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tv   BBC News  BBC News  April 28, 2022 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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the united nations secretary general, antonio guterres, has met ukraine's president zelensky in kyiv — two days after visiting vladimir putin in moscow. he criticises the un has mike pence a given council for not doing he criticises the un has mike pence a given councilfor not doing enough to stop the invasion and says the war is an absurdity and his evil. this war must end piece must be established in line with international relations and united law. the snack the united nations and international law. a british soldier is missing and one is confirmed dead. —— british volunteer soldier in ukraine. inadequate hospital trust, patients let down at
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their most vulnerable. some men in parliament behave like animals, the verdict in the cabinet minister after allegations an mp watched pawn next to female colleagues. sainsbury�*s doubles its colleagues do make profits but says it won't last, customers are watching every penny is the cost of living crisis bites. brilliant with a bat and ball can ben stokes bring his magic to his new trend as england test captain. the united nations secretary general, antonio guterres, has visited the ukraine
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capital kyiv. to capital kyiv. see for himself some of the places to see for himself some of the places where there have been alleged war crimes a russian troops. it was his first visit to the country since the conflict began more than two months ago. he described the war he is evil and urged moscow to cooperate with war crimes investigations by the international criminal court. mr tevez visited borodyanka, irpin and bucha, towns norfestive borodyanka, irpin and bucha, towns nor festive gift that saw huge destruction on civilian deaths during the ship is not recent offensive. the towns north—west of kyiv. tonight two missiles struck a central district of kyiv. our correspondence seven events that travelled with the secretary general and has this report which contain some details you might find upsetting. the destruction on the edge of kyiv is breathtaking. in irpin, russia's war has left ruin everywhere you turn. ukraine wanted the united nations
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secretary general to see that with his own eyes. and to hear of the families under fire in their own homes. antonio guterres was taken to bucha, too — a name that's now synonymous with massacre. there were dead bodies in the streets and... - when russian troops occupied this town, locals dug a mass grave in the churchyard for civilians shot in the streets. mr guterres called war evil and absurd. i am glad that the international criminal court sees the situation, that the prosecutor's office was already here. i fully support the international criminal court and i appeal to the russian federation to accept to cooperate. but russia already denies responsibility for any of this. the morgue in bucha is still receiving bodies exhumed from shallow graves, ever more evidence of war crimes. some of the dead are just numbers for now, still waiting to be identified.
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and people are still searching databases for their loved ones, a month after russian forces suddenly withdrew. gregori just found his son. he sobs. he tells me vlodymir was shot then burned. only his bones are left to bury. at the town's cemetery, ludmilla described how her husband was killed with a single shot to the head. she still has his hat with the bullet holes. valieri had just come out of their bomb shelter to make a phone call. at last, ludmilla can give him a proper burial. in the graveyard, not their garden. in bucha alone, more than 400 civilians were killed. translation: they should be prosecuted, they have to be. l but who knows?
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putin should be first, and his band of war criminals. this has happened because no—one punished russia sooner, and russia corrupted the whole world with its oil and its money. sobbing. there are already so many personal tragedies in ukraine. in a war that russia launched and shows no sign it is ready to stop. sarah rainsford, bbc news, bucha.
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it is important that the secretary general has a chance to win as the crimes committed against ukrainian people in a suburb of kyiv where witte seen what the occupying forces have done against our citizens. this is the true genocide and it is important to facilitate the establishment of a special international tribunal and russian crimes this was an issue that we have raised today. the un monitoring mission has to continue registering all crimes committed by russia and their military. the truth is that russian invasion taking fame is fine and city europe has not seen. it is
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important that he raises the issue of evacuating citizens from the people in the steel plant and the russian statement with regards to evacuation was always accompanied with bombardments and those bombardments took place during the negotiations between president putin and the secretary—general. ukraine is ready to have immediate negotiations on the evacuation of people from azovstal and any human agreement is reached. they will hope there will be human attitude in that part from the ship. we believe that part from the ship. we believe that part of the nation from the un secretary general will be affected and we are ready to spot this in whatever manner as possible. —— will be effective. why make the british foreign office says a british man has been killed in ukraine. the man, who has died, has been named a scot. the foreign office is seeking urgent information about another man who is missing. our diplomatic correspondent james
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landale reports. this is the first time a british national has been killed in ukraine. government wouldn't confirm the identity of the individual but he is understood to be a member of the armed forces and possibly the army logistics support squadron and certainly there have been tributes paid to him in line and a fundraising page has been set up in his memory. the foreign office also said that a second british national was missing and they were urgently seeking information and dip in and said it was likely these two individuals were part of the large group of foreigners who have gone to ukraine to support ukrainian armed forces and likely to have been fighting in the donbas possibly even in mariupol. as i say, they have been reports of all british nationals died but erosion and
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confident. this is the third set but they have always been unconfirmed. this is the first time a british national has died there. government of ukraine says _ national has died there. government of ukraine says thousands _ national has died there. government of ukraine says thousands of - of ukraine says thousands of civilians have been forcibly deported to russia including 120,000 children. muscle claims they are willingly move into russian. our correspondent yogita limaye has been hearing from families, some of those been taken captive by russian forces and civilians are ten from bush on prisoner exchanges will deny this claim. still in disbelief that he is back home. this vet cross volunteer was deported to russia, captured as he was evacuating people from more hit areas near kyiv. fans might we were beaten with hit areas near kyiv. fans might efie were beaten with rifles, hit areas near kyiv. fans might effie were beaten with rifles, punched and kicked. they blindfolded us and
