a lot of dry weather and sunshine, this morning's cloud across scotland and northern england starting to break up, through the afternoon we could see the odd shower across the midlands and southern scotland, but they will be the exception not the rule, with temperatures ranging from eight in the north to about 19 or 20 celsius in east anglia and the south—east. through this evening and overnight, the showers will fade, some patchy mist and fog around north—east england and also the tay valley. temperatures in rural areas falling as low as freezing, so there could be a touch of frost, but above freezing in towns and cities in particular. tomorrow, starting with the patchy mist and fog, taking its time to lift but should clear most areas. parts of eastern scotland might hang onto it potentially for much of the day, but away from here, a lot of sunshine, a few showers.
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tomorrow, could be warmer than today in east anglia, could be as high as 21 celsius. the average at this time of year is roughly ten to 13 celsius north to south. enter thursday winds again, a lot of dry weather, sunshine, a weather front making inroads across the north west of scotland could well produce some cloud and drizzle, and temperatures will be about 12 celsius here, still above average, but for the rest of the uk, temperatures full and perhaps by a degree but still up to about 19 celsius, feeling very pleasant in that sunshine. carol, thank you very much indeed. it was a tough watch for emmerdale fans last night, as they saw much loved character marlon dingle suffer a life—threatening stroke. mark charnock, who plays marlon, has described the scenes as some of the most challenging he's ever filmed. let's take a look.
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got a few chills watching that. very scary to watch. markjoins us now, along with nick, who suffered a number of strokes in 2020, and has been helping with the storyline. lovely to see you both. mark,
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emmerdale is not of covering scary stories or challenging stories, but this is another level. what did you think when they first spoke to you about this storyline?— about this storyline? quite daunting. _ about this storyline? quite daunting. it _ about this storyline? quite daunting, it is _ about this storyline? quite daunting, it is a _ about this storyline? quite daunting, it is a big - daunting, it is a big responsibility, because once you start digging into the numbers, given what we know about strokes and we all talk about them, it is a weirdly underreported thing, strokes, and so be sure numbers, one strokes, and so be sure numbers, one stroke every five minutes in the uk. 100,000 a year, 1.3 million survivors in the uk, so it felt a bit scary but it felt important. it felt like we needed to tell it. you were watching — felt like we needed to tell it. you were watching that clip there saying, obviously you're wearing a prosthetic on your face, and when you looked in the middle, that was the first time you have seen it, so that was a natural reaction, and exactly how people would react, i suppose. exactly how people would react, i su ose. , ., ., suppose. yes, i got them to cover up all the mirrors — suppose. yes, i got them to cover up all the mirrors on _ suppose. yes, i got them to cover up all the mirrors on the _ suppose. yes, i got them to cover up all the mirrors on the make - suppose. yes, i got them to cover up all the mirrors on the make up - suppose. yes, i got them to cover up all the mirrors on the make up the i all the mirrors on the make up the room, and the horror of it, it was
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genuinely shocking, you can only imagine what people go through when they have this. imagine what people go through when they have this-— they have this. next, tell us about our they have this. next, tell us about your exoerience — they have this. next, tell us about your experience with _ they have this. next, tell us about your experience with strokes. - they have this. next, tell us about your experience with strokes. so l they have this. next, tell us about your experience with strokes. so i | your experience with strokes. so i had a big stroke _ your experience with strokes. so i had a big stroke 1st of february 2020, — had a big stroke 1st of february 2020, i— had a big stroke 1st of february 2020, i was playing hockey at the timei _ 2020, i was playing hockey at the time, right— 2020, i was playing hockey at the time, right at the beginning of a hockey— time, right at the beginning of a hockey match, and suddenly i felt like i_ hockey match, and suddenly i felt like i couldn't follow the ball, i started — like i couldn't follow the ball, i started to _ like i couldn't follow the ball, i started to lose a bit of strength in my right _ started to lose a bit of strength in my right hand, and all i can say is it was— my right hand, and all i can say is it was like — my right hand, and all i can say is it was like i— my right hand, and all i can say is it was like i was watching myself 'ust it was like i was watching myself just from — it was like i was watching myself just from behind, almost out of body experience. — just from behind, almost out of body experience, and ijust wanted to get somewhere safe, so i ran to the touchlinei — somewhere safe, so i ran to the touchline, everybody started to... because _ touchline, everybody started to... because i— touchline, everybody started to... because i had onlyjust started playing — because i had onlyjust started playing the game, everybody wanted to know _ playing the game, everybody wanted to know why i had got on two of the pitch. _ to know why i had got on two of the pitch. and _ to know why i had got on two of the pitch, and then, just like now, i was _ pitch, and then, just like now, i wasjust— pitch, and then, just like now, i wasjust going... i completely lost the ability— wasjust going... i completely lost the ability to speak. and within a few minutes, somebody who i play
