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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 28, 2022 10:00am-12:30pm BST

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this is bbc news 7 these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the un secretary general, antonio guterres, is visiting war—torn sites surrounding kyiv that had been occupied by russian troops — he says russia must cooperate with the international criminal court. the the international criminal court. war is absurdity in 21st—century. the war is absurdity in the 21st—century. war is evil. —— de boer is evil. —— the war is evil. russian forces must be "pushed out of the whole of ukraine" according to the foreign secretary — liz truss calls on the west to use its strength to deter vladimir putin.
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some argue that we shouldn't provide heavy weapons, for fear of provoking something worse, but my view is that inaction would be the greatest provocation. allegations of sexism in westminster — a labour mp alleges that inappropriate comments were made to her by a member of the shadow cabinet. it comes after two female conservative mps claimed they saw a male colleague watching pornography in the commons. the government is to publish its plans for the sale of channel 4 — it's expected to scrap many of the rules for commercial public service broadcasters. and ben stokes is expected to be confirmed as the new england test cricket captain later today. hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world.
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the head of the un, antonio guterres, has arrived on the outskirts of the ukrainian capital, kyiv, ahead of talks with president zelensky. he with president zelensky. is visiting sites that have experience he is visiting sites that have experience rushing attacks and occupation. —— russian attacks. it's thought they'll discuss how to evacuate hundreds of civilians from a besieged steelworks in the southern port city of mariupol. the foreign secretary, liz truss, has said russian forces must be pushed out of the whole of ukraine — in what amounts to the clearest statement yet of the uk's objectives in the war. russia's president vladimir putin meanwhile warns any country interfering in ukraine will be met with a "lightning—fast" military retaliation.
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let's have a listen to what antonio guterres been saying. when i see those destroyed buildings i must say what i feel, i imagine my family in one of those houses that is now destroyed and black. i see my granddaughters running away in panic, part of the family eventually killed. so the war is an absurdity in the 21st century. the war is evil. and when we see these situations, our heart, of course, stays with the victims, our condolences to their families, but our emotions are, there is no way that a war can be acceptable in the 21st century. look at that.
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thank you. antonio guterres in the borodyanka _ thank you. antonio guterres in the borodyanka area _ thank you. antonio guterres in the borodyanka area north _ thank you. antonio guterres in the borodyanka area north of - thank you. antonio guterres in the borodyanka area north of kyiv. - let's get all the latest now from our correspondent andrew plant. the aftermath of a missile attack in the city of kharkiv in northern ukraine. at least one person is reported to have been killed here. the invasion has reduced much of this city to rubble. translation: it's scary. it's so painful. when it's dark, we're in fear. when there was a shooting, and when the evening comes, it's indescribable. unbearable. in a speech, the uk foreign secretary, liz truss, called for western countries to push russian forces out of ukraine. some argue that we shouldn't provide heavy weapons for fear of provoking something worse. but my view is that inaction
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would be the greatest provocation. some argue that we shouldn't provide heavy weapons for fear of provoking something worse. but my view is that inaction would be the greatest provocation. this is a time for courage, not for caution. now president putin has sent a message to the west, warning ukraine's allies against further interference. translation: if anyone from the outside intends to interfere in what's happening, then they should know this. if they create threats for us, threats of a strategic nature, our retaliation, our counter strike will be instantaneous. in the southern port city of mariupol, this steel plant, surrounded by russian forces, the last stronghold of ukrainian fighters here, their commander appealing for a mass evacuation, saying alongside 600 wounded soldiers are civilians, including children inside. translation: today my appeal is apply the extraction _ procedure to us.
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the wounded will die and those who are alive will fall in the battle. civilians will die together with us. very, very many people have died in the city. the city has been wiped off the face of the earth. andrew plant, bbc news. the defence secretary ben wallace told the bbc this morning that it would be legitimate for ukrainian forces to target russian logistics. so, first of all, under un law, a country that is being attacked, in the way ukraine has, has a right under international law, to defend itself. it is also under international law the right of that country to seek, where there is an illegal invasion or attack, to seek other countries to come to its defence. it is called mutual self defence. the united kingdom, alongside many of those a0 countries, are using that law to effectively provide aid to ukraine.
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when, how, ukraine uses the weapon systems it has is governed by international law, geneva convention and all of the rules of law, that is something we feel strongly about, but if it does so, it is perfectly right, ukraine, to use those weapons to defend itself and, part of defending itself in this type of invasion is obviously where ukraine will go after the supply lines of the russian army because, without fuel and food and ammunition the russian army grinds to a halt and can no longer continue this invasion, so, you know, i don't know of any evidence of the attacks or the explosions that we have seen in russia have actually come from ukraine state, but if ukraine did choose to target logistics infrastructure for the russian army, that would be legitimate under international law, and if they did it, they currently don't have british weapons that could do that, so it is unlikely that it is our weapons, but if they did it, it is legitimate and it is in line
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with international law. the uk defence secretary. washington says a first group of more than 50 ukrainians has now completed training on howitzers, a long—range weapon the us is sending to the country. pentagon spokesmanjohn kirby told a press briefing that the us is working hard to get ukraine the weapons it needs. munitions continue to flow into ukraine. the united states is helping coordinate. that continues to flow in there, including while we were overseas just over the last couple of days and efforts to get those munitions into ukrainian hands will also continue going forward as they are in a very active fight. you are asking do they have enough, i mean i think that question is something that changes every hour depending on the rate of consumption and what is actually going on on the battlefield. so it will be a difficult question for me to answer here, thousands of miles away at the pentagon.
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all i can tell you is that we know they are expending rounds every single day of all different types and calibres. we are doing everything we can, the flow continues to make sure that they can stay in the fight. human rights lawyer amal clooney is part of an international legal task force advising ukraine on securing justice for the victims of war crimes. speaking at the united nations in new york, she urged countries to collect, preserve and store evidence of abuses of human rights. ukraine is today a slaughterhouse, right in the heart of europe. putin's aggressivew war is so outrageous that, even after repeated warnings from the us and russia's long criminal record, ukrainians couldn't believe that this could happen and i still read news headlines not knowing quite how to process them.
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could it be that thousands of children are being forcibly deported to russia? could it be that teenage girls are being raped in the street in front of their families and neighbours? or the building that had the word "children" on it, was it really bombed? and are civilians today in mariupol systematically being tortured and starved to death? unfortunately, the answer is yes. we can talk now to the ukrainian opposition visit and i want to start with the visit of un secretary desire to bring guterres, and his desire to bring help ease the help to ukraine, to try to ease the suffering help to ukraine, to try to ease the su�* those humanitarian corridors. {iii up those humanitarian corridors. of course, his ambition to do that may not be matched
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course, his ambition to do that may not be r but 1ed course, his ambition to do that may not be r but what are you hoping course, his ambition to do that may not be r but wh first; you hoping course, his ambition to do that may not be r but wt-u hoping i course, his ambition to do that may not be r but wt_1oping i course, his ambition to do that may not be r but went -10ping i course, his ambition to do that may not be r but went to of aliioping course, his ambition to do that may not be r but wenti he i aliioping course, his ambition to do that may not be r but wenti he should ling course, his ambition to do that may not be r but wenti he should have that we have a then we have a then dealave a he then deal a??? like he chose a different path, he went to moscow like he chose a different path, he went to mt ended up quite speaking it ended up quite unexpectedly with no result, because putin pretended nothing happening putin pretended nothing is happening in mariupoland putin pretended nothing is happening in mariupol and gave no promises of helping people there, so right now we cannot be sure what result it can lead to given that the un is not really willing to take up a stance against russia, and negotiating with an aggressive state without proper coordination with the victim state,
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ukraine. he coordination with the victim state, ukraine. ,., , , ukraine. he said during his news conference _ ukraine. he said during his news conference with _ ukraine. he said during his news conference with sergei _ ukraine. he said during his news conference with sergei lavrov i ukraine. he said during his news i conference with sergei lavrov that they were talking about two completely different positions. he effectively said russia was not speaking in real terms about what was going on ukraine and called the situation in mariupol specifically a crisis within a crisis and he certainly did not hold back on his language in front of the russians, but clearly, any route to humanitarian corridors, to solving the situation in mariupol is clearly very difficult. what do you think needs to happen? what could realistically happen there? realistically the rad two basic ways to solve the situation in mariupol, the first is diplomatic or political and back is frankly speaking not really available right now because as you can see, the russians pretend that nothing is happening in our report today. so unfortunately probably the only way to solve this problem is militarily, to have
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weapons and war supplies to ukraine, so that we can actually break through the russian lines of the fence surrounding marie paul, and help to evacuate our people over there. —— lines of defence. and we need that today or yesterday because the political solution is not really available and people are living there in terrible conditions and they are under threat of their lives. so the solutions would have to be military, as of today. i appreciate that you cannot go into details for strategic reasons, but in terms of the resupply of weaponry, and we know russia has been targeting especially rail links at the moment that would bring supplies to ukrainian forces fighting in the east of the country, are they getting what they need? i know that you say that we need it today, we needed yesterday but are they getting what they need to continue to mount a defence? we are
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definitely getting _ continue to mount a defence? we are definitely getting much _ continue to mount a defence? we are definitely getting much more - continue to mount a defence? we are definitely getting much more than i continue to mount a defence? we are definitely getting much more than wej definitely getting much more than we did at the beginning of the war and we are truly grateful to all the countries contributing to this. of course we are asking for more and actually right now i am speaking to you from berlin, i came here with a delegation to talk to german politicians because they believe that germany specifically can do more to help ukraine, but those weapon supplies need to be constant, because the army that we are fighting against is huge and they have large resources, that they can still use against ukraine, even if they used half of their missiles, they used half of their missiles, they still have half of them left, and even if we destroy 20 per % of their artillery, they still have 80% left and in order to be able to kooning —— continue destroying their artillery we need is heavy weapons we are asking for and that is why we keep on talking about heavy weapons, and we have had recent progress on that and i am talking to the military men and women on the front line, they say that of course they have more, but they keep on saying
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that they will need more. this is something that has been established during the war, that we need a constant resupply of, so we shall unfortunately be in a position to keep on asking for more to keep the pressure on here. i keep on asking for more to keep the pressure on here.— pressure on here. i want to get your reaction to _ pressure on here. i want to get your reaction to that _ pressure on here. i want to get your reaction to that speech _ pressure on here. i want to get your reaction to that speech from - pressure on here. i want to get your reaction to that speech from uk i reaction to that speech from uk foreign secretary liz truss where she said it was a strategic imperative, victory for ukraine, was a strategic imperative and that russian forces must be pushed out of the whole of ukraine, presumably including crimea. is that beyond the focus of ukraine right now, the issue of crimea? it seems that the focus is primarily on the donbas, on the east of the country. first focus is primarily on the donbas, on the east of the country.— the east of the country. first of all i the east of the country. first of all i have _ the east of the country. first of all i have to — the east of the country. first of all i have to say _ the east of the country. first of all i have to say that _ the east of the country. first of all i have to say that we - the east of the country. first of all i have to say that we are i all i have to say that we are extremely grateful, that argument from the british side was very, you know, we took it very well here in ukraine, and we appreciate all of the efforts being made today in supporting ukraine. but the only
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thing we are doing is defending ourselves. everything that we are doing is defending our land with everything possible, and that is our plan is to defend our old territory and that includes crimea even though it is probably impossible to achieve, but we have to keep that in mind, because crimea is part of the sovereign ukraine territory, and we should not allow for a single state to just come should not allow for a single state tojust come and should not allow for a single state to just come and grab a piece of other countries' territoryjust because they want to do so. that is not just because they want to do so. that is notjust breaking ukraine's not just breaking ukraine's sovereignty notjust breaking ukraine's sovereignty but the principle of sovereignty but the principle of sovereignty for the whole world, so we are of course most focused on the territories that have been recently occupied by russian forces, but, yes, the only solution, the final resolution to this war is getting back the whole country under ukraine does not control and making sure that russia is not in a position to be an aggressor any more, and that
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will mean their total military defeat, and we are willing to deliver our army, all we are asking for is supplies of weapons from the west. . ~ for is supplies of weapons from the west. ., ~ , ., for is supplies of weapons from the west. ., ~' ,, , , for is supplies of weapons from the west. ., ~ i. , , ., west. thank you, the deputy leader ofthe west. thank you, the deputy leader of the opposition _ west. thank you, the deputy leader of the opposition ukrainian - west. thank you, the deputy leader of the opposition ukrainian party, . of the opposition ukrainian party, thank you for your time today. and — a quick reminder — we'll be taking your questions on the war in ukraine, later — at 12:30. we'll have panellists answering questions about a range of aspects of the war — from the battle raging in the east of the country, the consequences for civilians and what more the west could or should be doing to stop russia. you can get in touch on twitter using the hashtag #bbcyourquestions — and you can email us on yourquestions@bbc.co.uk here in the uk a labour mp has spoken out about lewd comments allegedly made to her by a member of the shadow cabinet. the welsh mp, who wants to remain anonymous,
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said she was described as a "secret weapon" because "women want to be herfriend and men want to sleep with her". it comes after two conservative mps claimed they saw a male colleague watching pornography in the commons. the claims were made at a meeting on tuesday night, when female conservative mps shared allegations of sexism and harassment in the commons. chief political correspondent addin fleming gave us the latest on these investigations into these claims. the claims about a male mp watching pornography on his phone in the commons chamber and a select committee meeting room should be referred to parliament's independent grievance scheme which was set up in the last couple of years. that would require somebody who witnessed this to come forward and make a formal complaint to them and then any investigation would take quite some time and be shrouded in intense secrecy and also, that scheme has got quite a lot of complaints in it already so it could take even longer to process. i could imagine some mps
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on both sides of the house today thinking that that is a very bureaucratic solution to the problem, and actually, there could be a swifter political solution to the problem, but they can serve the party would say that these policies, processes and systems are in place for a reason, for them to be used. —— the conservative party would say. labour said they would investigate any complaint that comes forward but they are also pointing out that if this person was to go to that independent grievance scheme, they would not know anything about it because of the confidentiality that would envelope the case, but jonathan ashworth, the shadow work and pensions secretary, was asked about it this morning, he didn't know the detail so he was talking in a general sense. mil know the detail so he was talking in a general sense.— know the detail so he was talking in a general sense. all these claims we are hearing — a general sense. all these claims we are hearing about, _ a general sense. all these claims we are hearing about, it _ a general sense. all these claims we are hearing about, it is _ a general sense. all these claims we are hearing about, it is shocking, i are hearing about, it is shocking, foul, _ are hearing about, it is shocking, foul, disgusting and utterly depressing. the majority of us are there _ depressing. the majority of us are there for— depressing. the majority of us are there for public service and yet, there _ there for public service and yet, there are — there for public service and yet, there are clearly people in that
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place _ there are clearly people in that place who are behaving inappropriately, behaving wrongly, and the _ inappropriately, behaving wrongly, and the authorities of all political parties _ and the authorities of all political parties need to resolve it. this shocking — parties need to resolve it. this shocking story about the pornography and all _ shocking story about the pornography and all that, need to be sorted out, and all that, need to be sorted out, and these _ and all that, need to be sorted out, and these people need to be kicked out. and these people need to be kicked out it— and these people need to be kicked out. , ., , ,., ., and these people need to be kicked out. , ., out. it needs to be sorted out says jonathan ashworth _ out. it needs to be sorted out says jonathan ashworth but _ out. it needs to be sorted out says jonathan ashworth but given i out. it needs to be sorted out says jonathan ashworth but given what| out. it needs to be sorted out says i jonathan ashworth but given what you jonathan ashworth but given what you said a moment ago, adam, are the policies and processes in parliament right now really fit for purpose? that is a question being asked, and we will only be able to answer it over the next few months, as this grieving system starts working properly. there is a big review of the mps' code of conduct being done by the standards committee about the rules and procedure and propriety around mps but there is a keys patchwork of things are available at westminster and you just go on the grievance scheme website and they list all the different places that people can go to, to get support or advice or make a complaint. 0n the one side that means there are lots of different places that people can go to, but on the other, it makes a complicated patchwork of things. you
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have got to remember that parliament is notjust like parliament is not just like parliament incorporated, is notjust like parliament incorporated, plc, it is the house of lords, house of commons, contractors, mps who were almost as individual small businesses employing their own staff, political parties, some people who are government ministers who are bound lay government ministers who are bound by government rules, which are different from backbenchers, and people say that the only way you can get rid of an mp if they are found to have done wrong is if they are voted out at the next election, or if they are suspended from parliament for a certain amount of time, which triggers a recall petition, which could end up with a by—election. this morning ben wallace the defence secretary was doing interviews on behalf of the government. he said that it was not that parliament was an institutionally sexist or misogynist or homophobic or violent place, but that it had a culture where it had as people in it and that the culture could sometimes, not encourage it, but provide a platform for that sort of behaviour because you have people
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grappling with big issues and a passionate way, doing strange hours, mixing work and pleasure and alcohol, and also sometimes people having their own personal problems as well. so it is another week where parliament has been doing a bit of soul—searching. today is the day that parliament provokes, remember that parliament provokes, remember that formerly controversial phrase? we remember it, yes!— that formerly controversial phrase? we remember it, yes! business tops toda then we remember it, yes! business tops today then a — we remember it, yes! business tops today then a break _ we remember it, yes! business tops today then a break for _ we remember it, yes! business tops today then a break for a _ we remember it, yes! business tops today then a break for a couple i we remember it, yes! business tops today then a break for a couple of i today then a break for a couple of weeks before the queen speech starting the next session, a session that people will be hoping is a little bit more decent than the end of this one. tblur little bit more decent than the end of this one-— of this one. our chief political correspondent, _ of this one. our chief political correspondent, adam - of this one. our chief political. correspondent, adam fleming. a man has been charged with the murders of four members of the same family who were found stabbed to death in bermondsey, in south east london. 28—year—old joshua jaques is due to appear before westminster magistrates later today. a man is due in court this morning charged with the murder of 33—year—old katie kenyon.
