Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 28, 2022 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

1:30 pm
so we have to stop dreaming and we're now at the very last stage of processing the regulations within permissions for flight with this vehicle. so it's getting so close. the pal—v liberty is made by a dutch company which is nearing the end of the long process to get everything licensed and approved. the question is, who's going to buy one. well, they've already got lots of orders. this is the fastest way to become a pilot so there's always a small james bond seat in every heart of every guy and every girl, so that's where we are selling to. it takes less than ten minutes to turn it from a plane to a car. you could land it at any airfield and then drive home. if you want to buy one of these it's going to cost you 300,000 euros. sounds a lot, but probably a snip if you want to be at the forefront of what they're promising will be a new motoring and aviation revolution. you'll need a private pilots licence but you can learn both here in coventry and in oxford.
1:31 pm
there have been many false starts in bringing a flying plane to market. next year, they reckon, is when you may see one driving along a street near you. phil mackie, bbc news, coventry. let's turn our attention to the weather. here's nick miller. there is a big area of high pressure sitting over us. there's a lot of cloud out there but because its high—pressure it's dry and that's how we are expecting it to stay through this afternoon into tomorrow. things will change at the weekend, we'll get to that in the moment. 0ne weekend, we'll get to that in the moment. one or two showers around northern scotland. maybe drizzle out of the thickest cloud in east england and there are areas seeing hazy sunshine but with all of the cloud it's certainly all the cool side at the moment. temperatures mid teens, most lowerthan side at the moment. temperatures mid teens, most lower than that, 8—9 along parts of the coast of north—east england. some of the cloud tonight is going to gradually
1:32 pm
fade away. we'll keep some across eastern areas in particular and as for a chance of a touch of frost it's there in northern ireland, southern scotland, northern england, as you can see with hints of blue in the forecast as we start the day tomorrow. tomorrow, we are going to is that you dry, sunny day, dry, sunny day compared with today, though there will be a lot of cloud across east anglia and south—east england that may hang on for match of the day. a few showers breaking of the day. a few showers breaking out through central and eastern parts of england, very hit and miss. the area of high pressure is still withers as we go into the start of the weekend. for wales and england, look at this, weather fronts and a chance of rain, the likelihood of seeing rain. it may turn out to be decent across parts of northern ireland and western scotland on saturday, so we'll see out the month with some rain out there. not much on the way for wales and england as this system weakens as it moves south overnight and into sunday. there will be on sunday a little patchy rain to clear away from parts
1:33 pm
of england and wales and for the bank holiday on monday we are left with a lot of cloud out there but not much in the way of rain again. we've been talking about how dry april has been this year. you can see it on the ground. april last year was dry, the fourth driest on record for the uk. cassjohn mind back, may last year there was a big transformation and we turned out to have our fourth wettest may on record in the uk. it doesn't look as if there is such a transformation in may this year. showers around at the start of next week before high—pressure bills and again which means where it's dry compared with average at the moment, in wales and england, showing there is some rain in the forecast but not very much. thank you, nick miller. that's all from the bbc one team, wejoin thank you, nick miller. that's all from the bbc one team, we join the newsrooms wherever you are. bye—bye.