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banned tasers and kept asking for information about the military. after six days in a crowded basement in ukraine we were taken to belarus. they felt we couldn't see but i saw a car crossing the border. —— they thought we couldn't see but i saw our car crossing the border. he shows as _ our car crossing the border. he shows as the identity slate made for him there. it is issued by the military of the russian federation. what does it say in the top? from belarus, he says, they were driven to a russian person. we wouldn't don that when we went to the plant we find evidence of men being taken. this is the basement at chernobyl where 169 this is the basement at chernobyl where169 ukrainian national guard will help there weeks when it was occupied. other staff saw them being taken from here by russian forces as they withdrew from northern ukraine. in a village nearby, we met the family of one of the missing men. we
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are hiding their identities to protect them. the guards wife, last spoke to him on the 31st of march, just before he was taken. translation: he just before he was taken. translation:— just before he was taken. translation: ., ., translation: he told me i am 0k -h sicall translation: he told me i am 0k physically but _ translation: he told me i am 0k physically but not _ translation: he told me i am 0k physically but not emotionally. - translation: he told me i am 0k physically but not emotionally. i. physically but not emotionally. i could hear the anxiety in his voice, she said. my boy keeps asking where his father is. he is very worried and he is scared that i might disappear too so he keeps following me around everywhere. from different arts of me around everywhere. from different parts of ukraine _ me around everywhere. from different parts of ukraine we _ me around everywhere. from different parts of ukraine we have _ me around everywhere. from different parts of ukraine we have spoken - me around everywhere. from different parts of ukraine we have spoken to - parts of ukraine we have spoken to the families of more than a dozen civilians who have been taken. only two have been released. most are yet to return. —— only if you have been released. this includes a family of four with two young children who have managed to contact their relatives here to say they are not being allowed to leave russia. the
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kremlin says civilians are willingly going across the border but everything we've heard strongly contradicts those claims. ukraine's prosecutor general, i veena, contradicts those claims. ukraine's prosecutor general, iveena, says they are hearing testimony of war crimes from people who have returned. crimes from people who have returned-— crimes from people who have returned. ~ , ., ., returned. we interview everyone who can come back _ returned. we interview everyone who can come back from _ returned. we interview everyone who can come back from russian - can come back from russian federation or occupied territories. almost all of them were tortured, actually, in prison, in russian prisons, and, again, we have a case about departure children, only children from donetsk region to russian federation and for me as a prosecutor it is very important. find prosecutor it is very important. and as the war rages — prosecutor it is very important. and as the war rages on in ukraine's east and south, every day that it neither reports of people being fulston to russia. peter lemire, bbc news, c. —— yogita limaye. , steve.
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we'll find out more about this this afternoon in the papers. join amira guess who is a common dominant columns of the times and sunday times and the chief political correspondent at the gladys —— joining me as a columnist for the times and sunday times and chief political correspondent at the guardian. failings at an nhs foundation trust, conclusions and the health watchdog, the care quality commission after its latest inspection. rated the trust inadequately and our health correspondent sophie hutchinson has been talking to families now fail by what has been called in when�*s was performing mental health trust. abigail henry loves performing in the privacy of her own bedroom but she struggles with her mental health and has attempted suicide many times. it and has attempted suicide many times. . , and has attempted suicide many times. ., , ., ., and has attempted suicide many times. ., ., , ., :: times. it has got to be about 50 times. it has got to be about 50 times that _ times. it has got to be about 50 times that they, _ times. it has got to be about 50 times that they, like, _ times. it has got to be about 50 times that they, like, her - times. it has got to be about 50 times that they, like, her life i times. it has got to be about 50. times that they, like, her life has
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seriously been in danger. —— 15 times. seriously been in danger. -- 15 times. , ., ., , times. her mum said things got worse when the mental _ times. her mum said things got worse when the mental health. _ times. her mum said things got worse when the mental health. this - when the mental health. this approach is getting in the community. then, last year, abigail was rushed to hospital after an overdose but rather than being treated in a psychiatric unit she ended up being sedated in intensive care. . , �* ended up being sedated in intensive care. �* ., , ended up being sedated in intensive care. , care. there wasn't any beds available — care. there wasn't any beds available locally _ care. there wasn't any beds available locally and - care. there wasn't any beds available locally and so - care. there wasn't any bedsj available locally and so they care. there wasn't any beds - available locally and so they kept her under sedation forcing stays. because intensive care was the only safe place to keep her. just might be kept under sedation for six mac days, that was the only safe place to keep her. days, that was the only safe place to keep her-— to keep her. was performing nhs mental health _ to keep her. was performing nhs mental health trust _ to keep her. was performing nhs mental health trust in _ to keep her. was performing nhs mental health trust in the - to keep her. was performing nhs| mental health trust in the country, today rated inadequate once again. and inspectors found care on the psychiatric ward for children and young people had deteriorated so severely it had to be closed to new admissions but support in the community for children and young people and adults was inadequate and that prices care was so poor it was putting patients at risk. i