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the mother—of—two, from lancashire, was last seen getting into a van in burnley nearly a week ago. although katie has not been found, police say they are now working on the basis she is no longer alive. andrew burfield will appear before magistrates later. a nationwide strike is taking place in sri lanka to try to force the government to resign over the country's unprecedented economic crisis. transport, health and banking services are expected to be hit by the industrial action. the move follows weeks of protests over rising prices and a worsening shortages of basic supplies, including fuel and food. 0ur correspondent, arshana shukla has the latest from the capital, colombo. what is the impact of these strikes after weeks of protest?— after weeks of protest? today the size and scale _ after weeks of protest? today the size and scale of— after weeks of protest? today the size and scale of the _ after weeks of protest? today the size and scale of the protest i after weeks of protest? today the size and scale of the protest is i size and scale of the protest is much larger as more than 1000 trade unions have participated today.
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thousands of employees both in the government sector and the private sector have reported sick today, and they are participating in protests across the country, and a large congregation can be seen here, this is right outside the presidential secretariat where thousands are now gathering, to show their protest, to demand the government step down, and they are over the mismanagement of they are over the mismanagement of the disease that led to economic mismanagement according to the protesters. as well as banking services, and some of those which will be affected, they have indicated that some trains will not be running, private banks are participating, but essential services will go on, there will be back low spot they will carry on essential services. 0nly today we met a group of government employees participating, on the health care side as well as from some of the
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ministries in colombo, and so some of those will be impacted. if ministries in colombo, and so some of those will be impacted.— of those will be impacted. if this strike is an _ of those will be impacted. if this strike is an escalation _ of those will be impacted. if this strike is an escalation after- of those will be impacted. if this strike is an escalation after two l strike is an escalation after two months of protests, what of the efforts to find a resolution or solution to all of this? resolutions have to be on _ solution to all of this? resolutions have to be on two _ solution to all of this? resolutions have to be on two fronts, - solution to all of this? resolutions have to be on two fronts, one i have to be on two fronts, one economic, one political, because on both sides we see a crisis in colombo. 0n the economic side the current finance minister is leading a team going to the imf and their creditors and speaking about emergency funding to deal with the crisis, because the country is on the verge of bankruptcy, we have no cash to import essentials, so that is one part, but on the political side, the solutions are very difficult to find because there is a political tug of war going on between the opposition, the ruling party, and even within the ruling party, and even within the ruling
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party, the family of the president, who was intending to be in power, but the protesters demand that the entire family leave, and the opposition parties have said that there is a no—confidence motion that they will pass, that they will present to parliament next week, and they have the majority in place. the president on one hand saying that the prime minister, who is his brother, must resign with the cabinet, the prime minister on his part, is not willing to, so there is a political tug of war, and this is casting a dark shadow on the economic stability of the country, and protesters here are saying that they do not want empty promises, they do not want empty promises, they want solutions. thank you for that update, from colombo, arshana shukna. pregnancy loss can be a life changing experience but despite an estimated one in five pregnancies ending in miscarriage, it's still something that isn't often spoken about openly. 0ur global health correspondent
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tulip mazumdar has suffered pregnancy loss herself, and has been finding out more about why it happens, and how care could be improved around the world. some viewers may find this report upsetting. you never think it will happen to you. one day your baby is there, you heard its fierce heartbeat. the next, the life inside of them, their life inside of you, is gone. it's estimated that around one in five pregnancies end in miscarriage. but the numbers are vague, as most countries don't actually count these losses. i've had one healthy pregnancy, my beautiful boy, rion. and four that ended in loss. two were early miscarriages, and two happened much later
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into my pregnancies, where i gave birth to my tiny babies, rivah and rae. i am one of tens of millions of women around the world who have suffered pregnancy loss. and, as my work as global health correspondent has shown me many times, i know how lucky i am to have received the level of care i've had. the conversation around pregnancy loss is opening up so much more here in the uk with things like this beautiful exhibition here in manchester. but, after my losses, it struck me. given how physically and mentally painful miscarriage can be, why aren't we talking about it more? why don't we know more about why it happens? so my name's professor siobhan quarmby. my name's natasha. i've spent the last few months looking into how pregnancy loss impacts families
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all around the world and how they can be better supported. why the colour of our skin can affect our chances of having a healthy pregnancy. ijust don't think we're being listened to, and heard in the spaces. do you think it is about the colour of your skin? absolutely. yes, absolutely. yes. and heard from one group often left out of the conversation. my wife was near to die. and i'd cry sitting on the toilet because that was the only time i could get to be alone. that report from our global health correspondent, tulip mazumder. meta — the company which owns facebook and instagram — has reported better than expected profits of seven and a half billion dollars in the first three months of the year. the number of people using facebook every day rose again —
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to nearly two billion — reversing a recent decline. the news sent meta shares up by almost a fifth, despite the company reporting slower revenue growth and warning of a difficult advertising market. 0ur north america business correspondent michelle fleury has been telling us more. the existential threat to facebook is, is it still cool? well, one measure is how many people are still using the social network. and on that front, it appears to have satisfied investors. facebook�*s daily active users were 1.96 billion on average for march. that's an increase of 4% year over year and better than expected. to reflect who we are... the company's founder and ceo, mark zuckerberg, spoke optimistically, saying we made progress this quarter across a number of key company priorities. from now on, we're going to be metaverse first. but meta, the parent company of facebook and instagram, still has plenty of issues. itjust reported its weakest revenue growth for a decade. the company explained that ad budgets were coming under strain from inflation, made worse since russia's invasion of ukraine.
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it also pointed to the impact of an apple software update last year that lets people choose whether or not they want to be tracked around the internet by firms like meta who can sell that information to advertisers. overall, the results, though, had investors hitting the "like" button with meta's share price rising sharply. let's return to the conflict in ukraine, where the government has told the un that more than 500,000 of its civilians have been forcibly deported to russia, including 120,000 children. the kremlin says ukrainians are willingly moving to russia. but the bbc has heard from the families of some of those taken captive by russian forces, and civilians who ve been returned from russia on prisoner exchanges, who refute these claims. yogita limaye reports. still in disbelief that he is back home. this red cross volunteer was deported to russia, captured as he
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was evacuating people from war hit areas near kyiv. translation: we were beaten j with rifles, punched and kicked. they blindfolded us and tied our hands with tape. they used tasers and kept asking for information about the military. after six days in a crowded basement in ukraine, we were taken to belarus. they thought we couldn't see, but i saw our car crossing the border. he showed us the identity slip made for him there. it's issued by the military of the russian federation. and what does it say on the top? from belarus, he says, they were driven to a russian prison. translation: the torture continued. if you dared to look up at the russian soldiers, we would be beaten. they treated us like animals.
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one evening, i counted 72 people, but there were more because we could hear the voices of others. the fact it is a large number of ukrainians there. he does not know why he was picked for the prisoner exchange. the only one from his cell. in a room next to him, he had heard there were people from the chernobyl nuclear site. when we went to the plant, we found evidence of men being taken. this is the basement at chernobyl, where 169 ukrainian national guard were held for weeks when it was occupied. other staff saw them being taken from here by russian forces as they withdrew from northern ukraine. in a village nearby, we met the family of one of the missing men.
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we are hiding their identities to protect them. the guard's wife last spoke to him on the 31st of march just before he was taken. translation: he told me i am ok physically, but not - emotionally. i could hear the anxiety in his voice. our son keeps asking where his father is. he is very worried and he is scared that i might disappear too, so he keeps following me around everywhere. from different parts of ukraine, we have spoken to the families of more than a dozen civilians who have been taken. only a few have been released. most are yet to the tonne including a family of four with two young
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children who have contacted relatives to say the are not allowed to leave russia. the kremlin says civilians are willingly this includes a family of four who said they the kremlin says civilians are willingly this includes a family of four who said they are not being allowed to leave russia. crossing the border, but everything we have had strongly contradict those claims. ukraine's prosecutor general says they are hearing testimony of war crimes on the people who returned. we interview everyone who can come back from russian federation or occupied territories. almost all of them were tortured in russian prisons. for me as a prosecutor, it is very important. and as the war rages on in ukraine's east and south, every day there are new reports of people being forced into russia.