1:34 pm
you're watching bbc news, i'm 0lly foster with the latest from the bbc sport centre. ben stokes says it's an honour to become the england test captain. he takes over from joe root who stood down earlier this month after five years in the role. his first series in charge will be agianst new zealand injune. let's speak to the cricket commenatator alison mitchell. were there any other viable options? not too many options that is for sure, because of the poor run of form the england team have had. there has been so many players in and out. when you look at the line up and out. when you look at the line up there are very few options of senior, well—respected players who are guaranteed their place there the side. and than scenario muddied somewhat by the fact stuart broad and james anderson being left of the last tour. they will come back into
1:35 pm
the fold undoubtedly, but yes, stokes seeing the obvious option an i think he will be a good one. he is a natural leaders, he has respect from those in the dressing room. is the next piece of the puzzle will be getting a head coach in for the test team. they are on a terrible run of result. rob keane says that stokes epitomises the mentality they want to take forward. does that suggest a more adventurous style, more front foot cricket we didn't see under root. �* , . ., , ., root. it's a winning mentality that ben stokes _ root. it's a winning mentality that ben stokes has, _ root. it's a winning mentality that ben stokes has, he _ root. it's a winning mentality that ben stokes has, he has _ root. it's a winning mentality that ben stokes has, he has a - root. it's a winning mentality that ben stokes has, he has a belief i root. it's a winning mentality that | ben stokes has, he has a belief you can win from any position, that was epitomised in the way he pulled back that incredible headingley ashes test match if 2019. now in terms of the way stokes will captain, i think we have had a collapse of his acumen, even times where he has stood in forjoe root, taking charge on the test field, that he does have
1:36 pm
a tremendous cricket brain, and i think maybe we willjust see him more adventurous captaincy on the field, but he has that talismanic aura about him in terms of leadership, by dint of the way he plays, and everything he has achieved. think he will be a good people person, a good manager manager which is another skill, because of the journey he has had and all the ups and down, places him well to try and understand and put himself in the shoes of some of those round him which isjust as important. most important is going to be can england put together big partnerships and improve the batting which has been the huge problem, and one captain alone can't change that. in that respect, joe root will have a big part to place, just for his batting. what about the dynamic of sharing a dressing room with a former captain. they are great mat mate, that will help, but surely stokes will want to be his own man? i think he will be. i thinkjoe root is the kind of personality who will
1:37 pm
be able to slip into the rank, it is of his volition he has stepped down. we have seen alastair cook step back into the range, steve smith, albeit under different circumstances is playing under pat couple in, he will be an asset and help to ben stokes, he needs him for the run scoring but i think he will be another wise head, counsel to lean on by stokes expecting to be his own man and have his own strong and positive ideas of what direction he wants the team to go in. what direction he wants the team to no in. . ~' ,, what direction he wants the team to coin. . ~ ~ the first of the snooker world championship semi—finals are under way at the crucible in sheffield. first up is the 2019 championjudd trump aaginst the three time winner mark williams. these are live pictures from the crucible, still in the very early stages, this is still the first frame. it is a cagey one, this will go the distance if this first frame
1:38 pm
is anything to go by. this evening, it's the six time winner ronnie o sullivan against four time winnerjohn higgins. you can follow that on the bbc sport website, all the snooker, i will bah backin website, all the snooker, i will bah back in the next hour. now it's time for your questions answered on ukraine with tim wilcox. hello, and welcome to another edition of your questions answered about ukraine. you have been sending in many questions about the war, which we will be putting to our panel today. letjust which we will be putting to our panel today. let just take which we will be putting to our panel today. letjust take you to the panel that we have set up. christine 0ckrent a veteran of foreign affairs journalism in france. she presents a current affairs programme and among her many books she has written about russia and its oligarch, shejoin us from
1:39 pm
greece where you are currently on sign. . from south o london, the security analyst michael clark is a professor of defence studies. the former director—general of rusi and associate director of the universe tiff of exeter strategy and security. welcome to you as well. dr aglaya snetkov is a lecturer in the international politics of russia at university college london. also author of russia's security policy under putin. she is also in london. welcome to you and from lviv we have the city's deputy mayor andriy moskalenko, responsible for economic development at lviv city council. welcome to you all. andriy moskalenko. i would like to start with you, before we start putting questions to you and the rest of the panel, to get a feeling of what life is like for you in lviv you are right at the western end of course of ukraine, you are what, a 20 hour
