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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 14, 2022 10:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news, these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. asylum seekers arriving in the uk will be sent to rwanda while their applications are processed, under new plans unveiled by the british government. critics say the plans would lead to more suffering. the issue here is we are trying to treat people, people who have lost everything as though they are human cargo and banishing them to another country which i think is rather cruel and inhumane actually. what do you think of the government's plans? you can reach me on twitter @annitabbc and use the hashtag bbc your questions. a record number of people are waiting for routine hospital treatment in england. new figures show 6.2 million people were on waiting lists at the end of february,
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the highest number since records began in 2007. a key russian warship has been �*seriously damaged' in the black sea. russia says a fire on board the flagship, moskva, caused ammunition to explode, but ukraine claims it was hit by its missiles. in the us, video has been released of a white police officer fatally shooting a black man in the back of the head, after a scuffle over a stun gun. michigan police are investigating the incident. iamon i am on the north wales coast speaking to voters ahead of the local elections on may the 5th. hello and welcome if you're watching
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in the uk or around the world. some asylum seekers are to be sent to east africa under a new deal between britain and rwanda. it's understood that those who travel across the english channel in small boats will be sent more than 4,000 miles to rwanda. the government sees it as a way to discourage people from crossing the english channel in this way, while critics have called the plans cruel. last year almost 29,000 people crossed the english channel in small boats. yesterday alone 600 people made the crossing. at least 44 drowned in 2021. the uk is expected to give 120 million pounds to the rwandan government under a trial scheme. but there are big concerns over rwanda's human rights record. last year at the un, the uk demanded investigations into killings, disappearances and torture in the country. sending migrants abroad
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isn't new though. australia and other countries have already tried the policy. with more details, here's our home editor mark easton. the home secretary priti patel arrived in rwanda telling reporters she had spent the last nine months trying to finalise a deal with another country to process some of the illegal immigrants who arrive into britain across the channel. at a conference centre in the rwandan capital, kigali, she will announce plans to relocate single male asylum seekers from kent more than 4000 miles south to central africa. the uk—rwanda migration and development partnership is the centrepiece of a wider policy blitz to deal with what has been a humiliation for ministers who promised brexit would mean control of britain's borders. record numbers of asylum seekers turning up in dinghies beneath the white cliffs of dover. in the last four years, the numbers of people crossing the channel in small boats has climbed from 297 in 2018 to almost 29,000 last year.
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this year has already seen 4,578 arrivals and looks set to be a new record. sending asylum seekers to rwanda, however, is likely to prove hugely controversial. this is a despicable policy, quite frankly. one that we know how awful it is in all of its guises because we can see what happened in australia. it costs huge sums of money to do a huge amount of cruelty to a very few people and with no ultimate impact on the fact that people need to flee. in a speech later this morning, the prime minister will say that outsourcing parts of the asylum system to rwanda will help break the business model of the people traffickers exploiting those seeking a better life in the uk. just as brexit allowed us to take back control of legal migration, he will say, the government is now determined to take back control of illegal migration.
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but critics point to rwanda's poor human rights record. at the un last year, the uk demanded investigations into alleged killings, disappearances and torture. is this the right place to entrust with protecting the human rights of vulnerable asylum seekers who hoped britain would protect them? flying in the ministerialjet for a day trip to rwanda is evidence that priti patel thinks the policy will prove popular with voters. even she accepts, though, that there are potentially insurmountable practical and legal hurdles before it can actually happen. mark easton, bbc news, rwanda. let's cross to rwanda, and speak to our home editor mark easton. store in your report, the home secretary priti patel is in the country today. what more if she expected to say? given, as you have reflected, there are a number of
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hurdles to cross before this policy can be put in place, why spend so much money sending people so many miles away from the uk to be processed?— miles away from the uk to be rocessed? ~ ., ., ., , processed? well, good morning. yes, we are still awaiting _ processed? well, good morning. yes, we are still awaiting a _ processed? well, good morning. yes, we are still awaiting a lot _ processed? well, good morning. yes, we are still awaiting a lot of— processed? well, good morning. yes, we are still awaiting a lot of the - we are still awaiting a lot of the detail on this plan, exactly how it is going to work. we have literally just been on a visit to an accommodation block which the rwandan government is renting and will be used to house those asylum seekers who the british government hoped to fly 4000 mile south to have their asylum claims heard in rwanda. let's be clear, this is a one—way ticket. the intention is not for these people to come back again, evenif these people to come back again, even if they are found to be genuine refugees. they will then, in the prime minister's world world —— what's later today, rebuild their
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lives in rwanda. it is hugely controversial and there are really practical problems. the accommodation block is for around 100 asylum seekers and we know there were 29,000 asylum seekers coming across the channel last year, so a tiny proportion of that. it is possible the centre can process quite a few in the course of a year, so maybe we could push it up to 400 or 500 going through that accommodation centre in a year. but still £120 million is the deal and we don't know the length of time that deal covers, but nevertheless it is an inkling of the course of what the government wants to achieve. the aim is to break the model of the people traffickers. they say they will make it so that the people coming across the channel, or coming to britain in other ways which they regard as illegal, those people will not know
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whether they will be able to stay in britain at all and could find themselves bundled onto a plane and sent thousands of miles south to a country that almost inevitably they will never have been to before. mark, good to talk to you. mark easton, our home editor in rwanda. we can speak now to harjap bhangal, a uk immigration lawyer. thank you forjoining. first of all, what kind of legal obligations with the uk government have to meet in order to do this, in order to set up this process and send people to rwanda? , ., ., ., ., rwanda? first of all, it would have to be safety. _ rwanda? first of all, it would have to be safety, health _ rwanda? first of all, it would have to be safety, health and _ rwanda? first of all, it would have to be safety, health and safety, i to be safety, health and safety, make sure the passage is safe, make sure the conditions are humane. when it comes to detention centres and keeping asylum seekers detained, and the uk does not have great detention centres, one hasjust the uk does not have great detention centres, one has just recently been closed down in it set of conditions
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that were described as appalling. so they would have to arrange this properly and make sure that their safety is primary i make sure people are not subject to abuse, physical abuse, mentalabuse, torture, and the sort of things. things they are fleeing from. the sort of things. things they are fleeing from-— the sort of things. things they are fleeing from. last year, the sub'ect of sendin: fleeing from. last year, the sub'ect of sending people i fleeing from. last year, the sub'ect of sending people to i fleeing from. last year, the sub'ect of sending people to albania h fleeing from. last year, the sub'ect of sending people to albania to h fleeing from. last year, the subject | of sending people to albania to have their claims processed was raised, it was mentioned by dominic raab, he was talking generally about a number of potential partners to carry out this process of looking at asylum claims, and the albanian prime minister in response at the time said this was a fake news, that albania would never receive people he described as refugees from richer countries. he said the eight international law. was he right or wrong? international law. was he right or wron: ? , international law. was he right or wronu? , ., international law. was he right or wron: ? , ., ., international law. was he right or wrone? , ., ., ., wrong? there is a potential and there will be _ wrong? there is a potential and there will be challenges - wrong? there is a potential and there will be challenges to - wrong? there is a potential and there will be challenges to this. like anything the home office does we will see the announcement first and the attempted planning comes
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afterwards. we have seen recently with the ukrainian scheme and the afghanistan resettlement programme that there are problems in this, and even the windrush scandal, the home office has problems and legal challenges and ends up paying compensation. so, we will believe it when we see it actually working, but be prepared for scandals, it would not surprise me if there are contract issues and stories come out like the ppe scandals we have seen and people are this sort of profiting from it. this sort of thing is very good to announce, but let's see what actually thing is very good to announce, but let's got what actually f' ' ' " ” ~ thing is very good to announce, but let's got to at actually f' ' ' " ” ~ thing is very good to announce, but let's got to remember” ' " ” ~ thing is very good to announce, but let's got to remember if "' ” ~ thing is very good to announce, but let's got to remember if these ~ thing is very good to announce, but let's got to remember if these claims ~ have got to remember if these claims succeed, what have got to remember if these claims succeed, whé to fly these people are we going to fly these people back? if someone succeeds and they have been granted in uk, not have been granted asylum in uk, not in rwanda, they do not have permission to be in rwanda. boris johnson is permission to be in rwanda. boris johnson to resettle them even if planning to resettle them even if a they are granted asylum, that is a very sticky wicket and does not add
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up. if you are granted asylum in the uk, the asylum seeker will want up. if you are granted asylum in the uk, the asylum seeke stay want up. if you are granted asylum in the uk, the asylum seeke stay in nt up. if you are granted asylum in the uk, the asylum seeke stay in the stay and has a right to stay in the uk cross of people a day are trying to cross the english channel on small of people a day are trying to cross the english channel on s sums of having paid extortionate sums of money to people who will take them if you were advising the either. if you were advising the claims should do to try to process claims in a fair, should do to try to process claims ir theiir, should do to try to process claims ir the government is really about crossing the channel concerned about crossing the channel and worried about lives, then what it should do and what people are saying they should do is open application centres in france, where claims can be considered while they wait in france. then at least they will not have to do these journeys to get here. that is the humane way to get here. that is the humane way to do it. but this isjust a deterrent and whether this will work or not we cannot say. australia try to do a similar thing. 0ver or not we cannot say. australia try
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to do a similar thing. over the past ten years it has cost them £5 million and they have only managed to process around 3000 people. the last person they sent to an island was in 2014. it does not really stop people coming to australia and get tens of thousands of people every year try to get to australia. are we going to spend this amount of money on 20,000 people a year? are we going to send all of these people there? what if 80% of them are accepted as refugees? will we fly them back here? who will fund this? this is a government who a few weeks ago said they did not have this kind of money to pay for fuel bills. they do not have money to pay for school meals for kids last year, we were told. they cannot help the taxpayers and the citizens of this country and they cannot help people using food banks. yet all of a sudden billions have tied up for this in a time where the government is constantly under pressure. we have to look at the motives behind this and is this really feasible or not? will this be
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financially beneficial or is it playing to a certain vote bank? thank you very much for your thoughts today. we expect to hear from the prime minister this morning for more on this plan. reports from russian state media say the most important ship in russia's black sea fleet, the moskva missile cruiser has been badly damaged after ammunition on board blew up causing a fire. the moskva is the flagship of the fleet. quoting the russian defence ministry, interfax said the crew had all been evacuated and the cause of the fire was being investigated. earlier, a ukrainian official said the ship had been hit by two missiles, but this has not been confirmed. lieutenant colonel daniel davis, is a senior fellow at the foreign policy think tank defense priorities. here's his perspective. well, it has to be very serious that they evacuated crew areas. there is a crew contingent of about 500 on one of those kinds of missile cruisers.
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so it had to be something very, very serious. and that's not something you do very simply, that had to have taken some time and, of course, this is the second ship that has been damaged in the war. there was also a russian landing ship in the port city of berdyansk, that we know for sure was destroyed by the ukrainians. we still don't know whether this one was actually destroyed by the ukrainians of whether it was just another bad accident in the russian navy. but in any case, this is a really black eye on them because it was the flagship, notjust a ship. let's speak now to wladimir klitschko, the brother of the mayor of kyiv vitali klitschko, and former professional boxing champion. thank you so much forjoining us today from the capital. we know that the situation there has stabilised in recent days. we saw the uk prime minister borisjohnson with latimer
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zelensky in kyiv recently. give us your thoughts on what life is like in the capital right now. the caital in the capital right now. the capital is — in the capital right now. the capital is slowly _ in the capital right now. tue: capital is slowly getting in the capital right now. tte: capital is slowly getting back to life. i could tell that there is more traffic so to speak, with more cars, more people walking on the streets, and less air strike alarms that are going off pretty much every night. so we didn't hear any in the past night, so it is getting better, but for sure there is danger of all the people who were evacuated previously from the capital, so everyone is looking forward to coming back home. 0bviously that needs to be slowed down because the
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situation is still very, very difficult. 0bviously russian aggression is continuing in the east and the south of the country and we must be prepared for everything. fies must be prepared for everything. as well as people who had left the capital to return to their homes, are you seeing significant numbers of people from elsewhere in ukraine trying to reach kyiv? yes. of people from elsewhere in ukraine trying to reach kyiv?— trying to reach kyiv? yes, that is what we can _ trying to reach kyiv? yes, that is what we can see _ trying to reach kyiv? yes, that is what we can see on _ trying to reach kyiv? yes, that is what we can see on the - trying to reach kyiv? yes, that is what we can see on the roads. . trying to reach kyiv? yes, that is - what we can see on the roads. people are coming back to their home, in this case in the capital. 0bviously this case in the capital. obviously this case in the capital. obviously this is a capital with almost 4 million people living and working here, so the amount of people is gigantic. 0bviously with all the partially damaged infrastructure as
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well as food and water it is a very complex city with many people living in it. obviously the danger of russian forces and russian rockets being somewhere here and landing in the capital is still possible. 0bviously the capital is still possible. obviously to maintain the city is very complicated and if all the people come back at once it will cause complications because roads are still blocked and it is just to prevent the russian invasion of the city as well and of the capital of ukraine. so the process must go slowly and very cautiously. so the lo . istics slowly and very cautiously. so the logistics are _ slowly and very cautiously. so the logistics are challenging - slowly and very cautiously. so the logistics are challenging becausel logistics are challenging because clearly the situation that people are returning to is not what they left and they have, as you say, people coming from elsewhere in the country trying to reach the relative
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safety of the capital. i know in recent days you have continued, and your brother likewise, you have continued both of you your appeals to the international community for military aid, for humanitarian aid. i get the feeling that you really cannot say that enough. you want to keep sending that message out to the rest of the world, that you need continued support? this rest of the world, that you need continued support?— rest of the world, that you need continued support? this is true. i want to say _ continued support? this is true. i want to say thank _ continued support? this is true. i want to say thank you _ continued support? this is true. i want to say thank you to - continued support? this is true. i want to say thank you to great. want to say thank you to great britain and to borisjohnson. he was one of the first leaders of the free world who were strictly against this russian invasion and aggression and from the very beginning he made many statements and was in ukraine in kyiv. the british people are supporting greatly ukraine. as long as the senseless war is still going we need this help and support. just imagine that our economy and the
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governmental budgets are pretty much down to nothing because the economy has stopped, or has slowed down tremendously. as long as this aggression is going we need to support. we need financial support, humanitarian support, we need weapons support, military support. we need to continue to isolate economically russia. speaking of the banking system, their ships cannot get into any ports and we need an oil embargo, so there are a lot of things that we can block russia from filling up their budgets. every penny, every cent that is going to the budget is going to be used for the budget is going to be used for the weapons that today are killing our country, our civilians, our infrastructure, destroying the
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infrastructure. so it is crucially important to keep on going until the russian military forces will leave our country, will leave ukraine, and. this aggression into the west, conquering ukraine. it will even go further, as is in their propaganda right now. in further, as is in their propaganda riaht now. ., , ., right now. in the east of the country we _ right now. in the east of the country we have _ right now. in the east of the country we have been - right now. in the east of the | country we have been talking right now. in the east of the - country we have been talking about mariupol, i heavily fought over city. we saw a few weeks ago those devastating images of attacks on hospitals there and competing narratives coming from the air right now. russia is saying it has either captured a significant number of ukrainian soldiers, or they have surrendered. ukraine is saying soldiers are continuing to fight in key pockets of the city. what are you hearing about the situation there? is it difficult to establish there? is it difficult to establish the reality of what is going on there right now? we the reality of what is going on
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there right now?— the reality of what is going on there right now? the reality of what is going on there riaht now? ~ . . . there right now? we have learnt that we cannot trust _ there right now? we have learnt that we cannot trust any _ there right now? we have learnt that we cannot trust any news, _ there right now? we have learnt that we cannot trust any news, any - we cannot trust any news, any statements from russia. they are lying to its own people and the country and they are trying to justify their aggression against ukraine and the world by saying it is a denazification and a special operation and whatever the special operation and whatever the special operation was made for, but what we see as a matter of fact and has been internationally observed and i have seen it with my own eyes that this is genocide of the ukrainian population. we are innocent people being murdered, raped, tortured and just complete madness what is going on. is just complete madness what is going on. , ~' ., just complete madness what is going on, , " ., , just complete madness what is going on. , a, , ., just complete madness what is going on, , " ., , .., ., ., on. is ukraine still in control of significant _ on. is ukraine still in control of significant sections _ on. is ukraine still in control of significant sections of - on. is ukraine still in control of significant sections of the - on. is ukraine still in control of significant sections of the city? are you able to establish that
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finally? 50 are you able to establish that finall ? ., ., .,, finally? so we have not lost. mariuool_ finally? so we have not lost. mariuool is _ finally? so we have not lost. mariupol is still— finally? so we have not lost. mariupol is still fighting. - finally? so we have not lost. - mariupol is still fighting. speaking of mariupol where fights have been going on in the past weeks and where russian forces are trying to bombard with anything they have and try to put as much military forces on mariupol as they can. i am proud of my country, women and men, in mariupol specifically for defending the city and standing strong against this war, against this madness. wladimir klitschko, we appreciate your time. thank you forjoining us. he wasjoining up your time. thank you forjoining us. he was joining up from the your time. thank you forjoining us. he wasjoining up from the ukrainian capital. he was “oining up from the ukrainian caital. ., ., he was “oining up from the ukrainian caital. ., ~' ,, he was “oining up from the ukrainian caital. ., ~ i. ., ., he was “oining up from the ukrainian caital. . ~ i- ., . | capital. thank you for having me. i am so sorry. _ capital. thank you for having me. i am so sorry. we — capital. thank you for having me. i am so sorry, we just _ capital. thank you for having me. i am so sorry, we just lost - capital. thank you for having me. i am so sorry, we just lost what - capital. thank you for having me. i am so sorry, we just lost what he l am so sorry, we just lost what he was saying at the end. there are just three weeks to go until voters across the uk go to the polls.
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voters in england, wales, and scotland will pick who they want to run services that affect everyday life in their local area. those in northern ireland will choose its government. ahead of the vote we will be profiling some of the key contests in the uk's four nations. today my colleague martine croxall joins us from the seaside town of rhyl on the north wales coast. good morning from rhyl in north wales. it is one of a number of times across the coast of north wales and very much dependent for income on visitors who come for their holidays here and we are just one day away from the long easter bank holiday, so that should be quite a bumpy time for places like rhyl. let's find out how healthy tourism is here in this town. joining me now is chris frost, chairman of north wales tourism, and joseph lyons mounds, ceo of rhyl caravan park lyons. chris frost also owns a small hotel.
