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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 22, 2022 9:00am-10:00am GMT

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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world... one of the leading kremlin critics, alexei navalny, has been found guilty of large scale fraud by a russian court. presidentjoe biden has warned that vladimir putin could use chemical and biological weapons in ukraine. the white house has also suggested russia could begin cyber—attacks in the us. he is considering using both of those. he has already used chemical weapons in the past, and we should be careful of what is about to come. he knows there will be severe consequences. ukraine's capital, kyiv, is once again under a curfew — it was put in place after eight people were killed in residential areas. there are calls for the 21 surrogate
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babies being cared for in a kyiv shelter to be evacuated as their parents cannot attend ukraine during the invasion. the search continues for survivors from a plane crash in southern china which was carrying 132 passengers. the jet went down in a mountainous area — everyone onboard is feared to have died. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. president biden has said there are clear signs vladimir putin may be preparing to use chemical and biological weapons in ukraine. mr biden said the russian leader "had his back to the wall" as a result of ukrainian military resistance and the united response of western countries, and there was a danger he would resort to
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more severe tactics. russia's war on ukraine has also led to disruption in food supplies. the two combattants are the world's largest exporters of wheat, and this in turn has meant trouble for the world's largest importer of wheat, egypt. now, the egyptian prime minister has set a fixed price for unsubsidised bread, with the aim of controlling rising food prices. we also have some breaking news from russia, where alexei navalny, one of the leading critics of president putin, who was already behind bars, is almost certain to be sentenced to more time in prison. the hearing took place via video link from the pokrov prison colony outside moscow, where he is currently serving two and a half years injail. the court found him guilty of embezzlement — an offence which could be punished with 13 years imprisonment. as per most mornings, we can see from a north—westerly direction, where the majority of most russian
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forces are, you might be able to see some dark smoke over the top of the buildings of kyiv. we have seen lee maggie heard some booms of artillery fire. it's never clear which direction it is going on, so fighting is never clear which direction it is. we have heard fighting on the outskirts of kyiv. in the south—east, the mayor has urged people to leave immediately. we don't have any more details, but fire crews across the city and region have been battling flames overnight as well. so itjust shows how things can vary, but the overall assessment from us military experts, once again, is that russian advances are continuing to stutter or stall because of mainly logistical problems. poor planning, and that is feeding two schools of thought. the first, the claim from president biden again that russia is considering using biological and
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chemical weapons, considering using biological and chemicalweapons, but considering using biological and chemical weapons, but the second is that president zelensky hopes that will pull vladimir putin more to the negotiating table. the kremlin says not a lot of progress has been made for both presidents to meet, and it requires both to meet in peace talks to find a way out of this war. president zelensky says everything is on the table, including the country's own security deals and integrity, but he also says any compromises would have to go to a vote of the ukrainian people, to a referendum. the ukrainian people time and time again throughout history, whenever russia is aggressive towards ukraine, they politically lean more to the west. so there will be a question of whether the brutality of this war will be enough to sway opinion and make people prioritise peace because ultimately, it is a decision for president zelensky and the people who voted him in on how much they are willing to concede to preserve the very future of this country.
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james bought a house there. as we've heard, president biden has warned there are clear signs russia is preparing to use chemical and biological weapons in ukraine, and said there's a real danger president putin could resort to more severe tactics. meanwhile, president zelensky has again appealed for direct talks with mr putin to try to end the conflict, as andrew plant reports. gunfire at a protest against the russian invasion people said they were fired on as they demonstrated here, in a city in southern ukraine. president zelensky said it was a rally forfreedom. the ukrainian president zelensky said it was a rally for freedom. the ukrainian air force now say russia is increasing its attacks from the air, amid reports that ground attacks are slowing, even stalling in places. further east, parts of the city of mariupol, the centre and suburbs here shelled and empty, a further 3000 people were evacuated
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yesterday. satellite images show the smoke rising across the city. the united states has said that russia may soon turn to using chemical weapons, following false claims that ukraine was poised to use them. his back is ukraine was poised to use them. h 3 back is against the ukraine was poised to use them. h 1 back is against the wall, and now he is talking about new false flags he is talking about new false flags he is setting up, including, he asserting that we in america and chemical and biological weapons from europe, it simply not true. i guarantee that. they are also suggesting that ukraine has biological and chemical weapons. that is a clear sign he is considering using both of those. in kyiv, eight people are reported dead after shelling on a residential area. russia said it was because rockets were stored here. the toll of this war is already hard to bear. sir guy �*s brother was killed when
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ukrainian barracks were bombed. here, the russian invasion still feels relentless.— here, the russian invasion still feels relentless. this is our land, he sa s. feels relentless. this is our land, he says- we _ feels relentless. this is our land, he says. we live _ feels relentless. this is our land, he says. we live here. _ feels relentless. this is our land, he says. we live here. where - feels relentless. this is our land, . he says. we live here. where should we run? for many ukrainians, there is no choice. they stay and cling to daily rituals. president zelensky has called again for direct talks with vladimir putin to end the fighting. but for now, hopes of a ceasefire still seem out of reach. andrew plante, bbc news. rebels from belarus are among some of the foreign fighters heading to ukraine to defend the country against russia. 0ur correspondent mark lowen met some of the recruits in warsaw, as they prepare to make the journey. a trial run for the terror they will soon see for real. recruits from belarus training before they go to fight with ukraine. slavic brothers uniting against a common enemy, putin's russia.
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this man came back from his life in new york to battle the kremlin�*s forces who are supported by president lukashenko of belarus. without independent and free ukraine, there is no independent and free belarus. i really admire ukrainian nation. from the very beginning we supported ukrainians in their fight for freedom and i would like to have my belarusian nation to be as strong and powerful as ukraine is right now. do you think lukashenko will send belarusian trips into ukraine? i hope so because if they send someone to ukrainian soil we will destroy them on ukrainian territory, then we won't have a lot of problems. for these dissidents it is in part a proxy war against a regime at home that has made belarus a launchpad for russian attacks on ukraine. 30,000 russian troops advancing from there to kyiv.