1:40 pm
drive, a 11100 kilometrejourney of ukraine, you are what, a 20 hour drive, a 11100 kilometre journey to the donbas region, to luhansk where the donbas region, to luhansk where the fighting is intensifying. before we start with a question. how is life in lviv? how fearful are people? hello? andriy, can you hear me? 0k, people? hello? andriy, can you hear me? ok, i people? hello? andriy, can you hear me? 0k, iam people? hello? andriy, can you hear me? ok, i am sorry, people? hello? andriy, can you hear me? 0k, iam sorry, i people? hello? andriy, can you hear me? ok, i am sorry, i think we have a few communication problems with andriy, we will show some pictures from lviv in a moment, once we get the connection back. let us go to the connection back. let us go to the first question really, think from the recent french elections crines tyne, —— christine, this will be one for you, emmanuel macron the re—elected president has been trying to negotiate and broker some sort of peace with ukraine, unsuccessfully along with the rest of the world so far. let us take this question from
1:41 pm
emma in france.— far. let us take this question from emma in france. hole low my name is emma, emma in france. hole low my name is emma. for— emma in france. hole low my name is emma. for the — emma in france. hole low my name is emma, for the bbc, _ emma in france. hole low my name is emma, for the bbc, because - emma in france. hole low my name is emma, for the bbc, because the - emma, for the bbc, because the french president emmanuel macron has been reelected. i want to know how law be the relations between france and russia, if the french president continues to help ukraine and could he become dangerous? christine. did ou he become dangerous? christine. did you catch all of that. i want to though what your response is? it is true that the _ though what your response is? it 3 true that the emmanuel macron has been re—elected on april 24th, and it is true that he will certainly play a leading role in the name of france, of course, but also of the european union, which has remained so far remarkably united, in its support for ukraine, and its efforts, at least, the french, in
1:42 pm
the german ones, in particular, to try and convince vladimir putin that this war is not only obscene, but it is useless, and again, russian, the russian military efforts on the ground, so far, even if in donbas, obviously, the situation is getting worse for ukrainian forces, that the russian forces have performed unusually badly, so to get back to emmanuel macron, yes, he will certainly pursue his effort, i assume he will certainly want to go to kyiv, in the coming days, macron was of course busy in the french presidential campaign, and therefore he had to devote his efforts to getting re—elected. is that going to be more dangerous for france? i
1:43 pm
think, first, goal is to think about ukrainians, and the fact that of course it is our very values, and freedoms, which are also at stake, and the ukrainians are fighting for those same values. i and the ukrainians are fighting for those same values.— those same values. i will turn to ou those same values. i will turn to you michael— those same values. i will turn to you michael to _ those same values. i will turn to you michael to the _ those same values. i will turn to you michael to the security - those same values. i will turn to you michael to the security and. you michael to the security and military matters, which you are an expert in michael clark. first let us give a quick overview of the situation in the east of the country, as well. how well is the russian army doing there. meta russian army doing there. new offensive started _ russian army doing there. ii? offensive started several days ago but it is not making particularly rapid progress, as far as we can see. it seems to have been a rolling start rather than a thunder clap start, which is to say that forces began the offensive with still equipment and more people coming in
1:44 pm
behind them, so the offensive will build, it didn't get off to a very big start what the russians are trying to do is to draw a line from kharkiv in the north to mariupol, and create the close the salient that would enclose, and therefore surround about 40% of the ukrainian army who are well dug in in that area. that is a big line to draw if you look at it on a map, kharkiv to mariupol. more immediately the russians are trying to draw a smaller line, south of isium as far as donetsk. that would enclose a smaller area, and the two places they want to go for, they are not particularly close to them. if they take the two places, then they are, thatis take the two places, then they are, that is the key to controlling all of the other routes in and out of to donbas, so that will be the key battle but it hasn't really started
1:45 pm