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welcome to you both. chris, how healthy is tourism in rhyl at the moment? is healthy is tourism in rhyl at the moment? , ., , healthy is tourism in rhyl at the moment? , ~ , ., ., . , moment? is weekend is traditionally the start of the _ moment? is weekend is traditionally the start of the tourist _ moment? is weekend is traditionally the start of the tourist season. - moment? is weekend is traditionally the start of the tourist season. it - the start of the tourist season. it is peak season with uk travellers remaining in the uk and it is looking to be a busy year once again. the overseas market has reopened and we have seen a surge in bookings in the last three to four weeks from overseas travellers. this will not get back to pre—pandemic levels any time soon, but we are very confident of a successful season this year.— very confident of a successful season this year. very confident of a successful season this ear. , w , ,, , season this year. joseph, you employ nearl 400 season this year. joseph, you employ nearly 400 people — season this year. joseph, you employ nearly 400 people and _ season this year. joseph, you employ nearly 400 people and your- season this year. joseph, you employ nearly 400 people and your business| nearly 400 people and your business has been around since 1925. expectations of holidays in that time have changed enormously? yes. time have changed enormously? yes, the more that — time have changed enormously? yes, the more that is _ time have changed enormously? yes, the more that is available, the more people _ the more that is available, the more people require. but it is still very important — people require. but it is still very important that it is a family thing. we represent families and it is good
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that families get together and the old—fashioned family vacations and caravans — old-fashioned family vacations and caravans. , ., , ,._ old-fashioned family vacations and caravans. , . , ,._ ., caravans. chris was saying that the andemic caravans. chris was saying that the pandemic meant _ caravans. chris was saying that the pandemic meant that _ caravans. chris was saying that the pandemic meant that people - caravans. chris was saying that the j pandemic meant that people chose caravans. chris was saying that the i pandemic meant that people chose to stay in the uk. how did you benefit from that? , , ., , , . from that? oh, yes, it was difficult at first trying _ from that? oh, yes, it was difficult at first trying to — from that? oh, yes, it was difficult at first trying to get _ from that? oh, yes, it was difficult at first trying to get to _ from that? oh, yes, it was difficult at first trying to get to grasps - at first trying to get to grasps with— at first trying to get to grasps with it — at first trying to get to grasps with it all, but one thing started to open— with it all, but one thing started to open up— with it all, but one thing started to open up slowly it was quite a that it _ to open up slowly it was quite a that it was _ to open up slowly it was quite a that it was all coming back to us it rained _ that it was all coming back to us it rained pretty thick and fast. people did not— rained pretty thick and fast. people did not have the option of going abroad, — did not have the option of going abroad, it — did not have the option of going abroad, it was pretty much stacation is. abroad, it was pretty much stacation is we _ abroad, it was pretty much stacation is we did _ abroad, it was pretty much stacation is. we did see a large increase in holiday— makers is. we did see a large increase in holiday—makers which is. we did see a large increase in holiday— makers which really did help _ holiday-makers which really did hel. ., , ., help. one of the things that councils in _ help. one of the things that councils in wales _ help. one of the things that councils in wales will - help. one of the things that councils in wales will have i help. one of the things that i councils in wales will have the option of doing in future is to increase the council tax that people who own second homes here can charge. that will drive up the cost of second homes. how problematic is that from a tourism point of view,
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given the idea is to free up some accommodation to make it more affordable for those who live here all year round? it is affordable for those who live here all year round?— all year round? it is challenging and taxation _ all year round? it is challenging and taxation has _ all year round? it is challenging and taxation has to _ all year round? it is challenging and taxation has to be - all year round? it is challenging i and taxation has to be equitable, but we know we are a socially responsible industry and we have a strategic problem with planning were lots of homes are second homes and holiday homes and we have not got room for people like our own employees to live here locally. it is a very important issue and it is one that has been hit backwards time and time again from the welsh government and has been kicked towards a local authorities to deal with. the whole taxation system needs looking at because we have other challenges as well. for example, the vat rate has gone up and for accommodation providers in the uk, in portugal it is 6%. it is not equitable at the moment and we need a holistic approach taken to
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all taxation systems. it is need a holistic approach taken to all taxation systems.— all taxation systems. it is very much a balancing _ all taxation systems. it is very much a balancing act. - all taxation systems. it is very much a balancing act. the - all taxation systems. it is very| much a balancing act. the kind edition that you provide, the kind that people can buy on your part, joseph, they are not subject to these high rates of extra tax. you don't pay council tax on a static caravan. how is that changing the market? shes caravan. how is that changing the market? a ., caravan. how is that changing the market? ~ , ., ., , ., , market? as long as the individual is aware of that. _ market? as long as the individual is aware of that, we _ market? as long as the individual is aware of that, we are _ market? as long as the individual is aware of that, we are still _ market? as long as the individual is aware of that, we are still quite - aware of that, we are still quite affordable. fora aware of that, we are still quite affordable. for a holiday home there is nothing _ affordable. for a holiday home there is nothing that is more affordable. if you _ is nothing that is more affordable. if you purchase it, you can use it throughout— if you purchase it, you can use it throughout the year as often as you like without being penalised with any more — like without being penalised with any more taxes or council rates, which _ any more taxes or council rates, which i — any more taxes or council rates, which i feel_ any more taxes or council rates, which i feel could be very difficult in our— which i feel could be very difficult in our leisure industry at the best of times— in our leisure industry at the best of times when you are paying vat and tax and _ of times when you are paying vat and tax and so _ of times when you are paying vat and tax and so forth. we need to be aware _ tax and so forth. we need to be aware really of what comes into the local area — aware really of what comes into the local area. when they come they spent _ local area. when they come they spent locally and it is better for the economy and it can only be better— the economy and it can only be better if— the economy and it can only be better if we get more bums on seats locally _ better if we get more bums on seats locally we _ better if we get more bums on seats locall . ~ ., , ., better if we get more bums on seats locall . . . , ., ., better if we get more bums on seats locall . ~ . , ., ., , ., locally. we are starting to see a
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few more _ locally. we are starting to see a few more people _ locally. we are starting to see a few more people coming - locally. we are starting to see a few more people coming out. locally. we are starting to see a few more people coming out as| locally. we are starting to see a . few more people coming out as the sun comes out. there were people walking their dogs and chasing seagulls on the beach, and maybe tourists are starting to appear. these are local elections, so how much scope is therefore county councillors to make a difference to tourism in rhyl and other towns along the coast?— along the coast? tourism is community _ along the coast? tourism is community led _ along the coast? tourism is community led so _ along the coast? tourism is community led so they - along the coast? tourism is| community led so they have along the coast? tourism is l community led so they have a along the coast? tourism is - community led so they have a very big part to play in driving legislation forward to promote tourism and to promote the industry and welcome people. of course we have got to make sure that our communities are accepting tourists and get the benefit of tourism. there is a lot they can do. at the moment we have started here in wales a tourism levy discussion and that is a big issue coming up in the autumn. so we need to talk to local authorities and local councils about this now. it authorities and local councils about this now. , ., ., ., authorities and local councils about thisnow. , ., ., ., this now. it is great to have your perspective _ this now. it is great to have your perspective on — this now. it is great to have your perspective on things _ this now. it is great to have your perspective on things and - this now. it is great to have your perspective on things and i - this now. it is great to have your perspective on things and i hopej this now. it is great to have your i perspective on things and i hope for a bumper season for you starting from this we can. thank you very much forjoining us here on bbc
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news. and you can find out more about the upcoming local elections in denbighshire county council on fifth may including information on how to vote, and who your local candidates are, by going to the council website denbighshire.gov.uk martin, i see you have got your coat on. i hope it warms up later. i hope it warms up later. and we'll be live across the uk in the coming weeks with special coverage of the election campaigns. forfull details of the elections in your area go to the bbc news website. in the politics section you can enter your postcode and get all the details. that's all at bbc.co.uk/ news. we are expecting the prime minister to make a speech on the action the uk government is taking to address migration and small boat crossings
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and english channel. that is the scene in kent. we are expecting the prime minister to speak very soon and we will bring that to you live as soon as it begins. new figures show that nhs waiting times in england have reached record highs. a record 22,506 people had to wait more than 12 hours in a&e departments in england in march from a decision to admit to actually being admitted, figures from nhs england show. the figure is the highest for any calendar month in records going back to august 2010. the new data also shows the average time ambulances took to respond to emergency calls has increased. 0ur health correspondentjim reed had a look at the figures. this is for things like cataract operations, hip replacements, things that are booked in advance for things you go to the hospital for. at this is the highest number ever, 6.2 million people in england waiting for that treatment. 0ne
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6.2 million people in england waiting for that treatment. one in nine people in the whole of england on a waiting list like that. there was some better news on the people waiting longest, and this is what the health secretary wants to concentrate on. people waiting longer than a year for that treatment has come down slightly to about 300,000. the first fall we have seen in awhile. also, people waiting over two years, the people waiting over two years, the people waiting the very longest. there has been a small fall of around 500. it is still significant. that is how the nhs is thinking of tackling this backlog, looking at the very longest waiting first and then working through. but i think we can expect to see the overall numbers to increase for a while for treatment on this list. increase for a while for treatment on this list-— on this list. what extent can we se arate on this list. what extent can we separate this — on this list. what extent can we separate this out _ on this list. what extent can we separate this out to _ on this list. what extent can we separate this out to the - on this list. what extent can we separate this out to the covid . separate this out to the covid backlog and delays been caused by staff being ill at the moment? you see that most _ staff being ill at the moment? ym. see that most when you look at a different set of figures. this looks
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at at accident and emergency departments and this is where you are seeing the major crunch at the moment, the difficulty in people getting seen quickly. if you look at the statistics, there is a target the statistics, there is a target the government has in england, which is four hours for when you turn up at a&e to when you either get discharged back home you get referred on for other treatment elsewhere in the hospital. you are notjust elsewhere in the hospital. you are not just to be elsewhere in the hospital. you are notjust to be seen by a doctor, but all your treatment in a&e to be completed. 95% of people should be seen, treated and discharged within four hours. that number has not been met for many years but it has fallen again in march. but 58% of people are being seen through to discharged within that four hour period. that is coming down to a lot of different reasons, staff absences being one, covid and all the complications in hospital about having to test people and isolate people is another reason. people being stuck in
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hospital and not been discharged from main wards because the social care components are not there. that is another reason we are seeing this backlog appearing at accident and emergency, the front end of the hospital. jim emergency, the front end of the hos - ital. , emergency, the front end of the hosital. , ,., attempts are continuing in the south african province of kwazulu—natal to find scores of people missing after the worst flooding in decades. more than 300 people died after torrential rain saw buildings, roads and bridges washed away. 0ur correspondent shingai nyoka is in durban, and has been giving us the latest. well, as you can see, the sun is out and the flood waters are receding, but the relief efforts are still ongoing, there are still many people that are missing. we have heard of stories from people on the ground. they say they are frustrated by the pace at which the relief agencies are getting to the communities that are in need and by admission the official say they are stretched beyond their capacity.
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there are many communities that are still cut off, children that have not been able to go to school, people who have been displaced in community halls and the government says it is still moving from community to community to assist their needs. mop—up operations have begun, they have started to restore power and water supplies in some of the affected areas, but this still is very much a state of disaster and the government has announced that recently, which allows more resources to be channelled towards this problem. borisjohnson is about to give a speech on action the uk government is taking to address illegal migration and small boat crossings in the english channel. 600 people approximately cross the english channel yesterday. boats have been out in the water today
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already, picking up people from the small boats that are used to make the crossing, and often dangerous crossing. but a lot of criticism around this plan as well to send people to have their claims processed 4000 miles to rwanda. it is being described as a one—way ticket for those sent there. it is not that they should expect to have their claim processed and if it is found to be a valid claim, to be sent back to the uk. we are expecting the prime minister to say they will be told to build a new life in rwanda. and also lots of questions about the cost of the scheme and there are various legal hurdles and political hurdles to go through as well, if the plan is to be put into place. but the prime minister is going to be making a speech about this in the next few minutes. the home secretary, priti
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patel is also in rwanda today. a feel of a launch about this, even though there are some processes that have to be gone through before this plan could be put into place. we will be back there pretty soon. police in new york have arrested a suspect wanted in a shooting at a subway station in the district of brooklyn on tuesday after receving a tip off as to his whereabouts. ten people were injured when the gunman fired 33 rounds from a semi—automatic handgun. gail maclellan reports. this was the moment 62—year—old frankjames was taken into custody. he was charged with several counts, including carrying out a terrorist attack on a mass transit system. the
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mayor announced the arrest via video link at a news conference. mr; mayor announced the arrest via video link at a news conference.— link at a news conference. my fellow new yorkers. _ link at a news conference. my fellow new yorkers. we — link at a news conference. my fellow new yorkers, we got _ link at a news conference. my fellow new yorkers, we got him. _ link at a news conference. my fellow new yorkers, we got him. we - link at a news conference. my fellow new yorkers, we got him. we got i link at a news conference. my fellow i new yorkers, we got him. we got him. a 30 hour manhunt prompted by this attack on a packed subway station at the height of the morning rush—hour. a gunman detonated smoke bombs and then opened fire on passengers. police quickly issued these photographs of someone described as a person of interest. that person of interest was frankjames. t a person of interest. that person of interest was frankjames.— interest was frankjames. i want to commend all _ interest was frankjames. i want to commend all the _ interest was frankjames. i want to commend all the investigators - interest was frankjames. i want to commend all the investigators and | commend all the investigators and analysts who took part in this investigation. literally, hundreds of nypd detectives worked doggedly during the last 30 hours to bring this together. shill during the last 30 hours to bring this together.— this together. all this, a terrifying _ this together. all this, a terrifying incident - this together. all this, a terrifying incident for . this together. all this, a terrifying incident for a i this together. all this, a i terrifying incident for a city this together. all this, a - terrifying incident for a city that has experienced its fair share of terrifying incidents, but this is, after all, the big apple. t terrifying incidents, but this is, after all, the big apple.-
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terrifying incidents, but this is, after all, the big apple. i was a little cautious, _ after all, the big apple. i was a little cautious, but _ after all, the big apple. i was a little cautious, but we - after all, the big apple. i was a little cautious, but we are - after all, the big apple. i was a little cautious, but we are back| after all, the big apple. i was a i little cautious, but we are back to normal _ little cautious, but we are back to normal. right back to where we were, 'ust normal. right back to where we were, just like _ normal. right back to where we were, just like nothing ever happened. it just like nothing ever happened. [it is just like nothing ever happened. it is astonishing, it is people's everyday commute. you are not getting up in the morning thinking you are not going to make it home or getting hurt. shes you are not going to make it home or getting hurt-— getting hurt. as for frankjames, he will a- ear getting hurt. as for frankjames, he will appear in _ getting hurt. as for frankjames, he will appear in court _ getting hurt. as for frankjames, he will appear in court on _ getting hurt. as for frankjames, he will appear in court on thursday. - getting hurt. as for frankjames, he will appear in court on thursday. if i will appear in court on thursday. if he is found guilty, he could face life behind bars. there is a lot of information about the ukraine war available online. but how do you tell if a photo or video posted on the internet is fake or real? at the bbc, a team of experts checks and verifies content that is shared on social media channels like twitter, telegram and facebook. kayleen devlin is part of the bbc s disinformation unit and takes you through the process. no, this video isn't from ukraine. it's actually from a video game, and this is not a recent video from the war, it's old footage.
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i'm kayleen devlin and i work for the bbc�*s disinformation team. and these are just some of the ways we check and verify content shared online. one of the first things i do when i come across a piece of content is ask whether it's recent and where it was taken. here is an image posted onto instagram by the mayor of the ukrainian. it claims to show the destruction from a russian attack. i'm trying to find out if it's genuine and what event it's referring to. first, i'll do a reverse image search. this can be useful for sharing if an image has appeared somewhere else and whether it's old. there are a number of sites you can do this on, including google, yandex and teni. in this instance, a search of the image shows the damage was caused at a library... we are off to kent where the prime minister has started speaking. including those who were fleeing
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persecution. my great grandfather came from turkey where he came to the uk. when you look back over the centuries, as people have come seeking refuge or simply in search of somewhere to build a better life, you see that this is the very stuff of history is made from the french to the jewish of history is made from the french to thejewish refugees, from russia, to thejewish refugees, from russia, to thejewish refugees, from russia, to the docking of the empire windrush, to the south asians fleeing east africa. to the many, many others who have come from different countries at different times, for different reasons. all have wanted to be here because our united kingdom is a beacon of openness and generosity. and all in—turn have contributed magnificently to the amazing story of the uk. today, that proud history of the uk. today, that proud history of safe and migration is ultimately
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responsible for many of those working in our hospitals and on the front line of our response to the pandemic. for more than 60% of the england football team at the final of euro 2020. for many of our country's leading figures in the worlds of business, art and culture. and i am pleased to say the ever—growing numbers of people serving in public life, including colleagues of mine. like nadeem sahalee, escaped with his family from saddam hussein's iraq. dominic raab, hisjewish father came from saddam hussein's iraq. dominic raab, his jewish father came from czechoslovakia to escape nazi germany. priti patel, his family fled persecution in uganda. i am proud this government has continued the great british tradition of providing sanctuary to those in need. in fact, providing sanctuary to those in need. infact, doing more to resettle vulnerable people in the uk through safe and legal roots that any other government in recent
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history. since 2015 we have offered a place to over 185,000 men, women and children seeking refuge. more than the entire population of sunderland at more than any other similar resettlement schemes in europe. this includes almost 100,000 british nationals overseas, threatened by draconian security laws in hong kong. 20,000 through our syrian scheme, 13,000 from afghanistan and whom we have debts of honour. and around 50,000 ukrainians. we are not only supporting british nationals of those settled in the uk to potentially bring hundreds of thousands to their extended family from ukraine, we are also welcoming unlimited numbers of refugees from that conflict as the british people open their homes in one of the biggest movements of refugees to this country that we have ever
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known. and as we work with local authorities and the devolved administrations to welcome those coming from ukraine into our communities, we will also find accommodation across the whole of the uk for those who have come here previously, but are currently in hotels. because it makes absolutely no sense for the taxpayer to foot those bills running to almost £5 million a day with a total of those we accommodate being concentrated in just a third of local authorities. it is controlled immigration, through safe and legal routes which enables us to make generous offers of sanctuary, while managing the inevitable pressures on our public services. such that we can give all those who come here the support they need to rebuild their lives, to integrate and to thrive. but the
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quid quo pro for this generosity is that we cannot sustain a parallel legal system. that we cannot sustain a parallel legalsystem. 0ur that we cannot sustain a parallel legal system. our compassion may be infinite, but our capacity to help people is not. we cannot ask the british taxpayer to write a blank cheque to cover the costs of anyone who might want to come and live here. uncontrolled immigration creates unmanageable demands on our nhs and welfare state, it over stretches our local schools, our housing and public transport and creates unsustainable pressure to build on precious green spaces. nor is it fair and those who are seeking to come here legally if others can bypass the system. it is a striking fact that around seven out of ten of those arriving in small boats last year were men under 40, paying people smugglers to queue jump.