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they'll also take in supplies and what they hope they won't have to use. and then a crash course in first aid by a polish veteran of afghanistan. the tourniquets and bandages of that vicious conflict now a part of life in europe. just hours before leaving, they are learning the vital lessons that could save their lives. when you look around you can see that these arejust ordinary guys, mainly, who were suddenly preparing for what it will be like entering a theatre of war. for all theirjingoism and unity, the facade cracks as reality hits. i'm afraid, a little. i saw you speaking to your mum earlier. yeah, she's crying. but now she'sjust, praying, maybe. she tries to tell me that this war is not mine,
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is not our, it's other countries, other people, but i don't agree. so they head off to someone else's war, which has become their own. both countries fighting the imperial oppressor. they travel from warsaw to war, hours first to the border.
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�* sanctuary there. so yes, looking for sanctuary there. so yes, for now, lviv has been targeted a few times in the last week or so, but is a relatively calm part of ukraine. the worst parts of the conflict are taking place elsewhere. and how significant a potential disruption to that calm is this warning from the us presidentjoe biden around these concerns that he is saying there are clear signs that president putin is going to use chemical or biological weapons? yes. chemical or biological weapons? yes, otentiall chemical or biological weapons? yes, potentially awful, _ chemical or biological weapons? yes, potentially awful, it _ chemical or biological weapons? 1&1 potentially awful, it has to be said. i think this is a reflection of the situation on the ground, that
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we have seen russian armoured vehicles making very little progress over the last week or so, effectively they appear to have stalled around the major cities, making a little bit of progress around the port city of mariupol into the outskirts there, but for the most part, the ground war appears to have stalled. we have seen a tense, continuing attempts to she“ seen a tense, continuing attempts to shell cities like mariupol into submission, and this is, i think, part of the reason now while you're having the question of, would chemical or biological weapons be used by the russians question what we don't know why president biden has said this right now. it be that they are picking up intelligence chatter that potentially the russians are preparing to do this. we have also heard in russian media particularly, discussion about the ukrainians having chemical and biological weapons and the way the thinking goes is that if russia was to use an awful weapon like this, perhaps in mariupol, for example, they might then turn around and
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blame it on the ukrainian forces and the night was them who had done it. if so, the ground is being prepared. this is something from the russian playbook we have seen before in operations in syria, and i think thatis operations in syria, and i think that is why we have had president biden coming out strongly saying that this is a possibility at the moment. . �* , ., , moment. that's right, and his suggestion — moment. that's right, and his suggestion is _ moment. that's right, and his suggestion is that _ moment. that's right, and his suggestion is that this - moment. that's right, and his suggestion is that this is - moment. that's right, and his suggestion is that this is a - suggestion is that this is a potential natural next step because president putin �*s back is against the wall, as he put it. bearing that in mind, how likely is it that they could be diplomatic solutions out of this? for example, we know that ukraine �*s president zelensky is still wanting face—to—face talks with president putin. still wanting face-to-face talks with president putin.— still wanting face-to-face talks with president putin. look, ukraine is desperate _ with president putin. look, ukraine is desperate for _ with president putin. look, ukraine is desperate for these _ with president putin. look, ukraine is desperate for these talks - with president putin. look, ukraine is desperate for these talks to - is desperate for these talks to work. that's been the position from the start. they talked about the possibility of talks from day one, and we know there is a channel of communication that exists, but the harsh reality of this is that russia started this war, we do not know
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what the russian objective is, but we do all have a pretty good sense that russia will only agree to some sort of ceasefire, some sort of peace agreement, when they have achieved an objective which will enable vladimir putin to tell the russian people that this was a worthwhile endeavour, and that they won this war. have we reached that point now? it doesn't feel like it on the ground with russia struggling to take so many of the major cities, and i think that's why many people are deeply sceptical of this peace process, if we can even call it that. while the bombs are falling, while the shells are continuing to fly, for we are still in the misery of mariupol, it is hard to believe that the russians are sincere about stopping this and signing some sort of peace agreement. thank you. for more on this, i'm joined by chemical weapons expert, hamish de bretton gordon.