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there is just one week to go until voters across the uk go to the polls. voters in england, wales, and scotland will pick who they want to run services that affect everyday life in their local area. those in northern ireland will choose its government. ahead of the vote we will be profiling some of the key contests in the uk's four nations. today my colleague luxmy gopaljoins us from the town centre in newcastle—under—lyme. what are the key concerns there? i am in the market town of newcastle—under—lyme, to give you a bit of context it is a few miles from stoke in the north of staffordshire, a predominantly labour held area but the current mp is a conservative and people here as other places across the uk are going to the polls next thursday to vote in the local council elections and some of the key issues are the very
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localised specific issues for people whether it is around planning and development in their area, balancing with the need to protect green belt areas and of course you have the broader issues of how businesses will continue their recovery after the pandemic, how to renew the fortunes of the high street and the big one, the cost of living crisis. with a look at these and the broader issues on voters' mines heaters alex forsyth. the political race is on. with elections round the corner, parties are trying to grab votes. and at this southampton climbing centre, people are pretty clear what's on their minds. inflation is going mad, and especially for fuel prices, for public transport, it's going absolutely insane. obviously, there has to be something done about that asap because people won't be able to to handle this much longer. the environment, i think, is quite important to take care
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of because i think that's a very pressing issue. next week's elections in england are about who runs local services, but they'll also show which parties are on their way up and which could be losing grip there. the first widespread test of opinion since the war in ukraine, since prices really started to climb and of course, since news of lockdown parties in downing street. i think that will probably contribute to the way a lot of people vote. if belief is shaken in a party, then that will will change the way that people kind of see them in the both on the local and large scale. in terms of covid and obviously we've had a recent party gate thing. i do follow that kind of stuff because it's obviously all over the media. but i think overall i would care more about the local elections because your councillor can make a change for you. southampton's just one place where these elections will test the political water, notjust for the larger parties, but the greens and a host of others too. what happens in these elections
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will be seen as the public�*s view of the political parties nationally. for the conservatives, is borisjohnson still a vote winner? for labour is keir starmer rebuilding support where he needs to? are the lib dems broadening their base? but remember these elections will decide who runs local services. so for many people, local factors will count. in southampton city centre, brenda's had a tough couple of years trying to keep her therapy business afloat. and with prices rising, she says it's local support that matters to her. electric bills have almost doubled, you know, and again, that affects running costs where we're not earning as much. now, i think more could be done and try and support those businesses that are trying to support the communities because we're all playing our part. not far away, this cocktail bar was set up after the pandemic as a place to bring people together. 0wners prince and dorothy say community is important to them,
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but to keep going, they need backing. from pandemic to to the war in ukraine, you know, down to to some of the factors that are affecting us. high inflation rate, items we buy have gone more than 100%, you know, increase in price. we're just really like hanging on the line, trying to see that we stay up. we really need a change whereby all these small businesses can be supported. the economy cannot do without small and medium scale businesses, whether local or national factors are at play. there's a lot at stake in these elections which could cause quite a political shake up. alex forsyth, bbc news, southampton. to get more on the context of the politics here in newcastle—under—lyme i am joined by jenny aitken who is the reporter
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from the local bbc radio station bbc stoke. tell us about the context, this is deemed a redwall area, explain why that is. the conservatives _ explain why that is. the conservatives will i explain why that is. the conservatives will be i explain why that is. tue: conservatives will be looking explain why that is. tte: conservatives will be looking to strengthen their hand in newcastle, a redwall area for 100 years, it had a redwall area for 100 years, it had a labour mp until 2019 when the conservative landslide where the last receipt to the conservative mp, two years after 2017 with incredibly marginal election, 30 votes between the parties and the council elections as well things started to change from red to blue. at the moment it is a conservative led authority but with a minority so they are looking to take control. when you have been speaking to people what is on their minds when they vote next week? what of the local issues?—
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local issues? they are affected by issues that _ local issues? they are affected by issues that are _ local issues? they are affected by issues that are affecting - local issues? they are affected by issues that are affecting and i issues that are affecting and resonate with voters across the country, without council tax is going, more trees and less potholes, they are worried about infrastructure and schools are getting full, doctor surgeries, hosting plans, green belt land, also the town centres atjust around the corner and the high street which is to be bustling and vibrant and now empty units like other towns as well so they want money injected into the local economy but the big issue that affects just people in newcastle and no one else in the country as the quarry, the big smell which is a story that has become national, 1.5 miles from us as silverdale, a nonhazardous waste landfill site, accepting 400,000 tonnes of waste a year and people here are affected,
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they cannot open at the doors and windows. t they cannot open at the doors and windows. .., ., , ., , ., windows. i cannot smell anything and i do not windows. i cannot smell anything and i do not think— windows. i cannot smell anything and i do not think i _ windows. i cannot smell anything and i do not think i have _ windows. i cannot smell anything and i do not think i have lost _ windows. i cannot smell anything and i do not think i have lost my - windows. i cannot smell anything and i do not think i have lost my sense i i do not think i have lost my sense of smell so what is it like? you must have smelt it because if it is thus much of an issue, how bad is it. ~ ., thus much of an issue, how bad is it. . ., _, ., thus much of an issue, how bad is it. . ., ., ., thus much of an issue, how bad is it. we have covered a lot of stories over the years _ it. we have covered a lot of stories over the years and _ it. we have covered a lot of stories over the years and that _ it. we have covered a lot of stories over the years and that can - it. we have covered a lot of stories over the years and that can go i it. we have covered a lot of stories| over the years and that can go from as little as not being able to open the window or hang a washing to more serious complaints as to exacerbating breathing problems and they are the cases that have gone to high court by the smell has been described as a very putrid and eggy. i have smelt it and at certain times it is worse than others but that is a big one on the doorstep and we know that three of the 44 candidates standing in newcastle council elections represent the stop the stink campaign which has been huge to try and stop the landfill. t to try and stop the landfill. i cannot imagine there are many councils of the local issue is a
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very eggy smell but it shows the very eggy smell but it shows the very specific localised issues but have you been speaking to anyone who has mentioned some of the more national political studies, for example are any of them are going to be influenced by the pattycake scandal? it be influenced by the pattycake scandal? . , , . be influenced by the pattycake scandal? ., , , ., scandal? it has been a mixed bag because mentioning _ scandal? it has been a mixed bag because mentioning the - scandal? it has been a mixed bag because mentioning the quarry, l scandal? it has been a mixed bag i because mentioning the quarry, that will not necessarily affect votes and the ballot because all parties are onside with the community and the conservatives have been proactive on that, speaking in the commons but in terms of local issues when i have been speaking to people and knocking on doors and in the town centre and businesses they have been saying party gate, leave that alone, it will not affect how i vote and others say they have had enough so it will be interesting. it is a barometer to see how the parties are performing. we barometer to see how the parties are erforminu. ~ ., ., barometer to see how the parties are performing-— performing. we have not mentioned the cost of living _
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performing. we have not mentioned the cost of living crisis _ performing. we have not mentioned the cost of living crisis which - performing. we have not mentioned the cost of living crisis which is i the cost of living crisis which is something that will undoubtedly be on the minds of voters across the country, how much of it as a factor here? , , ., , ., , here? interesting you bring that up because i have _ here? interesting you bring that up because i have spoken _ here? interesting you bring that up because i have spoken to _ here? interesting you bring that up because i have spoken to charitiesl because i have spoken to charities and food banks, the alice charity locally and they have told me in recent weeks since the bills started to go up the number of referrals they have been getting has shot up and this is from working families so thatis and this is from working families so that is very much an issue on the doorstep for candidates that are knocking on doors and campaigning. thank you for that analysis, jenny aitken the bbc reporter with a bbc stoke. as she mentioned the food back situation, we will be speaking to the volunteers who run the food bank and some of the people there and business owners to get an idea of what some of the key issues are that will be on voters' mines when they look like mike vote in council elections next thursday.
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holocaust survivors, their relatives, and ukrainian refugees will today take part in the annual march of the living. the march is one of the largest holocaust memorials globally, and leads survivors and delegations from around the world on a march from auschwitz to birkenau in defiance of the death marches the nazis forced their victims to walk at the end of the war. this is the first time the march has been able to take place since the pandemic. with me now is holocaust survivor arek hersh who will be taking part in march of the living. we are not to have you with us and thank you for your time, reading your story the number of times you escaped what would have been certain death at the hands of the nazis was quite remarkable. tell us about the time you spent in auschwitz. i think
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unfortunately we have lost the communications, let me try again. can you hear me? really unfortunate that we cannot establish communications but we will try to go back there. an investigation by the us state of minnesota — following the police killing of george floyd in minneapolis in 2020 — has found that the city's police have engaged in a pattern of race discrimination for at least the past decade. it showed a disparity in how officers used force, stopped, searched and arrested people of colour — compared to white people in similar circumstances. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes reports. the murder of george floyd by a white police officer sparked protests around the world.
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it prompted an investigation into the minneapolis police department, the use of force and other tactics by officers. going back a decade, the analysis of police reports, interviews and nearly 700 hours of body camera footage showed what investigators say were wide disparities between the treatment of people of colour and white individuals. it revealed that while african—americans make up only 19% of the city's population, they represented 54% of all traffic stops over a three year period. and between 2010 and 2020 two thirds of all citations for disorderly conduct and obstruction went to people who were black. the minnesota department of human rights finds that the city and minneapolis police department engage in a pattern or practice of race discrimination in violation of the minnesota human rights act. the report blames a paramilitary approach to policing and a culture that's ineffective at holding officers accountable for misconduct.
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i found the contents to be repugnant. at times horrific. they made me sick to my stomach and outraged. and i think that our community feels the same way. the findings, the mayor said, did not come as a surprise to the city's black community. they'd known about police misconduct for decades, for generations. the report calls for significant reforms, starting with officers training and disciplinary systems. others say only a complete shift in police culture will begin to address the problem. peter bowes, bbc news. hospital inspectors have warned that some patients are at risk of harm at england's worst—performing mental health trust, which has further deteriorated. the care quality commission has rated the norfolk and suffolk nhs foundation trust inadequate on safety and leadership — and said it would take further action if improvements weren't made. the trust has apologised. 0ur health correspondent
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sophie hutchinson reports. abigail henry is autistic and has poor mental health. but her family says her condition worsened when the help she was getting from the community mental health team was cut. i mean, it's got to be about 15 times that her life has seriously been in danger. the other times are cries for help, or like self—harming, or taking an overdose. then, last year, abigail was taken to hospital following an attempted suicide. but rather than being given a psychiatric bed, she ended up being sedated in intensive care. as they woke her up from the sedation, she then spent another week, just over a week in intensive care because there still wasn't any children's beds. and, at the time, there was people dying of covid in there.
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and it was just a really scary time for her. abigail's care comes under the norfolk and suffolk mental health trust, the worst performing trust in the country. today, hospital inspectors rated it inadequate once again. they found that care on the psychiatric ward for children and young people had deteriorated so severely, it had to be closed to new admissions. that support in the community for children and young people and adults was inadequate. and that crisis care was so poor, it was putting patients at risk. local campaigners and bereaved families say many have been harmed by the poor care. they estimate over the past nine years, there have been 1,000 unexpected deaths. caroline aldridge's son, tim, was one of them. he was bipolar and had complex needs. he died in 2014, while waiting for an appointment, at the age of 30. i find it really heartbreaking to sit with people who are newly bereaved and people find their way
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to me, and hear their stories of how they've just lost someone really precious to them and know that that was utterly preventable because we know from tim and other deaths that that is the consequences of those failings in services. in 2015, the norfolk and suffolk mental health trust became the first in nhs history to be put into special measures. since then, for most years, it's needed intensive support to improve. the trust says it's pleased inspectors saw some green shoots of change but has apologised for not doing more. i continue to apologise for people who've not got the service they want. that is not the reason why any of us come into work every day. i don't want to put forward excuses of why that's the case. i want to absolutely focus on what do we need to do now to make this better so people get the services they're entitled to. but, for families like abigail's,
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improvements can't come soon enough. she's still, you know, she is still bouncing from crisis to crisis. and i don't know if we just have to try and manage it because there isn't any support. inspectors will return to the trust in the next few months and warn if services are no better, further action will be taken. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. a heatwave which has gripped india for the past few weeks is expected to continue — with forecasters predicting record—breaking temperatures for the capital, delhi. firefighters have been tackling flames at a huge landfill site near the city,
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releasing toxic fumes in to the air. prime minister narendra modi says his country is getting too hot, too early in the year. nickjohnson has this report: a pile of smouldering rubbish, 60 metres high, and spewing toxic fumes. this landfill site on the outskirts of delhi has been burning for days, the school in its shadow. "we can't let the children sit in the smoke", this teacher says. "we have had no choice but to close the school". others who live nearby speak of feeling trapped. translation: i'm not able to breathe, and my eyes are burning. we are helpless, but what can we do? we cannot leave our homes and go anywhere else. it is thought the fire at this landfill site was sparked by india's stifling temperatures in recent weeks. the country has already experienced its hottest march since records began, more than 120 years ago. a month later, the heat shows no sign of letting up. large parts of the country are sweltering, as temperatures reach the mid—40s celsius, more than 110 fahrenheit, on a daily basis. some forecasters have predicted temperatures in delhi could reach a record—breaking 46 celsius this week. authorities have issued an alert, and asked vulnerable
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people to avoid the outdoors. the prime minister, narendra modi, seen here greeting eu leaders in delhi earlier this week, admitted temperatures across india were raising much earlier in the year than usual, and warned of the risk of fires in hospitals and factories. a leading climatologist in the country says it is beyond doubt that climate change has been a contributing factor to the consistently high temperatures here. forecasters predict temperatures will continue for at least the next few days, and there are fears that fires like this could become more widespread. nickjohnson, in delhi, bbc news. nasa's spacex dragon capsule carrying four astronauts has docked with the international space station. the astronauts were welcomed by seven crew members already on station. the dragon spacecraft was launched from the kennedy space center in florida yesterday. nasa says it's one of the fastest commercial crew flights to the international space station.
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hello again. there is no significant rain in the forecast today, but as we head into the weekend for scotland and northern ireland, we could start to see some coming our way. high pressure still firmly in charge of our weather. things are fairly staid. light winds but more of a breeze across the southeast and the english channel and also an onshore breeze along the east coast. so here it will feel cooler. we still have all this cloud across eastern coastal counties in through the midlands as well and a bit more cloud developing through the day, turning the sunshine quite hazy. we could catch the odd shower in south west england and also at times crossing northern scotland, but most of us will miss them. now, as we head on through the evening and overnight, the cloud starts to sink slowly southwards. we will see some clear skies develop. and where that happens, of course, the temperature will fall away.
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so we're looking at a touch of frost across northern ireland, southern scotland, northern england, north wales and parts of the midlands. but that's where tomorrow morning we will start with some sunshine. meanwhile, our thicker cloud pushing down into the southeastern quarter still thick enough for the odd spot of rain. so quite breezy, but not as breezy as today in the south, but more sunshine for more of us. now, having said that, there'll be a few showers across the north and east of scotland. those could get into the north east of england as well. temperaturs nine to about 16 degrees, possibly 17 somewhere. now, as we head on through the weekend, the high pressure that's been driving our weather of late sinks a bit further south, allowing this area of low pressure with its fronts to make inroads and the fronts will bring in some rain. so we could see some significant rain through the day coming in across western parts of scotland and also northern ireland ahead of it, the cloud will build. so it's for much of england and wales that we hang on to the dry conditions, albeit the sunshine turning
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hazier through the day. temperatures nine in lerwick to highs of 17 in hull and also in london. then as we move from saturday into sunday where the front continues to sink southwards across england and wales as a weakening feature, so it will introduce some patchy rain, quite a bit of cloud at times, but it will brighten up across northern and eastern parts of scotland and also parts of eastern england with some sunshine breaking through during the course of the afternoon. temperatures ten in the north to about 13 or 14 as we push farther south, but 17 in glasgow.
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the headlines at 11. the un secretary general, antonio guterres, is visiting war—torn sites surrounding kyiv that had been occupied by russian troops — he says russia must cooperate with the international criminal court. the war is absurdity in the 21st—century. the war is evil. russian foreign ministry has criticised un plans to send weapons to kyiv. criticised un plans to send weapons to k iv. ., , criticised un plans to send weapons tok iv. ., , ., criticised un plans to send weapons tokiv. ., ., , criticised un plans to send weapons tokiv. ., ., to kyiv. the only solution is a eaceful to kyiv. the only solution is a peaceful settlement - to kyiv. the only solution is a peaceful settlement of i to kyiv. the only solution is a peaceful settlement of the i to kyiv. the only solution is a i peaceful settlement of the conflict. ben stokes has been named as england
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test cricket captain. allegations of sexism in westminster, a labour mp claims inappropriate comments were made to her by a conservative member of cabinet. it comes after mps claimed they saw a member of parliament watching pornography in parliament. i am finding out which issues will most affect how people will vote in the elections next week. and the government is to publish its plans of the sale of channel 4. it's expected to scrap many of the rules for commercial public service broadcasters.