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taking up our capacity to help genuine women and child refugees. this is particularly perverse, because those attempting crossings are not directly fleeing imminent peril, as is the intended purpose of the asylum system, they have passed through manifestly safe countries, including many in europe where they could and should have claimed asylum. it is this rank unfairness of a system that can be exploited by gangs which risks eroding public support for the whole concept of asylum. the british people voted several times to control our borders, not to close them, but to control them. sojust borders, not to close them, but to control them. so just as borders, not to close them, but to control them. sojust as brexit allowed us to take back control of legal immigration by replacing free movement with our points based system, we are taking back control of illegal immigration, with a
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long—term plan for asylum in this country. it is a plan that will ensure the uk has a world leading asylum offer providing generous protection to those directly fleeing the worst of humanity by settling thousands of people every year through safe and legal routes. i emphasise this, so whether you are fleeing to tin or a sad, you shouldn't need to turn to the people smugglers or any other illegal option. —— putin. but to deliver that we must ensure the only route to asylum to the uk is a safe and legal one and those who try to jump the queue or abuse the system will find no automatic after settlement in our country. but rather be swiftly and humanely removed to a safe third country, or their country of origin. and the most tragic of
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all forms of illegal migration, which we must end with this approach, is the barbaric trade in human misery conducted by the people smugglers in the channel. before christmas, 27 people drowned and in the weeks ahead, there could be many more losing their lives at sea and whose bodies may never be recovered. around 600 came across the channel yesterday. injust around 600 came across the channel yesterday. in just a few weeks this could again reach 1000 a day. i accept that these people, whether they are 600 or 1000, are in search of a better life. the opportunities that the united kingdom provides and the hope of a fresh start, but it is these hopes, those dreams that have been exploited. these vile people
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smugglers are abusing the vulnerable and turning the channel into a watery grave yard with men, women and children drowning in unseaworthy boats and suffocating in refrigerated lorries. even if they do make it here, we know only too well some of the horrendous stories of exploitation over the years from east london to the cockle beds of morecambe bay as illegal migration makes people more vulnerable to the abuse of ruthless gangs. we must hold this appalling trade and defeat the public smugglers. that is why we are passing the nationality and border spill which allows us, for the first time to distinguish between people coming here and illegally. and for this distinction to affect how your asylum claim
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progresses and your status in the uk if that claim is successful. it will enable us to issue visa penalties against those countries who refuse to accept returns of foreign criminals and failed asylum seekers. they will clean up the abuse of our legal system, introducing a one—stop shop that will end the cycle of last—minute and vexatious claims and appeals that so often fought and the lay removal. and it will end the absurd practice of asylum seeking adults claiming to be children to strengthen their claims and access better services. crucially, strengthen their claims and access betterservices. crucially, it will also allow us to prosecute those who arrive illegally with life sentences for anyone piloting the boats. and to identify, intercept and investigate these boats, from today the royal navy will take over operational command from border
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force in the channel, taking primacy force in the channel, taking primacy for our operational response at sea in line with many of our international partners, with the aim that no boat makes it to the uk undetected. this will be supported tjy undetected. this will be supported by £50 million of new funding, new boats, aerial surveillance and military personnel. in addition to the existing task force of patrol vessels, helicopters, search and rescue aircraft, drones and remotely piloted aircraft. this will send a clear message to those piloting the boats. if you risk other people's lives in the channel, you risk spending your own life in prison. people who do make it to the uk will be taken, not to hotels at vast public expense, rather they will be housed in accommodation centres like those in greece, with the first of these to open shortly. at the same
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time, we are expanding our immigration detention facilities to assist with the removal of those who with no right to remain in the uk. we are investing over half a billion in those efforts and this is on top of overhauling our arrival is infrastructure here in kent. with new processing facilities now operational at weston jet foil. but we will need to go further in breaking the business model of these gangs. so from today, our new migration and economic development partnership will mean that anyone entering the uk illegally, as well as those who have arrived illegally since january the 1st, may now be relocated to rwanda. this innovative approach, driven by our shared humanitarian impulse and made possible by brexit freedoms, will
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provide safe and legal routes for asylum, while disrupting the business model of the gangs. because it means that economic migrants taking advantage of the asylum system will not get to stay in the uk. while those in genuine need full be properly protected, including with access to legal services on arrival in rwanda. and given the opportunity to build a new life in that dynamic country, supported by the funding we are providing. the deal we have done is uncapped and rwanda will have the capacity to resettle tens of thousands of people in the years ahead. and let's be clear, rwanda is one of the safest countries in the world, globally recognised for its records of welcoming and integrating migrants. later this year it will welcome
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leaders from across the commonwealth and before the pandemic, in 2018 the imf said rwanda was the world's fourth fastest growing economy. we are confident our new migration partnership is fully compliant with our international legal obligations. but, nevertheless, we expect this will be challenged in the courts. and if this country is seen as a soft touch for illegal migration by some of our partners, it is precisely because we have such a formidable army of politically motivated lawyers who, for years have made it their business to thwart removals and frustrate the government. so i know this system will not take effect overnight, but i promise that we will do whatever it takes to deliver this new approach. initially, within the limits of the existing legal and
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constitutional frameworks, but also prepared to explore all and any further legal reforms which may be necessary. because this problem has bedevilled our country for too long and caused far too much human suffering and tragedy. and this is the government that refuses to duck the government that refuses to duck the difficult decisions. this is the government that makes the big calls and i profoundly believe there is simply no other option. and i say to those who criticise our plan today, well we have a plan, what is your alternative? i know there are some who believe that we should just turn these boats back at sea. but after much study and consultation, including with border force, much study and consultation, including with borderforce, the police, national crime agency and military maritime experts, to whom by the way, i pay tribute for all
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the incredible work they do dealing with this problem as things stand. it is clear that they are extremely limited circumstances when you can safely do this in the english channel. and it doesn't help this approach, i don't think, be supported by our french partners. i have got to say to you, relying solely on this course of action is simply not practical in my view. of course, there are others he would say we should just negotiate a deal with france and the eu. we have made repeated and generous offers to our french friends, and we will continue to press them and the eu for the comprehensive returns agreement that would solve this problem. we remain grateful for the joint intelligence work and the cooperation that has stopped thousands of boats. we would like to deepen that work and we continue to believe that a deal with
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france and the eu is in the national interests of all our countries. studio: we are saying goodbye to viewers from bbc world but on the news channel we will continue to watch boris johnson. news channel we will continue to watch borisjohnson. brute news channel we will continue to watch boris johnson.— news channel we will continue to watch boris johnson. we need to stop the boats now. _ watch boris johnson. we need to stop the boats now, not _ watch boris johnson. we need to stop the boats now, not lose _ watch boris johnson. we need to stop the boats now, not lose thousands i the boats now, not lose thousands more lives while waiting for a deal that doesn't exist. i know there will be a vocal minority who think these measures are draconian and lacking in compassion. i simply don't agree. there is no humanity or compassion in allowing desperate and innocent people to have their dreams of a better life exploited by ruthless gangs as they are taken to their deaths in and boats and there is no humanity or compassion in endlessly condemning the people's smugglers, but then time and again ducking the big calls needed to
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break the business model of the gangs and stop these boats from coming. and there is no humanity or compassion in calling for unlimited safe and legal routes, offering the false hope of asylum in the uk to anyone who wants it. because that is just unsustainable. there are currently 80 million displaced people in the world, many in failed states where governments cannot meet their aspirations. states where governments cannot meet theiraspirations. in states where governments cannot meet their aspirations. in an era of mobile connectivity, they are a call or text message away potentially being swept up in the tide of people smuggling. the answer cannot be for the uk to become a haven for all of them. that is a call for open borders by the back door, a political argument argh masquerading as a humanitarian policy. those in favour of approach should be honest about it and argue for it openly. we reject it because the british people
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have consistently rejected it at the ballot box in favour of controlled immigration. we simply cannot have a policy of saying anyone who wants to live here can do so. we have got to be able to control who comes into this country and the terms on which they remain. and we must do this in they remain. and we must do this in the spirit of our history of providing refuge. and in that way, we can more than play our part in offering sanctuary to thousands fleeing persecution. but then of course, other countries must play their part, too. and that is what i think is most exciting about the partnership we have agreed with rwanda today. because we believe it will become a new international standard in addressing the challenges of global migration and people smuggling. so i am grateful for rwanda's leadership and partnership and we stand ready to work with other nations on similar
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agreements, as well as wider reforms to the international asylum framework. as i say, we will continue to work with our french friends to tackle the gangs. we will continue to lead cooperation with crime and intelligence partners across europe. we will continue to seek a returns agreement with the eu or with france. but in the meantime, and for the foreseeable future, we need this new approach. the people smugglers are undermining confidence in our borders, they are betraying all those who do the right thing, who try to come here legally through forms of migration or the safe and legal routes provided for refuge. they are undermining the natural compassion and goodwill people have towards refugees in this country and they are endangering human life day after day. although the way ahead it
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will be hard and we can expect many challenges and many obstacles to be thrown up against this plan, i believe this plan is the right way forward. because the people smugglers must be stopped in order to save countless lives and because tackling illegal migration is precisely the way to sustain a safe, legal and generous offer of sanctuary to those in need. that is in the best traditions of this country and the values we stand for in the world. thank you all very much indeed. i am now going to go to the media for some questions. going to nick eardley of the bbc. is the plan to send asylum seekers to rwanda a genuine answer? a
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workable solution or an attempt to look tough on an issue the government has failed to address the last few years? and if i can ask about the phone you received earlier this week, do use you still think you have the moral authority to govern? what would you say to people watching at home who think that you have been guilty of hypocrisy for not following the rules you told them they must follow? what would you say to the mps who think you lied to them? element thanks very much. 0n lied to them? element thanks very much. on your second point, lied to them? element thanks very much. 0n yoursecond point, isaid quite a lot about this on i think it was tuesday. i will be saying more when they update parliament, as you can imagine, next week. you will probably have to wait until then for me to say more on that. but on you know, whether this is a solution thatis know, whether this is a solution that is a magic bullet, as it were, that is a magic bullet, as it were, that can deal with the problem of illegal migration across the channel, i want to be absolutely
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clear with everybody. i think that this is necessary but it is of course not sufficient. there are many other things that we need to get right. we need to make sure that our legal framework is capable of dealing with the problem as well as the practical steps that we can take but none of the reforms to our laws will really be any good without the basic ability to get in the heads of the people smugglers and make them understand that the deal they are offering, their poor, vulnerable clients is not one that stacks up and it is to get into the heads of the people who are coming across the channel and risking their lives in this way, that there much, much better off going for the safe and legal routes that we have rather than paying tojump legal routes that we have rather than paying to jump the queue and risk their lives because, if they go that way, they go across the channel
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illegally in these vessels, then they risk, as i have explained, ending up not in the uk but in a row under. that is something that i believe will, over time, under. that is something that i believe will, overtime, prove under. that is something that i believe will, over time, prove a very considerable deterrent but there are several things that you've got to get right in addition to that policy. not least the legal framework. i've got no doubt at all that this will be challenged and there will be a long way to go but it is an indispensable component of the solution. the it is an indispensable component of the solution-— the solution. the people you are talkin: the solution. the people you are talking about — the solution. the people you are talking about say _ the solution. the people you are talking about say they _ the solution. the people you are talking about say they are - the solution. the people you are | talking about say they are fleeing persecution and they often come from countries where there are no safe routes here in the uk. why are you sending them with one—way tickets to a country where there are reports of ill—treatment and torture in
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detention centres and that your own government criticised last year for failing to investigate these alleged human rights violations? and a quick question because i'm not patient enough to wait hope you will answer it. on tuesday, you have admitted that you unknowingly misled parliament and i wonder if you put the record straight? fin parliament and i wonder if you put the record straight?— parliament and i wonder if you put the record straight? on the second oint the record straight? on the second point again. _ the record straight? on the second point again, forgive _ the record straight? on the second point again, forgive me, _ the record straight? on the second point again, forgive me, you're - point again, forgive me, you're going to have to wait until i come to parliament. of course i will set the record straight in anyway that i can but on your point about safe and legal writs i think it is crucial for people to understand that the uk is very, very generous and we should be proud, is a country, what we do to welcome people. 185,000 just in the last few years and it is not just that people who came from afghanistan, we are opening their arms and more. what we are doing
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with the ukrainian scheme is to uncapped looking after people coming from ukraine. this is a country does not put what we're trying to do is buttress that, shore it up in peoples imaginations, to make sure that people believe in it and our immigration system, by cracking down on the illegal approach and on the people smuggling, ijust on the illegal approach and on the people smuggling, i just want to say something about rwanda because there is a risk of stereotyping here. rwanda has totally transformed over the past few decades. we are making sure that we have a very, very high degree of confidence about the way people have been received on or under and are today publishing a
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long memorandum of understanding between the uk and veranda about how they will be received and treated. this is not something that we have put together overnight. this is the nine months in preparation so i would just urge people, you know, not to think in a blinkered way about rwanda. there will be, i think that this is the prototypes of the solution to the problems of global migration of those likely to be adopted by other countries that are there other european countries that are already in similar discussions notjust with row are already in similar discussions not just with row and about are already in similar discussions notjust with row and about others. billions of people are going to be moving across the face of the planet and many sensible partnerships to address those flows. last and many sensible partnerships to address those flows.— and many sensible partnerships to address those flows. last year more than 28,000 — address those flows. last year more than 28,000 migrants _ address those flows. last year more than 28,000 migrants cross - address those flows. last year more than 28,000 migrants cross the - than 28,000 migrants cross the channel. is your aim to bring that
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number down and what will you do if this policy fails to do that and just on party get you told the commons on december eight that it goes without saying that if the rules were broken then there will be disciplinary action for all those involved. when you go to parliament next week and speak to mps and you are in the house of commons we detail what that disciplinary up action is you have imposed on those who work for you and indeed yourself? t who work for you and indeed yourself?— who work for you and indeed ourself? . ., , yourself? i can certainly tell you i will be updating, _ yourself? i can certainly tell you i will be updating, as— yourself? i can certainly tell you i will be updating, as i _ yourself? i can certainly tell you i will be updating, as i said - yourself? i can certainly tell you i will be updating, as i said to - yourself? i can certainly tell you i will be updating, as i said to your colleagues, i will be updating parliament next week but on your first point about the numbers. look, you are right. the numbers are high last year but this year they are going to be even higher, there is no doubt about it. there is already in the first few months of this year, they are higher than they were over comparable period last year. they are growing. the people smugglers
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are growing. the people smugglers are now becoming very adept. they are now becoming very adept. they are getting their boats, these fail, fail things that they've seen. they have been manufactured to order in china. they have a whole system going now and we need a humane and compassionate way to interrupt their business model. they are making 350,000 euros a vote, something like that. this is a lucrative trade for them. it is an evil trade and it is undermining peoples confidence in safe legal migration. we need to emphasise the safe and legal roots and undermine what the people smugglers are doing. i want to be absolutely frank with people. this is not something. the deal that we are doing with rwanda is an essential part of the solution but it is not the total. it is a part of
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several steps we're taking to beat the problem. can several steps we're taking to beat the problem-— the problem. can i 'ust clarify, is it our the problem. can i 'ust clarify, is it your aim h the problem. can i 'ust clarify, is it your aim to _ the problem. can ijust clarify, is it your aim to bring _ the problem. can ijust clarify, is it your aim to bring the - the problem. can ijust clarify, is it your aim to bring the numbers| it your aim to bring the numbers crossing the channel illegally eventually down to zero? and on your relationship with the chancellor, as he in danger of being moved a chance does he have a job as long as he once had? does he have a 'ob as long as he hoov— does he have a 'ob as long as he once had? , ., , _, ., , , once had? yes to the second and yes, i think, to the — once had? yes to the second and yes, | think, to the first. _ once had? yes to the second and yes, i think, to the first. obviously - once had? yes to the second and yes, i think, to the first. obviously we - i think, to the first. obviously we do want to make sure that, you know, i would like to get it down to zero. i would like to get it down to zero. i think everybody would like to get it down to zero. i think people in this room to an absolutely heroic job and it is incredibly difficult to get the balance right and to be firm but also to be humane and compassionate to people, very, very vulnerable people who are doing something that is extremely brave
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and it's really dangerous which they shouldn't be doing. what we want to show people is that this is not only dangerous but also, likely to end in failure and that you are taking the wrong step. there is a better solution and you should wait and go by the safe and legal route and not fall victim to the people smugglers. that is what trying to do. fin fall victim to the people smugglers. that is what trying to do.— that is what trying to do. on top of the concerns _ that is what trying to do. on top of the concerns about _ that is what trying to do. on top of the concerns about the _ that is what trying to do. on top of the concerns about the human - that is what trying to do. on top of. the concerns about the human rights record of the under. 50 the concerns about the human rights record of the under.— record of the under. so there we will leave the _ record of the under. so there we will leave the prime _ record of the under. so there we will leave the prime minister- will leave the prime minister speaking in kent announcing the government's new immigration arrangement with row under. just some details that we have had this morning just to be up—to—date if you'rejustjoining us. the prime minister talking about those who seek seek to abuse the immigration system and say they will be removed to a third country or their country of origin. he said they must assure
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the only route to asylum in the uk as a safe and legal one. this is the british people have voted several times to control immigration and we cannot ask tax payers to write a blank cheque to support those who come here illegally. he also talks about the need for money to turn to the legal people smuggling. he said it is a barbaric trading human suffering and there are queue jumpers of those who seek to abuse the system who will be removed to a safe country. the payments are also pointing out that it has been made possible by breaks and freedoms for the system to be in place. he's talked about for lying so the on turning back boats in the channel. it is not practical, he says. let's get the thoughts from our political correspondent who joins get the thoughts from our political correspondent whojoins me now get the thoughts from our political correspondent who joins me now from westminster. you were listening to the prime minister as we were. what we make of what he said because we thought this was coming. there were
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a lot of announcements planned and now have details that asylum seekers will be sent 4000 miles away for processing. will be sent 4000 miles away for processing-— processing. secretary is going to rewind it highlight _ processing. secretary is going to rewind it highlight this _ processing. secretary is going to rewind it highlight this new - processing. secretary is going to | rewind it highlight this new policy and they are saying it is the solution to the ongoing problem of people crossing the channel attempting to claim asylum in the uk, fleeing conflict are various difficult circumstances in other countries but there are still big questions about how all this is going to work. the prime minister said himself that it is not going to happen overnight and also said the government expects legal challenges to this policy. our understanding at the moment is the legislation going through parliament at the moment, the nationality and border still need to pass before this policy could be put into place but even thatis could be put into place but even that is not 100% clear. politically, it is clear what from what boris
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johnson are said to david if he believes it is a potent issue and a big towards addressing what many people see as an unacceptable ongoing problem of people arriving in the uk, turning up at dover and around the southern coast of england in small boats having made that dangerous journey and being processed and attempted to claim asylum in the uk. there is a good deal of political opposition to this plan. the liberal democrats say it is expensive. labour says it is extortionate. it will be a big ask for the government to get this up and running. they are at pains to demonstrate they have a plan and are at least going to attempt to put it in place. at least going to attempt to put it in lace. ., ., at least going to attempt to put it in lace. ., ,, i. at least going to attempt to put it in lace. ., ~' ,, , at least going to attempt to put it in lace. ., ,, i. , . we can speak now to alp mehmet. he's the chairman of migration watch uk — an organisation that argues
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for lower migration into the uk. good to see you. so, we have some detail at last about how the government intends to tackle illegal migration into the uk. what you make of what you had from the prime minister because in some respects this goes further than we were led to believe. , ., , , , to believe. yes. it goes slightly further than — to believe. yes. it goes slightly further than a _ to believe. yes. it goes slightly further than a lot _ to believe. yes. it goes slightly further than a lot of _ to believe. yes. it goes slightly further than a lot of people - to believe. yes. it goes slightly i further than a lot of people were expecting but, ultimately, however far it goes we're still not sure it is going to be introduced because the bill is going to give it all the legal framework the bill is going to give it all the legalframework to work the bill is going to give it all the legal framework to work in is not yet passed. 0n the prime minister was also careful to repeat a couple of times that this is only part of the solution. i think you made the case for why it was necessary and i think he also think, quite rightly, showed that we have a very generous,
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welcoming all embracing system already in place for welcoming genuine refugees. it is whether this proposal to send some of those crossing in boats to rwanda, whether it will have the effect of dissuading people from setting off across the channel. that is, time will tell, i suppose.— will tell, i suppose. lets look at some of the _ will tell, i suppose. lets look at some of the detail _ will tell, i suppose. lets look at some of the detail that - will tell, i suppose. lets look at some of the detail that has - will tell, i suppose. lets look at| some of the detail that has been announced because this is may need to target mostly single men who are arriving in britain via crossings particularly the english channel. do we expect that focus will be announced to stem that tide of people who are coming here across the english channel and mainly in the english channel and mainly in the hands of people smugglers. t am the hands of people smugglers. i am not convinced — the hands of people smugglers. i am not convinced that _ the hands of people smugglers. i am not convinced that it _ the hands of people smugglers. t —n not convinced that it will, for a
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while yet. it won't persuade people or dissuade people until they see that it won't work. what i expect people smugglers may do is switch to those who are not being removed to rwanda, whoever that may be. women and children, older people. and then they may start piling them into boats, really to get them over here by hook or by crook knowing that they won't be removed. what may also happen is i think other countries, if it works, they may want to join in and have similar schemes and cooperate with similar schemes so that we can put an end to the
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illegal crossings into the eu. and into france. that is, again, it's probably a long way but insofar as this scheme has really been put together, i welcome it and i think that it together, i welcome it and i think thatitis together, i welcome it and i think that it is a good start.— that it is a good start. good to have your _ that it is a good start. good to have your thoughts. _ we will talk more about this in the afternoon. reports from russian state media say the most important ship in russia's black sea fleet, the moskva missile cruiser has been badly damaged after ammunition on board blew up causing a fire. the moskva is the flagship of the fleet. quoting the russian defence ministry, interfax said the crew had all been evacuated and the cause of the fire was being investigated. earlier, a ukrainian official said the ship had been hit by two missiles,
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but this has not been confirmed. let's go live now to anna foster who's in kyiv. so there we have it. two different claims. 0ne saying ammunition blew up claims. 0ne saying ammunition blew up on board. the training claim is that they targeted the ship. do we have any detail about who might be right? have any detail about who might be riiht? ., have any detail about who might be riiht? ~' ,., have any detail about who might be riiht? ~ ., , have any detail about who might be riiht? ~ ., i. have any detail about who might be riiht? ~ ., , right? like so many other occasions that we have _ right? like so many other occasions that we have seen _ right? like so many other occasions that we have seen in _ right? like so many other occasions that we have seen in the _ right? like so many other occasions that we have seen in the last - right? like so many other occasions that we have seen in the last seven | that we have seen in the last seven weeks of this while we had these two competing narratives and really, no way to independently verify which of them might be correct. the ukrainian say that this was to have their missiles which hit the ship. for them it would be a militarily important thing to have done put up ukrainian power is not at sea so, for them, to be a real blow to the russians but as far as russia is
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concerned, this was a fire that happened on board. they say the causes of it are still being established and in fact in the last few minutes they released a statement, the russian defence ministry, saying that the main cargo of missiles was unaffected by this. they had evacuated the crew to different ships in the black sea and they were bringing it in to be checked and repaired while they investigated how this could have happened but also symbolically this is important as well. this is a ship which is the of the russian navy but it is famous here in ukraine as well since that urban legend from the start of the conflict when it approached an island and asked the ukrainians to surrender and they told the ship were to go and that has become a meme now and you see it on bags and t—shirts and mugs. all kinds of things. so, for ukrainians to see that news this morning, they might not know for sure what the truth of that story is, but symbolically it feels, for them, like an important ukrainian push back against russia. about!