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thank you forjoining us, hamish. so, these are signs that the us president biden is talking about, signs that president putin is prepared to use chemical and biological weapons, prepared to use chemical and biologicalweapons, or prepared to use chemical and biological weapons, or close to preparing to use them, what signs are they? what do we know about how credible these concerns are? weill. are they? what do we know about how credible these concerns are?— credible these concerns are? well, i think there — credible these concerns are? well, i think there are _ credible these concerns are? well, i think there are a _ credible these concerns are? well, i think there are a number— credible these concerns are? well, i think there are a number of- credible these concerns are? well, i think there are a number of things. | think there are a number of things. first of all, the president of the united states says he thinks they will use them, he probably has some intelligence that they are moving various bits of machinery and vehicles into position. i think first of all. secondly, of course, the russians with their false flag operations over the last few weeks have been suggesting that the ukrainians are going to be using chemical and biological weapons, and i personally know from being in syria, and being up close to the russians for the last six years, when they do that, it is generally a precursor to them using the weapons
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themselves. but i think actually the position of the russian forces is telling. they are stalled, their tanks aren't working. they are running out of fuel. they are bogged down. in mariupol, which reminds me very much of aleppo. i saw conventional seed there which was broken in 13 days by the use of barrel bombs. president putin knows that if he wants to make the civilians surrender quickly and get this over with from his assyrian experience, chemical weapons are brilliant. if you have no morals or scruples, he would probably use it all the time. 50 scruples, he would probably use it all the time-— all the time. so it seems that, regardless _ all the time. so it seems that, regardless of _ all the time. so it seems that, regardless of what _ all the time. so it seems that, regardless of what the - all the time. so it seems that, - regardless of what the intelligence might be, just purely from russia �*s previous actions in previous conflicts, this is very much
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something out of their playbook. filth. something out of their playbook. 0h, entirel . something out of their playbook. 0h, entirely- the — something out of their playbook. 1 entirely. the russian something out of their playbook. o1, entirely. the russian playbook from syria attacking hospitals, attacking schools, attacking civilians, because putin wants civilians to surrender, and breaking their morals is the easiest way to do it. we have seen that in syria. we have had red lights about the use of chemical weapons. president 0bama �*s redline in 2015 disappeared in a puff of smoke and we did nothing. i think putin does not think the west will react, and he is in desperate straits. he either retreats back to moscow and, you know, the end of putin, or he does something demonstrative. but what i am doing at the moment, i have been training civilians on the last few weeks over how to survive these dreadful chemical and biological attacks. we learnt a lot in syria from thousands of people whose lives were saved,
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and i am publishing a free book online today which is how to survive a chemical and biological attack, and i will send you the link as soon as it is up. if putin knows that the chemical weapons are not going to be as effective as he hopes because civilians know what to do, maybe he won't use them. a lot of your actions in a chemical attack are almost counterintuitive, almost the opposite for what you would do for a conventional artillery attack. so i am hoping by getting as many people aware of what the best things are to do that actually, if he does use these dreadful weapons many people will actually survive. i these dreadful weapons many people will actually survive.— will actually survive. i have to ask, without _ will actually survive. i have to ask, without pre-empting - will actually survive. i have to l ask, without pre-empting your will actually survive. i have to - ask, without pre-empting your book ask, without pre—empting your book too much, what is the solution customer what is the advice for what civilians should do?— civilians should do? there are three ke thins civilians should do? there are three key things that _ civilians should do? there are three key things that you _ civilians should do? there are three key things that you have _ civilians should do? there are three key things that you have to - civilians should do? there are three key things that you have to do. - key things that you have to do. first of all, don't go underground. 0r, first of all, don't go underground. or, if you are underground, come above ground. the gas generally
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since underground and in syria, it killed people underground. 0r, since underground and in syria, it killed people underground. or, as they streamed above ground, they were easy pickings for snipers, or captured. so you get to higher ground. you also, always be aware where the wind is going because this stuff blows away on the wind pretty easily. simple things with chlorine, we tell people to hold their breath and run across a wind for 30 seconds, and then you are out of the downwind hazard, the danger area. and thirdly, decontaminate as quickly as you can. that might mean taking your clothes off. that might seem an odd thing to do, but you can remove 90% of contamination by doing that, or having a shower. chemical munitions, those things that deliver it like artillery shells or mortars, they don't explode or they don't do a big bang, they do a pop so that is an indication. we are trying to get some stuff into ukraine, where people can have simple detectors so
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they can work out whether it is chlorine or a nerve agent. i personally think putin will use readily available chemicals like chlorine because there are thousands of tonnes of chlorine in ukraine. so of tonnes of chlorine in ukraine. so of course, they can deny it. whatever chemical he uses to attack, no doubt he will of course blame the ukrainians for doing it. but i hope if they follow some basic rules then, you know, it will be a lot less effective, and i hope the russians realise we are doing this so that they don't use these dreadful weapons. it so that they don't use these dreadful weapons.— so that they don't use these dreadful weapons. it is surreal and chillina dreadful weapons. it is surreal and chilling that _ dreadful weapons. it is surreal and chilling that we _ dreadful weapons. it is surreal and chilling that we are _ dreadful weapons. it is surreal and chilling that we are even _ dreadful weapons. it is surreal and chilling that we are even talking i chilling that we are even talking about this, but that all sounds very interesting and practical advice. thank you for taking the time to share your thoughts with us. nearly 3.5 million people have fled ukraine since the start of the conflict. more than 500,000 refugees
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have now crossed into romania. many are passing through the border town which is also being used as a hub for sending medical and food supplies into ukraine. 0ur correspondent is in siret in romania. 0ne correspondent is in siret in romania. one of the things that stood out from what you mentioned earlier when i heard you speaking was at the women and children coming through, and the fact that there may be women who are in tears, adults in tears, and babies crying, but the children are not crying. they are trying to be a source of strength for their parents. that is a striking image.— for their parents. that is a striking image. for their parents. that is a strikinaaimae. , , , , striking image. exactly, yes. it is something _ striking image. exactly, yes. it is something i— striking image. exactly, yes. it is something i first _ striking image. exactly, yes. it is something i first noticed - striking image. exactly, yes. it is something i first noticed on - striking image. exactly, yes. it is something i first noticed on the l something i first noticed on the border of hungary and ukraine. and now here on the border of romania and ukraine. the women, sea they havejust and ukraine. the women, sea they have just left and ukraine. the women, sea they havejust left men and ukraine. the women, sea they have just left men behind, and ukraine. the women, sea they havejust left men behind, their husbands and partners, who may be delivered them to their border, or in the case of a woman who i spoke
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to this morning, she left her husband a month ago in kyiv, and then moved to the relatively safe city but then decided to move on. she was having trouble holding back the tears. difficult decisions being made here. but her children around, and watching their mothers in situations like this, they are comforting. they are traumatised, they are missing their fathers, their grandfathers and their older brothers, perhaps, but they are also looking after their mothers in visa situations. we are witnessing this time and time again, often with very small children of eight or ten years old. 111 small children of eight or ten years old. ., , , ., ., ., old. if the town set up to manage these large _ old. if the town set up to manage these large numbers— old. if the town set up to manage these large numbers of— old. if the town set up to manage these large numbers of people i old. if the town set up to manage - these large numbers of people coming through? it these large numbers of people coming throu~h? , , , ~ ., through? it is, yes. at the moment there is something _ through? it is, yes. at the moment there is something of _ through? it is, yes. at the moment there is something of a _ through? it is, yes. at the moment there is something of a lull- through? it is, yes. at the moment there is something of a lull at - through? it is, yes. at the moment there is something of a lull at this | there is something of a lull at this particular border crossing. 0nly