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hello. the secretary general of the united nations, antonio guterres, is in ukraine visiting towns to the north of the capital, kyiv, that have been badly damaged during russia's invasion. he's visiting sites that have experienced russian attacks and occupation ahead of a meeting with president zelensky. it's thought they'll discuss how to evacuate hundreds of civilians from a besieged steelworks in the southern port city of mariupol. let's take a look at some of the other developments. in a speech the foreign secretary liz truss said victory for ukraine was a "strategic imperative" and russian forces must be pushed out of "the whole of ukraine", in what amounts to the clearest statement yet of the uk's objectives in the war. russia's president vladimir putin meanwhile warns any country interfering in ukraine will be met with a "lightning—fast" military retaliation. let's have a listen now to what the head of the un, antonio guterres had to say when he arrived on the
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outskirts of kyiv. when i see those destroyed buildings i must say what i feel, i imagine my family in one of those houses that is now destroyed and black. i see my granddaughters running away in panic, part of the family eventually killed. so the war is an absurdity in the 21st century. the war is evil. and when we see these situations, our heart, of course, stays with the victims, our condolences to their families, but our emotions are, there is no way that a war can be acceptable in the 21st century.
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look at that. thank you. antonio guterres. it follows his visit to moscow a couple of days ago. let's get all the latest now from our correspondent andrew plant. the aftermath of a missile attack in the city of kharkiv in northern ukraine. at least one person is reported to have been killed here. the invasion has reduced much of this city to rubble. translation: it's scary. it's so painful. when it's dark, we're in fear. when there was a shooting, and when the evening comes, it's indescribable. unbearable. in a speech, the uk foreign secretary, liz truss, called for western countries to push
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russian forces out of ukraine. some argue that we shouldn't provide heavy weapons for fear of provoking something worse. but my view is that inaction would be the greatest provocation. this is a time for courage, not for caution. now president putin has sent a message to the west, warning ukraine's allies against further interference. translation: if anyone from the outside intends to interfere in what's happening, then they should know this. if they create threats for us, threats of a strategic nature, our retaliation, our counter strike will be instantaneous. in the southern port city of mariupol, this steel plant, surrounded by russian forces, the last stronghold of ukrainian fighters here, their commander appealing for a mass evacuation, saying alongside 600 wounded soldiers are civilians, including children inside.
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translation: today my appeal is apply the extraction _ procedure to us. the wounded will die and those who are alive will fall in the battle. civilians will die together with us. very, very many people have died in the city. the city has been wiped off the face of the earth. after meeting president putin earlier this week, today, andrew plant, bbc news. the defence secretary ben wallace told the bbc this morning that it would be legitimate for ukrainian forces to target russian logistics. so, first of all, under un law, a country that is being attacked, in the way ukraine has, has a right under international law, to defend itself. it is also under international law the right of that country to seek, where there is an illegal invasion or attack, to seek other countries to come to its defence. it is called mutual self defence. the united kingdom, alongside many of those 40 countries,
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are using that law to effectively provide aid to ukraine. when, how, ukraine uses the weapon systems it has is governed by international law, geneva convention and all of the rules of law, that is something we feel strongly about, but if it does so, it is perfectly right, ukraine, to use those weapons to defend itself and, part of defending itself in this type of invasion is obviously where ukraine will go after the supply lines of the russian army because, without fuel and food and ammunition, the russian army grinds to a halt and can no longer continue this invasion. so, you know, i don't know of any evidence of the attacks or the explosions that we have seen in russia have actually come from ukraine state, but if ukraine did choose to target logistics infrastructure for the russian army, that would be legitimate under international law, and if they did it, they currently don't have british weapons that could do that,
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so it is unlikely that it is our weapons, but if they did it, it is legitimate and it is in line with international law. ben wallace. glen grant. let's begin with those comments by foreign secretary liz truss last night where she set a victory for ukraine was a strategic imperative. she also said russian forces must be pushed out of the whole of ukraine. including presumably she means crimea. were you surprised by that particular phrase? you surprised by that particular hrase? ., ., ., ,, , , ., phrase? not at all. surprised that actually most _ phrase? not at all. surprised that actually most of _ phrase? not at all. surprised that actually most of the _ phrase? not at all. surprised that actually most of the western i phrase? not at all. surprised that i actually most of the western leaders still have not grasped how serious this is. this is notjust about ukraine, this is about the whole of the west. we simply can't afford to lose this. if you lose for ukraine,
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there will be someone —— somewhere else afterwards. 0ne shouldn't be worried about this. do else afterwards. one shouldn't be worried about this.— worried about this. do you think many western _ worried about this. do you think many western leaders - worried about this. do you think many western leaders haven't l worried about this. do you think i many western leaders haven't grasped the complete seriousness of this? we have heard about nato countries, not one inch of nato territory would go undefended if there was an incursion into it. we still have several countries around, finland, sweden, georgia and other places that are not members of nato, for a start. i hear that. not members of nato, for a start. i hearthat. from not members of nato, for a start. i hear that. from later countries. not members of nato, for a start. i hearthat. from later countries. but i do not think they have understood the seriousness of the battle still. i know we are giving them heavy weapons but those heavy weapons will take time to get to the front line and to learn how to use them. this is a challenge at the moment. the problem we have at the moment is
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ukraine as it stands now is running out of ammunition. find ukraine as it stands now is running out of ammunition.— out of ammunition. and is steadily bein: out of ammunition. and is steadily being eaten _ out of ammunition. and is steadily being eaten away. _ out of ammunition. and is steadily being eaten away. i _ out of ammunition. and is steadily being eaten away. i don't - out of ammunition. and is steadily being eaten away. i don't think i being eaten away. i don't think people quite grasp how serious this is. as we speak at the moment. that race to resuoply _ is. as we speak at the moment. that race to resupply has always been an issue in this war. 0perationally, from the russian perspective, do you think the russian military is in a stronger position than it was when it first made its incursions into ukraine? , . , ., , , ukraine? yes, much stronger because now they have — ukraine? yes, much stronger because now they have gone _ ukraine? yes, much stronger because now they have gone back _ ukraine? yes, much stronger because now they have gone back to _ ukraine? yes, much stronger because now they have gone back to fighting i now they have gone back to fighting in the old way, using heavy artillery to destroy people on the ground before they make the infantry attacks. they have changed their tactics, back to the old days, you could say and are being more successful with this because they have got so much artillery. ben wallace, defence _ have got so much artillery. ben wallace, defence minister, was talking this morning about escalating within the borders of ukraine without broadening the conflict. the thing that is entirely
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possible, given the weaponry that is being supplied to ukraine? that possible, given the weaponry that is being supplied to ukraine?- being supplied to ukraine? that is a aood being supplied to ukraine? that is a good question- _ being supplied to ukraine? that is a good question. he _ being supplied to ukraine? that is a good question. he is _ being supplied to ukraine? that is a good question. he is absolutely i good question. he is absolutely right that ukraine must go after russian supply lines. i don't think this idea that if you go and start fighting in russia it will cost something even worse, it is as bad as it can be now. you can't actually get much worse by attacking and beating your enemy. i think the ukrainians, as soon as they get weapons with longer range, have got to start actually engaging russia in places that russia, notjust inside ukraine. d0 places that russia, not 'ust inside ukraine. ~ ., , ukraine. do you think the latest comments _ ukraine. do you think the latest comments from _ ukraine. do you think the latest comments from vladimir i ukraine. do you think the latest comments from vladimir putin l ukraine. do you think the latest i comments from vladimir putin warning of retaliation, do you think that is essentially rhetoric? yes, i do. you are clear on — essentially rhetoric? yes, i do. you are clear on that? _ essentially rhetoric? yes, i do. you are clear on that? i _ essentially rhetoric? yes, i do. gm, are clear on that? i do because he has been saying things like this for a long time and he has not done
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anything except the conventional attacks he has been talking about. he may retaliate but he is going to retaliate at some stage anyway or is going to do things against us at some stage anyway so we might as well get used to the fact that he has to be beaten. d0 well get used to the fact that he has to be beaten.— well get used to the fact that he has to be beaten. do you fear the use of chemical _ has to be beaten. do you fear the use of chemical weapons, - has to be beaten. do you fear the use of chemical weapons, let's i has to be beaten. do you fear the l use of chemical weapons, let's not even go to talking about nuclear yet, but do you fear the use of chemical weapons in this situation? he has already been trying several times to use small amounts of different chemical weapons or using things like white phosphorus where there is no military benefit, only against surveillance. 0n there is no military benefit, only against surveillance. on a larger scale? the question is whether he could do it on a larger scale, i do not know whether they have the they may have and he may well do if he feels he is not getting his aims in ukraine fast enough. i do not know. it is still war. look at the pictures of mariupol. you can't make
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that any worse. i am sorry, you cannot kill more people than they have killed already, even using chemical weapons. they have destroyed the place, probably killed 20,000 people. if he steps forward into chemical weapons, i don't think it is going to be greatly much worse thanit it is going to be greatly much worse than it is at the moment. you it is going to be greatly much worse than it is at the moment.— than it is at the moment. you were sa in: he than it is at the moment. you were saying he understands _ than it is at the moment. you were saying he understands strength, i saying he understands strength, doesn't understand anything other than strength. in that sense, you think the comments by liz truss last night were on point? t think the comments by liz truss last night were on point?— night were on point? i do. completely- _ night were on point? i do. completely. i— night were on point? i do. completely. ithink- night were on point? i do. completely. i think the i night were on point? i do. i completely. i think the shame night were on point? i do. - completely. i think the shame was night were on point? i do. _ completely. i think the shame was we didn't get those points back in october, septemberwhen didn't get those points back in october, september when we knew they were going to attack. as it is now, yes, i would like to hear those same sort of points from a few other countries as well. to make the point that it countries as well. to make the point thatitis countries as well. to make the point that it is notjust great britain that it is notjust great britain thatis that it is notjust great britain that is currently leading with the
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point of the spear at the moment. i think rightly so. i would like to see others following a bit harder. glen grant from the baltic security foundation, thank you very much. and — a quick reminder — we'll be taking your questions on the war in ukraine, later — at 12:30. we'll have panellists answering questions about a range of aspects of the war — from the battle raging in the east of the country, the consequences for civilians, and what more the west could or should be doing to stop russia. you can get in touch on twitter. an investigation has found that the former labour cabinet minister liam byrne breached parliamentary bullying rules in relation to a member of the staff. that news just
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coming into us, we hope to talk to one of our political correspondence about the very shortly but just one of our political correspondence about the very shortly butjust in the last few minutes hearing that former labour cabinet minister liam byrne has been found to have breached parliamentary bullying rules in relation to a member of his staff. more on that coming up. a man has appeared in court charged with the murder of 33—year—old katie canyon. he has been remanded in custody to appear in preston crown court on friday. danny savage is at the magistrates' court in blackburn for us. danny, ourviewers may the magistrates' court in blackburn for us. danny, our viewers may know that police have been searching for katie for a number of days now. she
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went missing _ katie for a number of days now. §t2 went missing last katie for a number of days now. 5t2 went missing last friday at 9:30am getting into a ford transit van in burnley, police believe the vehicle drove north into the countryside and when they realised there was a major investigation under way the focus of the police search has been in remote countryside near clitheroe. police have been searching several square miles of woodland over the past few days trying to find any trace of katie kenyon. the 50—year—old was wearing a grey tracksuit, confirming his name age and date of birth, confirming his personal details, has been remanded
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to a fear before preston crown court tomorrow. a search on going, lancashire police believe they have a strong chance of finding her. no trace of katie kenyon has been found yet,. former labour cabinet minister liam byrne breached parliamentary bullying rules in relation to a member of his staff. damien grammatical is, what is the background to this? we grammatical is, what is the background to this? we got this final decision _ background to this? we got this final decision coming _ background to this? we got this final decision coming through i background to this? we got this l final decision coming through now from the icg as, the independent
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complaints and grievances to set up to deal with complaints against mps. liam byrne has been an mp since 2004 four birmingham hard shell. he served under tony blair, gordon brown is a cabinet minister. there was a treasury minister, chief secretary to the treasury, served in cabinet office. this complaint relates to being madejust cabinet office. this complaint relates to being made just under two years ago, the period at the beginning of the pandemic. at that time he had an assistant he had just employed called david parker. who was also a labour party member. at that time, mr barker ran a food bank in birmingham. a minor dispute in the office about his work with the food bank at the beginning of the
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pandemic, following the dispute mr barker said he had been ostracised by liam byrne mp, had contracted covid, had tried to contact liam byrne i think it was nine times, he said, six times about that. that was ignored. he was signed off work with stress. he then was told by a colleague that his contract would not be renewed. mr barker said this had a terrible impact on his mental health, was worried about his job, prospects in the labour party. his future if he had no references. he made this complaint, it has taken nearly two years to go through all of the process. the final finding was that liam byrne had acted in a way that amounted to bullying and abuse of power. he had deleted mr barker's work e—mail account at the time of trying to terminate his
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contract. this sanction recommended is that he make a public apology, he goes to a management course and he is suspended for two days as an mp. thank you, damian grammaticas in westminster. a labour mp has spoken out about lewd comments allegedly made to her by a member of the shadow cabinet. the welsh mp, who wants to remain anonymous, said she was described as a "secret weapon" because "women want to be herfriend" and men want to sleep with her. it comes after two conservative mps claimed they saw a male colleague watching pornography in the commons. the claims were made at a meeting on tuesday night, when female conservative mps shared allegations of sexism and harassment in the commons. joining me now is katy
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wedderburn, partnerand head of the employment law group at the macroberts law firm. if these claims are investigated as they are being and found to be guilty, someone is found guilty, are we talking about sexual harassment here, some form of discrimination, what area of law are we talking about? , ., ., ., ., ., ~' what area of law are we talking about? , ., ., ., ., ., ~ ., , about? the usual route to look at is whether someone _ about? the usual route to look at is whether someone has _ about? the usual route to look at is whether someone has been - about? the usual route to look at is whether someone has been racially| whether someone has been racially harassed or discriminated against at work is under the equality act, our uk legislation which includes discrimination, harassment prevention is. if this was an ordinary workplace it would probably be covered by the provisions in the act because the act covers employment, people engaged to perform personal services and a number of other groups like public office holders. 0ne number of other groups like public office holders. one would initially imagine i suppose that mps would be covered. but in fact, the provisions