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with said. — few minutes, somebody who i play with said. i— few minutes, somebody who i play with said, i think he has had a stroke. — with said, i think he has had a stroke. and _ with said, i think he has had a stroke, and as soon as that happened, as soon as he said that, i was almost — happened, as soon as he said that, i was almost destroyed. i was like, how _ was almost destroyed. ! was like, how. why— was almost destroyed. i was like, how. why is — was almost destroyed. i was like, how, why is this happening to me, and then— how, why is this happening to me, and then not being able to communicate at all. and and then not being able to communicate at all. and what has been our communicate at all. and what has been your role — communicate at all. and what has been your role on _ communicate at all. and what has been your role on emmerdale, i communicate at all. and what has been your role on emmerdale, to | communicate at all. and what has i been your role on emmerdale, to try to make sure that that story is all authentically told?— authentically told? yeah, i was asked by the — authentically told? yeah, i was asked by the stroke _ authentically told? yeah, i was| asked by the stroke association authentically told? yeah, i was i asked by the stroke association to help mark— asked by the stroke association to help mark in terms of i guess trying to understand what it is like in that— to understand what it is like in that moment. we have not even spoken about it. _ that moment. we have not even spoken about it, because i only saw it last night _ about it, because i only saw it last night. completely nailed it, particularly the inner voice going, i am _ particularly the inner voice going, i am still— particularly the inner voice going, i am still 0k, particularly the inner voice going, i am still ok, i am still here, but not being— i am still ok, i am still here, but not being able to communicate that, it was— not being able to communicate that, it was so— not being able to communicate that, it was so terrifying at that time, not marcus— it was so terrifying at that time, not marcus done an amazing job. nexti _ not marcus done an amazing job. next, seeing you sitting here chatting to us on the sofa, you seem to have made a full recovery. how are you? to have made a full recovery. how are ou? . ., ,.,,.,_
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to have made a full recovery. how are ou? . ., , , f~f are you? yeah, i am probably 85% better, are you? yeah, i am probably 85% better. so — are you? yeah, i am probably 8596 better. so i— are you? yeah, i am probably 8596 better. so i can — are you? yeah, i am probably 8596 better, so i can bring _ are you? yeah, i am probably 8596 better, so i can bring my- are you? yeah, i am probably 8596 better, so i can bring my game i are you? yeah, i am probably 8596 better, so i can bring my game at| better, so i can bring my game at times— better, so i can bring my game at times like — better, so i can bring my game at times like this but i will be complete with knackered litter. and most importantly, i want to have that voice — most importantly, i want to have that voice to help others avoid that — that voice to help others avoid that. ~ . ., that voice to help others avoid that. ~ . i , that voice to help others avoid that. ~., i , , that voice to help others avoid that. i , , ., , that. mark, it must be lovely to hear nick _ that. mark, it must be lovely to hear nick say — that. mark, it must be lovely to hear nick say you _ that. mark, it must be lovely to hear nick say you know - that. mark, it must be lovely to hear nick say you know that - that. mark, it must be lovely to| hear nick say you know that last night. as an actor, you want to get these big storylines right, for people who have never seen it before and also for people like nick who have lived through it. you and also for people like nick who have lived through it.— have lived through it. you have a du to have lived through it. you have a duty to do _ have lived through it. you have a duty to do that. _ have lived through it. you have a duty to do that. but _ have lived through it. you have a duty to do that. but the - have lived through it. you have a duty to do that. but the problem j have lived through it. you have a i duty to do that. but the problem of strokes as they are all different, it is just myriad reactions to it and after effects as well, so we have tried our very best. nick has been invaluable, the whole stroke association have been absolutely amazing in helping us. the response on twitter last night was extraordinary, because you realise how many people have gone through this and so many different ways, it
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is overwhelming.— this and so many different ways, it is overwhelming. what is the method ou would is overwhelming. what is the method you would like _ is overwhelming. what is the method you would like people _ is overwhelming. what is the method you would like people to _ is overwhelming. what is the method you would like people to hear, - is overwhelming. what is the method you would like people to hear, what l you would like people to hear, what is the important thing for people to know? . ., i , is the important thing for people to know? ,, ., i , ., ., is the important thing for people to know? ,, ., , . know? strokes are not predictable, the come know? strokes are not predictable, they come out _ know? strokes are not predictable, they come out of— know? strokes are not predictable, they come out of nowhere - know? strokes are not predictable, they come out of nowhere to - know? strokes are not predictable, l they come out of nowhere to anyone at any age at a time. people can make incremental changes to their life, diet, exercise, a bit more mindfulness, and if the doctor offers you a blood pressure check, take one. people can make small changes to head this off.- take one. people can make small changes to head this off. nick, you sa ou changes to head this off. nick, you say you were _ changes to head this off. nick, you say you were playing _ changes to head this off. nick, you say you were playing hockey, - changes to head this off. nick, you say you were playing hockey, so i. say you were playing hockey, so i imagine you are quite active physically. when you're under a lot of stress at that time, what was happening? i of stress at that time, what was happening?