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particular border crossing. only 2000 people crossed here yesterday, that's comparing to five, six, 7000 in the days before that, of the 10-20,000 in the days before that, of the 10—20,000 people coming into romania a day, but it is very well organised. there are a lot of volunteers as you can see over my shoulder here. these will be translators, people from the romanian fire brigade, who are playing a central role at all these border crossings, and of course the romanian police. there is also a growing awareness at border crossings like this of the vulnerability of so many young women and children crossing. there is a worry amongst international organisations following this situation as it evolves about the danger of trafficking. there are small groups here, warning women and children about this danger, and so generally one has a sense of a very well organised humanitarian organisation within the chaos of this wider refugee situation. thank
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ou. you. russia �*s most prominent opposition figure alexei navalny has been found guilty on a trial on charges rejected by supporters are fabricated. he was jailed when he returned to the country last year after surviving a poisoning he blames on the bremen. we are waiting to hear what sentence he receives, but the prosecutors have been pushing for 13 years behind bars, and they might be pushing for him to be in a maximum security prison as well. so really stepping up the pressure in this situation. in terms of alexei navalny, of course, his organisation has been mounting a direct challenge to president putin. he tried to run for president in 2018. he was not allowed to. he has called for protests here, led protest here against corruption against the president, his organisation, his foundation have investigated corruption charges and that foundation was also labelled an
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extremist organisation and that has meant that many people who were involved, many of his key allies have left the country because they were scared for their own safety. that was exacerbated by the fact that in 2020 alexei navalny himself was poisoned by novichock on a flight and the russian authorities have always denied they were involved in that, but that is not necessarily how it is perceived by others here. the charges were against fraud, he was charged with taking money from the foundation that had been given to it, and also for contempt of court. the charges are being perceived around the world as being a political case, rather than being a case about embezzlement. that is how alexei navalny has also talked about it. for example, the foreign secretary in america has said these charges were dubious. the german chancellor has said they were incompatible with the rule of law. alexei navalny was
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arrested back when he returned to russia after treatment for that novichock poisoning when he returned to russia back injanuary 2021, and then he was put behind bars. of course, today the expectation is that the sentence will be very much extended after this guilty verdict. back to the warning from the white house that russia may also resort to cyber attacks against the us in response to increasingly damaging sanctions. joe, how is the us able to detect this? how easy is it to get a heads up that this is likely to happen?— get a heads up that this is likely tohauen? , , get a heads up that this is likely tohauen? , to happen? well, i suppose they are lookin: at to happen? well, i suppose they are looking at previous _ to happen? well, i suppose they are looking at previous incidents, - to happen? well, i suppose they are looking at previous incidents, and i looking at previous incidents, and these warnings are not new, but it is important that it has come from the president himself. they said there is some sort of new
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intelligence. they haven't given us any evidence of this, but to be honest, the western intelligence has been pretty on the money since its invasion in terms of getting the next moves of the kremlin. i think what they are most concerned about our first of all, it is an attack on the us or the uk, these warnings are being echoed by the uk. it is like direct cyber attack. the sort of things against critical infrastructure that could really cause vertical problem. last may, one of the biggest oil pipelines were hit by a run somewhere attack which was thought to be russian cyber criminals. that caused oil supplies to dry up along the east coast, panic buying at the pumps, and a real crisis for about a week—and—a—half in the us. the other thing that is a concern is an overspill attack, so for example in 2017, russia launched a cyber attack
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on ukraine and that was malicious software which affected lots of computers in ukraine, and it wiped all the data, making all those networks unusable. that spread across the world and caused about $10 billion worth of damage. that's what they will be most worried about at the moment. flan what they will be most worried about at the moment.— what they will be most worried about at the moment. can anything be done to revent at the moment. can anything be done to prevent the — at the moment. can anything be done to prevent the damage, _ at the moment. can anything be done to prevent the damage, or _ at the moment. can anything be done to prevent the damage, or is - at the moment. can anything be done to prevent the damage, or is it i at the moment. can anything be done to prevent the damage, or is itjust i to prevent the damage, or is itjust an inevitability? this to prevent the damage, or is it 'ust an inevitability?i an inevitability? this is what president — an inevitability? this is what president biden _ an inevitability? this is what president biden is _ an inevitability? this is what president biden is a - an inevitability? this is what president biden is a saying, | an inevitability? this is what i president biden is a saying, and it's the same we are hearing from the uk cyber authorities. people need to make sure they are defended as best they can and take the threat seriously. cyber attacks, particularly around somewhere, are a particularly around somewhere, are a part of modern business. there are cyber criminals are constantly getting into networks and holding companies to ransom. but this increased threat from russia, and perhaps from the russian state, is something that ceo! need to take seriously around the world. president bidens is calling on private individuals and companies to
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take this seriously. they say you have the power and authority to strengthen the cyber security on which americans rely and we need everyone to do their part. this has been a drive from the us government for about six months now. not only government departments to shore up their defences, but also for private companies to do the same. briefly, what is the — companies to do the same. briefly, what is the aim _ companies to do the same. briefly, what is the aim of— companies to do the same. briefly, what is the aim of this? _ companies to do the same. briefly, what is the aim of this? it - companies to do the same. briefly, what is the aim of this? it seems . what is the aim of this? it seems like it is just a case of a bit of vengeful anarchy. 0r like it is just a case of a bit of vengeful anarchy. or is it about putting pressure on the west to leave russia alone? {131 putting pressure on the west to leave russia alone?— putting pressure on the west to leave russia alone? of course it hasn't happened _ leave russia alone? of course it hasn't happened yet, _ leave russia alone? of course it hasn't happened yet, and i leave russia alone? of course it| hasn't happened yet, and russia leave russia alone? of course it i hasn't happened yet, and russia will say that this is part of the narrative that the west is trying to portray. they say that these kinds of comments from joe biden are causing a rift that is the biggest diplomatic issue that the countries have ever seen. i suppose what the west is concerned about is that it would be some sort of revenge attack with all the sanctions that are taking place, but also it could be a
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case that it might be effectively opening up a cyber offensive, the likes of which we have never seen before. we know that the russians are in the networks of the us, likewise at the us in the russian networks. everyone is in everyone �*s networks. everyone is in everyone �*s networks. what we are waiting for but hoping won't happen is that there will be an opening salvo by russia against the us which could cause a wider cyber offensive on a large scale. cause a wider cyber offensive on a large scale-— this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. one of the leading kremlin critics, alexei navalny, who was already behind bars — is set to be sentenced to more time in prison after being found guilty of large scale fraud by a russian court. presidentjoe biden has warned that vladimir putin could use chemical and biological weapons in ukraine. the white house has also suggested russia could begin cyber—attacks in the us. bbc correspondents in kyiv say the city has been relatively calm overnight, during the first part of a 35—hour curfew.