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that apply in the workplace, that have protections against sexual harassment and discrimination do not apply to mps. they are expressly excluded because they are elected into public office. this is a bit of a controversial issue because while members of staff of the house of commons are protected because they are employed by the house of commons, while potentially members of staff who are employed by directly by mps will be protected because they are in an on appointment relationship, unfortunately appointment relationship, u nfortu nately for appointment relationship, unfortunately for mps there is a bit of a gaping hole, express exemption for elected office as an mp for protections in the act. t for elected office as an mp for protections in the act. i presume ou think protections in the act. i presume you think that — protections in the act. i presume you think that is _ protections in the act. i presume you think that is pretty _ protections in the act. i presumej you think that is pretty ridiculous that there are these exemptions and that there are these exemptions and thatis that there are these exemptions and that is why you say if this were an ordinary workplace, referring to the house of commons? t ordinary workplace, referring to the house of commons?— house of commons? i think that is riaht house of commons? i think that is right because _ house of commons? i think that is right because if _
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house of commons? i think that is right because if you _ house of commons? i think that is right because if you look _ house of commons? i think that is right because if you look at - house of commons? i think that is right because if you look at the i right because if you look at the statute of protections, they include harassment, which is defined as unwanted conduct either related to irrelevant characteristic under the act, that includes sex. conduct of a sexual nature. where that conduct has the purpose of effect of violating the person complaining's dignity or creating an intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensive environment for them. i think anyone on during what has happened would initially expect a complaint for sexual harassment or possibly for discrimination coming from the people complaining. this express exemption would exclude mps from making those complaints under the equality act. brute
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from making those complaints under the equality act-— the equality act. we discussed this earlier, whether _ the equality act. we discussed this earlier, whether the _ the equality act. we discussed this earlier, whether the policies i the equality act. we discussed this earlier, whether the policies and i earlier, whether the policies and processes in parliament were fit for purpose or simply to bureaucratic. presumably as a lawyer who specialises in employment law, you would like to see some reform here? i think it is an interesting point, there has been a lot of ongoing consultation over the last few years. we have had a consultation of women, and equality select committee which started consulting back before the pandemic and produce the report —— a report in 2018 and sexual harassment in the workplace was that they made recommendations they needed to be much more activity and recommended a duty to prevent harassment in the workplace. as yet, that hasn't happened because there has not been parliamentary time but i think we can expect to see that in the future. i think the question now is whether this new duty might be reviewed or looked at in a different
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light because there are clearly categories of people who are not protected expressly under the equality act who are at the receiving end or affected by behaviour of others. i think we heard with your previous correspondence speaking about the internal mechanisms there are, because at the moment these complainers who need to make a complaint through the independent complaints agreement scheme which is then, if it becomes a formal issue, looked at by the parliamentary standards committee officials with a view to deciding whether or not complaint would be upheld. there is an internal mechanism for that and internal policies which could be, the conduct could be assessed against, but there is no legal protection in the anti—discrimination legislation as it stands. anti-discrimination legislation as it stands. ., ., ., ., it stands. partner and head of the
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employment _ it stands. partner and head of the employment law _ it stands. partner and head of the employment law group, - it stands. partner and head of the employment law group, katy i employment law group, katy wedderburn. ben stokes has been named england test captain — taking overfrom joe root. all—rounder stokes, 30, has scored 5,061 runs and taken 174 wickets in 79 tests and had been vice—captain across two spells since 2017. joe root stepped down after five years in charge, having led england in a record 64 tests. stokes' first test as permanent england captain will be against world champions new zealand at lord's on 2nd june. was he a shoe in for the role? was the best choice _ was he a shoe in for the role? was the best choice to _ was he a shoe in for the role? —" the best choice to be captain in reality. you have to be good enough first of all to be captain. they are at such a low ebb at the moment, precious few players actually can command a place in the team, ben stokes is certainly one of them. you
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mentioned his statistics, those emphasise how important he is to england as an all—round cricketer. thinking back five years to when he was suspended by england following the incident in bristol, he went on to have the court case, found not guilty of affray. hard to imagine him then as england captain. subsequently amazing innings in summer 2019 and subsequently amazing innings in summer2019 and in subsequently amazing innings in summer 2019 and in particular, sports personality of the year. last summer, we heard he was taking an indefinite breakfrom cricket summer, we heard he was taking an indefinite break from cricket to restore his physical and mental well—being. he did that, came back over the winter. england will hope that when ben stokes feels he is ready to be captain he absolutely is because, let's be clear, they need him more than ever.— him more than ever. what kind of ca tain him more than ever. what kind of captain do — him more than ever. what kind of captain do you — him more than ever. what kind of captain do you think— him more than ever. what kind of captain do you think he _ him more than ever. what kind of captain do you think he will- him more than ever. what kind of captain do you think he will be? l him more than ever. what kind of. captain do you think he will be? you say he is an all—rounder, will that stand him in good stead, well the trials and tribulations he has gone through stand him in good stead as well? ., , ., through stand him in good stead as well? .,, ., _ , through stand him in good stead as well? .,, ., , ., well? people would say he is far more mature — well? people would say he is far more mature acting _ well? people would say he is far more mature acting as - well? people would say he is far more mature acting as an i well? people would say he is far- more mature acting as an individual, he is 30 years old. he has always
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been a leaderfigure in he is 30 years old. he has always been a leader figure in the team because of the way he handles himself, expressive, passionate. when you're captain, it is so intense, you are in charge of the minute by minute tactics in a test match, media engagements, in the past when the charismatic all—rounder has been captain for england, it hasn't really worked. they will hope the promotion and responsibility inspires ben stokes and does not prohibit him. the key ruestion, and does not prohibit him. the key question. can _ and does not prohibit him. the key question, can he _ and does not prohibit him. the key question, can he make _ and does not prohibit him. the key question, can he make england's l and does not prohibit him. the key l question, can he make england's win again? we question, can he make england's win auain? ~ ., question, can he make england's win aain? . ., �* question, can he make england's win aaain? ., �* ,, , again? we need about five ben stokes reall . again? we need about five ben stokes really- there — again? we need about five ben stokes really. there has _ again? we need about five ben stokes really. there has been _ again? we need about five ben stokes really. there has been real— again? we need about five ben stokes really. there has been real void i again? we need about five ben stokes really. there has been real void at i really. there has been real void at england, he is now captain, we have appointed a managing director who will speak later this morning. they still need a coach, ben stokes is the right support network around him. new zealand coming up, in test match the summer, also south africa. they are only losing streak. in the
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summer you wonder where the next one is coming from. ben stokes has the ability to inspire those throughout his career, that is the absolute key to his appointment now.— his career, that is the absolute key to his appointment now. thank you, joe. a man has appeared in court this morning charged with the murder a man has been charged with murder of four members of same family. prince andrew has lost his freedom of the city of your corner following a vote by local councillors, the motion to remove the accolade was passed unanimously. 0ff motion to remove the accolade was passed unanimously. off the back of his...
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hello again. today's wather is very similar to yesterday's, in that in that along eastern coastal councils and round the midlands we have a lot of low cloud. thick enough here and there for the odd spot of rain. after a sunny cold start, a bit more cloud developing in other areas, turning the sunshine hazy. we could see the odd shower coming into the south—west, and some showers weaving across northern scotland. quite breezy across some southern counties in the english channel, and with the onshore breeze along the north sea coastline, it will feel chilly here again. tonight we still have this cloud around. as showers fade, there will be clearer skies, and it will be cold enough for a touch of frost tonight, across northern england, northern ireland, southern scotland, wales, and also parts of the midlands as well. but least people start with some sunshine tomorrow, and all this low cloud still with us, but sinking southwards. still breezy across the south, but tomorrow there will be more sunshine around than today, with just a few shower, perhaps in eastern scotland, north east england but highs up to 17.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. the un secretary—general antonio guterres is visiting war—torn sites round in kyiv that had been occupied by russian troops. he says russia must co—operate with the international criminal court over alleged war crimes. in ben stokes has been named as england test cricket captain. allegations of sexism in westminster, a labour mp that inappropriate comments were made to her by a member of the shadow cabinet. it comes after two female conservative mps claim they watched a male colleague watching pornography in the commons. liam berne breached parliamentary bullying rules and it is recommended he is suspended for two days.
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sport, and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre. england have turned to their talismanic all—rounder ben stokes as they look to get revitalise the fortunes of their test team. he's the new captain, and takes over from joe root who stood down earlier this month after five years in the role he had after five years in the role. he had been root�*s vice captain and was the stand out candidate. he's been capped 79 times at test level since making his debut nine years ago and has scored over 5000 runs and taken 174 test wickets although he took a break from cricket for four months last year to protect his mental health. his first series in charge will be against new zealand injune. stokes says he's honoured to be given the chance to lead the england test team. this is a real privilege, and i'm excited about getting started this summer. says "i want to thankjoe root for everything he has done for english cricket and for always being a great ambassador for the sport all across the world."
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i thought he was the best person to do it. i know there has been a lot saying, he is the only one, if you had lots of leaders ben stokes would still be the best person, because he has a great cricket brain in my opinion, he has the respect of the dressing room. he has been a leader for however long he has been in, he was someone that people follow, he has a hell of a lot of empathy for the player, he cares about the player, he goes does not go off and do his own thing, he is constantly thinking about the people round him so stokes will become england's 81st full time test captain. former skipper david gower says stokes should be ready to step into the role. 0riginally i would have said that ben is so important for the team just as a figures as a presence in that dressing room, and someone who can bowl, bat and catch and inspire people round him, and that for if
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first part of his career is absolutely the key, i think now there are two thing, one he is more mature, i know he has had problems in the last couple of years and as hopefully be hope he is all through those completely. he has done the job in bits and piece, he has done it temporarily, he has captained the one day side and looked good doing it. and i think and hope he is ready for it. staying with cricket. meanwhile, more than 200 people have come forward to give evidence to an independent investigation into scottish cricket. some of those testimonies have been passed on to police scotland. it's after sportscotland ordered a review last year after numerous complaints from within the game, including the country's all time highest wicket taker majid haq, who said cricket in scotland was institutionally racist. emily scarratt will captain england in the absence of the injured sarah hunter for this weekend's women's six nations grand slam decider in france. scarratt, who won her 100th cap last time out, says she'll be treating the game like a world cup final
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in front of the sell out crowd in bayonnes, with england having won the last three meetings by four points or fewer. poppy cleall is expected to start at number eight despite going off injured in the win over ireland. we've had wins for manchester city and liverpool in the champions league this week, there are also two british sides in the europa league semi—finals, west ham and rangers both face german opposition tonight. rangers are away at rb leipzig west ham are at home for the first leg against eintracht frankfurt. it's the first time david moyes, has managed a club in a european semifinal, and it's be the first time the hammers have got this far in europe since 1976, when they went on to lose in the final of the european cup winners' cup. and leicester city are hoping to reach their first european final, in the europa conference league. brendan rodgers' side host, jose mourinho's roma in their semi final first leg
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of this new competition. the third tier of european club football. what a semi final line up we have at the world snooker championship. all four players are former champions first up at one o'clock champions — first up at one o'clock the 2019 championjudd trump, will face three time winner mark williams, for a place in the final, after trump came back from 8—5 down, against stuart bingham, winning the last eight frames, in a row to clinch their quarterfinal — while four time winnerjohn higgins starts his semi this evening against six time champion ronnie 0'sullivan. breaking news coming from the courts and at coventry crown court her win addict laura heath has beenjailed
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for the gross negligence manslaughter of her seven—year—old son, who was asthmatic and who was found dead in a garden at their home in birmingham, so his mother, laura heath has beenjailed for 20 in birmingham, so his mother, laura heath has been jailed for 20 years for gross negligence, manslaughter, the court heard she pry ticeed her drug addiction over the wellbeing of her young son, seven—year—old hakim who was found dead in the garden of their home. he has suffered from severe asthma. it's been confirmed russia has cut off natural gas supplies to poland and bulgaria, dramatically escalating its response to western sanctions. before the current conflict, some countries moved to reduce their dependency on russian gas. lithuania isjust 700 kilometres from the russian capital. just eight years ago, 100% of its gas came from russia. that same year, it started producing its own liquefied natural gas from a floating terminal off
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the country's baltic coast. recently the lithuanian government announced it had become the first european country to stop all imports of russian gas. so an energy revolution in little more than a decade but how was it achieved? let's speak to rokas masiulis, ceo of energy firm litgrid. he is the former lithuanian minister for transport and energy. thank you very much forjoining us on bbc news today. and when you were first told to find a plan, to wean lithuania off russian gas what was your reaction in ~ russian gas what was your reaction in . ., , russian gas what was your reaction in ~ ., , ., , ., , russian gas what was your reaction in ., russian gas what was your reaction in well, it was obvious that russia is usin: in well, it was obvious that russia is using energy — in well, it was obvious that russia is using energy as _ in well, it was obvious that russia is using energy as a _ in well, it was obvious that russia is using energy as a weapon, i is using energy as a weapon, pipeline oil pipeline to the retynery was stopped for renovation, it has been renovated until now, so it has been renovated until now, so it is clear we had to find a solution and our own was a solution.