yet and so far the ukrainians are holding the russians, most of the three or four areas, the three or four lines of offensive that the russians have tried to establish, so far. �* , , . , ., ., far. and these pictures are from donbas, far. and these pictures are from donbas. but _ far. and these pictures are from donbas, but odesa _ far. and these pictures are from donbas, but odesa hasn't - far. and these pictures are from donbas, but odesa hasn't fallen far. and these pictures are from i donbas, but odesa hasn't fallen or donbas, but 0desa hasn't fallen or we haven't seen a battle for 0desa, we haven't seen a battle for 0desa, we are looking at what is happening in moldova and in transnistria and andrew ask, how do the russians supply their trusts in transnistria, given there is no access to the sea and the only borders are with moldova and ukraine, both enemies. moldova and ukraine, both enemies. moldova is not an enemy in the sense ukraine has, the russians have had troops in transnistria since 1992 and it declared itself a russian speaking republic and the lugses put so—called peacekeeper troops in there, they have been instructed by there, they have been instructed by the un to remove them because they have no authority and they have ignored that. it looks as if the
1:46 pm
russians only have 15002,000 troops in trans mist are, there are reports they have 10,000 there and so son. nobody can substantiate that. there are a lot of mercenaries there, some troop, but the official so—called peacekeeping troops are probably about 1500, and they have been easily supplied so far, this is the headquarterses of the 14th army, the red army 14th army, so there is a lot of stuff already there and as peacekeepers they are only there really to keep order, so they don't need heavy equipment and moldova, the government has been carefully not to push too hard on this trans notice tourist republic, so until the war started on 24th, there there's no particular problem in getting these troops resupplied. i it may get more difficult if transnistria blows up, as it looks as if it is about to and moldova
1:47 pm
becomes unavailable. then resupplying troops may become more difficult but so far it is not a problem. idr difficult but so far it is not a problem-— difficult but so far it is not a roblem. , ~ ,, ~ problem. dr aglaya snetkov, i think we will come _ problem. dr aglaya snetkov, i think we will come to _ problem. dr aglaya snetkov, i think we will come to you _ problem. dr aglaya snetkov, i think we will come to you in _ problem. dr aglaya snetkov, i think we will come to you in a _ problem. dr aglaya snetkov, i think we will come to you in a moment, l problem. dr aglaya snetkov, i think. we will come to you in a moment, we have a connection with the deputy mayor in lviv. i hope you can hear me if that has been corrected. i wanted to start by asking what life was like where you are at the moment. you are a 20 hour drive from luhansk, the donbas region where the fighting is intensifying, what are things like there, just to start off with, how prepared are people there, and aware of the conflict, more than 1,000 kilometres away? that and aware of the conflict, more than 1,000 kilometres away?— and aware of the conflict, more than 1,000 kilometres away? that is what one ear 1,000 kilometres away? that is what one year ago — 1,000 kilometres away? that is what one year ago nobody _ 1,000 kilometres away? that is what one year ago nobody can _ 1,000 kilometres away? that is what one year ago nobody can say - 1,000 kilometres away? that is what one year ago nobody can say right. one year ago nobody can say right now, it is real in ukraine, so it is real war, when two months has held already passed and it is real when russians fight against, not military, they killed children, you
1:48 pm
know, more than 200 children unfortunately were killed by russian, so women, and so it is reality, which we live today, in our country, in our city, so come paribly lviv is city with peaceful sky, because we had only several missile attacks but unfortunately, during the last attack was killed seven people but come paribly what is in mariupol, it is real and in zist is in mariupol, it is real and in 21st century. we in our city have today main mission to provide peaceful places for our ukraine abs who are located from east of ukraine, cities were bombed every day, and today we have more than 200,000 ukrainians, today we have days more and more trains, with wounded ukrainian, and so it is
1:49 pm
really quite awful that what our doctors see, because they know we never see such a lot of and such a lot of injured ukrainian, after missile attacks from russia's side. also, some companies located from east of ukraine to our city, and thatis east of ukraine to our city, and that is what i can definitely say for this last two months as ukrainians show for the whole world, the whole europe is that today, all ukrainians are heroes, and so they are really brave, they fight, we fight together and we will fight till win the end, we do appreciate that people over the world who understand what you is the real value of this, this war, what is real in this moment happened in mariupol, happen in kharkiv, that awful things which russia do, and so it is a war not only against
1:50 pm