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like an important ukrainian push back against russia.— back against russia. and that symbolism — back against russia. and that symbolism is _ back against russia. and that symbolism is so _ back against russia. and that symbolism is so important, l back against russia. and that| symbolism is so important, as back against russia. and that - symbolism is so important, as we know, in this war. president putin very keen to claim victories. this brings up to date, if you would, what is happening elsewhere in the country. i know you are there but that push towards the south and east continues. tt that push towards the south and east continues. ., , a, ,., continues. it does. in mariupol, which we _ continues. it does. in mariupol, which we have _ continues. it does. in mariupol, which we have talked _ continues. it does. in mariupol, which we have talked about - continues. it does. in mariupol, which we have talked about so i continues. it does. in mariupol, - which we have talked about so many times of the last few weeks, we have in the last day or two this competing narrative from ukraine and russia. russia says that around 1000 ukrainian troops surrendered. ukraine, for its part says that is not the case, they are still fighting. they hold strategic parts of the city and an iron and steel works which is of the important point to be in control though. if you look at the way that mariupol has been surrounded and cut off and how difficult it is to get information out and verify i think it is impossible at this stage to know which side is in control of that city but again, if you move up
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the east of ukraine we see this push being readied by russia for the next phase of the conflate and receive the satellite images showing russian convoys moving into place again to really focus on the donbas region as president putin tries to salvage what he can from the first stage of this work where he hopes to take places like you have and of course, failed too. for russia, the easter now is incredibly important so they can claim victory at home. for now, thank you- — for now, thank you. let's go live now to moscow and speak to our correspondent — jenny hill. this later story really does underline, doesn't it? that war of words in war of image on either side both keen to claim victory and we know president putin is very keen to have some good welcome headlines right now. have some good welcome headlines riiht now. , ~ have some good welcome headlines riiht now. , . i. ., ., right now. yes. whether you have to bear in mind — right now. yes. whether you have to bear in mind that, _ right now. yes. whether you have to bear in mind that, of _ right now. yes. whether you have to bear in mind that, of course, - right now. yes. whether you have to bear in mind that, of course, here i
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bear in mind that, of course, here in russia, the narrative are strictly controlled by vladimir putin so russians are not seeing or hearing very much of what you see here at home or indeed the kind of information ukrainians are getting access to. as far as russia is concerned and bear in mind most russians in the getting their information from russian state television or newspapers, it is all going according to plan and, actually, the veal plan all along was simply to defend the interests of russian speaking populations in the donbas region and to protect russia against the so—called aggressions of ukraine aided by the west. we get daily updates here from the ministry of defence, sometimes several times a day, actually put up and they're always very upbeat and they talk about the developments and progress russian are making in ukraine and in terms of the latest on this flagship cruiser. the ministry of defence have actually issued another statement saying it issued another statement saying it is still afloat. the main missiles were not affected by the fire and subsequent explosion of ammunition
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on board. all the crew have been taken off the ship and are going to tow it back to port where they are going to establish the cause. little information here. sadly, no acknowledgement about whether or not this was caused by a ukrainian missile strike. even at some point if it is independently verify that it was it is interesting to see how thatis it was it is interesting to see how that is handled by state television which this morning is not talking about what has happened to this flagship cruiser. i had a look at the headlines earlierjust out of interest as if they were talking about it and both the stations i looked at, nothing at all. they are talking about how russian soldiers are handing out humanitarian aid to civilians and how ukrainian forces have been attacking civilians. that is the picture that russian viewers andindeed is the picture that russian viewers and indeed readers are given of this war. fish and indeed readers are given of this war. �* , and indeed readers are given of this war. . , ., ., war. an interesting alternative perspective — war. an interesting alternative perspective there. _ war. an interesting alternative perspective there. for- war. an interesting alternative perspective there. for now, i war. an interesting alternative - perspective there. for now, thank you. new figures show that nhs waiting times in england have reached record highs.
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a record 22,506 people had to wait more than 12 hours in a&e departments in england in march from a decision to admit to actually being admitted, figures from nhs england show. the figure is the highest for any calendar month in records going back to august 2010. the new data also shows the average time ambulances took to respond to emergency calls has increased. jim reed, our health correspondent, joins me now. talk us through these numbers. anyone who has been in the hospital will not be hugely surprised by these right now but it is easy for us to blame all of this on covid but thatis us to blame all of this on covid but that is not necessarily the case, is it? . ., , , , ., that is not necessarily the case, is it? _, , , , ., it? the contents pint is a soaring demand as _ it? the contents pint is a soaring demand as we — it? the contents pint is a soaring demand as we start _ it? the contents pint is a soaring demand as we start to _ it? the contents pint is a soaring demand as we start to live - it? the contents pint is a soaring i demand as we start to live normally again after this pandemic so if you look, the highest number of 999 calls on the highest number of people going to a&e. urgent cancer
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referrals. gps to hospitals up 26% and as you said, record waiting lists. routine treatments, cataract operations due to hip replacements and that kind of thing. i wanted to focus on and give this waiting time is because you mention those in the introduction and it is with the interesting. again, you are seeing this kind of pressure coming through in ambulances. three different types of category of ambulance waiting of category one is life threatening problems. and there you are seeing ambulance hitting the targets at the moment. they should see people within 15 minutes and they are seeing them within 12 but the less kind of life threatening problems is when you are seeing issues. category two, stuff like, for example, a stroke, an epileptic seizure or something like that. the target is to get the ambulance to you within 40 minutes. in february, it was 42 minutes. in it is now over an hour. category three so things like late stage labour, barons, still very
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serious. the target there is two hours. in february it was two hours 16 minutes. march it was three and a half hours. so you're really seeing this pressure at the emergency end of the health service especially here with ambulance waiting times. so interesting to get those figures. thank you so much. joining me now is hugh alderwick, director of policy at independent charity the health foundation. what do you make of these numbers? many will not be surprised by them but nonetheless, when we see them laid out so plainly it is not welcome reading.- laid out so plainly it is not welcome reading. laid out so plainly it is not welcome readini. , , ., welcome reading. yes, it paints a nicture of welcome reading. yes, it paints a picture of the _ welcome reading. yes, it paints a picture of the whole _ welcome reading. yes, it paints a picture of the whole system - welcome reading. yes, it paints a| picture of the whole system under incredible strain. and millions of people across the country are feeling the effects. struggling to cope with these incredible demands being placed on it. despite the incredible work of the staff right across the system, there is an enormous backlog. there are 6
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million people waiting for routine hospital care. 0ne million people waiting for routine hospital care. one of 300,000 people waiting more than a year for treatment. as you are talking about emergency care also under intense pressure. lots of patients waiting more than 12 hours on trolleys in emergency departments before being admitted to hospital but important to point out these are notjust pressures on hospitals. they reflect strain right across the system in general practice, mental health, services across the community, social care is on its knees. so the stats for hospitals, ambulances look grim but they reflect pressures right across the system. there are not evenly distributed so if you're in different parts of the country might be feeling the effects much harder. as you say, while the pressures are happening, some of this is clearly covid. we have seen big increases and jumps of the number of staff off sick because of the virus in both of those things
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disrupt pace the, patient care. it is important to remember that a longer term systemic issues here not because of the pandemic but the pandemic is exacerbated it, the big one being chronic staffing shortages in the nhs. it now stands at about 110000 and a broader pattern of constrained resources. we went into the pandemic with fewer doctors, nurses, hospital equipment than many comparable countries so government needs to be honest with the public about the combination of issues here under failte and be the time it is going to take to address them. these going to take to address them. those ofthe going to take to address them. those of the issues — going to take to address them. those of the issues and _ going to take to address them. those of the issues and that _ going to take to address them. those of the issues and that is _ going to take to address them. those of the issues and that is where - going to take to address them. those of the issues and that is where we stand right now. i wonder, what is the answer short of just stand right now. i wonder, what is the answer short ofjust spending more money? is there a better way to organise this because quite clearly, we see if you are waiting on an ambulance you will be prioritised according to your need and no one wants to wait on an ambulance. you have called an ambulance because you think it is an emergency but nonetheless, there has to be a system that will prioritise those most in need. what is the answer?