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that prices care was so poor it was putting patients at risk.— putting patients at risk. i continue to apologise _ putting patients at risk. i continue to apologise to — putting patients at risk. i continue to apologise to people _ putting patients at risk. i continue to apologise to people who - putting patients at risk. i continue to apologise to people who have l putting patients at risk. i continue i to apologise to people who have not -ot to apologise to people who have not got the _ to apologise to people who have not got the service they want. that is not the _ got the service they want. that is not the reason why any of us coming into work— not the reason why any of us coming into work every day. i don't want to put forward — into work every day. i don't want to put forward excuses as to why this is the _ put forward excuses as to why this is the case — put forward excuses as to why this is the case i— put forward excuses as to why this is the case. i want to absolutely focus _ is the case. i want to absolutely focus on — is the case. i want to absolutely focus on what we need to do now to make _ focus on what we need to do now to make this _ focus on what we need to do now to make this better so that people get the services they are entitled to. this is— the services they are entitled to. this is the — the services they are entitled to. this is the fourth time in eight years that the norfolk and suffolk trust has been rated inadequate. time and time again, efforts to improve care had failed. there are now undoubtedly be questions for ministers hear about the trust's future and about how long it can be allowed to keep putting patients at risk. one local mp has now called on the government to take control of the government to take control of the trust. ., , the government to take control of the trust. ., ~ ,, , ., ,, .., the government to take control of the trust. ., e ,, , ., «e .., the trust. howe, mr speaker, can i make it clear— the trust. howe, mr speaker, can i make it clear to _ the trust. howe, mr speaker, can i make it clear to the _ the trust. howe, mr speaker, can i make it clear to the secretary - the trust. howe, mr speaker, can i make it clear to the secretary of i make it clear to the secretary of state for health that enough is enough and that he must take direct control of this failing service, provide emergency funding to do so
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and rebuild it from the bottom up with patience and hard working staff in that service.— in that service. bereaved families went to the _ in that service. bereaved families went to the trust's _ in that service. bereaved families went to the trust's it _ in that service. bereaved families went to the trust's it was - in that service. bereaved families went to the trust's it was us - in that service. bereaved families | went to the trust's it was us today to remember the 1000 people they say have died over almost a decade due to poor services. the figure the trust disputes. inspectors will return soon and have threatened further action if safety doesn't improve. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. details of organisations offering help and support within the health of available at bbc.co.uk for its last action line and you can call for free at any times to hear the recorded information on over 8000, 155, 998. mafia the recorded information on over 8000, 155. 998.— the recorded information on over 8000, 155, 998. now it is time for a look at sport — 8000, 155, 998. now it is time for a look at sport and _ 8000, 155, 998. now it is time for a look at sport and here _ 8000, 155, 998. now it is time for a look at sport and here is _ 8000, 155, 998. now it is time for a look at sport and here is the - 8000, 155, 998. now it is time for a look at sport and here is the bbc - look at sport and here is the bbc sport centre. a big night of european
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football tonight — west ham and rangers both face german opposition in their europa league semi—finals — around 15 minutes gone... and in the europa conference league — the third tier of european club competition. brendan rodgers' leicester city are at home for the first leg againstjose mourinho's roma. boma have just got to go one up boma havejust got to go one up in that one and currently goalless in the other game against marseille. one game in the premier league is a night, manchester united have seen chelsea, chelsea sit third in the table, 15 points behind league leaders manchester city and united are six points outside of the top four. that one is goalless and
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chelsea have had a few opportunities, 32.5 minutes played in that one and all those matches include the sleek and premier league is well on the bbc sport website as well. my black stain with united the interim boss ralf rangnick is considering in the track —— staying with united, the track —— staying with united, the interim boss ralf rangnick is considering an offer to take over. staying with united, their interim boss ralf rangnick is considering an offer to take over as austria's national coach. if the german accepts, it would not necessarily impact on his planned consultancy role at united from next season — when erik ten hag takes over as manager. liverpool managerjurgen klopp has signed a contract extension that will keep him at the club until 2026, meaning his plans to take a break in 2024 at the end of his original deal have been put on hold. the sa year old german manager joined the club in 2015 and since then has guided them to their first league title in 30 years and also
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a sixth european crown. his side are still on for a quadruple this season — they've already won the league cup, are in the fa cup final, have one foot in the champions league final, and arejust a point behind manchester city in the premier league. while chelsea's women have the chance to stretch their lead over arsenal at the top of the women's super league to four points if they claim victory over tottenham. looking pretty good for them in the moment. beth england put chelsea in fron after a quater of an hour. ben stokes has already told the ecb that he expects james anderson and stuart broad to come back into the england reckoning after they were dropped from the tour of west indies earlier this year. stokes's first series as the new test captain will be against new zealand injune. the 30 year old all—rounder takes over from joe root who stood down earlier this month. we obviously needed a captain and i thought ben stokes was by far and away the best person to do it and i know there is a lot they said about him being the only one and regardless if you had lots and lots of leaders in that dressing room ben stokes would be the best person to do it because he has a great cricket
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brain in my opinion, the spectre of the dressing room, and he has been a leaderfor the the dressing room, and he has been a leader for the last however long he has been an illness coming as a young man. he was someone people followed. he has got a hell of a lot of empathy for the players around him, cares the people and isn't where those players who go his own thing, he is and who is constantly thinking about the people around him. judd trump has made a fantastic start in the first of the world snooker championship semi—finals. the 2019 champion has taken charge against the three time winner mark williams — and leads 7 frames to 1 after the first session. they'll return tomorrow morning with seventeen frames the target. these are live pictures on bbc four of the second semifinal which is under way between six—time winner ronnie o'sullivan who's playing four—time championjohn higgins. as you can see, john higgins has just missed on there and it was a big opportunity to go 3—0 up in