ukraine, so today we fight for the whole of europe. stay with us, thank you. i am glad we have you now connected. let us turn to what is happening in russia. what is the mind—set of vladimir putin? let us speak to dr aglaya snetkov a lecturer in the international politic of russia at university college london. i would like to put this question to you, from gideon about sanctions in particular. mt; from gideon about sanctions in particular-— from gideon about sanctions in articular. g , ., ., particular. my question regarding the russia. _ particular. my question regarding the russia, ukraine _ particular. my question regarding the russia, ukraine conflict. - particular. my question regarding the russia, ukraine conflict. is i the russia, ukraine conflict. is sanction— the russia, ukraine conflict. is sanction on russia the best way to deal with_ sanction on russia the best way to deal with this situation at the moment? thank you very much. did you — moment? thank you very much. did you get _ moment? thank you very much. did you get that? is sanctioning russia the best way to deal with this at the moment? 50 i russia the best way to deal with this at the moment?— this at the moment? so i think, sanctions _ this at the moment? so i think, sanctions we — this at the moment? so i think, sanctions we have _ this at the moment? so i think, sanctions we have seen - this at the moment? so i think, sanctions we have seen are - sanctions we have seen are unprecedented as early as february this year. the us together with uk
1:51 pm
and the eu have launched the biggest sanction regime against russia we have everyone seen. so it is unprecedented. we from the to remember that russia has been under sanctions since 2014, so, the extent of the regime has been long—term and there are expectations that the russian economy will indeed suffer, and contract and figures vary how much it will contract by, a fifth, more, we don't know. now something to consider, however, is that although the sanctions regime is extensive, russian economy, it doesn't mean sanction also have an immediate effect on the battlefield in ukraine, that is not what sanctions do, what sanctions do is they degrade an actors capacity to be able to for example rebuild a military. we are already seeing that on the ground. we are seeing that the russian military is having
1:52 pm
difficulty to manufacture tank, to find new components for example for the weapons, but, it is important that the sanctions regime has been deployed, together with the military assistance from the west to ukraine, because what you need is... we need the immediacy of the military assistance to ukraine and we need the more longer term approach of sanctions against russia, to ensure us, the us has talked about to prevent russia from being able to do this in the future, so sanctions on their own is not enough to get out of this conflict. sanctions together with europe for example moving away from buying russian energy is a way of putting maximum pressure on russia domestically, on the ground militarily and in terms of the energy export, in trying to convince president putin to end this
1:53 pm
conflirkt and to help ukraine on their side to militarily win this war on the ground.— their side to militarily win this war on the ground. thank you. -- conflict. war on the ground. thank you. -- conflict- i — war on the ground. thank you. -- conflict. i want _ war on the ground. thank you. -- conflict. i want to _ war on the ground. thank you. -- conflict. i want to come _ war on the ground. thank you. -- conflict. i want to come back- war on the ground. thank you. -- conflict. i want to come back to l conflict. i want to come back to you, nato is pouring more arms into the defence, we also know what the west�*s war aims are potentially now with ukraine, liz truss the foreign secretary speaking in london last night to take russia back to pre—february 24th, or indeed further than that, to what happened in 2014 where they annexed crimea. russia's response has always been though, that this war could escalate, involving even potentially the use of nuclear weapon, listen to this yes from france. i of nuclear weapon, listen to this yes from france.— of nuclear weapon, listen to this yes from france. i am jane, i am livin: in yes from france. i am jane, i am living in france, _ yes from france. i am jane, i am living in france, and _ yes from france. i am jane, i am living in france, and i— yes from france. i am jane, i am living in france, and i would - yes from france. i am jane, i am living in france, and i would like| living in france, and i would like to ask, — living in france, and i would like to ask, do — living in france, and i would like to ask, do you think that conflict in ukraine — to ask, do you think that conflict in ukraine could lead to a global nuciear— in ukraine could lead to a global nuclear war?— in ukraine could lead to a global nuclear war? ~ . ., ., ., ., nuclear war? michael, how great a risk is there _ nuclear war? michael, how great a risk is there of _ nuclear war? michael, how great a risk is there of that? _ nuclear war? michael, how great a risk is there of that? the - nuclear war? michael, how great a risk is there of that? the not - nuclear war? michael, how great a risk is there of that? the not for l nuclear war? michael, how great a risk is there of that? the not for a | risk is there of that? the not for a rlobal risk is there of that? the not for a global nuclear _ risk is there of that? the not for a global nuclear war, _ risk is there of that? the not for a global nuclear war, no. _ risk is there of that? the not for a global nuclear war, no. this - risk is there of that? the not for a global nuclear war, no. this is - risk is there of that? the not for a global nuclear war, no. this is not a nuclear crisis, i mean in cuba in
