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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  April 29, 2022 5:00am-5:31am BST

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this is bbc news, i'm victoria fritz with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. ukraine's president condemns a russian missiles strike on the capital, kyiv, which came during a visit by the un secretary—general, antonio guterres. i was shocked to be informed that two rockets had exploded in the city where i am, so this is a dramatic war and we absolutely need to end this war and we absolutely need to have a solution for this war. presidentjoe biden asks the us congress for $33 billion in extra funding for ukraine — president zelensky welcomes the move. this is a very important step by the united states and i am
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grateful to the american people and personally to president biden. denmark is accused of double standards after allowing ukrainian refugees to stay for up to two years, while reducing the number of non—european asylum seekers. authorities in beijing roll out mass testing this week, as they close more gyms, malls and cinemas to try to contain the spread of covid. the london club that's hosted some of music's biggest names is reopening later, three years after it was struck by fire, flood, and a plague.
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hello there and a very warm welcome to the programme. ukraine's president volodymyr zelensky has said a russian missile attack on ukraine's capital, during a visit by the un secretary—general, illustrates russia's contempt for global institutions. mr zelensky said the strikes on kyiv showed that civilians in ukrainian cities could not relax. gareth barlow reports. missile strikes in the centre of kyiv, a first for two weeks. two russian rockets struck a 25 story building, close to where the head of the un was staying during a visit to the country. several people were left injured by the attack. i was shocked to _ injured by the attack. i was shocked to be _ injured by the attack. i was shocked to be informed - injured by the attack. i wasl shocked to be informed that injured by the attack. i was - shocked to be informed that two rockets had exploded in the city where i am, so this is a dramatic war and we absolutely need to end this war and we absolutely need to have a solution for this war. the sales struck _ solution for this war. the sales struckjust - solution for this war. the sales struckjust hours i solution for this war. the sales struckjust hours after the un secretary general
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criticised the organisation security council for failing to prevent or end the war, saying the situation was a source of angen the situation was a source of anger, frustration and disappointment. it seems that us presidentjoe biden says he is trying to prevent, with proposed new aid package worth $33 billion. the majority of which to help increase ukraine's air defence and artillery capacity as well as offering further economic and humanitarian support. translation: humanitarian support. tuna/mom- humanitarian support. translation: , , translation: this is a very important — translation: this is a very important step _ translation: this is a very important step by _ translation: this is a very important step by the - translation: this is a very| important step by the united states and i am grateful to the american people and personally to president biden. a hope that the congress will quickly support this request for help for our state.— for our state. nato says it is ready to _ for our state. nato says it is ready to support _ for our state. nato says it is ready to support ukraine . for our state. nato says it isj ready to support ukraine for years to come, as it warns that the war could drag on. and as russia shows it is fully prepared to strike at the heart of the country during an official visit by the un, and
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as president putin increasingly warns the west to back off, it seems nato's warning could easily prove to be true. maria avdeeva is a a security analyst and research director for a ukrainian think tank, and joins us now from kharkiv. good to see you again. maria, you were involved in an attack. if you feel comfortable doing so, would you be able to tell us more about what happened? yes, sure, good morning. we were with one of the international team of reporters covering the emergency services because they are doing just tremendous work under the constant shelling here in kharkiv and they save people and go and take those who are winded after the shelling, so we wanted to make this report about their work and they've got a call on a large residential area to the north
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of kharkiv under constant bombardment for more than two months, so every day there will be someone there who would be wounded or killed because of the russian shelling, so they received that call, we went to get the patient from the area and when we were on the spot, what happened was, it is called double tap attack, it means that the russian troops shall the building, then they run sometime about 20, 30 minutes until the emergency team comes and then they had the same area again, so that more people will be injured or wounded or more people will be killed. so when we arrived probably one, two minutes, another air attack by rocket systems started, so all the team started running into the team started running into the building to find some coverage there and we were hiding under the staircase and