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sullivan back on the table now and all of these being covered in the bbc sports website. very good at the moment invested 33 contest eight frames in the session. british cyclist ethan hayter won stage two of the tour de romandie in switzerland. it's his second win for the ineos grenadiers team in three days. the 23—year—old is having an eventful race — he won the prologue time trial on the first day, crashed on stage one, and then sprinted to victory on stage two. currently 1—0 in the european league is set does not currently 1—1 in that europa league semifinal equaliser against eintracht frankfurt. good news is my husband is a west ham fan! noted his complaints early in the week that a conservative was caught
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watching pawn in the house of commons sitting next to a female colleague. today a senior member of the government had a small minority of men in parliament behave like animals. those were her words. that alleged incident and other claims have raised questions about the culture in parliament. here is our political correspondent chris mason. parliament is being renovated. a never ending building site, scaffolding and hard hats. but what about the culture inside? does that need modernising to? today a cabinet minister told us about some of the men she works with.— minister told us about some of the men she works with. there are some bad a- les men she works with. there are some bad apples who _ men she works with. there are some bad apples who are _ men she works with. there are some bad apples who are out _ men she works with. there are some bad apples who are out of _ men she works with. there are some bad apples who are out of order, - bad apples who are out of order, behave like animals and are bringing parliament into disrepute to been so i don't think we should be saying that as pervasive culture and that is not my experience. there are certain of the individual to pervasive culture and that is not my experience. there are certain other individuals who are behaving in an unacceptable way. mike met obviously unacceptable way. mike met obviously unacceptable for an mp to watch pornography while here in the house
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of commons. the claim made by a minister about a fellow unnamed conservative mp. government is now suggesting it is investigated by parliamentmake independence pa rliamentmake independence complaints process. the prime minister added it was obviously unacceptable for an mp to watch pornography while here in the house of commons. the claim made by a minister about a fellow unnamed conservative mp. the government is now suggesting that it is investigated by parliament's independent complaints process. labour say... i think it is very good that we've got an independent system and obviously that requires anonymity. this is an unusual case because the tory party knows who this individual is. i think that they should deal with it and deal with it sooner rather than later and take appropriate action. listers have promised appropriate action once ministers have promised appropriate action once an investigation is finished. let's be blunt, this is a strange workplace. who is an mp�*s boss? ultimately it's you, voters. but what does that mean between elections? the current complaints system was set up four years ago following criticisms about how claims of sexual harassment by mps
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were dealt with. we need to bring people to account, we need to protect staff and other memos of parliament so they have an independent complaints process, but it needs to be seen to operate at pace. and yes, loads of people here say investigations take ages, denying alleged victims and perpetrators answers and justice. and there's a broader point here — that the reputation of politics is dragged into the gutter. scotland's first minister said that has consequences. we will rue the day we make it more difficult and less attractive for women to come forward for election to public office, it is time to draw a line in the sand and it is time for men, not all men are misogynists, but misogyny comes from men, and it's time for them to change. and for plenty, that change is not happening anywhere near fast enough. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. the labour mp liam byrne is to be suspended from the commons
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for two days for bullying a member of staff. an investigation found the ex—cabinet minister had ostracised a former assistant after a minor argument. mr byrne said he had apologised and was "profoundly sorry". streaming services are to be regulated by ofcom for the first time, under new government proposals. netflix, disney+, amazon prime video and other streamers will be given new rules that will bring them in line with traditional broadcasters. the culture secretary said the move would protect audiences from harmful material. the government's also publishing its plans for the sale of channel 4. they've been detailed in a white paper today. well, we can get more on this story now by speaking to matt deegan, who's the presenter of the media podcast. in terms of ofcom dealing with streaming services what kind of powers will it had and how will it use themnot powers will it had and how will it use themno— powers will it had and how will it use themno powers will it had and how will it usethemno. ., ., , , ., use themnot makes a lot of sense to brina use themnot makes a lot of sense to bring netflix — use themnot makes a lot of sense to bring netflix and _ use themnot makes a lot of sense to bring netflix and amazon _ use themnot makes a lot of sense to
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bring netflix and amazon prime - use themnot makes a lot of sense to | bring netflix and amazon prime video in line with broadcasters like bbc or itv. in the moment consumers can complain to ofcom directly about something they seem dull podcast is full the ofcom podcasting code so it is something to judge them against. what the government are suggesting in the white paper is that they will apply the broadcasting to scream it don't... just complaints from uk consumers. i5 don't. .. just complaints from uk consumers-— consumers. is it likely that will draw u- consumers. is it likely that will draw op fines _ consumers. is it likely that will draw up fines for _ consumers. is it likely that will draw up fines for these - consumers. is it likely that will - draw up fines for these broadcasters and streamers and if so how they could they potentially be? normally what happens _ could they potentially be? normally what happens with _ could they potentially be? normally what happens with complaints - could they potentially be? normally what happens with complaints is - could they potentially be? normally what happens with complaints is if i what happens with complaints is if they are upheld by ofcom it is a bit of a slap on the list with broadcasters and the public dressing down. yes what you can do and there have been times in broadcasters have been fined ofcom. tend to be on the extreme end and i would expect netflix and amazon or digital operators like them to be fizzing up