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to go from 100% of gas coming from russia to zero is an asheave. though, how did you do it in that timescale, tell us in more detail. the whole country was unified, to make this project happen, experiments and so—and—so forth. everything was done as fast as possible, and it is technically not so complicated project. i believe that everybody else can do as we did. , , ., , that everybody else can do as we did. , .,, . ., , did. just to be clear, you still im ort did. just to be clear, you still import gas. _ did. just to be clear, you still import gas, don't _ did. just to be clear, you still import gas, don't you? i did. just to be clear, you still import gas, don't you? we . did. just to be clear, you still- import gas, don't you? we import as much as we — import gas, don't you? we import as much as we need, _ import gas, don't you? we import as much as we need, our— import gas, don't you? we import as much as we need, our terminal i import gas, don't you? we import as much as we need, our terminal is i import gas, don't you? we import asj much as we need, our terminal is big enough not only for lithuania but it can supply other balkan states like estonia but partially we still import a little bit from russia, now, not but imported before then. and the gas that you import now, where is that coming through from? mostly united states. stand
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where is that coming through from? mostly united states.— where is that coming through from? mostly united states. and how much, what percentage _ mostly united states. and how much, what percentage of _ mostly united states. and how much, what percentage of your _ mostly united states. and how much, what percentage of your national- what percentage of your national requirements do you produce yourselves? th requirements do you produce yourselves?— requirements do you produce yourselves? requirements do you produce ourselves? ., ., ., yourselves? in lithuania there no as yourselves? in lithuania there no gas production. _ yourselves? in lithuania there no gas production, we _ yourselves? in lithuania there no gas production, we import i gas production, we import everything, and as i said primarily from united states right now. tqm. everything, and as i said primarily from united states right now. ok, so the liquefied — from united states right now. ok, so the liquefied natural _ from united states right now. ok, so the liquefied natural gas _ from united states right now. ok, so the liquefied natural gas you - the liquefied natural gas you referred to, tell me more about that. tt referred to, tell me more about that. , , , ., . that. it is being produced in the us, that. it is being produced in the us, shipped — that. it is being produced in the us, shipped to _ that. it is being produced in the us, shipped to our— that. it is being produced in the us, shipped to our terminal, i that. it is being produced in the| us, shipped to our terminal, off loaded to our terminal and our terminal produces the normal gas, which is pumped into the pipelines and being supplied to our residents. so other countries have been looking at energy supply, security for some time now, before this, this current crisis of course because of the environmental crisis but now because of the urgency added by the war in ukraine, what advice would you give to other country, about how they can
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wean themselves off supplies of russian gas and oil. you have to start doing it. once you start doing it, not looking back, things will happen. you start doing it, not looking back, things will happen.— things will happen. you make it sound a very — things will happen. you make it sound a very straightforward i sound a very straightforward enterprise. sound a very straightforward enterprise-— enterprise. that is a simple business- — enterprise. that is a simple business. ok, _ enterprise. that is a simple business. ok, and, - enterprise. that is a simple business. ok, and, in i enterprise. that is a simple | business. ok, and, in terms enterprise. that is a simple i business. ok, and, in terms of enterprise. that is a simple - business. ok, and, in terms of the, the costs. — business. ok, and, in terms of the, the costs. to _ business. ok, and, in terms of the, the costs, to consumers, _ business. ok, and, in terms of the, the costs, to consumers, has i business. 0k, and, in terms of the, the costs, to consumers, has there| the costs, to consumers, has there been a significant increase in costs, or has that levelled off? in costs, or has that levelled off? ll�*i opposite. in lithuania costs, or has that levelled off? in opposite. in lithuania energy prices reduced by 40% because russian gas was sold under inflated prices because we had no option, so that is how russia operates, if you have no option, then they will press you. so for lithuanians it has been a win all round, in terms of energy security and indeed cost, as well? absolutely. this will happen to everybody else.
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absolutely. this will happen to everybody else-— everybody else. thank you. formally — everybody else. thank you. formally lithuania's - everybody else. thank you. formally lithuania's energyl everybody else. thank you. - formally lithuania's energy minister there. there is just one week to go until voters across the uk go to the polls. voters in england, wales, and scotland will pick who they want to run services that affect everyday life in their local area. those in northern ireland will choose its government. ahead of the vote we will be profiling some of the key contests in the uk's four nations. today my colleague luxmy gopaljoins us from the town centre in newcastle—under—lyme. the local guard —— gardeners have been busy. it looks very colourful behind you. been busy. it looks very colourful behind yom— been busy. it looks very colourful behind yon-— been busy. it looks very colourful behind ou. , ., ., ., behind you. yes i am in front of the local council— behind you. yes i am in front of the local council offices _ behind you. yes i am in front of the local council offices here, _ behind you. yes i am in front of the local council offices here, among i behind you. yes i am in front of the local council offices here, among a| local council offices here, among a sea of tulips. don't be deceived by the palm trees, because it is a brisk spring morning, if you don't know the area, news ca can —— newcastle unlist lime is a couple of milds from stoke, here, like many
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other places in the country people are going to the polls next week, to cast their vote in the local council election, and the matters on their mind include things like what can be done to improve public transport in the area, what can be done to revive the area, what can be done to revive the fortunes of the high street and of course, there is the cost of living crisis, that will inevitably be weighing on voters minds. looking at those and other key issues is alex forsyth. in the political race is on. with elections round the corner, parties are trying to grab votes. and at this southampton climbing centre, people are pretty clear what's on their minds. inflation is going mad, and especially for fuel prices, for public transport, it's going absolutely insane. obviously, there has to be something done about that asap because people won't be able to to handle this much longer.
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the environment, i think, is quite important to take care of because i think that's a very pressing issue. next week's elections in england are about who runs local services, but they'll also show which parties are on their way up and which could be losing grip there. the first widespread test of opinion since the war in ukraine, since prices really started to climb and of course, since news of lockdown parties in downing street. i think that will probably contribute to the way a lot of people vote. if belief is shaken in a party, then that will will change the way that people kind of see them in the both on the local and large scale. in terms of covid and obviously we've had a recent party gate thing. i do follow that kind of stuff because it's obviously all over the media. but i think overall i would care more about the local elections because your councillor can make a change for you. southampton's just one place where these elections will test the political water, notjust for the larger parties, but the greens and a host of others too. what happens in these elections will be seen as the public�*s view of the political parties nationally.
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for the conservatives, is borisjohnson still a vote winner? for labour is keir starmer rebuilding support where he needs to? are the lib dems broadening their base? but remember these elections will decide who runs local services. so for many people, local factors will count. in southampton city centre, brenda's had a tough couple of years trying to keep her therapy business afloat. and with prices rising, she says it's local support that matters to her. electric bills have almost doubled, you know, and again, that affects running costs where we're not earning as much. now, i think more could be done and try and support those businesses that are trying to support the communities because we're all playing our part. not far away, this cocktail bar was set up after the pandemic as a place to bring people together. owners prince and dorothy say community is important to them, but to keep going, they need backing.
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from pandemic to to the war in ukraine, you know, down to to some of the factors that are affecting us. high inflation rate, items we buy have gone more than 100%, you know, increase in price. we're just really like hanging on the line, trying to see that we stay up. we really need a change whereby all these small businesses can be supported. the economy cannot do without small and medium scale businesses, whether local or national factors are at play. there's a lot at stake in these elections which could cause quite a political shake up. alex forsyth, bbc news, southampton. iamjoined by i am joined by rob preece, a local butcher, he owns it now, he has worked there since he was 13. you
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have lived here your whole life. life. you are a good person to ask how it has changed? it life. you are a good person to ask how it has changed?— life. you are a good person to ask how it has changed? it has changed a lot since i was — how it has changed? it has changed a lot since i was a _ how it has changed? it has changed a lot since i was a lad _ how it has changed? it has changed a lot since i was a lad and _ how it has changed? it has changed a lot since i was a lad and now- how it has changed? it has changed a lot since i was a lad and now i'm - how it has changed? it has changed a lot since i was a lad and now i'm a . lot since i was a lad and now i'm a man. in lot since i was a lad and now i'm a man. , ., _, ., y lot since i was a lad and now i'm a man. , ., _, ., , ., ., man. in terms of the economy and how well the town — man. in terms of the economy and how well the town centre _ man. in terms of the economy and how well the town centre is _ man. in terms of the economy and how well the town centre is doing, - man. in terms of the economy and how well the town centre is doing, how - well the town centre is doing, how you feel business is thriving, how have you seen that change? it you feel business is thriving, how have you seen that change? it has chanced a have you seen that change? it has changed a lot- _ have you seen that change? it has changed a lot. changed _ have you seen that change? it has changed a lot. changed a - have you seen that change? it has changed a lot. changed a hell - have you seen that change? it has changed a lot. changed a hell of l have you seen that change? it has changed a lot. changed a hell of a j changed a lot. changed a hell of a lot. there is a lot more people in the town, when i first come here, it was bustling, bustling, people everywhere, you know, there was, the markets were full, and now, it's, it has gone really quiet. haifa markets were full, and now, it's, it has gone really quiet.— markets were full, and now, it's, it has gone really quiet. how has your business been _ has gone really quiet. how has your business been affected, _ has gone really quiet. how has your business been affected, especially i business been affected, especially as we have been coming out of the pandemic and high street fortunes aren't necessarily as thriving as they were, how you feeling about business potential?— they were, how you feeling about business potential? well, we quite fortunate, business potential? well, we quite fortunate. we _ business potential? well, we quite fortunate, we have _ business potential? well, we quite fortunate, we have a _ business potential? well, we quite fortunate, we have a lot _ business potential? well, we quite fortunate, we have a lot of- fortunate, we have a lot of ha rd—core fortunate, we have a lot of hard—core customers, regular people who come every week, and a lot of them just come to see us, which we are really fortunate about.— them just come to see us, which we
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are really fortunate about. now, you ma as are really fortunate about. now, you may as well — are really fortunate about. now, you may as well be _ are really fortunate about. now, you may as well be mr— may as well be mr newcastle—under—lyme, because in the moments we were standing here before we came on air, loads of people walking past would call out to you by name, what are some of the issues they have been saying that is important the them. aha, they have been saying that is important the them.- they have been saying that is important the them. a lot of people, arkin: is important the them. a lot of people, parking is one. _ important the them. a lot of people, parking is one, there _ important the them. a lot of people, parking is one, there is _ important the them. a lot of people, parking is one, there is not - important the them. a lot of people, parking is one, there is not as - important the them. a lot of people, parking is one, there is not as many| parking is one, there is not as many car parks as there should be. plus they are too expensive, but we, where we are, at the moment, there is a generation, we are getting a lot of money from central government to help the high street and they are having office, houses and a car park, this car park, we hope, because it is up the high street it will be free or it will be discounted heavily. will be free or it will be discounted heavil . �* ., ., discounted heavily. and that would make a difference _ discounted heavily. and that would make a difference to _ discounted heavily. and that would make a difference to your- discounted heavily. and that would | make a difference to your business. absolutely, definitely. do make a difference to your business. absolutely, definitely.— absolutely, definitely. do you feel ou have absolutely, definitely. do you feel you have as _ absolutely, definitely. do you feel you have as much _ absolutely, definitely. do you feel you have as much pride _ absolutely, definitely. do you feel you have as much pride in - absolutely, definitely. do you feel you have as much pride in your - absolutely, definitely. do you feel l you have as much pride in your town as you always did?— as you always did? yes, i am always roud of
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as you always did? yes, i am always proud of newcastle _ as you always did? yes, i am always proud of newcastle it _ as you always did? yes, i am always proud of newcastle it a _ as you always did? yes, i am always proud of newcastle it a shame - as you always did? yes, i am always proud of newcastle it a shame howl as you always did? yes, i am always| proud of newcastle it a shame how it has gone. proud of newcastle it a shame how it has one. ~ ., proud of newcastle it a shame how it has one. . ., ., ,, ., proud of newcastle it a shame how it has gone-_ there i proud of newcastle it a shame how it l has gone._ there is has gone. what do you mean? there is not as many — has gone. what do you mean? there is not as many people — has gone. what do you mean? there is not as many people come _ has gone. what do you mean? there is not as many people come in _ has gone. what do you mean? there is not as many people come in the - has gone. what do you mean? there is not as many people come in the town l not as many people come in the town as used to be, there is over a0 empty shops here, and, there isjust not the foot fall that there should be, in the town. find not the foot fall that there should be, in the town.— not the foot fall that there should be, in the town. and what would you like to see councils _ be, in the town. and what would you like to see councils do, _ be, in the town. and what would you like to see councils do, the - be, in the town. and what would you like to see councils do, the council. like to see councils do, the council do to help?— like to see councils do, the council do to help? well they could reduce the car parking _ do to help? well they could reduce the car parking like _ do to help? well they could reduce the car parking like i've _ do to help? well they could reduce the car parking like i've said, - do to help? well they could reduce the car parking like i've said, they| the car parking like i've said, they could put better bus lynns on, kiel, there is massive student population up there is massive student population up there, they could put free buses on, they would come to the town and that generates more interest and custom. , ., ., ., custom. there is no train station in this town itself, _ custom. there is no train station in this town itself, so _ custom. there is no train station in this town itself, so a _ custom. there is no train station in this town itself, so a lot _ custom. there is no train station in this town itself, so a lot people - this town itself, so a lot people rely on buses but perhaps aren't the services people want. ihla rely on buses but perhaps aren't the services people want.— services people want. no and they have cut a — services people want. no and they have cut a lot _ services people want. no and they have cut a lot of _ services people want. no and they have cut a lot of the _ services people want. no and they have cut a lot of the bus, - services people want. no and they have cut a lot of the bus, they - services people want. no and they. have cut a lot of the bus, they need to be funded really find have cut a lot of the bus, they need to be funded reall— have cut a lot of the bus, they need to be funded really and when you go to be funded really and when you go to vote, to be funded really and when you go to vote. next — to be funded really and when you go to vote, next week, _ to be funded really and when you go to vote, next week, are _ to be funded really and when you go to vote, next week, are those - to be funded really and when you go to vote, next week, are those the i to vote, next week, are those the kinds of issues that will be on your mind when you are casting your ballot or are you going to also be weighing up things like, partygate,