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there are a few things i need to be done. nhs organisations are already working really hard to try to reduce backlog to deal with emergency pressures, expanding diagnostic centres in the community, trying to prioritise long waiters. supporting people while they are waiting. getting in the way of recovering services and stopping us dealing with these pressures are big staff shortages which have been exacerbated by high levels of staff off sick and what is missing from government is a plan to support and expand the nhs workforce. this is so desperately needed in the short and the longer term but in addition it is notjust about the longer term but in addition it is not just about the the longer term but in addition it is notjust about the nhs pressures that turn up in hospitals, and not just about what happens in the health system. it is about social care and supporting the community, the things to help us stay healthy. funding provided by government for social care over the next two years is barely enough to keep up with growing demand for services never
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mind expand services to those who need them and are currently going without. a workforce plan that the government has not put in place yet, we gasp of the need and investment in services outside hospitals, outside the nhs and to help people stay healthy and outside of hospitals. hello, again. over the next few days, we are going to have temperatures above average and it is going to feel pleasantly warm. what we have today is still some low cloud along parts of the west coast and also the english channel coastline. but the early fog continuing to lift, allowing some sunshine to develop. and we're also going to see more rain coming in across western scotland and northern ireland as we go through the afternoon, with top temperatures 19 or 20 degrees. through this evening and overnight, there will be some clear skies developing. so once again some patchy mist and fog forming. and you'll see more of that coming in through the irish sea
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and the english channel and drifting inland. it's not going to be a particularly cold night. we shouldn't have any issues with frost tonight. and into tomorrow, the fog that has formed inland lifting, but again some of itjust clinging to parts of the west coast and the south—west. one or two showers, too, in the west and also the east. with top temperatures tomorrow potentially up to 22 somewhere in the south—east. hello, this is bbc news. i'm ben thompson. the headlines... some asylum seekers who cross the channel to the uk will be sent to rwanda to be processed and resettled, under new government plans. but critics say the proposals are cruel and inhumane. this innovative approach, driven by our shared humanitarian impulse and made possible by brexit freedoms, will provide safe and legal routes
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for asylum while disrupting the business model of the gangs. tote business model of the gangs. we sim-l business model of the gangs. we simply cannot support sending vulnerable refugees who may be victims — vulnerable refugees who may be victims of— vulnerable refugees who may be victims of torture, who have survived _ victims of torture, who have survived atrocities and war, and packing — survived atrocities and war, and packing them off halfway around the world to _ packing them off halfway around the world to a _ packing them off halfway around the world to a poor country. it is despicable. a record number of people are waiting for routine hospital treatment in england. new figures show 6.2 million people were on waiting lists at the end of february, the highest number since records began in 2007. a key russian warship has been "seriously damaged" in the black sea. russia says a fire on board the flagship, moskva, caused ammunition to explode — but ukraine claims it was hit by missiles. it's 11 30 it'sii 30 2am. it's 11 30 2am. let's it's1130 2am. let's get the it's 11 30 2am. let's get the latest from the sports centre. we start with an announcement
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from the world of cricket. as england's two—time world cup winner, anya shrubsole reveals she is to retire from the international game. it brings to an end, a 14 year career during which she also won two ashes and has been awarded an mbe after bowling her side to that famous victory at lord's in 2017. she's played 173 games for her country across all formats, claiming 227 wickets — and bows out as england's current top it20 wicket—ta ker. as you'd expect, there's been a huge reaction to this news, including england team mate kate cross, who tweeted to say... alex hartley simply
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said, "thank you, anya. you have inspired so many." and the former england captain charlotte edwards said... uefa look set to launch disciplinary proceedings into events at the wanda metropolitana stadium in madrid last night. police had to intervene after manchester city knocked ateltcio madrid out of the champions league to reach the semifinals. tempers spilled over firstly on the pitch following the goalless second leg, and continued after the final whistle and in the tunnel. in a feisty game, city's closest chance came in the first half, ilkay gundogan hitting the post there. atletico were unable to keep their cool, and finished with ten men, felipe sent off in the final moments after lashing out at phil foden. diego simeone's side
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incensed at the decision. but it's city who go through. pep guardiola said his side are in big trouble as they count the cost of injuries in what was a bruising encounter. also a thriller for liverpool, 3—3, they drew with benfica last night, but are through 6—4 on agregate, they face villareal in the last four. ibrahima konate put klopp's side in front, but benfica pulled level. roberto firmino's two second—half goals put the reds back in pole position. benfica finished with two more goals of their own, to level the game, but couldn't overhaul liverpool's first leg advantage who are still chasing a total of four trophies this season. with the dust starting to settle on the quarterfinals, here are those all important dates for the semifinals. the first will begin
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on tuesday 26 april, with man city v real madrid and liverpool v villarreal the following night. then the second legs are on the 3rd and 4th of may. all matches kicking off at 8pm. some sad news to bring you, the former colombia captain freddy rincon has died after suffering severe head injuries in a car crash. the 55—year—old was driving a car that collided with a bus on monday in cali, in colombia. the former real madrid midfielder scored 17 times for his country, and he's remebered for playing in the 1990, 1994 and 1998 world cups. and finally, in the past few minutes the draw for snooker�*s world championship has been made. mark selby will open the defence of his title against wales' jamie jones. the englishman has had a tough year since lifting the trophy
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for a fourth time 12 months ago. he's only made one ranking event since then. more details on the bbc sport website. there are just three weeks to go until voters across the uk go to the polls. voters in england, wales, and scotland will pick who they want to run services that affect everyday life in their local area. those in northern ireland will choose its government. ahead of the vote, we'll be profiling some of the key contests in the uk's four nations. today, my colleague martine croxall joins us from the seaside town of rhyl on the north wales coast. thank you very much. yes, we have moved _ thank you very much. yes, we have moved to— thank you very much. yes, we have moved to the — thank you very much. yes, we have moved to the rhyl high street, which
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is where _ moved to the rhyl high street, which is where you come if you want to buy a stick— is where you come if you want to buy a stick of— is where you come if you want to buy a stick of rock— is where you come if you want to buy a stick of rock or maybe some flip-flops _ a stick of rock or maybe some flip—flops or a bag of chips. but you have — flip—flops or a bag of chips. but you have to watch out for the seagulls _ you have to watch out for the seagulls. last time around, in the local— seagulls. last time around, in the local elections in 2017, labour lost seats _ local elections in 2017, labour lost seats in _ local elections in 2017, labour lost seats in wales. then the conservatives in the general electlon— conservatives in the general election also made further gains in what were — election also made further gains in what were traditionally be labour heartlands. so there is a lot to play— heartlands. so there is a lot to play for— heartlands. so there is a lot to play for in _ heartlands. so there is a lot to play for in these local elections this time — play for in these local elections this time around, and here in denbighshire as across wales, there is a lot— denbighshire as across wales, there is a lot of— denbighshire as across wales, there is a lot of concern about the state of our _ is a lot of concern about the state of our high — is a lot of concern about the state of our high streets and also how much _ of our high streets and also how much in — of our high streets and also how much in terms of rates businesses are expected to pay. joining us now is mike. _ are expected to pay. joining us now is mike. the — are expected to pay. joining us now is mike, the senior development manager— is mike, the senior development manager for the federation of small businesses. thank you very much for joining _ businesses. thank you very much for joining us— businesses. thank you very much for joining us here in rhyl today. how optimistic— joining us here in rhyl today. how optimistic do you think your members feel about _ optimistic do you think your members feel about the state of town centres across _ feel about the state of town centres across wales? we feel about the state of town centres across wales?— feel about the state of town centres across wales? we published a report across wales? we published a report a few weeks — across wales? we published a report a few weeks ago _ across wales? we published a report a few weeks ago called _ across wales? we published a report a few weeks ago called a _ across wales? we published a report a few weeks ago called a vision - across wales? we published a report a few weeks ago called a vision for. a few weeks ago called a vision for welsh towns, and in that report only
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3% of the respondents said that they would describe their high street as thriving. so, yeah, the towns are in a bit of a sorry state, businesses have had enormous challenges across the last couple of years, but as we now come out of the pandemic they have a whole set of new challenges. they have problems with staffing. some of them are actually operating at just capacity. some of them are actually operating atjust capacity. but there businesses that are in hospitality, retail and tourism have been particularly hard—hit. so, you know, the problem is the cost of living has increased, notjust for consumers, which is given them less disposable income to spend in the shops, but also for businesses themselves. they have been literally left out in the cold because domestic customers have got the price cap, the energy price cap, there is no commercial premises
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price cap. some businesses are seeing massive increases in energy costs, so the cost of doing business has been really difficult for them. what would you as an organisation want _ what would you as an organisation want to— what would you as an organisation want to see from local councils across — want to see from local councils across wales? what scope is there for them _ across wales? what scope is there for them to— across wales? what scope is there for them to offer greater support. local— for them to offer greater support. local authorities have got a critical role to play in getting town centres back into where they should be. the first thing to understand is that each town is unique, so there is not a one size fits all solution to this. each local authority needs to look at their local towns and come up with a strategic plan in order to make that town centre thrive again. so that plan could look at things like active travel, for example. helping customers come in via bicycle and
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walking, for example. a decent public transport service. help towards parking, reduced parking. places like rhyl could really benefit from events strategy. we could have events put on by the local authority. as i say, each town is different so the solution has to be different. and local authorities need to consult with businesses, business groups like ourselves and local residents in order to develop that strategy. pond local residents in order to develop that strategy-— local residents in order to develop that strategy. and i'm guessing as well, that in _ that strategy. and i'm guessing as well, that in a _ that strategy. and i'm guessing as well, that in a place _ that strategy. and i'm guessing as well, that in a place like _ that strategy. and i'm guessing as well, that in a place like rhyl - that strategy. and i'm guessing as well, that in a place like rhyl and | well, that in a place like rhyl and other— well, that in a place like rhyl and other seaside towns, you've got not 'ust other seaside towns, you've got not just the _ other seaside towns, you've got not just the visitors who come, you have that permanent population who need something rather different from businesses all year around. that is absolutely right. _ businesses all year around. that is absolutely right. but _ businesses all year around. that is absolutely right. but tourism - businesses all year around. that is absolutely right. but tourism of i absolutely right. but tourism of course is an enormous boom to the welsh economy. local residents are supportive of that. 0bviously, welsh economy. local residents are supportive of that. obviously, we have had some bad publicity during
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lockdown with the borders being closed at all that sort of thing. but we absolutely welcome visitors to come back. we need them. please come to rhyl- — to come back. we need them. please come to rhyl- lt _ to come back. we need them. please come to rhyl. it looks _ to come back. we need them. please come to rhyl. it looks like _ to come back. we need them. please come to rhyl. it looks like quite i to come back. we need them. please come to rhyl. it looks like quite a i come to rhyl. it looks like quite a few people are doing just that. it is the _ few people are doing just that. it is the easter bank holiday ahead of us, it— is the easter bank holiday ahead of us, it is— is the easter bank holiday ahead of us, it is starting to fill up a bit, the son— us, it is starting to fill up a bit, the son has— us, it is starting to fill up a bit, the son has been trying to come out. mikei _ the son has been trying to come out. mike. thank— the son has been trying to come out. mike, thank you very much for joining — mike, thank you very much for joining us— mike, thank you very much for joining us here on the high street. listening _ joining us here on the high street. listening to that with emily, she sits on— listening to that with emily, she sits on the — listening to that with emily, she sits on the welsh government's ministerial advisory board for economlc— ministerial advisory board for economic policy. she isjoining us now in— economic policy. she isjoining us now in her— economic policy. she isjoining us now in her personal capacity. thank you for— now in her personal capacity. thank you for being with us today. what in your view _ you for being with us today. what in your view has the welsh government done to— your view has the welsh government done to support small and medium businesses?— businesses? when you are talking about small _ businesses? when you are talking about small and _ businesses? when you are talking about small and medium - businesses? when you are talking i about small and medium businesses in town centres, on the high street, the welsh government has taken steps and it is very clear that it cares about regenerating and rejuvenating town centres, things like the town
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centre first policy, locating public services in town centres. those kind of things are key to supporting businesses occupying those spaces. but i think there is also evidence raised by the welsh audit office that historically the work that has been done to rejuvenate town centres has focused too much on building our way out of these issues, and so you can visit a lot of towns and cities across wales that have exciting new—build schemes happening there is not necessarily the strong network of sustainable jobs, those not necessarily the strong network of sustainablejobs, those kind of things. continue supporting that development beyond the shining new is buildings the comes down. loilol’hozit is buildings the comes down. what would ou is buildings the comes down. what would you want — is buildings the comes down. what would you want to _ is buildings the comes down. what would you want to see _ is buildings the comes down. what would you want to see local councils dolng _ would you want to see local councils doing in— would you want to see local councils doing in support of the national efforts? — doing in support of the national efforts? because we were hearing from _ efforts? because we were hearing from mike — efforts? because we were hearing from mike there that it needs to be a very—
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from mike there that it needs to be a very bespoke solution in a lot of cases _ a very bespoke solution in a lot of cases. different towns need different things.— cases. different towns need different things. cases. different towns need differentthinis. , ,, , ,, different things. yes, i think mike is absolutely _ different things. yes, i think mike is absolutely right. _ different things. yes, i think mike is absolutely right. every - different things. yes, i think mike is absolutely right. every single i is absolutely right. every single town, city, high street is different. i think a lot of time the focus is on conversations about the high street are generic. i work specifically in cardiff, and what we are calling our local authorities to do in the next term is to focus on providing a great setting for the city, high quality public and active transport options, and opportunities to celebrate and nurture and develop local culture. they are broad themes that could probably be replicated in towns and cities across wales and the uk, but the way those things are going to be delivered is obviously going to be delivered is obviously going to be very different for a medium sized city centre like cardiff compared to what you would need to do in rhyl. they are all unique solutions to unique places.
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well, we can explore some of those options _ well, we can explore some of those options from the various political parties _ options from the various political parties a — options from the various political parties a little bit later here on the bbc— parties a little bit later here on the bbc news channel. when we speak to some _ the bbc news channel. when we speak to some of— the bbc news channel. when we speak to some of those candidates. for the moment. _ to some of those candidates. for the moment, emily, thank you very much forjoining _ moment, emily, thank you very much forjoining us~ — moment, emily, thank you very much forjoining us. if you would like more _ forjoining us. if you would like more information on the elections here. _ more information on the elections here. you — more information on the elections here, you can go to the local council— here, you can go to the local council website. here, you can go to the local councilwebsite. it here, you can go to the local council website. it will tell you how you — council website. it will tell you how you can vote and who the different — how you can vote and who the different candidates are standing in the various wards and constituencies. the council website denbighshire.gov.uk. we will later be at a community bakery — we will later be at a community bakery l— we will later be at a community bake . . ., , .~' we will later be at a community bake . . ., , n ., we will later be at a community bake . . ., , ., ,, bakery. i will have a stick of rock and some _ bakery. i will have a stick of rock and some flip-flops, _ bakery. i will have a stick of rock and some flip-flops, please, i bakery. i will have a stick of rock i and some flip-flops, please, martin. and some flip—flops, please, martin. she will bring it back. i don't know if she even heard me, so i will send my shopping list as she continues that coverage.
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and we'll be live across the uk in the coming weeks — with special coverage of the election campaigns. for full details of the elections in your area, go to the bbc news website. in the politics section, you can enter your postcode and get all the details. that's all at bbc.co.uk/ news. you will know we were hearing a little earlier from the prime minister in kent, outlining the government's new arrangements with rwanda as far as illegal immigration across the english channel is concerned. plans to send people for processing in rwanda. that isjust show you the sea now in the rwandan capital. the home secretary is to lay out some details of how that plan will work in practice. it is worth pointing out, this isjust a trial at the moment. it will focus mainly on single men who are deemed to be inadmissible. but, as we have been hearing this hour, there are significant legal hurdles to overcome. there are also questions
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overcome. there are also questions over the cost and rwanda's human rights record. borisjohnson saying that this would be controlled immigration via a safe and legal route. let'sjust have immigration via a safe and legal route. let's just have a listen to this press conference. route. let'sjust have a listen to this press conference.— route. let'sjust have a listen to this press conference. randy was formerly one _ this press conference. randy was formerly one earthly _ this press conference. randy was formerly one earthly world's i formerly one earthly world's leading... many rwandans have experienced what it means to be displaced. this has shaped how we approach migration and asylum. rwanda already provides refuge for almost 130,000 refugees from multiple countries, including neighbours like burundi, as well as afghanistan and migrants from libya. this work has involved working with international bodies, including the african union, and we remain open to
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continue working with these and other organisations on this new programme. forthere other organisations on this new programme. for there to be meaningful long—term solutions to the migration crisis which is causing huge suffering to millions, we need to do more than just give shelter. it is possible to frame migration in another way, and it is an opportunity for all societies to thrive. here in suspicion of those who need to move to build a better life makes it harderfor all of us to work out win — win solutions for all. migrants make social, cultural and economic contributions to societies in which they integrate. we believe that africans and others from elsewhere should be able to live safe, dignified lives in africa
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and should not be locked out of opportunity. this is why we need to work with partners on both new approaches which look at the root causes while providing immediate safety and opportunity to those currently in need. madame home secretary, this is why rwanda is pleased to work with the uk on this partnership. by locating migrants to rwanda, investing in their personal development and providing education, employment and other opportunities, we are giving them a chance to make new lives in our country as full members of our communities. this will not only help them but it will benefit rwanda and rwandans, and help to advance our own development. and for those who do not wish to make right at their new home, they will be facilitated to return to their country of origin or settle in
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other receiving countries. we believe this partnership with the uk offers a unique and innovative approach that will provide a safe haven and opportunity to those in need and be the first crucial step towards a more effective, humane global migration system. we look forward to partnering with the uk on this exciting programme. i thank you all and welcome the home secretary to make her remarks before we take a view questions from the media. madame home secretary, the floor is yours. madame home secretary, the floor is ours. . ~' madame home secretary, the floor is ours. . ~ , ., madame home secretary, the floor is ours. . , . madame home secretary, the floor is ours. . . ., ,, madame home secretary, the floor is ours. . . ., yours. thank you so much. thank you for our yours. thank you so much. thank you for your incredibly _ yours. thank you so much. thank you for your incredibly warm _ yours. thank you so much. thank you for your incredibly warm welcome, i for your incredibly warm welcome, certainly— for your incredibly warm welcome, certainly to — for your incredibly warm welcome, certainly to my delegation and our colleagues from the uk media as well _ colleagues from the uk media as well i'm — colleagues from the uk media as well. i'm delighted to be here alongside our friend and partner. and i_ alongside our friend and partner. and ljust — alongside our friend and partner. and ijust would like to express my personal— and ijust would like to express my personal thanks in particular to him
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and his— personal thanks in particular to him and his team for the constructive way in _ and his team for the constructive way in which we have been working over many. — way in which we have been working over many, many months to achieve and deliver— over many, many months to achieve and deliver this partnership. the united _ and deliver this partnership. the united kingdom has a long and proud development history with rwanda, and our shared _ development history with rwanda, and our shared interests have resulted in a strong — our shared interests have resulted in a strong economic and development growth. _ in a strong economic and development growth, lifting millions out of poverty. _ growth, lifting millions out of poverty, growing manufacturing and technology secretaries which are developing jobs and growth for generations to come. i know at first hand _ generations to come. i know at first hand that _ generations to come. i know at first hand that your country is a regional and international, you are on the global— and international, you are on the global stage, very much yourself more _ global stage, very much yourself more often than not, but hosting the commonwealth heads of government meeting. _ commonwealth heads of government meeting, the sustainable energy for all forum _ meeting, the sustainable energy for all forum. your national leadership is the _ all forum. your national leadership is the african voice on international initiatives, which really— international initiatives, which really speaks to seeking to find solutions — really speaks to seeking to find solutions to regional and international challenges. and i'm very honoured to be here, and the uk
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is delighted _ very honoured to be here, and the uk is delighted to be working ever more closely— is delighted to be working ever more closely with rwanda. we have many, many— closely with rwanda. we have many, many interests in common and we face many— many interests in common and we face many of— many interests in common and we face many of the _ many interests in common and we face many of the same challenges, and i want to— many of the same challenges, and i want to turn— many of the same challenges, and i want to turn to one of those challenges now. the global migration crisis and _ challenges now. the global migration crisis and how we tackle illegal migration requires new world solutions, there are an estimated 18 million _ solutions, there are an estimated 18 million people displaced in the world — million people displaced in the world and the global approach to asylum _ world and the global approach to asylum and migration is broken. evil people _ asylum and migration is broken. evil people smugglers and their criminal gangs _ people smugglers and their criminal gangs are _ people smugglers and their criminal gangs are facilitating people into europe _ gangs are facilitating people into europe resulting in the loss of life and huge — europe resulting in the loss of life and huge costs to the uk taxpayer. the tragic— and huge costs to the uk taxpayer. the tragic loss of life of people in the channel and in the mediterranean at the _ the channel and in the mediterranean at the hands of these evil people smugglers must stop, and today our approach _ smugglers must stop, and today our approach is — smugglers must stop, and today our approach is to outward —looking countries — approach is to outward —looking countries has led to the signing of a new— countries has led to the signing of a new international partnership which _ a new international partnership which is — a new international partnership which is a — a new international partnership which is a world first. it is a migration— which is a world first. it is a migration and economic development partnership with the country of