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material that would be so offensive and potentially that is an option. in the uk, generally, for broadcasters, it is a percentage of revenue but it tends to be relatively small amounts so we are unlikely to see multi million pound signs because a load of people don't like what is on sex education on netflix. , . ef like what is on sex education on netflix. , ., «e ., ., netflix. lets talk about channel 4 and of course _ netflix. lets talk about channel 4 and of course a _ netflix. lets talk about channel 4 and of course a lot _ netflix. lets talk about channel 4 and of course a lot of— netflix. lets talk about channel 4 and of course a lot of people - netflix. lets talk about channel 4 and of course a lot of people are| and of course a lot of people are talking about in this country particularly about plans to sell channel 4 and the privatisation of channel 4 and the privatisation of channel 4 and the privatisation of channel 4 has been up till now very controversial. where do you think it is going to go from here?— is going to go from here? welcome that the government _ is going to go from here? welcome that the government is _ that the government is very keen to privatise channel 4 and nobody else seems to be very keen for that to happen so the channel themselves, production companies that make all the content on the channel, and all advertisers have basically said they don't think it's a particularly good idea. today the government response to the consultation and had 55,000 responses in something like 94% of
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them said it wasn't a good idea, but they are pressing on. some people argue it is perhaps ideological on behalf of the common government. they have an 80 seat majority so they want to push something through they want to push something through they can. they can. they are likely to get some pushback from peers, tory peers and perhaps tory mps as well, and the solution that the government are looking for is one to try and reinforce the channel now it faces all this competition, but there doesn't seem to be a lot of argument about why selling it off to probably international broadcaster would do that, particularly for the people who own it at the moment, us, the public, why it would enhance the service that we get in the moment. finally want to ask about netflix will have you here. people talking about the number of subscribers netflix falling. what you think netflix falling. what you think netflix is going to do? work and it go from here to make more money? adverts? charging people more to watch it? e . ,
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adverts? charging people more to watch it? . , , adverts? charging people more to watch it? ., , , , adverts? charging people more to watchit? ., ,, ,, ., watch it? may have pushed up prices in the uk and — watch it? may have pushed up prices in the uk and other— watch it? may have pushed up prices in the uk and other markets - watch it? may have pushed up prices in the uk and other markets this - in the uk and other markets this year? does make they have pushed up prices. they will look at content spend another spending too much and is a risk is that they have got out the gate first and been very successful in growing their business but lots of markets like the uk and usa might be reaching potential limits it's a view to make new subscribers but this is looking at pricing and also advertising at the first time. they said it would never come to netflix and now they have started talking about it and there is no mention that it's actually if you reduce the subscription vies for someone that is to have, like, and netflix with iron ads actually they can make more money from a consumer providing they continue to watch lots of programmes —— netflix with ads. combination with all of those things out the bottom line. —— to help the bottom line. thanks, good to talk to. now the weather with nick miller. hello. a lot of the cloud we've seen today will slowly clear tonight.
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the cloud that stays with us in northern and eastern scotland, down the eastern side of england may just produce a few showers or some spots of light rain and drizzle. there'll be a few mist and fog patches developing. it looks to be coldest across rural parts of northern ireland, southern scotland, northern england, and this is where you may see a frost into tomorrow morning. now, tomorrow is looking like a brighter, sunnier day compared with today. still a lot of cloud through the east and south east of england, and that will take a lot of the day to clear. it will feel quite cool here. some showers through central and eastern parts of scotland, especially first thing. then into the afternoon, many places will avoid them and stay dry. and a warmer feeling day with more sunshine around. glasgow, 17 degrees. now, into tomorrow night, the showers that we've seen develop will fade away, but some rain heading in towards scotland and northern ireland for the start of the weekend, pushing south into wales and england, though beginning to die out during sunday.
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the un chief meets president zelensky and russia must cooperate with the criminal court. they have been killed in ukraine. understood that he was fighting for ukrainian forces a second britain is currently missing. president biden promises to keep helping ukraine defend itself from russia's invasion and promises moscow will not be allowed to intimidate europe with cuts to energy supply. allegations of sexism as a wash and pete says inappropriate comments were made to her by members of the shadow cabinet. after two female conservative mps claim he saw a male colleague watching pornography on his phone in the comments. bad to worse, england's worst performing health care trust, saying to be further
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deteriorating. let's return to ukraine now there the un secretary general — antonio guterres — has visited the capital kyiv to see for himself some of the places near this city where there've been alleged war crimes by russian troops. it was his first visit to this country since the conflict began more than two months ago. he's been speaking to my colleague ben brown and begins here by talking about his meeting with vladimir putin earlier this week. president putin has in the groups involved in evacuation of the civilians that are in dramatic circumstances in this steel factory and margie mariupol, my main objective is that
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we are able to rescue these people. other important scenes were discussed and i hope that this will translate itself and the progress in the humanitarian field in the field of evacuations and, of course, our interests is to see this war ended. i am in kyiv and avenue i was shocked that it exploded in the city where i am and this is a dramatic war and we absolutely need to end this work we absolutely need to have a solution to this war. and this will not happen tomorrow, but the capacity to boost her humanitarian presence and support, which i announce to the government and we are working closely with the government and the increasing humanitarian support to the