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the measure was enforced after eight people died in residential areas following what ukraine says were russian attacks. and there are calls for the 21 surrogate babies being cared for in a kyiv bomb shelter to be evacuated — it's as their intended parents can't travel to ukraine during the russian invasion. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. president biden says there are �*clear signs' russia may be preparing to use chemical or biological weapons in ukraine — saying president putin has his �*back to the wall�* in the fighting there. eight people were killed in missile attacks by russia on sunday night including that huge attack on a shopping centre. our international correspondent
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0rla guerin reports. footage of the shopping centre in kyiv released by russia appears to show a military vehicle driving up. and this was the russian attack which moscow says was targeting rocket launchers stored at the site. in the darkness, emergency services picked their way through the ruins. from the rubble, hands emerge, trembling, and a survivor is pulled to safety. but eight people were killed in this attack on the capital. here is what is left of the shopping centre. there are indications that the ukrainian military had a presence here, but russia has hit plenty of non—military targets, in kyiv and elsewhere. you can see here that the scale
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of the destruction is absolutely immense, and spread over a wide area, surrounded by apartment blocks. there could be a lot more of this ahead for kyiv. russian forces are not inside the city, but they can hit hard from the outside. how are you feeling about the future here now in kyiv? ido i do not know now but i do not want to leave kyiv. you want to stay? it is my home. to leave kyiv. you want to stay? it is my home-— to leave kyiv. you want to stay? it is my home. even though things are so dangerous _ is my home. even though things are so dangerous now? _ is my home. even though things are so dangerous now? i _ is my home. even though things are so dangerous now? i know, - is my home. even though things are so dangerous now? i know, but i is my home. even though things are so dangerous now? i know, but it i is my home. even though things are so dangerous now? i know, but it is| so dangerous now? i know, but it is dancerous so dangerous now? i know, but it is dangerous for _ so dangerous now? i know, but it is dangerous for all _ so dangerous now? i know, but it is dangerous for all ukraine. - so dangerous now? i know, but it is dangerous for all ukraine. all i dangerous for all ukraine. all cities. �* ~ , . , ., cities. but the key city, the tea dam key target _ cities. but the key city, the tea dam key target is _ cities. but the key city, the tea dam key target is kyiv - cities. but the key city, the tea dam key target is kyiv and i cities. but the key city, the tea dam key target is kyiv and in l cities. but the key city, the tea i dam key target is kyiv and in the forests on the outskirts, its defenders are preparing for battle.
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these territorial defence recruits now training for urban combat. their instructor is a georgian who fought the russians during the war in his homeland in 2008. the concern here is not that russia can surround or capture kyiv, but that it may avenge itself on the city. i or capture kyiv, but that it may avenge itself on the city.- or capture kyiv, but that it may avenge itself on the city. i am not sure they will _ avenge itself on the city. i am not sure they will be _ avenge itself on the city. i am not sure they will be able _ avenge itself on the city. i am not sure they will be able to - avenge itself on the city. i am not sure they will be able to besiege l sure they will be able to besiege kyiv because it is a very long city with a lot of defence and it would be really hard to encircle it but what i am afraid of is that out of weakness, despair, because they are losing, they will destroy it as much as possible. losing, they will destroy it as much as possible-— losing, they will destroy it as much as ossible. �* , ., ., as possible. because of hate. then, time to get — as possible. because of hate. then, time to get into _ as possible. because of hate. then, time to get into position. _ as possible. because of hate. then, time to get into position. behind i time to get into position. behind the sniper sites. alex has been a
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hunter since boyhood. he is unflinching and unapologetic. about his new wartime role, hunting the enemy. it his new wartime role, hunting the enem . , ., ., ., ., enemy. it is our motherland and we must defend _ enemy. it is our motherland and we must defend it _ enemy. it is our motherland and we must defend it but _ enemy. it is our motherland and we must defend it but in _ enemy. it is our motherland and we must defend it but in this _ enemy. it is our motherland and we must defend it but in this case i i must defend it but in this case i think it is no difference between animals which i try to shoot and animals which i try to shoot and animals which i try to shoot and animals which come here to kill our people, our children, destroy our buildings and our livelihood. ukrainian forces may be facing a war of attrition here. british defence officials expect russia to make a renewed push for the city in the coming weeks. 0rla guerin, bbc news.