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rwanda — partnership with the country of rwanda and the uk. this will see some _ rwanda and the uk. this will see some of— rwanda and the uk. this will see some of those arriving illegally in the uk. _ some of those arriving illegally in the uk, such as those crossing the channel— the uk, such as those crossing the channel in — the uk, such as those crossing the channel in dangerous small boats, relocated — channel in dangerous small boats, relocated to rwanda to resettle and rebuild _ relocated to rwanda to resettle and rebuild their lives in the way that the minister hasjust outlined. more than 28,000 migrants crossed the channel— than 28,000 migrants crossed the channel last year by small boat, a very dangerous and perilous conditions. the uk asylum system is collapsing _ conditions. the uk asylum system is collapsing under accommodation of real humanitarian crisis and evil people — real humanitarian crisis and evil people smugglers profiteering. criminals are exploiting the hopes and fears— criminals are exploiting the hopes and fears of migrants, pushing them to making _ and fears of migrants, pushing them to making dangerous journeys and fears of migrants, pushing them to making dangerousjourneys to and fears of migrants, pushing them to making dangerous journeys to the uk with— to making dangerous journeys to the uk with fictitious and false promises that they can settle in the uk if they— promises that they can settle in the uk if they make it. and this has a devastating consequence for the countless men, women and children who have _ countless men, women and children who have tragically lost their lives or a loved — who have tragically lost their lives or a loved one is on the perilous journey — or a loved one is on the perilous journey it— or a loved one is on the perilous journey it is— or a loved one is on the perilous journey. it is also deeply unfair, because — journey. it is also deeply unfair, because it — journey. it is also deeply unfair, because it advantages those with the means—
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because it advantages those with the means to _ because it advantages those with the means to pay smugglers over the vulnerable who cannot. global systems — vulnerable who cannot. global systems and conventions have failed to address _ systems and conventions have failed to address this global crisis and the world — to address this global crisis and the world has changed and renewed global— the world has changed and renewed global leadership is required to find new— global leadership is required to find new innovative solutions to this growing problem. today, the united _ this growing problem. today, the united kingdom and rwanda have liked a joint _ united kingdom and rwanda have liked a joint partnership to put an end to his deadly— a joint partnership to put an end to his deadly trade in people smuggling. this is part of the united — smuggling. this is part of the united kingdom's new plan for migration, to control our borders, protect— migration, to control our borders, protect our— migration, to control our borders, protect our communities, stop dangerous illegal migration, helpe world's_ dangerous illegal migration, helpe world's most desperate people. it is the biggest overhaul of our immigration system in decades, underpinned by a bill that will soon become _ underpinned by a bill that will soon become law. 0ur underpinned by a bill that will soon become law. our country, the united kingdom. _ become law. our country, the united kingdom, has always extended the hand of— kingdom, has always extended the hand of friendship to those in need, and in _ hand of friendship to those in need, and in recent years alone we have proudly— and in recent years alone we have proudly welcomed tens of thousands of refugees from syria, afghanistan,
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ukraine _ of refugees from syria, afghanistan, ukraine and hong kong. rwanda has one of— ukraine and hong kong. rwanda has one of the _ ukraine and hong kong. rwanda has one of the strongest records for refugee — one of the strongest records for refugee resettlement, and in recent years— refugee resettlement, and in recent years rwanda has resettled over 130.000 — years rwanda has resettled over 130,000 refugees. it has an established record of welcoming and integrating people, such as those from _ integrating people, such as those from the — integrating people, such as those from the democratic republic of congo _ from the democratic republic of congo and burundi. but also includlng _ congo and burundi. but also including people from libya, evacuated under the eu's emergency transit— evacuated under the eu's emergency transit mechanism, in partnership with the _ transit mechanism, in partnership with the un refugee agency. ryder is also a _ with the un refugee agency. ryder is also a state party to the 1951 refugee _ also a state party to the 1951 refugee convention. border control is fundamental to national sovereignty. uncontrolled immigration reduces our capability and capacity to help those who need our support. it puts intolerable pressures _ our support. it puts intolerable pressures on public services and on local communities. and at home, as
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the prime _ local communities. and at home, as the prime minister has said today, because _ the prime minister has said today, because the capacity of the system is not _ because the capacity of the system is not limited, the presence of illegal— is not limited, the presence of illegal migrants inhibits our ability— illegal migrants inhibits our ability to support others in genuine need of— ability to support others in genuine need of detection. —— not unlimited. the british— need of detection. —— not unlimited. the british people are fair and generous, but the persistent circumventing of our laws and immigration laws, and the reality of a system _ immigration laws, and the reality of a system that is open to gaming and criminal— a system that is open to gaming and criminal criminalisation... putting evil people — criminal criminalisation... putting evil people smugglers is a moral imperative requiring us to use every tool at _ imperative requiring us to use every tool at our— imperative requiring us to use every tool at our disposal and also to find new— tool at our disposal and also to find new solutions. that is why today's — find new solutions. that is why today's partnership with rwanda is a major— today's partnership with rwanda is a major milestone. it is also very much _ major milestone. it is also very much in — major milestone. it is also very much in keeping with our vision for global— much in keeping with our vision for global britain that harnesses the potential for new relationships and
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stimulate — potential for new relationships and stimulate investment and jobs in partner— stimulate investment and jobs in partner countries. working together, the united _ partner countries. working together, the united kingdom and rwanda will help make the immigration system fairer. _ help make the immigration system fairer, ensure that people are safe and enjoy— fairer, ensure that people are safe and enjoy new opportunities to flourish — and enjoy new opportunities to flourish. we have agreed that people who enter— flourish. we have agreed that people who enter the flourish. we have agreed that people who enterthe uk flourish. we have agreed that people who enter the uk illegally will be considered for relocation to rwanda to have _ considered for relocation to rwanda to have their asylum claims decided. and those _ to have their asylum claims decided. and those who are resettled will be given _ and those who are resettled will be given the _ and those who are resettled will be given the support, including up to five years— given the support, including up to five years of training with the help of integration, accommodation, health— of integration, accommodation, health care, so they can resettle and thrive — health care, so they can resettle and thrive. this agreement fully complies— and thrive. this agreement fully complies with all international and national— complies with all international and national law, and as part of this ground—breaking agreement the uk is making _ ground—breaking agreement the uk is making a _ ground—breaking agreement the uk is making a substantial investment in the economic development of rwanda. this will— the economic development of rwanda. this will support programmes to improve — this will support programmes to improve the lives of people in rwanda — improve the lives of people in rwanda and develop the economy, job prospects _ rwanda and develop the economy, job prospects and opportunities. in addition. — prospects and opportunities. in addition, the uk will divide funding and expertise to implement this agreement. as i have said many
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times. _ agreement. as i have said many times. this _ agreement. as i have said many times, this is a global issue with many— times, this is a global issue with many countries are struggling to address— many countries are struggling to address the challenges and the causes. — address the challenges and the causes, and there is no single or simple _ causes, and there is no single or simple solution. this agreement illustrates that we can no longer accept _ illustrates that we can no longer accept the status quo. people are dying _ accept the status quo. people are dying and — accept the status quo. people are dying and the global migration crisis — dying and the global migration crisis requires new ways to find new partnerships and to find new solutions. it will also deal a major blow— solutions. it will also deal a major blow to _ solutions. it will also deal a major blow to the — solutions. it will also deal a major blow to the evil people smugglers. we know— blow to the evil people smugglers. we know that this will not be easy. we know that this will not be easy. we know _ we know that this will not be easy. we know that this will not be easy. we know that we will face challenges alon- we know that we will face challenges along the _ we know that we will face challenges along the way. but together with the national— along the way. but together with the national anti—borders bill, and a new plan— national anti—borders bill, and a new plan for immigration, the uk will support those fleeing oppression, persecution and tyranny through— oppression, persecution and tyranny through safe and legal roots while controlling our borders and deterring illegal entry. 0ur partnership is a global first and it will change the way we collectively tackle _ will change the way we collectively tackle illegal migration, through new. _ tackle illegal migration, through new, innovative and world beating solutions — new, innovative and world beating
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solutions. thank you. thank you so much. i work with the new times in rwanda. my question is, how has rwanda's previous experience in welcoming, hosting, implementing refugees and asylum seekers informed this decision? and madame secretary, how did you arrive at the decision to pick rwanda to be a partner in
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this process?— this process? yes, i thinki mentioned _ this process? yes, i thinki mentioned something i this process? yes, i think ii mentioned something about this process? yes, i think i i mentioned something about this this process? yes, i think i - mentioned something about this in this process? yes, i think i _ mentioned something about this in my remarks when i said that rwanda is already hosting more than 130,000 refugees from countries like burundi, the dr c, or even afghanistan. and i also said that our people in rwanda, a good number of them have in their previous lives faced these challenges of being displaced, being refugees or asylum seekers. these experiences have informed the government of rwanda to be convinced that we should do something about this problem of illegal migration. there will be one way to look at this problem, one way would be to just look at it and be
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indifferent. the other one would be to try new solutions. because the problem is there and principles are not working. as a government, we thought we need to eventually partner with the uk, among others, to do something about the existing problem. so our history, our past has informed our decision to work with the uk in innovative solutions for the migration crisis. thank you. you have asked how do we reach the conclusion to partner with rwanda and ask the minister has said this is a partnership. clearly, we engage in dialogue and we have been for over nine months now. but rwanda has
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a very unique history in terms of refugees and resettlement. resettlement in particular. first and very most, rwanda is a safe and secure country with respect for the rule of law and clearly, a range of entities since evolved and developed over time and with that, the skilled way in which rwanda has already provided the settlement for almost 130,000 refugees from multiple countries. and look at that alongside many of the innovations that have taken place along with some of the investments, economic development, the fundamental principle of respecting and the investing in people. if i may say so, rwanda has been very forward leaning on very dynamic in the conversations that we have a swell around, yes, economic growth in the partnership but respect for people and giving them the ability to find new opportunities but effectively, restart their lives, build careers
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potentially unsettle here successfully. australia have set up their own offshore processing system and there are reports of self harming and even people taking their own lives because these people are going through a tremendously difficult times with a mental health and they have made a difficultjourney. i wanted to ask how you ensure the well—being of asylum seekers sent to a wonder. do you see that as the uk government's responsibility or are you passing the buck to the rwandan government on this? i also wanted to ask the question, there is a massive backlog of cases to get through when it comes to uk asylum claims and you could be welcoming thousands of people here. how are you going to ensure you have the infrastructure to make sure that works?- ensure you have the infrastructure to make sure that works? thank you very much- — to make sure that works? thank you very much- so. _ to make sure that works? thank you very much. so, first— to make sure that works? thank you very much. so, first of— to make sure that works? thank you very much. so, first of all, _ to make sure that works? thank you very much. so, first of all, let i to make sure that works? thank you very much. so, first of all, let me i very much. so, first of all, let me
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just say, this is a partnership was that this is a partnership between our two countries, first and foremost. this is not a one—sided deal so ijust want foremost. this is not a one—sided deal so i just want to absolutely deconstruct any myths around that. the app and working together. in fact, i actually want to pay tribute to our teams because it is our officials who for nine months, in fact, had been working on a lot of detail and when we publish our memoranda of understanding you will see the detail of how much work has taken place in terms of being fair and having the right processes to understand people who come here to resettle. australia is not comparable. this is not the type of arrangement that australia had. australia is a sovereign country and has its own arrangement. it is fair to say, our teams have been working through facilities here. you've heard me mention in my remarks as well the technical experience that well the technical experience that we are bringing. we believe in investing in rwanda and we are very open about we believe it is the
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right thing to do. we stand here today absolutely committed to changing some of the norms around the broken global migration system because, for too long, other countries and, by the way, naysayers, been sitting on the hands watching people die so we have the right processes in place and we have the checks and balances which are incredibly important and you heard me say my remarks as well about respect for the rule of law but importantly, as well, national and international laws and conventions. in addition to the infrastructure aspect of the programme, when we are discussing these partnerships we assess our capacity to receive migrants and we know that we have the capacity in place to receive migrants but we are also investing
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in new infrastructures going forward. and we are looking at investing in social infrastructures for this programme to take place. we are looking at investing in education, we are looking at investing in housing for the migrants but also for our own people so we have been working on all aspects of the programme including the infrastructure programme. we are ready and going forward we want to keep investing with the support of the uk to have the capacity we need to receive migrants.
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welcome to bbc news. we are live in the rwandan capitalfor a press conference announcing the uk government's partnership with the rwandan government to process asylum claims. focusing on single men he may travel across the channel claiming asylum in the uk. the home secretary in rwanda pointing out this is the biggest overhaul of the uk immigration system in decades. she says it is a scheme that is fairer to ensure the people i say. she has just been taking fairer to ensure the people i say. she hasjust been taking questions from journalists there about why the uk government has chosen to partner with rwanda. she says this is absolutely a partnership. it is a two—way arrangement and a
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culmination of nine months of dialogue. nine months of talks to make sure the technical arrangements are in place. we had from the prime minister who was making the announcement in the uk in kent same relying solely on turning back boats in the english channel is not practical. this is a way of the uk government seizing control of immigration debbie said the uk public voted several times to take control of immigration and he is focused on the work of people smugglers in the english channel and said it is a barbaric trade in human suffering in the english channel. there's been you up—to—date with all the details that we have had on what is being described as a landmark announcement. borisjohnson said.
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announcement. boris johnson said. some announcement. borisjohnson said. some people refuse permission to stay in the uk will instead be sent 4000 miles to east africa. it is part of a range of measures outlined to cut the number of people crossing the english channel in small bits foot of the government ceases as a way to reduce illegal migration but critics have called those plans cruel. last year nearly 29,000 people crossed the english channel in small boats and yesterday alone 600 people made that crossing. in 2021, at least 44 of them drowned. the uk is now expected to give £120 million to the rwandan government under what is a trial scheme. boris johnson says rwanda is one of the safest countries in the world but last year, to the united nations, the uk demanded investigations into killings, disappearances and torture in the country. sending migrants abroad, though, is not new. australia and other countries have already tried that policy. in that
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speech earlier the prime minister said the plans were designed to combat the people smuggling gangs who turn the english channel into a watery grave yard. anyone entering the uk illegally, as well as those who have arrived illegally since january one may now be relocated to rwanda. this innovative approach driven by our shared humanitarian impulse and made possible will provide safe and legal roots for asylum by disrupting the business model. it means that economic migrants taking advantage of the asylum system will not get to stay in the uk while those in genuine need will be properly protected including with access to
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legal services. given the opportunity to build a new life in that dynamic country supported by the funding provided. the deal we have done is uncapped and rwanda will have the capacity to resettle tens of thousands of people in the years ahead and lets be clear. rwanda is one of the safest countries in the world. globally recognised for its record in welcoming and integrating migrants. as you saw, that press conference being given by the home secretary there in rwanda. mark easton, our home editor gave this update from rwanda earlier. we have just been on a visit to an accommodation block which the
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rwandan government is renting and will be used to house those asylum seekers who british government hoped to fly, as you say, 4000 miles south to fly, as you say, 4000 miles south to have their asylum claims had in rwanda. the intention is not for these people to come back again even if they are found to be genuine refugees. they will then, in the prime ministers words, rebuilt their lives in rwanda. hugely controversial and real practical problems. the accommodation block we saw had accommodation for 100 asylum seekers and there are 29,000 asylum seekers and there are 29,000 asylum seekers coming across the channel so a tiny proportion of that. if possible the centre can process quite a few in the course of the year so maybe we could push it up to
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400 or 500 going through that accommodation centre in a year but £120 million is the deal. we don't know the length of time that the deal covers but nevertheless it is perhaps an inkling of the cost of what the government wants to do. the aim is to break the model of the people traffickers. they say they want to make it so that the people coming across the channel coming to britain in the ways they regard as illegal, those people will not know whether they are able to stay in britain until and could find themselves bundled into a plane and sent thousands of miles south to a country almost inevitably, they will never have been to before. they will never have been to before. our correspondent simonjones is in doverfor us this morning. simon, the government says this deal is needed to tackle the growing number of people making the dangerous journey across the channel?
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absolutely. and i think the message from the government is they need to take some drastic action. when we heard borisjohnson speak this morning it was very much framed in humanitarian terms. he said, think back to november last year when 27 people lost their lives in one day in the channel when their vote capsized. he said he fears if these journeys continue there will be many more deaths this year and deaths we never hear about because peoples bodies will never be found. it also, make no mistake, as well as the humanitarian message this is a message of deterrence aim to people, if you come across the channel, if you choose to pay people smugglers to reach the uk when you come from a safe country, from france, that will count against you and ultimately you may be sent 4000 miles from here in kent to rwanda. just to update you, there's been a very busy morning on
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there's been a very busy morning on the channel. we have been standing up the channel. we have been standing up even the white cliffs and we have seen several bolts of migrants being brought to shore and it seems as business as usual potentially with a couple hundred people arriving yesterday. 5000 people so far this year. some things have changed because we had from borisjohnson that now the military from today has taken that now the military from today has ta ken overall that now the military from today has taken overall command of the channel and that means they are going to coordinate the response to these crossings are growing in numbers. fits crossings are growing in numbers. as you said, 600 that crossing yesterday alone. for now, thank you very much. for now, thank you very much. earlier, we heard from alp mehmet, the chairman of migration watch uk — an organisation that argues for lower migration into the united kingdom. he expressed concerns that the plans may not be approved by parliament. i think it goes slightly further than a lot of people were expecting but, ultimately, however far it goes, we're still not sure it's
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going to be introduced because the bill that's going to give it all the legal framework to work in is not yet passed. and the prime minister was also careful to repeat a couple of times that this is only part of the solution. i think he made the case for why it was necessary and i think he also, i think quite rightly, showed that we have a very generous, welcoming, all embracing system already in place for welcoming genuine refugees. it's whether this proposal to send some of those crossing in boats to rwanda, whether it will have the effect of dissuading people from setting off across the channel. that...
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time will tell, i suppose. lots of criticism this morning. but zoe gardner from thejoint council for the welfare of immigrants condemned the plans. this policy is despicable. it's an absolute disgrace. the people of this country have shown time and again that we are warm and we are welcoming and we want to help refugees fleeing persecution. we have shown that with ukraine. we also saw an incredibly generous and open—hearted response to the crisis in afghanistan. the government is completely out of step with the public here. we simply cannot support sending vulnerable refugees who may be victims of torture, who may have survived atrocities and war, and packing them of halfway around the world to a poor country. it is despicable. the labour leader keir starmer has had this to say about the plans.
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i think we need to see these plans for what they are. it is a desperate announcement by prime minister who just wants to distract from his own lawbreaking. you know, they are unworkable. they are extortionate. they're going to cost taxpayers billions of pounds and theyjust reflect a prime minister who has got no grip, no answers to the questions that need answering and no shame and ijust think britain deserves better than this. ijust think britain deserves better than this. some asylum seekers across the channel will be sent to rwanda to be processed and resettled there. critics say their proposals are cruel and inhumane. a record number of people are waiting for routine hospital treatment in england. new figures show 6.2 million people were on waiting lists at the end of february, the highest number since records began in 2007. a key russian warship has been "seriously damaged" in the black sea. russia says a fire on board
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the flagship, moskva, caused ammunition to explode — but ukraine claims it was hit by missiles. figures released this morning show the number of people in england waiting for routine hospital procedures has risen to a new record. 6.2 million people hadn't started their treatment at the end of february, up from 6.1 million injanuary. it's the highest number since records began in 2007. more than 22 thousand people waited more than 12 hours to be admitted to accident and emergency —— which is also a record. our health correspondentjim reed gave us this update. the context behind all this is really soaring demand as we start to live normally again after this pandemic. so, if you look, the highest number
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of 999 calls on record last month, the highest number of people going to a&e. urgent cancer referrals. this is from gps to hospitals — up 26% on last year. and as you said, record waiting lists for routine treatments — there we're talking about cataract operations through to hip replacements, that kind of thing. i wanted to focus on ambulance waiting times, because you mentioned those in the introduction and they're really interesting. again, you're seeing this kind of pressure coming through on ambulances. there's three different types of category of ambulance waiting times. category one is a life—threatening problem. and there you're seeing ambulances hitting the target at the moment. they should see people within 15 minutes, they're seeing them within 12. but the less kind of life—threatening problems is when you're seeing issues. category two — stuff like, for example, a stroke, an epileptic seizure, something like that. the target there is to get the ambulance to you within 40 minutes. in february, it was 42 minutes. in march, it's now over an hour.