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population at the same time, an effort to create a condition to rescue civilians in desperate situations as was the case and mariupol, more thanjustifies situations as was the case and mariupol, more than justifies this visit. d0 mariupol, more than 'ustifies this visit. ., visit. do you feel you can go further and _ visit. do you feel you can go further and possibly, - visit. do you feel you can go - further and possibly, eventually negotiate some sort of cease—fire here? some sort of peace agreement? was that beyond the scope of the united nations? the was that beyond the scope of the united nations?— was that beyond the scope of the united nations? , ., , , ., united nations? the un is associated with the agreement, _ united nations? the un is associated with the agreement, the _ united nations? the un is associated with the agreement, the normandy . with the agreement, the normandy format, this was always done with mediation in france and germany and obviously, i came to moscow through turkey and with the president, they have been very active in supporting these negotiations and we are supporting those efforts and we are not currently involved in peace negotiations and i asked for a truce during easter in order to be able to
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exactly have evacuations from different points from where people are threatened by these dramatic confrontations and that was not possible. but we will not give up. we want peace and ukraine, peace in line with the un charter and international law and we want to do everything we can to support the people that are suffering and they need and deserve our full commitment and ourfull support. bud need and deserve our full commitment and our full support.— and our full support. and you saw some of that _ and our full support. and you saw some of that suffering _ and our full support. and you saw some of that suffering today, - and our full support. and you saw some of that suffering today, you j some of that suffering today, you went to some of the towns north of here where there are alleged war crimes and you looks like you're shocked by what you saw. his shocked by what you saw. h 3 investigations and i fully support the activity of the international criminal court and i trust them and
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the russian federation will cooperate with international criminal court. it is absolutely essential that wherever there is a violation of international humanitarian law or a war crime, it is absolutely essential that the truth is completely clarified and that those responsible will be punished and accountability works. but were your impressions we went around the town so there's been so much killing of innocent civilians? when i was there, when we fill the motion to make a motion of being in a place or people have suffered so much, ifelt as if i a place or people have suffered so much, i felt as if i was a place or people have suffered so much, ifelt as if i was imagining my family there and how terrible it would be. ithink, when like
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my family there and how terrible it would be. i think, when like this, international organisations sometimes, we are absorbed with numbers and every person matters. that is what counts is to be able to support people in distress, to be able to rescue people in distress and understand that even if this only resolves to rescue one person, it will be worthwhile. he only resolves to rescue one person, it will be worthwhile.— it will be worthwhile. he spoke of our it will be worthwhile. he spoke of your frustration _ it will be worthwhile. he spoke of your frustration and _ it will be worthwhile. he spoke of i your frustration and disappointment that the united nations security council has not been able to stop the fighting at the end this war. filtrate the fighting at the end this war. we know the fighting at the end this war. - know they have been penalised many situations and also in ukraine, but the un is not a secondary counsel, their general assembly and thousands in ukraine, hundreds of staff members of un, women and men were working to support people of ukraine providing assistance, providing
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food, cash, otherforms of support, cooperating with the government on that, the un is much more than the security council.— that, the un is much more than the security council. there are warnings that this work _ security council. there are warnings that this work is _ security council. there are warnings that this work is escalating - security council. there are warnings that this work is escalating to - security council. there are warnings that this work is escalating to a - that this work is escalating to a third world war and they're talking about nato fighting a proxy war here. do you think this could escalate? i here. do you think this could escalate?— here. do you think this could escalate? , , ., . ., escalate? i truly believe a nuclear war is unthinkable _ escalate? i truly believe a nuclear war is unthinkable and _ escalate? i truly believe a nuclear war is unthinkable and obviously, | escalate? i truly believe a nuclear. war is unthinkable and obviously, it is a matter of concern with these things are discussed. but, a nuclear war is unthinkable and we need to do everything possible to make it impossible. pregnancy loss can be a life changing experience but despite an estimated one in five pregnancies ending in miscarriage, it's still something that isn't often spoken about openly. our global health correspondent
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tulip mazumdar has suffered pregnancy loss herself, and has been finding out more about why it happens, and how care could be improved around the world. some viewers may find this report upsetting. you never think it will happen to you. one day your baby is there, you heard its fierce heartbeat. the next, the life inside of them, their life inside of you, is gone. it's estimated that around one in five pregnancies end in miscarriage. but the numbers are vague, as most countries don't actually count these losses. i've had one healthy pregnancy, my beautiful boy, rion. and four that ended in loss. two were early miscarriages, and two happened much later into my pregnancies, where i gave
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birth to my tiny babies, rivah and rae. i am one of tens of millions of women around the world who have suffered pregnancy loss. and, as my work as global health correspondent has shown me many times, i know how lucky i am to have received the level of care i've had. the conversation around pregnancy loss is opening up so much more here in the uk with things like this beautiful exhibition here in manchester. but, after my losses, it struck me. given how physically and mentally painful miscarriage can be, why aren't we talking about it more? why don't we know more about why it happens? so my name's professor siobhan quarmby. my name's natasha. i've spent the last few months looking into how pregnancy loss