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ukranian authorities have said air strikes hit apartment blocks on the outskirt of the countries third largest city — 0dessa. no casulties are known but the port city is thought to be russia's next target with russian warships stationed in the black sea. joining me now from his home in north london military expert sidharth kaushal. thank you so much forjoining us. first of all, 0desa is thought to be the next target for russia but what makes it strategically significant? it is strategically significant because of its centrality to ukraine �*s economy, roughly 70% of the country �*s experts go by sea and roughly 70% of the experts go through edessa, given that russia holds much of the black sea coast already come up with the exception of mariupol which may well fall in the coming weeks, 0desa really becomes ukraine �*s last outlet in the sea and control of it would give russia a stranglehold of the
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ukrainian economy. we understand russian warships _ ukrainian economy. we understand russian warships are _ ukrainian economy. we understand russian warships are stationed i ukrainian economy. we understand russian warships are stationed in i russian warships are stationed in the black sea, what sort of form as the black sea, what sort of form as the attack likely to take, are we expecting an amphibious assault? i would not expect an amphibious assault to take place until and unless ground forces with which an amphibious force could link up, begin to approach 0desa. russia simply lacks the amphibious lift capabilities to moving enough trip spicy to take the city by themselves. the ground offensive towards 0desa has for the most part stalled to the east and to the extent of the russians have made advancesin extent of the russians have made advances in the northern direction rather than towards 0desa so i am not entirely sure that an amphibious assault will materialise anytime soon, given the absence of ground forces with which it link up. do you think the warships _ forces with which it link up. do you think the warships stationed i forces with which it link up. do you think the warships stationed there | think the warships stationed there are partly a sort of a symbolic
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intimidation tactic?— are partly a sort of a symbolic intimidation tactic? partially but the also intimidation tactic? partially but they also serve _ intimidation tactic? partially but they also serve the _ intimidation tactic? partially but they also serve the role - intimidation tactic? partially but they also serve the role of- intimidation tactic? partially but| they also serve the role of fixing ukrainian — they also serve the role of fixing ukrainian forces in 0desa, for as long _ ukrainian forces in 0desa, for as long as — ukrainian forces in 0desa, for as long as the — ukrainian forces in 0desa, for as long as the russians post amphibious forces _ long as the russians post amphibious forces of— long as the russians post amphibious forces of the coast and naval vessels — forces of the coast and naval vessels to share the city, ukrainian forces _ vessels to share the city, ukrainian forces must — vessels to share the city, ukrainian forces must fear the russians attempt — forces must fear the russians attempt an amphibious assault so forces _ attempt an amphibious assault so forces that could be more fruitfully used elsewhere for example in nikolai — used elsewhere for example in nikolai of or against the northern advance, — nikolai of or against the northern advance, are effectively fixed in 0desa _ advance, are effectively fixed in 0desa so — advance, are effectively fixed in 0desa so by their very presence, the russian _ 0desa so by their very presence, the russian naval and amphibious forces indirectly— russian naval and amphibious forces indirectly support the russian ground — indirectly support the russian ground advance further east. what do ou think ground advance further east. what do you think the — ground advance further east. what do you think the best _ ground advance further east. what do you think the best tactics _ ground advance further east. what do you think the best tactics are - ground advance further east. what do you think the best tactics are or- you think the best tactics are or the likelihood is of ukrainians being able to hold fast at 0desa? the ukrainians have a limited number of anti—ship missiles because they only began to take delivery of
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training stocks before the war began. they can and have no doubt deployed things like naval mines of the coast and they have minds across likely landing sites but given the inherent difficulties of securing beachhead under the best of circumstances specially in a highly urban area there is probably a lot of things the ukrainians can do to make life very difficult for an amphibious force, if it chose to operate by itself without ground support. if the russians made a breakthrough and significantly reinforced that advance, that might change substantially but right now, the ukrainians are probably well placed to hold it should the russians seek to assault it purely ljy russians seek to assault it purely by sea but i doubt that is the written approach in any case. thank ou for written approach in any case. thank you for your — written approach in any case. thank you for your thoughts. _ the un secretary general, antonio guterres, recently warned
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that russia's war against ukraine could lead to severe hunger and food insecurity worldwide. many poor countries are heavily reliant on wheat production in russia and ukraine and anushree rao from concern worldwide told my colleague sally bundock that the situation is already desperate in many countries. concern has been working for over 50 years in some of these countries that are already facing acute hunger. we've already seen that this year there are around 43 million people who are affected by famine or famine—like conditions in over 38 countries and 13 million people across to somalia, kenya and ethiopia are facing severe hunger, with 5.5 million children who are at risk of even death. and the conflict in ukraine couldn't have come at a worse time in the sense that it's already denting a severely weakened
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and fragile food system. yeah, as you say, this was a big issue prior to the conflict in ukraine. russia, ukraine, they're described as the breadbasket of the world. wheat exports many of the grains are a huge supply for many countries. so what is the answer? that's the question, because of course, developed countries are able to respond to this, maybe invest in their own agricultural sectors and plug the gap. but as you say, it's the poorer developing countries that can't do that. no, exactly. you're right. i mean, ukraine and russia together export around a fourth of all global wheat requirements and a fifth of all corn requirements. and around 60% of oilseeds like sunflower and saflower and cottonseed. these are all what composed like the staple grains for a lot of the developing countries and the developed world, which is why
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i mean, this is going to have repercussions for the world as a whole, really. but the question is, what do we do about this? because we're very acutely aware of the problem and the likes of antonio guterres and other world leaders have been saying there needs to be collaboration because of... food insecurity will lead to political unrest. so what are the answers? from our experience of working on both humanitarian response, but also in long term development interventions on the ground, what we really need to see right now is an end to the conflict and start of the rehabilitation process. but we know that while that happens in the immediate term, we need to see global donors coming together and really investing in a strong humanitarian response on the ground to these existing food
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crises in, say, the horn of africa that we see in countries like the democratic republic of congo. we are seeing, you know, a lot of countries, in afghanistan, there are around 22 million people who are facing acute hunger. so what we need to really see is a strong humanitarian response and investment in that in the immediate term. but at the same time, we really need to see global donors start investing heavily in tackling the root causes of acute hunger, which are conflict and climate change. kateryna 0sadcha is a tv presenter and journalist in ukraine, who is using her celebrity status to help reunite families who've been torn apart by war. she's launched a group called search for the missing on the messenger app telegram, which now has over 100,000 subscribers. it gets many hundreds of desperate pleas everyday, from people trying to find theirfriends
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and family members. thank you forjoining us. i want to start by asking you what prompted you to start this group? fin start by asking you what prompted you to start this group?— start by asking you what prompted you to start this group? on the day ofthe you to start this group? on the day of the war i — you to start this group? on the day of the war i realised _ you to start this group? on the day of the war i realised we _ you to start this group? on the day of the war i realised we were i you to start this group? on the day| of the war i realised we were seeing millions of messengers of missing children, missing people and mostly people from irpin, mariupol, with no chance to connect to the people and i realised i canjust help bite my instagram which is really popular but not enough and we just strayed away made this group on the telegram channel and my tv group, those who are working with me, they say of course they will help me and we just united for this in one hour and we start searching for the missing.