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category three — so things like late—stage labour, non—severe burns, so still very serious. the target there is two hours. in february, it was two hours 16 minutes. in march, it was three and a half hours. so you're really seeing this pressure at the emergency end of the health service, especially here with ambulance waiting times. especially here with reports from russian state media say the most important ship in russia's black sea fleet, the moskva missile cruiser has been badly damaged after ammunition on board blew up causing a fire. the moskva is the flagship of the fleet. quoting the russian defence ministry, interfax said the crew had all been evacuated and the cause of the fire was being investigated. earlier, a ukrainian official said the ship had been hit by two missiles, but this has not been confirmed. 0ur moscow correspondent — jenny hill — has been giving us the latest — from russia. whether you have to bear in mind
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that, of course, here in russia, the narrative are strictly controlled by vladimir putin so russians are not seeing or hearing very much of what you see here at home or indeed the kind of information ukrainians are getting access to. as far as russia is concerned, and bear in mind most russians are getting their information from russian state television or newspapers, it is all going according to plan and, actually, the real plan all along was simply to defend the interests of russian—speaking populations in the donbas region and to protect russia against the so—called aggressions of ukraine aided by the west. we get daily updates here from the ministry of defence, sometimes several times a day, actually, and they're always very upbeat and they talk about the developments and progress russian are making in ukraine and in terms of the latest on this flagship cruiser — the ministry of defence have actually issued another statement saying it is still afloat. the main missiles were not affected by the fire and subsequent explosion of ammunition on board.
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all the crew have been taken off the ship, and they are going to tow it back to port where they are going to establish the cause. little information here. certainly, no acknowledgement about whether or not this was caused by a ukrainian missile strike. even at some point if it is independently verified that it was it is interesting to see how that is handled by state television which this morning is not talking about what has happened to this flagship cruiser. i had a look tt the headlines earlierjust out of interest as if they were talking about it and both the stations i looked at, nothing at all. they were talking about how russian soldiers are handing out humanitarian aid to civilians and how ukrainian forces have been attacking civilians. that is the picture that russian viewers and indeed readers are given of this war. joining me now is shashankjoshi, the defence editor at the economist. good to see you. two claims, there.
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the ukrainian say they fired missiles and the russians are actually it was ammunition on board that blew up. i'll any closer to finding out what happened? the russians did not delay in this may have struck the ship. it is possible missile struck the ship and ammunition exploded. in magazines and ships explode, the results tend to be absolutely devastating for the ships concern. you know, this is huge amounts of explosives that can completely destroy the ship. they can certainly render it combat ineffective for a long period so i think on balance i am more inclined to believe that the ukrainians did strike the ship and of course it is worth remembering here they have struck other ships. they struck a landing ship a few weeks ago. in total, if you include this they have stuck around for russian warships in total with ballistic missiles or in this case supposedly cruise
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missiles. it is completely credible and i am personally inclined to believe it. and i am personally inclined to believe it— and i am personally inclined to believe it. . ,, ., ., believe it. talk to me about the significance _ believe it. talk to me about the significance of _ believe it. talk to me about the significance of it _ believe it. talk to me about the significance of it given - believe it. talk to me about the significance of it given that i believe it. talk to me about the significance of it given that we i believe it. talk to me about the i significance of it given that we are told it is the flagship of the black sea fleet under president putin it is not a headline that he will want to read. ., . . , is not a headline that he will want to read. ., ., ., , ., to read. not at all. it is a huge symbolic— to read. not at all. it is a huge symbolic success _ to read. not at all. it is a huge symbolic success because i to read. not at all. it is a huge symbolic success because as l to read. not at all. it is a huge i symbolic success because as you to read. not at all. it is a huge - symbolic success because as you may remember, it was one of the warships that surrendered or asked ukrainian forces to surrender on snake island which prompted a famous reply that i cannot repeat now because it includes profanity, but was a iconic phrase that summarised ukrainian resistance but beyond the symbolism of that, it was a very important ship. it was not only offensively significant, it had what we call calibre cruise missiles that could strike quite far inland into ukraine across cities and southern targets but it was also a defensive ship of is. it provided anti—aircraft anti—missile bubble for other ships
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abounded and indeed possibly some distance into ukraine's coastline for russian ground forces so with the loss of that ship, not only can they not replace it very easily because turkey is closed into the black sea but also it means other russian ships in the fleet are probably now more at risk of aerial attack. .,, ' i: . probably now more at risk of aerial attack. .,, ' :: . ., , attack. those 510 crew have been evacuated- _ attack. those 510 crew have been evacuated- l— attack. those 510 crew have been evacuated. i wonder— attack. those 510 crew have been evacuated. i wonder if— attack. those 510 crew have been evacuated. i wonder if we - attack. those 510 crew have been i evacuated. i wonder if we surmount a little bit what this tells us about the way this war is progressing. we know that russian troops are pulling out of some areas around kath to focus their efforts in the east end in the south. and there, one would assume, that is where president putin is hoping to make some gains ahead of that crucial may nine victory day that they will celebrate.— victory day that they will celebrate. . . victory day that they will celebrate. . , ., �* celebrate. that is right we don't know if that _ celebrate. that is right we don't know if that is _ celebrate. that is right we don't know if that is a _ celebrate. that is right we don't know if that is a hard _ celebrate. that is right we don't know if that is a hard deadline l know if that is a hard deadline without is powerfully possible he wants to have something to show for his efforts by then. and of course, the course, the problem the russians are still facing is that, although they can move some of their forces
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from northern ukraine to donbas, first of all, the ukrainians can move their defenders more quickly than the russians can because they are operating on what we call interior lines of communication. they can move them to the east more quickly and more easily but, also, those russian forces in the north absolutely spend. they are exhausted. 0f absolutely spend. they are exhausted. of 125 absolutely spend. they are exhausted. 0f125 italian tactical groups, perhaps 37, 38 exhausted. 0f125 italian tactical groups, perhaps 37,38 are said to be combat ineffective which means they are exhausted, depleted, their men are winded, it is going to take weeks for russia to get back up to strength and in the meantime, i think ukraine are scoring quite a few successes both in terms of attacks at sea and attacks and via areas including on russian soil on land. �* areas including on russian soil on land. ,.. ,,, ., ., land. and those successes that our correspondent _ land. and those successes that our correspondent was _ land. and those successes that our correspondent was telling - land. and those successes that our correspondent was telling us i land. and those successes that our correspondent was telling us will i correspondent was telling us will not be reported quite clearly at home so one wonders whether, you know, any of this will get through to moscow or indeed to the kremlin. there are losses occurring on the
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ground and actually present putin will not necessarily hear about them. t will not necessarily hear about them. .. . will not necessarily hear about them. ,, ., , . them. i think that is correct. one ofthe them. i think that is correct. one of the reasons _ them. i think that is correct. one of the reasons we _ them. i think that is correct. one of the reasons we saw _ them. i think that is correct. one of the reasons we saw the - them. i think that is correct. one of the reasons we saw the head i them. i think that is correct. one | of the reasons we saw the head of gchq, britain's signals intelligence agency make the point publicly a couple of weeks ago that he did not think putin is getting good information was that there is announcements, there is messages not just to us in the russian public, they are also messages to the kremlin to say, your people are not giving you the full picture of the battlefield. and i think it is with the interesting, isn't it? that the norwegian prime minister, i think it was, on a phone call to put in two weeks ago, specifically gave him a western nato assessments of russian casualties because it is entirely possible he is not getting them any other way. possible he is not getting them any other wa . . ., , , other way. thanks for being with us. it is really interesting _ other way. thanks for being with us. it is really interesting to _ other way. thanks for being with us. it is really interesting to are - it is really interesting to are grateful for your time. it is really interesting to are gratefulfor your time. thank you. grateful for your time. thank you. time gratefulfor your time. thank you. time for a look at the weather. when i got in it was glorious this morning but i'm looking outside in the clouds have arrived. it is going
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to be that sort of weekend and there will be some sunshine occasionally. cloudier moments and a lot of dry weather around although across western parts of the uk this is where you're going to see some rain. already today in northern ireland and parts of western scotland we have seen some occasional rain. a lot of that is petering out this afternoon and in a few places we will be brightening up and for wales and england there is a slight chance of a shower and cloud at sunny spells coming through and especially where you get that sunshine, does feel quite warm and towards south—east england up to 20 celsius. the misty, low cloud for wales and south west england. moore played for northern ireland in south—west scotland. some drizzle. clear spells elsewhere. there will not be enforced anyway as we go through the west of the weekend. for good friday, the cloudy skies are not completely cloudy. wales, south—west england, northern ireland and south—west scotland. elsewhere other there is the chance of a shower,
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there is the chance of a shower, there will be warm sunny spells and it is looking women hello, this is bbc news. i'm ben thompson. the headlines... some asylum seekers who arrive in the uk will be sent to rwanda to be processed and then resettled there under new government plans. but critics say the proposals are cruel and inhumane. this innovative approach, driven by our shared humanitarian impulse and made possible by brexit freedoms, will provide safe and legal routes for asylum while disrupting the business model of the gangs. we simply cannot support sending vulnerable refugees who may be victims of torture, who may have survived atrocities and war, and _ packing them off halfway around the world to a poor country. it's despicable. a record number of people are waiting for routine hospital treatment in england.
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new figures show 6.2 million people were on waiting lists at the end of february, the highest number since records began in 2007. a key russian warship has been "seriously damaged" in the black sea. russia says a fire on board the flagship, moskva, caused ammunition to explode — but ukraine claims it was hit by its missiles. and mountain rescue teams in scotland are testing whether drones could be used to help search for people who get stuck and stranded on some of britain's highest peaks. more now on the government's shake—up of its policy on immigration. some people who arrive illegally in the uk are to be sent to rwanda, where their claims will be processed and where they may be resettled. the rwandan government is to be paid £120 million to accept migrants on our behalf. meanwhile, the royal navy is to take command of the response to small
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boats in the channel — with the home secretary saying the aim is to put "evil people smugglers out of business". here, asylum seekers who are settled in the uk will be spread more evenly across local authorities. as you'd expect, lots of reaction to this. joining me now is chief whip of the liberal democrats, wendy chamberlain. welcome to bbc news. but you make of what you've heard from the prime minister? ~ .. what you've heard from the prime minister? ~ ~' ., what you've heard from the prime minister? ~ ,, ., . ., minister? well, i think i would echo the thoughts _ minister? well, i think i would echo the thoughts of _ minister? well, i think i would echo the thoughts of refugee _ the thoughts of refugee organisations who are calling these plans cruel and inhumane. the premise said this morning that this was about ensuring that people took legal roots to come to this country, but the reality is that there are no legal roots so people are forced into the hands of traffickers in order to come to the uk and claim asylum. order to come to the uk and claim as lum. , ., , ., asylum. something needs to be done, thou~h, asylum. something needs to be done, though. does — asylum. something needs to be done, though. does it _ asylum. something needs to be done, though, does it not? _ asylum. something needs to be done, though, does it not? 600 _ asylum. something needs to be done, though, does it not? 600 people i though, does it not? 600 people yesterday alone making that trip? 600 people came yesterday, but reported on the bbc news app is that
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the plants at the government have only provides accommodation for 100. so this is an expensive scheme that won't actually solve the problem, which is that the asylum scheme as we currently operated under this government is broken. this is a number of... priti patel has made a number of... priti patel has made a number of... priti patel has made a number of announcements in relation to asylum and immigration. this feels likejust to asylum and immigration. this feels like just another one. more despicable in its outcome, but not actually changing the facts, which is that the vast majority of people who come under these illegal routes do so because there are not legal roots for them to do so. they claim asylum, and over 70% of their applications are accepted. these are not economic migrants, they are people fleeing persecution and torture in conflict regions. tn people fleeing persecution and torture in conflict regions. in his statement. _ torture in conflict regions. in his statement, the _ torture in conflict regions. in his statement, the prime _ torture in conflict regions. in his statement, the prime minister i torture in conflict regions. in his statement, the prime minister would disagree with that. he said this trial would mostly involve single men who are arriving in britain via these crossings. he says these people are not fleeing peril, that
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is the purpose of the asylum system, to help people in peril. he says it is a barbaric trade in human suffering in the english channel and they are cute jumpers and people abusing the system. this would help processor them, would it not? the reali is processor them, would it not? the reality is that _ processor them, would it not? tts: reality is that the prime minister's own home office statistics suggest otherwise. pretty much everybody who travels these routes does so and claims asylum, and over 70% of those claims asylum, and over 70% of those claims are accepted. i absolutely accept that we need to stop these happening, but you do that by providing safe and legal roots, not by sending people thousands of miles away to a country that already has a poor human rights record that the uk has previously questioned. folilther has previously questioned. other countries, including _ has previously questioned. other countries, including denmark- has previously questioned. other countries, including denmark and australia, have a similar system, albeit with some differences. if it works for them, why would it not works for them, why would it not work for us?— work for us? well, the reality is that it doesn't _
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work for us? well, the reality is that it doesn't work. _ work for us? well, the reality is that it doesn't work. the - work for us? well, the reality is i that it doesn't work. the government are paying 120 million for this initial agreement with rwanda, but that doesn't include all the other costs involved in processing these applications. they estimate that to be at about 1.4 billion, and that is based on australia's figures. and australia's programme has not worked at all. it has been a disaster and has been rightly criticised. tt is has been rightly criticised. it is iood to has been rightly criticised. it is good to have _ has been rightly criticised. it is good to have your— has been rightly criticised. it is good to have your thoughts, thank you for being with us this afternoon. there are just three weeks to go until voters across the uk go to the polls. voters in england, wales and scotland will pick who they want to run services that affect everyday life in their local area. those in northern ireland will choose its government. ahead of the vote, we'll be profiling some of the key contests in the uk's four nations. today, martine croxalljoins us from the seaside town of rhyl on the north wales coast. you were doing a bit of shopping
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earlier. t you were doing a bit of shopping earlier. . ., , earlier. i have, i have my fridge mainet. earlier. i have, i have my fridge magnet- and — earlier. i have, i have my fridge magnet- and i— earlier. i have, i have my fridge magnet. and i got _ earlier. i have, i have my fridge magnet. and i got you - earlier. i have, i have my fridge magnet. and i got you your i earlier. i have, i have my fridge. magnet. and i got you your rock, earlier. i have, i have my fridge i magnet. and i got you your rock, as promised. _ magnet. and i got you your rock, as promised, from the high street. i can hear— promised, from the high street. i can hear you now. we've moved along the promenade to abbey street, to come _ the promenade to abbey street, to come to— the promenade to abbey street, to come to a — the promenade to abbey street, to come to a community training bakery called _ come to a community training bakery called use _ come to a community training bakery called use your loaf. you know you're — called use your loaf. you know you're in— called use your loaf. you know you're in the right place, because halfway— you're in the right place, because halfway down the street you can smell— halfway down the street you can smell the — halfway down the street you can smell the bread. just look at some of the _ smell the bread. just look at some of the bread that has already been made _ of the bread that has already been made today. i have my eye on a catcher~ — made today. i have my eye on a catcher. but i think it has already been _ catcher. but i think it has already been sold — catcher. but i think it has already been sold. we'll find out how important this local immunity is in a moment. — important this local immunity is in a moment, and what more councillors who might _ a moment, and what more councillors who might be elected on may five good _ who might be elected on may five good help a permanent in places like rhyl. _ good help a permanent in places like rhyl. the _ good help a permanent in places like rhyl. the last time around, labour lost seats. — rhyl. the last time around, labour lost seats. then in the general election. — lost seats. then in the general election, the conservatives made more _ election, the conservatives made more inroads into those labour
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heartlands. thomas morgan reports now. �* ,., heartlands. thomas morgan reports now. . ,., , , now. after some turbulent times, tourists are _ now. after some turbulent times, tourists are now— now. after some turbulent times, tourists are now rushing - now. after some turbulent times, tourists are now rushing back. i now. after some turbulent times, | tourists are now rushing back. the natural beauty are a big draw for holiday—makers. it's the main reason that bearded men adventures began trading out of nearby llangollen four years ago. but with visitors come certain issues for locals. mind your heads! so, i would never say problems, but i suppose trying to find places to live is quite difficult, that's renting or buying a house. the co—owner hugh has lived in denbighshire for years, but recently had to move out of the area due to a lack of affordable housing. that's mainly because it's a small area, as well as the tourists taking up some of the aianbs
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and stuff like that. so quite hard to rent and then not a lot of houses are for sale, really, especially houses that you can buy first time. for only the second time ever, the conservatives became the largest party in this council in 2017. one that was part of the north—east red wall, seats flooding blue from labour. having lost over 100 councillors last time around, labour will be hoping to make up for lost ground across wales, especially in those historical heartlands. for the tories, fielding more candidates than ever before and gaining significantly five years ago, the fight will be holding onto and increasing the gains in areas like north—east wales. plaid will be looking to maintain control of their only majority in gwynedd, and building on those modest gains in 2017, with the lib dems looking to make up lost ground. and independents are also a big factor here. they make up the second largest group and they're in a leadership coalition in several councils across wales. just a few miles down the dee
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in neighbouring wrexham council, is the pontcysyllte aqueduct, another draw for sightseers. this is also historically a former labour stronghold, but again an area the tories are now in a coalition. bridging the gap between local and national issues can be a tricky course to navigate for both candidates and voters alike in these elections. with turnout often notoriously low in much of wales. sally roberts' tea room is a stone's throw away from the unesco site. for her, it's the way covid was dealt with which will play a part in her voting strategy. we struggled last year obviously through the pandemic, we struggled and then again once we were open, there were so many different rules and regulations between ourselves and england, it was really hard with the hospitality. you could do one thing four miles away and it was a different thing here, so i think people just went over the border and had a party. so, after decades of dominance, the changing political waves have forced the red wall to crack under
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the pressure of the tories here. yet there are signs, ripples of positivity for welsh labour. they'll be hoping that after such a strong showing in cardiff bay last year, and those negative headlines for borisjohnson, will reverse the flow of votes back in labour's direction. tomos morgan, bbc news, in north—east wales. as in the rest of the country, a lot of people — as in the rest of the country, a lot of people here worried about the of living. _ of people here worried about the of living. this— of people here worried about the of living. this community training bakery— living. this community training bakery comes into play. it's project manager— bakery comes into play. it's project manager is— bakery comes into play. it's project manager is alex bowen who is here with us— manager is alex bowen who is here with us now. — manager is alex bowen who is here with us now. this bakery is part of an initiative — with us now. this bakery is part of an initiative by a local charity. i set up? — an initiative by a local charity. i set up? lt— an initiative by a local charity. i set u . ? . . an initiative by a local charity. i set u-? . an initiative by a local charity. i set u n ? ., , , , an initiative by a local charity. i set u-? . , , , ., an initiative by a local charity. i setu-? , , .,. ,, set up? it was set up to address the need in our — set up? it was set up to address the need in our local—