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impacts families all around the world and how they can be better supported. why the colour of our skin can affect our chances of having a healthy pregnancy. ijust don't think we're being listened to, and heard in the spaces. do you think it is about the colour of your skin? absolutely. yes, absolutely. yes. and heard from one group often left out of the conversation. my wife was near to die. and i'd cry sitting on the toilet because that was the only time i could get to be alone. post—brexit checks due to be introduced injuly on imported food and fresh products from the european union have been dropped. instead, new border import controls will be established by the end of next year. the government says the move will reduce the risk of disruption at ports. our economics editor faisal islam joins me now. borisjohnson's brexit deal prioritised independence for the uk
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over rules and standards and immigration policy and the natural result of that was a more distant trading relationship with our major trading partner, europe. now, the european union applied the extra red tape and paperwork and checks that comes with this new arrangement on day one, in january of last year, and that's applied to uk exporters. this is about coming the other way — about eu imports into the uk. they've been delayed three times, and what we had today, effectively, was a further delay of at least a year—and—a—half, but the government hopes that, by then, we will have in place a digitised world trade borderfor the entire globe that will mean, effectively, it doesn't have to be in place at all, and so the consequence — so that's the, sort of, positive motivation for it. the more concerning motivation is about the cost—of—living crisis. the government did not want to put this in place at a time when there's already supply chain challenges and by rising prices,
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and they felt that this would add to that £1 billion — an "act of self—harm" said jacob rees—mogg. so, the supermarkets are happy, the chambers of commerce are happy, too, but the ports say they've spent tens of millions of pounds in trying to build facilities that are white elephants, and some exporters now face checks on their exports and no equivalent checks for their competitors on their imports. the uk's second biggest supermarket chain is warning of tougher times ahead for its customers, even as it's just posted a big recovery in profits. they've more than doubled thanks to the pandemic but — as every shopper knows — it's been followed by rising costs and a massive squeeze on household budgets. sainsburys' profits rose by 350 million pounds to 730 million pounds for the twelve months to march this year. research suggests the average household food bill could increase by £271 a year. our business correspondent emma simpson has more details. prices are rising everywhere in the supermarket aisles
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but there is a battle to keep them as low as possible on everyday essentials. it's an unprecedented time. the boss of sainsbury says it's not easy at the moment. the cost of fuel is going up. the cost of fertilizer to grow and produce food is going up and the cost of labour is going up. and so against the backdrop of a lot of cost pressure, cost inflation, we are working really hard to make sure we keep our prices down, and we are doing that by making savings elsewhere in our company so we can refocus that back in to being the best value it can be for customers. are you doing enough? there's always more we push ourselves to do. this is a very competitive market. we expect profits to be lower than last year as we invest more to be even better value. food price inflation has not been this high since at least a decade. back then, the big four supermarkets put their prices up too much allowing aldi and lidl to steal customers.
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this time around, they cannot afford these discounters and other value chains to eat their lunch, but they are facing cost pressures like never before. the company behind these well—known brands has already raised prices by more than 8%. and warned today more hikes are on the way. unilever are one of the biggest businesses in the world that make consumer goods, the things we use every day. they can usually control pricing and at the moment they are saying they can't. if they can't control the price increase coming from around the world, what does that mean for smaller businesses and other organisations that make the products we buy every week? in coventry, shoppers are anxious about prices. i have not at the moment had to go to a food bank, but there is that possibility. i'm on benefits. it's a struggle. it's a worry. it is what it is. you have to eat. it's expensive but i have to do it.
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the pressure is on, and for retailers the big question is how much inflation they can absorb and how much they have to pass on. emma simpson, bbc news. in northern ireland, voters go to the polls a week today almost 100,000 fewer cars are built in the first three months of this year compared to the same period last year. the decline is been blamed on the shortage of computer chips and energy costs for manufacturers. in northern ireland, voters go to the polls a week today for elections to the stormont assembly. these political campaigns are largely characterised as a battle between unionism and nationalism. in other words, the biggest parties are defined by whether or not they support remaining part of the uk, or becoming
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a united ireland. but while the divide over british or irish identity is still very apparent, our correspondent emma vardy has found that there is also a growing middle ground. every band is unique and every band wants their own trousers, hat, jacket. soon, many streets will echo with the sound most symbolic of northern ireland's unionist heartlands. my father was a drummer and his father was a drummer. the hundreds of marching bands represent a distinct image of british identity here. it's not to offend. it keeps a lot of children off the streets because they're being taught an instrument. for a large section of voters, views over northern ireland's future within the union still has the biggest impact over the way they vote. do you think people make judgements about someone's identity here quite quickly? it's the only country in the world where people are interested in whether you're protestant or catholic in the first five minutes of meeting you. expressions of britishness are more prominent here than anywhere else in the uk. because there's people wanting to take that away from us. -
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we feel threatened. northern ireland could be about to experience a pivotal moment. the polls are indicating that, for the first time, a nationalist party could become the largest party at stormont. in nationalist communities, there is a high level of participation and pride in gaelic sports. we feel it is very much as part of our culture and our heritage that encompasses so much because you have sports, but you also have the the irish language, the irish culture. while the top jobs at stormont are decided on whether a unionist or nationalist party wins the most seats, in recent years an increasing number of votes have gone to parties which don't align themselves as either. i think there's a new generation of people coming through, and theyjust want the best for their kids. all my children played here, but would i call them - nationalist? less so than me.