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there must be so many heartbreaking stories out there, what sort of messages have you been receiving? the most hard part of this job, messages have you been receiving? the most hard part of thisjob, this voluntary mission is when you see pictures of the people which is smiling, they send us pictures and stories, help these people were missed and the hardest part is you see people smiling on a vacation, on the coast of the sea or somewhere and you realise that it is not like this any more. and there are a lot of stories which when we unite a family and on the other hand there's a lot of stories when we cannot unite a family any more because of dead, someone who is missing and it is the most terrible part. because the third thing that we realised last weekend is a lot of people are moving from mariupol, for
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example, to the far side of russia and like captives, you know? they are not asking them if they want to stay in ukraine or they want to be moved, moved to the side of russia and it is terrible and we just want to say to the whole of the world that it to say to the whole of the world thatitis to say to the whole of the world that it is breaking all the roots of humanity. that it is breaking all the roots of humani . , , ., , humanity. there must be some really de-aressin humanity. there must be some really depressing cases _ humanity. there must be some really depressing cases that _ humanity. there must be some really depressing cases that you _ humanity. there must be some really depressing cases that you have i humanity. there must be some really depressing cases that you have been | depressing cases that you have been seen but it must be really rewarding when you see some success stories are so what sort of examples have there been a family is reunited through the group? filtrate there been a family is reunited through the group?— there been a family is reunited through the group? we are really ha - through the group? we are really happy when _ through the group? we are really happy when we — through the group? we are really happy when we unite _ through the group? we are really happy when we unite the - through the group? we are really| happy when we unite the families, for example, we described the least of the people who is still alive in a shelter in mariupol, a lot of shelters and the people are writing ljy shelters and the people are writing
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by hand, the names in the shelter and making pictures and sending them to us and we are just printing all of the names and putting it to the groups and last week we described thousands of people who were missing and we described them in the shelter and we described them in the shelter and you can imagine how touched the messages we are doing and when they realise that their parents or children or sister, brother, are still alive in the shelter. hagar children or sister, brother, are still alive in the shelter. how are ou? still alive in the shelter. how are you? how— still alive in the shelter. how are you? how have _ still alive in the shelter. how are you? how have you _ still alive in the shelter. how are you? how have you been - still alive in the shelter. how are| you? how have you been keeping during this horrific conflict? you know, during this horrific conflict? you know. our— during this horrific conflict? you know, our lives _ during this horrific conflict? you know, our lives are _ during this horrific conflict? 1m, know, our lives are changed, 380 degrees, in these three weeks because i am a mother of three and my older son he is studying in the us so i am happy he is safe and
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might smaller kids, they are still not realising what is going on because we left kyiv on the second day when already there were rockets and explosions but not that much like today. and ijust want and explosions but not that much like today. and i just want to and explosions but not that much like today. and ijust want to keep my children safe and in mentality and they have to be in a safe place. but i am really, really hoping that it will finish because we really hope all the world can close our eyes and watch us on the tv, we need help, we need support for everyone and we need to stop this invasion and we need to stop this invasion and you know, i did not realise in all of my life, i was living in a country with a huge war, russia against ukraine.— country with a huge war, russia against ukraine. thank you so much for takin: against ukraine. thank you so much for taking the _ against ukraine. thank you so much for taking the time _ against ukraine. thank you so much for taking the time to _ against ukraine. thank you so much for taking the time to speak- against ukraine. thank you so much for taking the time to speak to i against ukraine. thank you so much for taking the time to speak to us i for taking the time to speak to us about your situation and the amazing
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work you're doing trying to reunite families and i hope you and your children continue to safe.- children continue to safe. thank ou. people around the world have seen images of the 21 surrogate babies being cared for in a kyiv bomb shelter. a top eu official is now calling for their evacuation as their intended parents can't travel to ukraine during the russian invasion. shelley phelps has spoken to one of those surrogate mothers. these surrogate—born babies are starting life at a makeshift nursery in a bomb shelter basement. their foreign biological parents unable to pick them up because of war. more arrive every day and they expect to have around 100 here by the end of the month. translation: we are worried for ourselves, for our own i children, for these little babies who stay here, for everyone. it's terrifying because we sit here and we don't know what will happen next. even though we stay in the basement, when there is an explosion somewhere nearby, we can hear it very clearly.
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paid surrogacy is legal in ukraine and there's thought to be hundreds of women carrying babies forforeign couples. but those weighing up whether to flee the war zone are being told they could face complicated legal situations if they give birth in another country. poland or in czech republic or in moldova, in romania, the countries, they do not recognise the legal relation of a child, and first of all, in the countries, from roman law, the legal mother of a child is a woman who gives birth. it's notjust the international parents who face worry and heartache at being separated from their children. this is natalia, a ukrainian surrogate who travelled to kyiv and gave birth to a baby boy for a german couple. days later, war broke out
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with missiles striking roads and railway stations. translation: i was unable to go back to my kids. i unfortunately, they are far away from here, from me, and they are missing me so much, and same way, i am missing them so much. that's why would like to ask everyone, anyone who can see or hear me, please support us, the ukrainians. please support ukraine. help us to defend ourselves against the invaders. the happiness her own family brings is one of the reasons natalia became a surrogate, and she says she's proud to be helping making others' dreams come true. the parents of the boy she gave birth to have made it to ukraine to unite with their baby, and natalia hopes she'll be hugging her own children again soon. shelley phelps, bbc news. the duke and duchess of cambridge will travel to jamaica today, as their tour of the caribbean continues.