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set up? it was set up to address the need in our local area _ set up? it was set up to address the need in our local area to _ set up? it was set up to address the need in our local area to get - set up? it was set up to address the need in our local area to get people | need in our local area to get people work experience, qualifications and hands on skills to take home to theirfamilies as well. hands on skills to take home to their families as well. find hands on skills to take home to their families as well.— hands on skills to take home to their families as well. and how well is it going? — their families as well. and how well is it going? you _ their families as well. and how well is it going? you only _ their families as well. and how well is it going? you only started - their families as well. and how well is it going? you only started on i their families as well. and how well is it going? you only started on the | is it going? you only started on the 7th of— is it going? you only started on the 7th of march, didn't you? it feels like you — 7th of march, didn't you? it feels like you have been here for a while. covid _ like you have been here for a while. covid didn't— like you have been here for a while. covid didn't help, and then on the 7th of march we had an open day. it has been fully booked since. it has been a fantastic response from the local community, from organisations in the area. we have had a lot of people coming to the doors and wanting to come and bake and join events and the courses. letiol’hozit wanting to come and bake and 'oin events and the courses.i events and the courses. what has one events and the courses. what has gone round. _ events and the courses. what has gone round, hasn't _ events and the courses. what has gone round, hasn't it? _ events and the courses. what has gone round, hasn't it? let's- events and the courses. what has| gone round, hasn't it? let's speak to some _ gone round, hasn't it? let's speak to some of— gone round, hasn't it? let's speak to some of the other people who are here _ to some of the other people who are here steve — to some of the other people who are here. steve is the baker, chef, what have _ here. steve is the baker, chef, what have been— here. steve is the baker, chef, what have been been making today? tocietg.r have been been making today? today we have been — have been been making today? today we have been producing _ have been been making today? today we have been producing a _ have been been making today? to— we have been producing a mixture of white and brown. we have produced brown loaves, white carbs, white many roles and french baguettes, and
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our favourite, focaccia. a lot of people haven't baked or even made anything at home. and we can see the progression through the course, through the several weeks on confidence, their confidence in what they are producing, confident in themselves and the way that they grow personally. themselves and the way that they grow personally-— themselves and the way that they grow personally. phil, you have done the course already. _ grow personally. phil, you have done the course already. what _ grow personally. phil, you have done the course already. what difference i the course already. what difference has it _ the course already. what difference has it made to you, having done this pro-lee _ has it made to you, having done this pro—lee mack for a proper course? it pro—lee mack for a proper course? [t is pro—lee mack for a proper course? is made a pro—lee mack for a proper course? tt is made a difference to my confidence in baking. i now do french bread, and the wholemeal focaccia is the nicest life i have made here. t
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focaccia is the nicest life i have made here-— focaccia is the nicest life i have made here. i wish we could tell everyone _ made here. i wish we could tell everyone how _ made here. i wish we could tell everyone how it _ made here. i wish we could tell everyone how it smells. - made here. i wish we could tell everyone how it smells. it i made here. i wish we could tell everyone how it smells. it is i made here. i wish we could tell| everyone how it smells. it is the bestseller. _ everyone how it smells. it is the bestseller, focaccia. _ everyone how it smells. it is the bestseller, focaccia. you - everyone how it smells. it is the bestseller, focaccia. you have i everyone how it smells. it is the i bestseller, focaccia. you have now been so successful— bestseller, focaccia. you have now been so successful at _ bestseller, focaccia. you have now been so successful at this - bestseller, focaccia. you have now been so successful at this that i bestseller, focaccia. you have now| been so successful at this that they are not— been so successful at this that they are not letting you go. you are now part of— are not letting you go. you are now part of the — are not letting you go. you are now part of the team? | are not letting you go. you are now part of the team?— part of the team? i have 'ust been told that in h part of the team? i have 'ust been told that i'm being i part of the team? i have just been told that i'm being dragged - part of the team? i have just been told that i'm being dragged into i told that i'm being dragged into coverfor told that i'm being dragged into cover for steve when he is on holiday. cover for steve when he is on holida . . �* . cover for steve when he is on holida . . �* , ., cover for steve when he is on holida. . �*, ., , holiday. that's what happens when ou show holiday. that's what happens when you show a — holiday. that's what happens when you show a talent _ holiday. that's what happens when you show a talent for _ holiday. that's what happens when you show a talent for something. i you show a talent for something. tracy— you show a talent for something. tracy is— you show a talent for something. tracy is also on the course. you are doing _ tracy is also on the course. you are doing it _ tracy is also on the course. you are doing it once — tracy is also on the course. you are doing it once a _ tracy is also on the course. you are doing it once a week. tell us what you have — doing it once a week. tell us what you have been making? i came in when you have been making? i came in when you are— you have been making? i came in when you are putting the finishing touches— you are putting the finishing touches to it.— you are putting the finishing touches to it. ., ., , touches to it. today i have been makini touches to it. today i have been making l?oath _ touches to it. today i have been making bath bonds _ touches to it. today i have been making bath bonds stop - touches to it. today i have been making bath bonds stop a i touches to it. today i have been making bath bonds stop a soft | touches to it. today i have been - making bath bonds stop a soft finger bun with icing on the top. we put a bit of lemonjuice in bun with icing on the top. we put a bit of lemon juice in the icing. they look fantastic. will you be taking — they look fantastic. will you be taking some home with you? yes. what difference taking some home with you? what difference has it taking some home with you? 133 what difference has it made to you? when you first _ difference has it made to you? when you first arrived, you obviously wanted — you first arrived, you obviously wanted to _ you first arrived, you obviously wanted to do the course, but what difference — wanted to do the course, but what difference has it made? it is wanted to do the course, but what difference has it made?— wanted to do the course, but what difference has it made? it is made a hue difference has it made? it is made a huge difference. _ difference has it made? it is made a huge difference. i— difference has it made? it is made a huge difference. i struggled -
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difference has it made? it is made a huge difference. i struggled over . huge difference. i struggled over the pandemic with my anxiety, and then i started volunteering and it was through there that i learned about the course. helping there has helped me to come here, and i can't tell you how much the two places have just enormously... and also, i discovered a love of baking over the pandemic but i made bread in a bread machine. but i wanted to learn how to do it by hand. how to do it properly. to do it by hand. how to do it preperly-_ to do it by hand. how to do it ”roerl _ , ., , . ~' properly. very therapeutic. i think a lot of peeple — properly. very therapeutic. i think a lot of people will _ properly. very therapeutic. i think a lot of people will recognise - properly. very therapeutic. i thinkj a lot of people will recognise what your talking about, about the lockdown and how difficult it was for people's mental health. why do you think— for people's mental health. why do you think this has made a difference?— you think this has made a difference? �* ., ,., ., difference? i'm doing something and i can see the — difference? i'm doing something and i can see the results. _ difference? i'm doing something and i can see the results. it _ difference? i'm doing something and i can see the results. it also, - difference? i'm doing something and i can see the results. it also, i- difference? i'm doing something and i can see the results. it also, i am i i can see the results. it also, i am doing something, i am giving back to the community. that is one of the reasons i started at the centre. they helped me. i wanted to help back, and coming back, what we bake here we sell. i can see it, i'm
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doing it, i'm selling it, i'm seeing that it doing it, i'm selling it, i'm seeing thatitis doing it, i'm selling it, i'm seeing that it is helping the community. they come in, they buy, they are signing up. it is helping lots of people. it signing up. it is helping lots of neale, . ., , , people. it certainly is. the food that is left _ people. it certainly is. the food that is left over _ people. it certainly is. the food that is left over at _ people. it certainly is. the food that is left over at the - people. it certainly is. the food that is left over at the end - people. it certainly is. the food that is left over at the end of i people. it certainly is. the food | that is left over at the end of the day, _ that is left over at the end of the day, if— that is left over at the end of the day, if it— that is left over at the end of the day, if it hasn't been sold, you can pay it— day, if it hasn't been sold, you can pay it forward. it can be sent to the local— pay it forward. it can be sent to the local food bank. we are talking about _ the local food bank. we are talking about the _ the local food bank. we are talking about the local elections. what would — about the local elections. what would you say to people who are standing — would you say to people who are standing for election on may five in terms _ standing for election on may five in terms of— standing for election on may five in terms of what they could do to come out and _ terms of what they could do to come out and support other initiatives like this? — out and support other initiatives like this? , , , , ., out and support other initiatives likethis? , , , , ., like this? just be present to really and talk to us _ like this? just be present to really and talk to us and _ like this? just be present to really and talk to us and speak - like this? just be present to really and talk to us and speak to - like this? just be present to really. and talk to us and speak to people, speak to the community. there is a great community spirit here in rhyl and we need people who can come down and we need people who can come down and get theirfinger on and we need people who can come down and get their finger on the pulse and get their finger on the pulse and see exactly what we need and how best to do that.— best to do that. amenities for the eo - le best to do that. amenities for the peeple who _ best to do that. amenities for the peeple who live — best to do that. amenities for the people who live here _ best to do that. amenities for the people who live here all - best to do that. amenities for the people who live here all year - best to do that. amenities for the i people who live here all year round, not just _ people who live here all year round, not just those who are visiting. great _ not just those who are visiting. great to— not just those who are visiting. great to talk to you. thank you very much _ great to talk to you. thank you very
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much indeed. it has got to be lunchtime, surely. if you would like more _ lunchtime, surely. if you would like more information about the elections, you can go to the local councit— elections, you can go to the local council website. the council website denbighshire.gov.uk. we will be speaking to a new initiative. _ we will be speaking to a new initiative, a co—working hub that allows— initiative, a co—working hub that allows people to work among other local people rather than being stuck working _ local people rather than being stuck working at _ local people rather than being stuck working at home all the time. and there _ working at home all the time. and there is— working at home all the time. and there is a — working at home all the time. and there is a young man we will be talking — there is a young man we will be talking to — there is a young man we will be talking to who set up a video making company, _ talking to who set up a video making company, and he uses the hop. i hope you will— company, and he uses the hop. i hope you will he _ company, and he uses the hop. i hope you will be able to join company, and he uses the hop. i hope you will be able tojoin us company, and he uses the hop. i hope you will be able to join us later. go and — you will be able to join us later. go and get _ you will be able to join us later. go and get some lunch. get your focaccia. martin billy back this afternoon. we are going to be live across the uk, special coverage of the election campaigns. for full details of the elections in your area — go to the bbc news website. in the politics section —
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you can enter your postcode and get all the details. that's all at bbc.co.uk/news. just approaching 12:1i7am. the headlines on bbc news... some asylum seekers who cross the channel to the uk will be sent to rwanda to be processed and resettled there, under new government plans. but critics say the proposals are cruel and inhumane. a record number of people are waiting for routine hospital treatment in england. new figures show 6.2 million people were on waiting lists at the end of february, the highest number since records began in 2007. a key russian warship has been "seriously damaged" in the black sea. russia says a fire on board the flagship, moskva, caused ammunition to explode — but ukraine claims it was hit by its missiles. in the united states, videos have emerged of a police officer fatally shooting a black man in the back of the head as he lay
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face—down on the ground. footage shows patrick lyoya running from a white officer. the two men were then involved in a struggle over a taser. you may find some of the images in tim allman's report disturbing. grand rapids, michigan earlier this month. police stop a car being driven by 26—year—old patrick lyoya. the two men get out of their vehicles in what appears to be a fairly routine interaction, but that's when things start to go wrong. i'm stopping you. do you have a license? do you have a driver's license? do you speak english? yes. can i see your license? what does he want? the plate doesn't belong in this car? do you have a license or no? the officer repeatedly asks to see patrick lyoya's driving license, which he says is inside the car. but then he closes the door and appears to try and walk away. no, no, no.
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stop, stop, put your hand where i can see them... the policeman tries to stop him. there's a struggle, and mr lyoya runs off. he's caught and they both fall to the ground. they get back up again. the officer has pulled out his taser, which they then fight over. let go of the taser! at this point, according to police, the officer accidentally turned off his body camera. stop! by now, the passenger in patrick lyoya's car was filming the incident on his phone. then the police officer appears to shoot mr lyoya in the back of the head. when i saw the video, it was painful to watch, and i immediately asked what caused this to happen? and what more could have been done to prevent this from occurring? what do we want? justice. when do we want it?
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now! following the release of this footage, hundreds of people gathered peacefully outside the headquarters of the local police department. not for the first time in america, there are demonstrations following the death of a black man killed by a white policeman. the officer in question has not been named and is on paid leave while state police investigate whether to bring charges. patrick lyoya was a son, a brother and a father. grand rapids police chief said he viewed his death as a tragedy. tim allman, bbc news. attempts are continuing in the south african province of kwazulu—natal to find scores of people missing after the worst flooding in decades. more than 300 people died after torrential rain saw buildings, roads and bridges washed away. our correspondent shingai nyoka is in durban, and has been giving us the latest.
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well, as you can see, the sun is out and the flood waters are receding, but the relief efforts are still ongoing, there are still many people that are missing. we have heard of stories from people on the ground. they say they are frustrated by the pace at which the relief agencies are getting to the communities that are in need and by admission the officials say they are stretched beyond their capacity. there are many communities that are still cut off, children that have not been able to go to school, people who have been displaced in community halls and so the government says it is still moving from community to community to assess their needs. mop—up operations have begun, they have started to restore power and water supplies in some of the affected areas, but this still is very much a state of disaster and the government has announced that recently, which allows more resources to be channelled towards this problem. scotland s mountain rescue
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teams have a new tool — they've begun using sophisticated drones, to search for climbers lost in often dangerous and isolated terrain across the highlands. the drones, weighing around a kilo, enable rescuers to search inaccessible gullies and remote areas more quickly and safely than before. our scotland correspondent, lorna gordon, has been given exclusive access to meet the teams using the new kit. tower ridge on the north face of ben nevis. snow, but not enough for this climber�*s ice axe and crampons to dig in. i'm quite scared. because i might fall off _ she couldn't go up. couldn't go down. so they called for help. and it'sjust a scary place to be. and became the first climbers in trouble to be located by a drone in the mountains of the uk. i had been on winter climbs before, i had done a lot of winter hill walking as well. but i didn't realise just how scary it would be and how
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exposed the route would be. and ijust felt so stupid for getting myself into this situation, because i thought that i knew what i was heading for. but i really, really didn't — ididn't know my limits until i got there. the technology used in their rescue has moved on since then. track forward, really good view of that crag now. while a drone pilot focuses on flying, an observer operates the drone cameras used for searching on a headset screen protected from the glare of the sun. the capabilities are awesome. just being able to pop a drone out of the bag, put it on the hill, we could clear an area that might take a few hours on foot. we can clean that sometimes within five or ten minutes and then we can move, so we don't have to commit people on the hill where they could be better used elsewhere. the team moved to a different part of glen nevis so they can demonstrate new technology they're testing and will soon use
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here for the first time. so, johnny, talk us through what we're doing here. so, we are going to hide a phone here to replicate someone missing on the hillside who would have a mobile phone with them. so i think this place here would be a good spot to hide our phone and we will see if this team can locate it. i'm getting a nice strong reading off in this direction here. exactly this direction up here. originally designed to find contraband phones in prisons, last year this was successfully used for a rescue in the alps. but never yet here. a phone doesn't necessarily need to have a signal, but as long as it's powered on, they'll find it. they have located the phone in this area so they are now using the drone to search this area for that phone. they can also speak to us as well because this drone has speaker on it, loudspeaker so they can send a message to usjust now. this is the mountain rescue team, we have located you, please stay where you are, help will be with you shortly. we're going to predominantly use this as part of our avalanche tools, so not everybody uses an avalanche
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transceiver, for instance, but everybody has a mobile phone. so this will help us locate those people who are buried. every avalanche incident is extremely time critical for the person who could have sustained very serious injuries during the avalanche or could be buried and losing air, basically. so we need to get there as fast as we can. avalanches can be risky for the rescue teams themselves. and drones can also help with keeping them safe. here deployed to look for unstable overhanging cornices while searching for a climber. the independent scottish mountain rescue teams carry out around 200 rescues every year. for all the technology, for the volunteers, this is still difficult and dangerous work and it can leave a mark. it's the call outs where i have been out, usually overnight and the wind speeds have been at over 100 miles an hour on the cairngorm plateau
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and it's blizzard conditions, those are difficult. but, you know, all the other searches we are involved in, or rescues where we do find people, or unfortunately fatalities when we can bring loved ones back to theirfamily, it's still a positive outcome. scotland's highest mountains can be deceptive and dangerous. they tell a story of risk and rescue, and amid this stunning natural landscape, technology is rapidly changing the game. lorna gordon, bbc news, ben nevis. bbc news at one is coming up here very shortly with the latest on the government's new immigration arrangement with a reminder that has been announced this morning. the home secretary saying it is the biggest overhaul of the uk immigration system in decades. ben brown will have all of that for you. now it's time for a look at the weather. many places have seen fog to clear away. overall, a lot of fine weather to come for the uk for much of this we can. but not everywhere. high pressure is close by, atlantic weather fronts trying to move in
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with rain, the high pressure going, no, you are not coming injust yet. it does mean that the closer they are to western parts of the uk, this is where you are more likely to see some cloud and occasional rain into this weekend. until we get to easter monday, with the air coming in from the south we are going to see temperatures above average, some sunshine and it will feel quite warm. weatherfronts sunshine and it will feel quite warm. weather fronts to the west have already brought rain to northern ireland and western scotland. then seems to peter out in many places, but some light, patchy rain pushing north through scotland. sunny spells through wales and england, the chance of catching an isolated shower. up to around 20—21 in south—east england. into tonight, low, misty cloud into wales, south—west england, may be some drizzle. cloud in northern ireland and south—west scotland. clear spells elsewhere. wales, south—west
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england, south—west scotland seeing the cloudy skies for good friday, maybe a few showers into northern ireland. the odd shower elsewhere is possible, but for many places it will be dry, broken cloud, sunny spells. into the start of the weekend, cloudy first thing on saturday, patchy rain. we will start to see some sunny spells coming through, a weather system approaching northern ireland and into the western isles stop later any day, an increasing chance of rain and a strengthening breeze. pleasant in the sunshine. high pressure battling these weather fronts again as we go to easter sunday. it does look like they are going to make more inroads into western areas. more likely on easter sunday that we will see some rain pushing into northern ireland and western scotland, perhaps wales and western scotland, perhaps wales and western england. but still something to play for in how much rain and how quickly, and indeed by easter monday at how quickly it will clear. easter
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monday looking mainly dry, cool.
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on a one—way flight to rwanda. mainly single men arriving in the uk on small boats will now be flown 4,000 miles away to africa. the home secretary is in rwanda to sign a multi—million pound agreement there — which the government says will help end the problem of people smugglers. this problem has bedevilled our country for too long and caused far too much human suffering and tragedy. it's a desperate announcement, unworkable, extortionate. and britain really does deserve better than this. and from today, the royal navy will take charge of patrolling the english channel for small boats carrying asylum seekers. we'll be live with
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correspondents on both sides of the channel — and in rwanda.

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