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how much of that is a factor? ihell how much of that is a factor? well it is uuite how much of that is a factor? well it is quite a _ how much of that is a factor? well it is quite a bit _ how much of that is a factor? well it is quite a bit of— how much of that is a factor? well it is quite a bit of a _ how much of that is a factor? -ii it is quite a bit of a factor really, you have the partygate, plus, you know, we want, it is a local election so we want it for local election so we want it for local people, we want the right things, because it is a good town and put in the right hands, it can work. it can work.— and put in the right hands, it can work. it can work. thank you so much for takin: work. it can work. thank you so much for taking the — work. it can work. thank you so much for taking the time _ work. it can work. thank you so much for taking the time to _ work. it can work. thank you so much for taking the time to speak— work. it can work. thank you so much for taking the time to speak to - work. it can work. thank you so much for taking the time to speak to us, . for taking the time to speak to us, thatis for taking the time to speak to us, that is rob price, a local butcher, he has lived here in newcastle—under—lyme all his life. we are here throughout the day and we will be speaking to other people like rob, business owner, we will speaking to volunteers at a food bank and looking at the other issues, including the coyle crisis that will make up —— the cost of living crisis. thank you. and you can find out more about the upcoming local elections in newcastle under lyme council on 5th may, including information on how to vote, and who your local candidates are, by going to the council website
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newcastle—staffs.gov.uk. we are hearing thatjamie we are hearing that jamie wallace has been charged with driving without due care an attention. let's get more now on the news that ben stokes is england's new test captain. with me now is the cricket commentator alison mitchell. thank you forjoining us. i was chatting tojoe wilson earlier and he was saying really there was only one viable person for the captain psi, and it was ben stokes, would you agree that?— psi, and it was ben stokes, would you agree that? yes, indeed. he has had a period — you agree that? yes, indeed. he has had a period as _ you agree that? yes, indeed. he has had a period as captain _ you agree that? yes, indeed. he has had a period as captain very - you agree that? yes, indeed. he has had a period as captain very briefly l had a period as captain very briefly before, but when you look at the england line up, you look at other senior players and their longevity
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and there are very few options at this point in time which is reflected in the poor run of form england have had, only winning one test in the last 17 which led tojoe root stepping down. you had stuart broad and stuart anderson, that is clouded they were dropped for the recent tour but in the terms of captain, ben stokes, the only option but still a very good option and he will be an exceptional lead earthquake he shows that talent, so a natural leadership in the way he has been such a talismanic cricketer. 50 has been such a talismanic cricketer-— has been such a talismanic cricketer. ., ., ., , ., cricketer. so a lot of expectation on him to _ cricketer. so a lot of expectation on him to try _ cricketer. so a lot of expectation on him to try and _ cricketer. so a lot of expectation on him to try and change - cricketer. so a lot of expectation i on him to try and change england's run of form, but it is not all down to one person, clearly, how much of a difference can he make, do you think? ~ ., , a difference can he make, do you think? ~ . , ., �* think? well, that is it. you can't really expect — think? well, that is it. you can't really expect england's - think? well, that is it. you can't really expect england's batting i really expect england's batting fortunes to change overnight because there has been a change of leader. joe root will continue to bat in the side and his runs, as prolific as they have been will continue to be
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so important to the england team. overall, yes, stokes will need to look to the players round him to step up. can he provide inspiration which at times seems to be lacking from joe root. certainly his tactical nous on the field that ben stokes has displayed will be able to come to the fore in a leadership role, so that might help the team, but overall, in the battle he has —— batting he has to improve. that is the bottom line, how much of that comes from the inspiring leadership of the captain, i suppose we will see in the first couple of test matches but ben stokes can't do it all alone. he matches but ben stokes can't do it all alone. ., , matches but ben stokes can't do it all alone. . , ., ~ matches but ben stokes can't do it all alone. ., ., ~ ,., all alone. he has taken some time awa to all alone. he has taken some time away to work— all alone. he has taken some time away to work on — all alone. he has taken some time away to work on his _ all alone. he has taken some time away to work on his physical- all alone. he has taken some time | away to work on his physical health and mental health. will that stand him in good stead? l and mental health. will that stand him in good stead?— and mental health. will that stand him in good stead? i think that ben stokes has an _ him in good stead? i think that ben stokes has an empathetic - him in good stead? i think that ben | stokes has an empathetic character, he has been through an extraordinary journey in his own career, the ups and downsped and he has come through and downsped and he has come through
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and shown resilience in that when you think of him being left out of the 17/18 ashes tour because he was awaiting a court case. he has... before that hitting the fastest double hundred by an englishman in test crick. so he has been through all sort, he was strip to have had voice can't psi, he earned it back, he has that respect of the dressing room. i think the fact he has been through so many ups and down, personally losing his father, not so long ago he was central to his life around cricketing life, his sporting life as well. i think those qualities will shine through in a captain because you not only need to be a respected cricketer, and have that natural leadership, but you need to be a good people manager, when you are captain of a test side in international cricket, so i think thatjourney in international cricket, so i think that journey that he in international cricket, so i think thatjourney that he has been on, absolutely helps him in his
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leadership credentials. speaking of international— leadership credentials. speaking of international cricket _ leadership credentials. speaking of international cricket how _ leadership credentials. speaking of international cricket how do - leadership credentials. speaking of international cricket how do you i international cricket how do you think will appointment will be received round the cricking world? i received round the cricking world? i think it depends on people's viewpoint, of course there is the viewpoint, of course there is the viewpoint people look on all rounders who have been appointed captains of england andrew flintoff didn't have a good run. ian botham wasn't a successful test can't, so maybe some might think this might burden ben stokes and diminish his ability of a cricketer which will help the international teams for who help the international teams for who he is a feared competitor, on the flip side he, if he proves to be an inspirational leader that can transform the fortunes of the england test team, well, then, he will garner greater respect from his opponents, in those opposition teams and he already has done. goad opponents, in those opposition teams and he already has done.— and he already has done. good to talk to you- _ #3
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nasa's spacex dragon capsule carrying four astronauts has docked with the international space station. the astronauts were welcomed by seven crew members already on station. the dragon spacecraft was launched from the kennedy space center in florida yesterday. nasa says it's one of the fastest commercial crew flights to the international space station. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. there is no significant rain in the forecast today, but as we head into the weekend for scotland and northern ireland, we could start to see some coming our way. high pressure still firmly in charge of our weather. things are fairly staid. light winds but more of a breeze across the southeast and the english channel and also an onshore breeze along the east coast. so here it will feel cooler. we still have all this cloud across eastern coastal counties in through the midlands as well and a bit more cloud developing through the day, turning the sunshine quite hazy. we could catch the odd shower in south west england and also at times crossing northern scotland, but most of us will miss them. now, as we head on through the evening and overnight, the cloud starts
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to sink slowly southwards. we will see some clear skies develop. and where that happens, of course, the temperature will fall away. so we're looking at a touch of frost across northern ireland, southern scotland, northern england, north wales and parts of the midlands. but that's where tomorrow morning we will start with some sunshine. meanwhile, our thicker cloud pushing down into the southeastern quarter still thick enough for the odd spot of rain. so quite breezy, but not as breezy as today in the south, but more sunshine for more of us. now, having said that, there'll be a few showers across the north and east of scotland. those could get into the north east of england as well. temperaturs nine to about 16 degrees, possibly 17 somewhere. now, as we head on through the weekend, the high pressure that's been driving our weather of late sinks a bit further south, allowing this area of low pressure with its fronts to make inroads and the fronts will bring in some rain. so we could see some significant rain through the day coming in across western parts of scotland and also northern ireland ahead of it, the cloud will build.
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so it's for much of england and wales that we hang on to the dry conditions, albeit the sunshine turning hazier through the day. temperatures nine in lerwick to highs of 17 in hull and also in london. then as we move from saturday into sunday where the front continues to sink southwards across england and wales as a weakening feature, so it will introduce some patchy rain, quite a bit of cloud at times, but it will brighten up across northern and eastern parts of scotland and also parts of eastern england with some sunshine breaking through during the course of the afternoon. temperatures ten in the north to about 13 or 1a as we push farther south, but 17 in glasgow.
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this is bbc news — the headlines: the un secretary general antonio guterres is visiting war torn sites surrounding kyiv that had been occupied by russian troops — he says russia must cooperate with the international criminal court over alleged war—crimes. the war is an absurdity in the 21st—century. the war is evil. an investigation has found that former labour cabinet mininster, liam byrne breached parliamentary bullying rules and recommends he is suspended from the commons for two days. allegations of sexism in westminster — a labour mp alleges that inappropriate comments were made to her by a member of the shadow cabinet. it comes after two female conservative mps claimed they saw
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a male colleague watching pornography in the commons. i think anyone on hearing what has happened would initially imagine there would potentially be a complaint for sexual harassment... ben stokes has been named as the new england men's test cricket captain. we'll be answering your questions on the war in ukraine on your questions answered at 12:30. the united nations chief antonio guterres has denounced war in the 21st century as an "absurdity", as he visited towns in ukraine devastated during russia's invasion.
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we can cross live now to kyiv and my colleague ben brown. welcome from kyiv where antonio gets terrace un secretary general is due to meet volume zelensky. the secretary general has been visiting towns near here to see for himself the impact of the invasion. first he travelled not far from the border of belarus and the main access of the advance on kyiv. it was heavily sheuedin advance on kyiv. it was heavily shelled in the early days of the conflict next to bucha, which had been occupied by russian troops, visiting the site of a mass grave there. also said there needs to be a
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thorough investigation into alleged war crimes and appealed to russia to cooperate. he passed widespread destruction, homes shops and infrastructure smashed by bombs, rockets, missiles and fighting after russian forces occupy territory they're very russian forces occupy territory they�* re very close to russian forces occupy territory they're very close to kyiv. he denounced the war as evil and also called it an absurdity in the 21st century. let's listen to what he was saying today. century. let's listen to what he was saying today-— saying today. when i see those destro ed saying today. when i see those destroyed buildings. _ i must say what i feel, imagine my family in one of those houses now destroyed and black. i see my
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granddaughters running away in panic, part of the family eventually killed. 50 the war is an absurdity in the 21st century. they were as evil. when we see these situations, our heart of course stays with the victims, our condolences to their families. but our emotions are, there is no way war can be acceptable in the 21st century. look at that. un secretary general there on a tour of those towns near kyiv and visibly upset by what he had seen. he will be meeting the ukrainian president for the mayor of zelensky. he has been to moscow to meet the russian
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forest management foreign minister and vladimir putin. and welcome back to talk to the ukrainian president. quite what he will be able to agree with ukrainian president is clear. he would like to secure some sort of peace agreement, even a temporary ceasefire, but it seems that is a long way off. it seems a more limited target of monetary corridors especially out of mariupol. it is their decision _ especially out of mariupol. it is their decision but _ especially out of mariupol. it 3 their decision but if they decide to apply, they will be warmly welcomed
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in sweden and expect the process to go quickly. meanwhile, the british foreign secretary said russia's forces must be pushed out of the whole of ukraine in the clearest indication yet of the uk's aims in this conflict, in a speech in london liz truss described a victory as ukraine —— for ukraine as a strategic imperative for the rest in order to deter future russian aggression. the aftermath of a missile attack in the city of kharkiv in northern ukraine. at least one person is reported to have been killed here. the invasion has reduced much of this city to rubble. translation: it's scary.
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it's so painful. when it's dark, we're in fear. when there was a shooting, and when the evening comes, it's indescribable. unbearable. in a speech, the uk foreign secretary, liz truss, called for western countries to push russian forces out of ukraine. some argue that we shouldn't provide heavy weapons for fear of provoking something worse. but my view is that inaction would be the greatest provocation. this is a time for courage, not for caution. now president putin has sent a message to the west, warning ukraine's allies against further interference. translation: if anyone from the outside intends to interfere in what's happening, then they should know this. if they create threats for us, threats of a strategic nature, our retaliation, our counter strike will be instantaneous. in the southern port city of mariupol, this steel plant, surrounded by russian forces, the last stronghold of ukrainian fighters here, their commander
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appealing for a mass evacuation, saying alongside 600 wounded soldiers are civilians, including children inside. translation: today my appeal is, apply the extraction _ procedure to us. the wounded will die and those who are alive will fall in the battle. civilians will die together with us. very, very many people have died in the city. the city has been wiped off the face of the earth. after meeting president putin earlier this week, today, the un secretary general, antonio guterres, will meet ukraine's president zelensky. the focus, he says, on securing humanitarian corridors to try to evacuate the thousands of civilians still caught in the fighting. andrew plant, bbc news.