— of stress at that time, what was haueninu? , ., ,, of stress at that time, what was hautenin? , .,,.,,y ., happening? i was probably under a fair amount — happening? i was probably under a fair amount of _ happening? i was probably under a fair amount of stress, _ happening? i was probably under a fair amount of stress, and - happening? i was probably under a fair amount of stress, and it - fair amount of stress, and it was right— fair amount of stress, and it was right at— fair amount of stress, and it was right at the — fair amount of stress, and it was right at the beginning of covid as welli _ right at the beginning of covid as well, so — right at the beginning of covid as well, so there was a lot going on. it may— well, so there was a lot going on. it may be — well, so there was a lot going on. it may be that i might have been one of the _ it may be that i might have been one of the only— it may be that i might have been one of the only people that got covid, because _ of the only people that got covid, because we know there has been some evidence _ because we know there has been some evidence of— because we know there has been some evidence of blood thickening as a
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by—product of that virus. but fundamentally, ijust try by—product of that virus. but fundamentally, i just try to take each _ fundamentally, ! just try to take each day— fundamentally, i just try to take each day as it comes, hit it with positivity— each day as it comes, hit it with positivity as much as i can, there's definitely— positivity as much as i can, there's definitely some mental issues that come _ definitely some mental issues that come off— definitely some mental issues that come off the back of trying to get around _ come off the back of trying to get around your recovery, but fundamentally from my perspective it is about _ fundamentally from my perspective it is about making sure people act fast to the _ is about making sure people act fast to the symptoms. find is about making sure people act fast to the symptoms-— is about making sure people act fast to the symptoms. and also, i do not mean this to — to the symptoms. and also, i do not mean this to try _ to the symptoms. and also, i do not mean this to try to _ to the symptoms. and also, i do not mean this to try to put _ to the symptoms. and also, i do not mean this to try to put fear - to the symptoms. and also, i do not mean this to try to put fear in - mean this to try to put fear in anybody�*s mind, but there is also the concern about this happening again. memberspeaking the concern about this happening again. member speaking to a footballer who collapsed on the footballer who collapsed on the football pitch and now has a piece of metal in his heart, but now he is always living with, could be today? yes, that is probably the thing i must _ yes, that is probably the thing i must wrestle with, getting up each morning _ must wrestle with, getting up each morning and going, great, i'm alive, but because — morning and going, great, i'm alive, but because i— morning and going, great, i'm alive, but because i do not know why it
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happened. — but because i do not know why it happened, there's always a chance, and that— happened, there's always a chance, and that is— happened, there's always a chance, and that is something i have to wrestle — and that is something i have to wrestle with every day as well. you mention how _ wrestle with every day as well. i'm, mention how important it is for people to act fast. what do people need to do?— need to do? fundamentally, if you see anybody's _ need to do? fundamentally, if you see anybody's face _ need to do? fundamentally, if you see anybody's face dripping, - need to do? fundamentally, if you see anybody's face dripping, their| see anybody's face dripping, their arms— see anybody's face dripping, their arms going week, their speech being affected. _ arms going week, their speech being affected, like it was with myself, it is all— affected, like it was with myself, it is all about time. it took me unfortunately nearly five hours to have _ unfortunately nearly five hours to have the — unfortunately nearly five hours to have the right medication, and every single _ have the right medication, and every single minute counts in terms of the disruption _ single minute counts in terms of the disruption in your brain. so if in doubt, — disruption in your brain. so if in doubt, just— disruption in your brain. so if in doubt, just call 999. the descent advice. doubt, just call 999. the descent advice- you _ doubt, just call 999. the descent advice. you are _ doubt, just call 999. the descent advice. you are still _ doubt, just call 999. the descent advice. you are still on _ doubt, just call 999. the descent advice. you are still on the - advice. you are still on the recovery road, this is going to be a storyline that you follow for quite some time. storyline that you follow for quite some time-— storyline that you follow for quite some time. , , ,, ., ., ., some time. yes, soaps are great for this, some time. yes, soaps are great for this. because _ some time. yes, soaps are great for this. because it— some time. yes, soaps are great for this, because it is _ some time. yes, soaps are great for this, because it is the _ some time. yes, soaps are great for this, because it is the only - some time. yes, soaps are great for this, because it is the only form - some time. yes, soaps are great for this, because it is the only form of l this, because it is the only form of drama happening in real time to the audience. so this will go on for months, small bits of recovery day