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and, you know, my nationalists were probably a lot less - so than my parents. if we see this nationalist victory, does that make a border poll more likely? i don't think it's inevitable. probably put more political pressure on them to call it. i'm a wee protestant from east belfast. for younger voters, the old divisions are far less clear. and on northern ireland's growing comedy scene for william thomson, a performer with cerebral palsy, there's plenty of material. so here is my actual opinion on a united ireland. whoever has the best dla, i'm on your side. i think it's changed because we would integrate a lot more than the previous generation would. but smaller parties argue there's only limited influence the emerging centre ground can have if mandatory power—sharing between unionists and nationalists continues to exist. you are, whether you like it or not, sort of grouped into one or the otherfrom birth. is there a new identity which is neither british nor purely irish but northern irish? i think for a lot of people there is, definitely,
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but it doesn't feel like that's reflected in stormont. next week's elections will determine whether a unionist or nationalist takes the first minister's job. but it will also be an important test of how many voters turn away from this traditional divide. emma vardy, bbc news. the motion to remove the accolade was passed unanimously. they also called for him to relinquish his duke of york title in the wake of his out—of—court settlement in virginia who accused him of sexual
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assault in the united states. the prince of wales and duchess of cornwall have visited the bbc�*s headquarters to mark the 90th anniversary of the world service.prince charles expressed admiration for journalists covering wars in ukraine and afghanistan, saying it was important the public had the 'impartial truth' from conflict zones. matter, which also owns and instagram and what's app has its lowest revenue growths in at least a decade. what make the dragon capsule has docked at the international space station, they are welcomed by seven crew members already on the station. the spacecraft was launched from the kennedy space centre in florida yesterday. as a system of
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the fastest commercial conflates of commercial space of the international space station. now, are flying cars just a sci—fi fantasy? or could they one day be lifting off? a dutch company that makes them has set up a base at coventry airport. phil mackie reports. for as long as there have been cars and planes, someone's been trying to combine the two. this italian model was built in the 1940s. the trouble is they've never been really practical, but now things could be about to change. so we have to stop dreaming and we're now at the very last stage of processing the regulations within permissions for flight with this vehicle, so it's getting so close. the liberty is made by a dutch company which is nearing the end of the long process to get everything licensed and approved. the question is who's going to buy one? well, they've already got lots of orders. this is the fastest way to become a pilot so there's always a small james bond seat in every heart of every guy and every girl,
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so that's where we are selling to. it takes less than ten minutes to turn it from a plane to a car. you could land it at any airfield and then drive home. if you want to buy one of these, it's going to cost you 300,000 euros. sounds a lot, but probably a snip if you want to be at the forefront of what they're promising will be a new motoring and aviation revolution. you'll need a private pilot's licence, but you can learn both here in coventry and in oxford. there have been many false starts in bringing a flying plane to market. next year, they reckon, is when you may see one driving along a street near you. phil mackie, bbc news, coventry. now, it's time for a look at the weather with nick. hello. can certainly see, actually april last year was dry too, the fourth
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dressed on record for the uk. if you remember last year, we had a big transformation and fortunes from april into may. one extreme to the other, the ground turned much wetter and last year, it was the fourth widest on record. there is some rain in the forecast but not enough to cause that sort of transformation. because although high—pressure is still on for friday and demonstrated the weekend, low pressure looks to be going out of scotland and yes, there is some rain moving and will pick up will be more before the month is done and will look at that just a moment. friday is another largely dread day with high—pressure just a few showers popping up through central and eastern parts of scotland and through east ambience of these for much of the date is clearing later and actually it looks to be a brighter sunnier day compared to thursday temperatures will be a bit higher as a result. internet high—pressure, again,
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another look at this weather system moving in initially on saturday to northern ireland and scotland with some rain we've had some decent rain in northern ireland to the west of scotland. and claudia the chance in northern england in northern wales. souther that, clouds are still a few sunny spots in the southeast world will see higher temperatures. the sunday, this weather system will swing southwards and will be weakening as it does so, those to be some rain associated with it and light, patchy or showering on sunday and all that gradually clearing the way probably selfless words. keeping a good deal of cloud i'd come a few sunny spells and a few showers, especially to scotland and northern ireland, and said a milder, warmer day and you'll feel cooler in wales and england. going into the bank holiday, pressure is high in the system now clears the way. and so, there will be a fair amount of cloud around and it will break to allow some sunny spells to come through and there's a chance of catching the
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art shower here and there but most places will stay dry and submitting this most places will stay dry it's mainly settled bank holiday not particularly warm but pleasant enough for this and makes an appearance, some of pricks of rain in the day —— outbreaks of rain. and into wednesday. and outbreaks of rain gradually pushing into showers as well for a fair amount of cloud they think it will be rain totals to they think it will be rain totals to the next and temperatures around the mid teens. now, beyond that, looks as though high—pressure is going to move in from the southwest and may still allow other systems to skirt around it and delete scotland maybe with some rain at times where it is been dry compared to other areas in wells in england, and the keep things largely dry as well. before we get to that, this is the next five days of rainfall. we've established some other systems moving through and yes, this is some rain. of the key here is to look of
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the scale, but the drier into the scale, these colours here look like a splash of rain here in there. especially across parts of england and so, no sign yet of the big transmission we had last year but drier in april.
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hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching the context on bbc news. more support and more weapons for ukraine — as president biden asks congress to commit another $33bn to the fight against russia the un secretary general sees for himself the devestation in ukraine. the county's chief prosecutor says they have collated more than 8,000 cases of suspected war crimes. we are going to devote the second half of the programme to the issues of war crimes, and the international support thats building for a war crimes tribunal. also tonight... one of germany's biggest energy firms is preparing to buy russian gas through a payments system critics say will undermine eu sanctions. and despite the commitment made at the glasgow climate summit we are still an area of rainforest, the size of 10 football pitches, every minute — what can be done.

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