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the ukrainian government has told the united nations more than 500,000 civilians have been forcibly deported to russia including an hundred 20,000 children. the kremlin says ukrainians are willingly moving to russia but the bbc has been hearing from families of people who have been taken captive by russian forces and civilians who have been returned from russia on prisoner exchanges who refute the claims from moscow. our correspondent has this report. moscow. our correspondent has this re ort. ,, , , ., report. still in disbelief that he is back home. _ report. still in disbelief that he is back home. a _ report. still in disbelief that he is back home. a red _ report. still in disbelief that he is back home. a red cross - report. still in disbelief that he - is back home. a red cross volunteer deported to russia, captured as he was evacuating people from more hit areas near kyiv. was evacuating people from more hit areas near kyiv-_ areas near kyiv. translation: we were beaten — areas near kyiv. translation: we were beaten with _ areas near kyiv. translation: we were beaten with rifles, _ areas near kyiv. translation: we were beaten with rifles, punched i areas near kyiv. translation: we i were beaten with rifles, punched and kicked. they blindfolded us and tied our hands with tape. they used tasers and kept asking for
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information about the military. after six days in a crowded basement in ukraine we were taken to belarus. we could not see but i saw our car crossing the border. —— they thought we could not see. he showed us the identity slip made for him there. it isissued identity slip made for him there. it is issued by the military of the russian federation. from belarus, he says, they were driven to a russian prison. translation: the torture continued. every day i had to look up continued. every day i had to look up at the russian soldiers. we would be beaten. they treated us like animals. one evening, i counted 72 people. there were more because we could hear the voices of others. the fact that there is a large number of ukrainians there is 100% true. he does not know why he was freed. the
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only one in his cell. he overheard there were people from the chernobyl nuclear site. when we went to the point we found evidence of them being taken. this is the basement at chernobyl where 169 ukrainian national guard were held for weeks when it was occupied. other staff saw them being taken from here by russian forces as they were driven from northern ukraine. —— as they withdrew from northern ukraine. in a village nearby, we met the family of one of the missing men. we are hiding their identities to protect them. the guard's wife last spoke to him on the 31st of march, just before he was taken. translation: he told me i am 0k physically but not
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emotionally. i could hear the anxiety— emotionally. i could hear the anxiety in _ emotionally. i could hear the anxiety in his voice, she said. our son keeps— anxiety in his voice, she said. our son keeps asking where his father is. son keeps asking where his father is he _ son keeps asking where his father is he is _ son keeps asking where his father is. he is very worried and he is scared — is. he is very worried and he is scared that _ is. he is very worried and he is scared that i might disappear too so he keeps _ scared that i might disappear too so he keeps following me around everywhere. he keeps following me around everywhere-— he keeps following me around eve here. ., ' , ., everywhere. from different parts of ukraine we have _ everywhere. from different parts of ukraine we have spoken _ everywhere. from different parts of ukraine we have spoken to - everywhere. from different parts of ukraine we have spoken to the - ukraine we have spoken to the families of more than a dozen civilians who have been taken, only a few have been released, most are yet to return, this includes a family of four with two young children who have managed to contact the relatives here to say they are not being allowed to leave russia. the kremlin says civilians are willingly going across the border but everything we have heard strongly contradicts those claims. ukraine's prosecutor general says they are hearing testimony of war crimes from the people who have returned. lode
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crimes from the people who have returned. ~ , ., ., returned. we interview everyone who can come back _ returned. we interview everyone who can come back from _ returned. we interview everyone who can come back from the _ returned. we interview everyone who can come back from the russian - can come back from the russian federation or occupied territories, almost all of them were tortured, actually in russian prisons. and again we have a case about departure children, all the children... for me as a prosecutor it is very important. as a prosecutor it is very important-— as a prosecutor it is very important. as a prosecutor it is very imortant. �* ., ., , ., important. and as the war rages on in ukraine's— important. and as the war rages on in ukraine's east _ important. and as the war rages on in ukraine's east and _ important. and as the war rages on in ukraine's east and south, - important. and as the war rages on in ukraine's east and south, everyl in ukraine's east and south, every day there are new reports of people being forced into russia. a snapshot there of some of the horrors of this war, and as we were saying the un secretary general about to meet volodymyr zelensky. whether he can sort out any sort of ceasefire or peace agreement having been in moscow and now in kyiv seems pretty doubtful but it does look like he will try to establish at the very
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minimum humanitarian corridors out of the besieged city of mariupol were so many thousands of civilians are now trapped. more from you throughout the day in ukraine but thatisit throughout the day in ukraine but that is it from me, you are watching bbc news. then brown and the ukrainian capital. sticking with ukraine, let's talk to the conservative mp tobias ellwood, who served in the british army and is now the chair of the house of commons defence select committee. thank you forjoining us, liz truss' speech last night, saying the west should supply were placed in ukraine, ben wallace also talking today about escalating within the borders of ukraine but not broadening the conflict. so would providing war planes be something that you support, or could that come under the definition of broadening the conflict?—
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the conflict? let's take those two im ortant the conflict? let's take those two important contributions _ the conflict? let's take those two | important contributions together, the penny dropping that we are experiencing a deterioration in european security. this is a turning point in our history. success or failure in ukraine will have huge repercussions. iam pleased failure in ukraine will have huge repercussions. i am pleased to see the foreign—policy qualification addressing the big question i have been asking for some time, what are we collectively trying to achieve, what does mission success look like? is it pushing russian forces back to the preinvasion lines or removing russia completely from the ukraine mainland? it seems we are now saying it must be the latter and that is important, otherwise viraemia putin could be allowed to claim victory and survived to fight another day. in clarifying our goal, it helps define strategy, tactics required and the subsequent weapon systems and the subsequent weapon systems and training you have been asking about. this starts to look like a plan. the question is, do our allies
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also support this? this is a big question for the forthcoming nato summit, a test of will. that is what war is about, a test of will. we should now be willing to support the plan which i hope will also be supported by our nato allies. you want to see escalation unanimously supported by allies, on the specific issue of planes, the thing that could come under the definition of broadening the conflict? absolutely. if this is now— broadening the conflict? absolutely. if this is now our _ broadening the conflict? absolutely. if this is now our objective, - broadening the conflict? absolutely. if this is now our objective, that - if this is now our objective, that we need to recognise what equipment, training and support ukrainians required to meet the objective. if we don't do it this is all words itself. you touched on something important, our risk averse must exported completely by putin. he has recognised how timid we have been, thatis recognised how timid we have been, that is why the war crimes have been allowed to take place. the biggest concern has been where this might escalate to. we have been fearful of
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escalation but i think we have exaggerated the fear of nuclear conflict, we have been spooked by the rhetoric from the kremlin. there is no bite of food advantage to apply a tactical nuclear weapon. look at mariupol. —— no tactical advantage. without the stigma of global condemnation that will follow if nuclear weapons are used and we should offer a read by news that if nuclear weapons are used in ukraine it would trigger a five—day nato air campaign to take out every tank, plane, every supply truck inside ukraine, it would bring closure to the water illustrate that the use of nuclear weapons are simply not acceptable. this is the wine we should put down. do you think vladimir putin's most recent remarks about a lightning response against further meddling as he puts it in ukraine, do you think that is simply rhetoric and he only respects a
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tough response?— rhetoric and he only respects a tough response? absolutely right. all alon: tough response? absolutely right. all along we _ tough response? absolutely right. all along we have _ tough response? absolutely right. all along we have been _ tough response? absolutely right. all along we have been listening l tough response? absolutely right. i all along we have been listening and fearful of the rhetoric, it has affected our strategic objectives we have tried to clarify, now as i say we are very much learning fast. you could argue what happened over the last five to ten years, building up this image that somehow russia has advanced its forces, will have this capability. we saw that in the opening, the opening few weeks of the campaign that russian capability is not what it was, not what we thought it would be. they are not the first to take on the might of nato. liz the first to take on the might of nato. , , the first to take on the might of nato. ,, ,, ., , ., nato. liz truss said russia needs to be ushed nato. liz truss said russia needs to be pushed out _ nato. liz truss said russia needs to be pushed out of _ nato. liz truss said russia needs to be pushed out of the _ nato. liz truss said russia needs to be pushed out of the whole - nato. liz truss said russia needs to be pushed out of the whole of - be pushed out of the whole of ukraine, employing crimea as well. ukraine, employing crimea as well. ukraine said they were grateful for this statement but said at the moment taking back crimea is not a realistic short—term prospect. do
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you think that the uk and its allies should be focusing on the donbas, the areas in the east of ukraine that russia has made its incursion into? �* ., that russia has made its incursion into? �* . ., ., ., into? again, we are going into the strate: , into? again, we are going into the strategy. if _ into? again, we are going into the strategy. if it _ into? again, we are going into the strategy. if it is — into? again, we are going into the strategy, if it is our— into? again, we are going into the strategy, if it is our plan _ into? again, we are going into the strategy, if it is our plan to - into? again, we are going into the strategy, if it is our plan to clear. strategy, if it is our plan to clear the main line, i have focused on mainland ukraine, absolutely should be a long—term prospect when we see other partitions taking place, other annexation taking place such as during the cold war with the balkan states, we should make sure in the long term they should come back. it is more complex than donbas. we also have to recognise and look after the flanks. let's get nato forces into moldova now. let's make sure sweden and finland canjoin nato immediately. let's make sure we support odesa. we should have a black sea strategy. a maritime nato strategy to make sure that critical port can stay open. if that does
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fall, were russia to have success in donbas, ukraine would be landlocked and that would be devastating to its economy. b. and that would be devastating to its econom . �* ., and that would be devastating to its econom . ~ ., ., , economy. a final point on energy, i soke to economy. a final point on energy, i spoke to the _ economy. a final point on energy, i spoke to the former _ economy. a final point on energy, i spoke to the former lithuanian - spoke to the former lithuanian energy minister earlier who explained how the country had gone from 100% russian gas imports to know russian gas imports in around ten years and said, look, other countries should just take the first step, but how much concern given by the decision by russia to stop supplying gas to poland and bulgaria, how much concern about the impact on energy security in the rest of europe? he impact on energy security in the rest of europe?— impact on energy security in the rest of europe? impact on energy security in the rest of euro e? ., . ., , rest of europe? he touched on why we need a wider — rest of europe? he touched on why we need a wider russian _ rest of europe? he touched on why we need a wider russian strategy, - rest of europe? he touched on why we need a wider russian strategy, we - need a wider russian strategy, we need a wider russian strategy, we need to recognise that european security has changed, we need to increase our defence spending. that eventually will happen again i think as liz truss has employed with them on the energy itself, this is a bizarre position for putin to make because bulgaria was a borderline country. now they will excellently
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be going against russia itself. we need a wider strategy, energy is the achilles' heel when it comes to russia but we can win our self of energy requirements for russia and make the end of putin come far quicker. make the end of putin come far ruicker. ., , . , make the end of putin come far ruicker. ., , ., , ., ., make the end of putin come far ruicker. .,, .,, ., ., ~ . ., make the end of putin come far ruicker. .,, .,, ~ . ., ., quicker. tobias ellwood mp, chair of the house of — quicker. tobias ellwood mp, chair of the house of commons _ quicker. tobias ellwood mp, chair of the house of commons defence - quicker. tobias ellwood mp, chair of. the house of commons defence select committee, thank you. and — a quick reminder — we'll be taking your questions on the war in ukraine, shortly — at 12:30. we'll have panellists answering questions about a range of aspects of the war — from the battle raging in the east of the country, the consequences for civilians, and what more the west could or should be doing to stop russia. an investigation has found that former labour cabinet mininster,
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liam byrne breached parliamentary bullying rules and recommends an investigation has found the former labour cabinet minister liam byrne breached parliamentary bullying rules in relation to a member of his staff. earlier i spoke to our political correspondent damian grammaticas. we got this final decision coming through now from the igcs, the independent complaints and grievances to set up to deal with complaints against mps. liam byrne has been an mp since 200a. he served under tony blair, gordon brown is a cabinet minister. there was a treasury minister, chief secretary to the treasury, served in cabinet office. this complaint relates to being madejust under two years ago, the period at the beginning of the pandemic. at that time he had an assistant he had just employed called david barker. who was also a labour party member.
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at that time, mr barker ran a food bank in birmingham. a minor dispute in the office about his work with the food bank at the beginning of the pandemic, following the dispute mr barker said he had been ostracised by liam byrne mp, had contracted covid, had tried to contact liam byrne i think it was nine times, he said, six times about that. that was ignored. he was signed off work with stress. he then was told by a colleague that his contract would not be renewed. mr barker said this had a terrible impact on his mental health, was worried about his job, prospects in the labour party. his future if he had no references. he made this complaint, it has taken nearly two years to go through all of the process. the final finding was that
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liam byrne had acted in a way that amounted to bullying and abuse of power. he had deleted mr barker's work e—mail account at the time of trying to terminate his contract. this sanction recommended is that he make a public apology, he goes to a management course and he is suspended for two days as an mp. damian grammaticas in westminster. staying in westminster, a labour mp has spoken out about lewd comments allegedly made to her by a member of the shadow cabinet. the welsh mp, who wants to remain anonymous, said she was described as a "secret weapon" because "women want to be herfriend" and "men want to sleep with her". it comes after two conservative mps claimed they saw a male colleague watching pornography in the commons. the claims were made at a meeting on tuesday night, when female conservative mps shared allegations of sexism and harassment in the commons. katy wedderburn is partner and head
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of the employment law group at macroberts law firm. she explained that while some of the claims might constitute harassment or discrimination, many mps are not protected by employment law because they're not classed as employees. the usual route to look at is whether someone has been sexually harassed or discriminated against at work is under the equality act, our uk legislation which includes discrimination, harassment preventions. if this was an ordinary workplace it would probably be covered by the provisions in the act because the act covers employment, people engaged to perform personal services and a number of other groups like public office holders. one would initially imagine i suppose that mps would be covered. but in fact, the provisions that apply in the workplace,
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that have protections against sexual harassment and discrimination do not apply to mp5. they are expressly excluded because they are elected into public office. this is a bit of a controversial issue because while members of staff of the house of commons are protected because they are employed by the house of commons, while potentially members of staff who are employed by directly by mps will be protected because they are in an employment relationship, unfortunately for mp5 there is a bit of a gaping hole, express exemption for elected office as an mp from protections in the act. i presume you think that is pretty ridiculous that there are these exemptions and that is why you say if this were an ordinary workplace, referring to the house of commons?
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i think that is right because if you look at the express statutory of protections, they include harassment, which is defined as unwanted conduct either related to a relevant characteristic under the act, that includes sex. conduct of a sexual nature. where that conduct has the purpose of effect of violating the person complaining's dignity or creating an intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensive environment for them. i think anyone on hearomg what has happened would initially expect a complaint for sexual harassment amd possibly for discrimination and unfair treatment on the basis of sex. coming from the people complaining. this express exemption would exclude mp5 from making those complaints under the equality act.
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a man has appeared in court this morning charged with the murder of 33—year—old katie kenyon. andrew burfield, 50, appeared at blackburn magistrates' court and has been remanded into custody to appear at preston crown court on friday. ben stokes has been named england test captain — taking overfrom joe root. all—rounder stokes has scored 5,061 runs and taken 17a wickets in 79 tests and had been vice—captain across two spells since 2017. joe root stepped down after five years in charge, having led england in a record 6a tests. stokes' first test as permanent england captain will be against world champions new zealand at lord's on 2june. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. high pressure across the uk, largely dry, some showers into the far north—east of scotland, some of the figures carved east yorkshire, lincolnshire into east anglia, some drizzle, hazy further north and
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southern scotland. otherwise lots of cloud out there, temperatures for many struggling to reach 15 celsius. tonight, perhaps picking up a shower into east anglia and south east england, northern ireland, far north of scotland. elsewhere increasingly create overnight. a chance of a touch of frost in northern ireland, southern scotland, northern england into the morning. looks like a brighter, sunnier day, in among some patchy cloud tomorrow. take a squad across east angry and the south east throughout the day, cool here, showers popping up in central and eastern scotland. sunny spells elsewhere. feel warmer.
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hello, this is bbc news. you have been sending in many questions about the war which we will be putting to our panel today. let us take you to the panel we have set up. christine is a veteran of foreign affairs journalism in france. among her many books is has written about russia and it oligarch, shejoins us written about russia and it oligarch, she joins us from written about russia and it oligarch, shejoins us from greece where you are on assignment. from south london, the security analyst michael clark is a professor of defence study, the former
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director—general

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