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by day, and hopefully the audience will see that recovery in the audience will see that recovery in marlon. ., . , ., , audience will see that recovery in marlon. ., . y., , ., , audience will see that recovery in marlon. ., . , ., marlon. how much will you be able to hel mark marlon. how much will you be able to help mark with _ marlon. how much will you be able to help mark with this _ marlon. how much will you be able to help mark with this next _ marlon. how much will you be able to help mark with this next bit? - help mark with this next bit? because once you realise this has happened, the real challenge starts. yes, we cover that with the initial dialogue — yes, we cover that with the initial dialogue we had in terms of trying to help _ dialogue we had in terms of trying to help and how things progress over the two _ to help and how things progress over the two years. i am sure we will stay— the two years. i am sure we will stay in — the two years. i am sure we will stay in contact as the storyline develops — stay in contact as the storyline develops as well. but as i say, you have _ develops as well. but as i say, you have done — develops as well. but as i say, you have done a — develops as well. but as i say, you have done a greatjob in representing it really amazingly welt _ representing it really amazingly well. i , ., ., well. mark, give us an idea, in terms of— well. mark, give us an idea, in terms of the _ well. mark, give us an idea, in terms of the whole _ well. mark, give us an idea, in terms of the whole team, - well. mark, give us an idea, in terms of the whole team, howj well. mark, give us an idea, in - terms of the whole team, how much work goes into making sure that is right? obviously this conversation with you and neil, and i imagine you talk to other numbers of the production team, but the care and attention from everybody at emmerdale to make sure it is right. the sheer volume of research, video testimonies from survivors, speaking to clinicians who are specialist in the subject. we have had a gentleman on set from the stroke association advising us, he is a doctor, so
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emmerdale have really assumed a massive responsibility for it, because it is such a mass important story to tell to so many people. so the research has been extraordinary. next, how have you changed your life now? what have you done, what changes have you made? i now? what have you done, what changes have you made? i guess it could be called _ changes have you made? i guess it could be called a _ changes have you made? i guess it could be called a stroke _ changes have you made? i guess it could be called a stroke of - changes have you made? i guess it could be called a stroke of luck, i could be called a stroke of luck, getting — could be called a stroke of luck, getting a — could be called a stroke of luck, getting a fresh perspective and realising what actually does matter in life _ realising what actually does matter in life from now on. personally, it is making — in life from now on. personally, it is making sure i really want to help others _ is making sure i really want to help others avoid this happening to them. so again. _ others avoid this happening to them. so again, talking about fast and the action, _ so again, talking about fast and the action, so— so again, talking about fast and the action, so important, and more and more _ action, so important, and more and more exposure to things like this, the better~ — more exposure to things like this, the better. ~ . , more exposure to things like this, the better-— the better. was it strangely emotional— the better. was it strangely emotional to _ the better. was it strangely emotional to watch - the better. was it strangely emotional to watch it - the better. was it strangely emotional to watch it last i the better. was it strangely - emotional to watch it last night? i wasjust a new emotional to watch it last night? i was just a new hotel room, emotional to watch it last night? i wasjust a new hotel room, and honestly, — wasjust a new hotel room, and honestly, it— wasjust a new hotel room, and honestly, it was completely tearful,
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because _ honestly, it was completely tearful, because you just did it really, really— because you just did it really, really welcome and i think a lot of the things— really welcome and i think a lot of the things we talked about, as i say, _ the things we talked about, as i say. you — the things we talked about, as i say, you nailed it, usually took that— say, you nailed it, usually took that on— say, you nailed it, usually took that on board and really represented what it _ that on board and really represented what it is— that on board and really represented what it is like in that moment. could — what it is like in that moment. could not— what it is like in that moment. could not have done anything without nick. . i . i ,. could not have done anything without nick. . i ., i y., , could not have done anything without nick. ., i y., , . could not have done anything without nick. ., i , . ., nick. nick, thank you very much for cominu in nick. nick, thank you very much for coming in and _ nick. nick, thank you very much for coming in and sharing _ nick. nick, thank you very much for coming in and sharing your - nick. nick, thank you very much for coming in and sharing your story. i coming in and sharing your story. mark, thank you for a beautiful story well told. emmerdale is on every weeknight at 7.30 on itv. if you have been affected by what we have been talking about and you would like any information, you can go to stroke.org.uk. you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8.59.
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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world... one of the leading kremlin critics, alexei navalny, has been found guilty of large scale fraud by a russian court. presidentjoe biden has warned that vladimir putin could use chemical and biological weapons in ukraine. the white house has also suggested russia could begin cyber—attacks in the us. he is considering using both of those. he has already used chemical weapons in the past, and we should be careful of what is about to come. he knows there will be severe consequences. ukraine's capital, kyiv, is once again under a curfew — it was put in place after eight people were killed in residential areas. there are calls for the 21 surrogate
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