1:54 pm
1962 the famous cuban missile crisis, that was a nuclear crisis, it was about nuclear weapon, this is a crisis about something quite different, and what makes it nuclear is because president putin keeps threatening nuclear weapons but he always has. he hadn't made a speech since 2015 without mentioning russia is a major nuclear power and they hold more than any other single power in the world. so, it is president putin's threats which raise the nuclear spectre, if a nuclear weapon were used in this case, then, the likelihood, and i think we are a long way from this yet, but the likelihood is it would be a tactical nuclear weapon used in ukraine. if that were the case it wouldn't necessarily do all that much damage. small nuclear weapons are surprisingly small but a major psychological bar yore would have been crossed a threshold would have been crossed a threshold would have been crossed a threshold would have been crossed and that would be a different ball game. how would the
1:55 pm
west react to that? we don't know. the americans have a group called the tiger team or team tiger comp un2 who are working all the time on responses to anything that president putin might do next and they think about this on a daily basis, what would we do if president putin did this or that? it isn't the west is struck for options but it doesn't want to announce in advance what any options would be because that would diminish the force of them. so i don't think there would be a global nuclear war but we are closer to a use of nuclear weapons than i would have imagined before the 24th february, and there is no question about it, this crisis is becoming more dangerous every week, and we have to live with that fact. hello. while most of us woke up to cloudy skies this morning, a bonus feature overnight, which may have kept some awake, but in a good way, where skies were clear and especially in aberdeenshire, a view of the northern lights
1:56 pm
that were on show. and this is where, of course, after some clear skies overnight we had most of the early sunshine, whereas the earlier satellite picture indicates where we had all of this cloud, and a lot of this is hanging on through the day. just some hazy sunny spells coming through. despite all of that cloud, though, most of us are not going to see any rain because it is high pressure right across the uk at the moment. there are just a few showers around towards the far north of scotland and northern isles. maybe from the thickest cloud in yorkshire and down to east anglia you may see a little drizzle, the cloud holding on for many. south wales and southern england, it will thin at times to allow some hazy brightness to come through, as it will in northern ireland, the further north you are, in northern england across southern parts of scotland. we started with the sunshine in northern scotland some cloud building. for the most part, temperatures close to the mid teens, but it will feel really quite cool with the thickest cloud especially across the eastern side of england, and mayjust get one or two showers running down towards the south—east, overnight
1:57 pm
and into north east scotland, we're expecting cloudier skies, a chance of frost where it is clear will be towards northern ireland into northern england and southern scotland. friday is shaping up and it looks like a brighter sunnier day across many areas. still a lot of cloud across east anglia and the south—east, whereas elsewhere a better chance of seeing the sunshine. some cloud building, squeezing out a few showers in central and eastern parts of scotland, and while overall it is looking like a warmer day tomorrow, with the cloud towards east anglia and the south—east, this is where temperatures will be on the cool side again. there will be breeze too. a change into the weekend, look at this. low pressure, weather fronts, that is rain heading our way. of course, it is welcome in many places, though it has to be timed with the weekend, doesn't it. it looks as if on saturday we will see some rain gradually pushing in across more of scotland and northern ireland during the day. eventually into parts of northern england, whereas the rest of england and wales, the cloud will increase, there will be sunny spells and this is where we will see the higher temperatures up to round 17 degrees for example in hull and london.
1:58 pm
that all weakens that rain as it moves south overnight into sunday. still some patchy rain left on sunday and a lot of cloud left behind for the bank holiday.
1:59 pm
2:00 pm
this is bbc news. i'm geeta guru—murthy. the headlines at 2: the un chief, antonio guterres is in kyiv to meet president zelensky. as he visits scenes of alleged war crimes — he says russia must cooperate with the international criminal court. the war is an absurdity in the 21st—century. the war is evil. more than half a million ukrainian civilians have been forcibly deported to russia — the bbc hears first—hand accounts from some of those taken. the death of four members of one family in south london — a man has appeared in court charged with murder. an investigation has found that former labour cabinet minister liam
2:01 pm
byrne breached parliamentary bullying rules and recommends

50 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on