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yesterday, prince william paid tribute to ukrainians fighting for their homeland, during a visit to a british military training camp, in the jungles of belize. 0ur royal correspondent jonny dymond reports. learning about another world, another civilisation, way up in the hills of belize. if you're looking for historical perspective, there are worse places to find it than a mayan temple. the british monarchy has been around for a thousand years, but this place, it's been around for 3,000. think of what it's seen. and now, they came to see it. the army uses the jungle to teach its soldiers and survival skills. the duke was here more than 20 years ago, but now was a chance to brush up his knowledge on how to trap a monkey in the wild.
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the reception spoke about the conflict in ukraine.— conflict in ukraine. sadly, elsewhere _ conflict in ukraine. sadly, elsewhere in _ conflict in ukraine. sadly, elsewhere in the - conflict in ukraine. sadly, elsewhere in the world, l conflict in ukraine. sadly, i elsewhere in the world, that vigilance is being tested in ukraine. belize hasjoined many others in condemning the invasion. standing upfor others in condemning the invasion. standing up for the principles of international law, peace, and security. today we think of those struggling in ukraine. and we stand with them in solidarity. from struggling in ukraine. and we stand with them in solidarity.— with them in solidarity. from the r0 als it with them in solidarity. from the royals it doesn't _ with them in solidarity. from the royals it doesn't get _ with them in solidarity. from the royals it doesn't get much i with them in solidarity. from the. royals it doesn't get much blunter than that. the couple head for their next stop, jamaica, later today. coming up later we will be hearing from the ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky who continues his
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addresses to political leaders and he will address italian politicians, coming up later, but first, a i7—month—old girl has died after being attacked by a dog at her home in the north west of england. merseyside police said the animal was bought by the family only a week ago. was bought by the family only a week auo. , ., ., , ago. the investigation is in the early stages. _ ago. the investigation is in the early stages, police _ ago. the investigation is in the early stages, police have - ago. the investigation is in the early stages, police have said l ago. the investigation is in the i early stages, police have said this was a tragic accident in which a i7—month—old girl has died. officers were called here to this estate in the black brook area of st helens, just before for pm yesterday, reports that the girl had been attacked by the family pet dog. she was taken to hospital but sadly died as a result of her injuries. the dog was handed into police and officers say it was humanely destroyed. so far, officers have spoken to a number of people here and carried out house—to—house inquiries, had a look at cctv footage but they are
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trying to establish the history of the dog, they say it was only bought last week by the family. they want to trace its previous owners. the family are said to be absolutely devastated by what has happened and police say there are thoughts are very much with the family at this time. what will happen next is tests will be carried out on the dog to determine its breed and whether that breed is legal or illegal under the dangerous dogs act. figs breed is legal or illegal under the dangerous dogs act. $5 i breed is legal or illegal under the dangerous dogs act. as i mentioned, we will be hearing _ dangerous dogs act. as i mentioned, we will be hearing later _ dangerous dogs act. as i mentioned, we will be hearing later from - dangerous dogs act. as i mentioned, we will be hearing later from the - we will be hearing later from the ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky as he addresses leaders around the world, on this particular occasion he will address politicians in italy from rome. he will be doing that via a video link, coming up we have your headlines at the top of the arizona with us.
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hello. a lot of fine weather to come today but potentially for the next five, 87, even ten days thanks to this high pressure. a lot of warm sunshine today, temperature is doing very well, sitting on the western side of this area of high pressure, pulling the air in from the south, one direction and we are getting into march now and the sun gathering strength. you see cloud roaming around under the western flank of the high pressure and out of that cloud through the day we could see some showers generated. most likely to see the showers later in the afternoon in parts of east anglia, perhaps the midlands, some drifting into northern england but they will be scattered and for the majority
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its dry, up to 19 degrees across eastern england. elsewhere looking widely at the mid—teens. always a little breezy perhaps in the west coast. into the small hours of wednesday it's largely clear skies, some mist and murk for some eastern coasts, perhaps through the vale of york but with clear skies at turns chilly especially in rural spots, close to freezing. wednesday sees a lot of sunshine, perhaps more cloud towards the south—west, it will be brazier here, any mist and fog should clear elsewhere to leave a fine day, relatively light winds and lots of sunshine. warmer still than tuesday, we could locally see up to 21 degrees across eastern england. thursday into friday the high—pressure centre moves west and will come to sit across the uk, that changes the wind direction a little, across the north of the uk we pulled the air in from the atlantic, more
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breeze for scotland, could feel cooler here, the same for the south coast but again, largely warm story, temperatures above average. friday come into the weekend, high—pressure stays with us, plenty more fine weather to come, just some signs early next week that we may switch around to a northerly wind direction as high—pressure drifts to the west of the uk but as you see no sign of anything particularly wet in the forecast in the next week at least, temperatures above average right the way through the weekend, getting potentially a little cooler when we look into next monday.
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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world... president biden has warned that vladimir putin could use chemical and biological weapons in ukraine. the white house also suggests russia could begin cyber—attacks in the us. he is considering using both of those. he has already used chemical weapons in the past, and we should be careful of what is about to come. he knows there will be severe consequences. ukraine's capital, kyiv, is once again under a curfew — it was put in place after eight people were killed in residential areas. one of the leading kremlin critics, alexei navalny, has been found guilty of large scale fraud by a russian court. there are calls for the 21 surrogate babies being cared for in a kyiv bomb shelter to be evacuated, as their intended parents can't travel to ukraine during the russian invasion.

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