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at that moment when we were running there, i slept and got both of my hands cut of the glass because all the windows in the building were broken and so when ice slept a actually cut my hands with the glass, but then the dock was there so he helped me to stop the bleeding and then we were in the building and at the moment we were inside probably 15 metres from us another rocket hit the same building and everything was shaking, everything was shaking, everything was shaking, everything was falling from the outside and actually the ambulance itself that was standing outside was hit. the window was broken, the defibrillator was broken as well, and after that these heroic medics, they actually managed to take the wounded man
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out of the building and bring him to the hospital. i out of the building and bring him to the hospital.- him to the hospital. i am so sorry you — him to the hospital. i am so sorry you had _ him to the hospital. i am so sorry you had to _ him to the hospital. i am so sorry you had to go - him to the hospital. i am so sorry you had to go through j sorry you had to go through that, that sounds absolutely appalling. and you were extremely lucky, as you say, that you were there with dock as. i was wondering is your capacity and a security analyst, you could tell our viewers just how common these double tap attacks are, that they wait for people to come and help before attacking again. and help before attacking aaain. , ., , and help before attacking aaain. , ., , again. yes, that is what they do and that _ again. yes, that is what they do and that is _ again. yes, that is what they do and that is what - again. yes, that is what they do and that is what happens| again. yes, that is what they . do and that is what happens and what is most dangerous because when we now do another report of coverage of such stories, what the emergency services do, it is always a big risk because when people come to rescue others, it is not the only occasion, it happens regularly, then the new attack will come and so everyone who is there helping people all is putting themselves on a great risk
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because they might be killed just there on the spot helping others and i have talked to the main doctor who is in charge of the ambulances here in kharkiv, so before they had 250 cars and now 50 of them are broken or out of order because they constantly got under the shelling and he was showing me the huge holes because of the shrapnel that actually hit all the time these ambulances when they arrive on the spot in the same situation is with the emergency workers because they regularly got killed and when they arrive, the same situation might happen and recently two of them here in kharkiv were killed just because they were de— mining the territory and an
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unexploded shell exploded at that time. a ., unexploded shell exploded at thattime. ., ., ~ unexploded shell exploded at that time-— unexploded shell exploded at thattime. . ., that time. maria, thank you so much for _ that time. maria, thank you so much for taking _ that time. maria, thank you so much for taking the _ that time. maria, thank you so much for taking the time - that time. maria, thank you so much for taking the time to i much for taking the time to speak to us this morning, and for your continued coverage and your bravery in doing so. thank you, i am sure we will see you again soon. thank you. denmark has been welcoming ukrainian refugees since the start of the russian invasion. the number of new arrivals could reach one 100,000 in the coming weeks. the danish government has just passed a law that will allow them to stay for up to two years. but at the same time, the government has also been working on plans to reduce the number of non—european asylum seekers. human rights groups have accused denmark of discrimination. bbc arabic�*s hanan razek reports from copenhagen. here, from first step, they were so kind to us.
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however my supposed to integrate in a society that reject me?— integrate in a society that re'ect me? , _, , reject me? one hosting country, two different _ reject me? one hosting country, two different refugees, - reject me? one hosting country, two different refugees, two - two different refugees, two different experiences. recently the danish government has passed a special law to host ukrainian refugees. although it is well—known for its zero asylum policies that has led to asylum policies that has led to a lot criticism to the danish government and i have come here to find out if there is really a double standard when it comes to refugees. my first stop is a cam posting ukrainian refugees. denmark has received around 40,000 ukrainians since the start of the russian invasion. are you planning to learn danish? , ., are you planning to learn danish?— are you planning to learn i danish?_ this are you planning to learn - danish?_ this is danish? yes of course. this is a mother— danish? yes of course. this is a mother of— danish? yes of course. this is a mother of four _ danish? yes of course. this is a mother of four who - danish? yes of course. this is a mother of four who was - danish? yes of course. this is| a mother of four who was here with her family. a mother of four who was here with herfamily. irate a mother of four who was here with her family.— with her family. we are very thankful for _ with her family. we are very thankful for danish - with her family. we are very thankful for danish people. | thankful for danish people. they give us roof to live, food to eat, and all these clothes, we have a lot of donations. it
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is very, very nice.— we have a lot of donations. it is very, very nice. but as anna prepares _ is very, very nice. but as anna prepares to — is very, very nice. but as anna prepares to make _ is very, very nice. but as anna prepares to make this - is very, very nice. but as anna prepares to make this country | prepares to make this country home, other refugees here have been feeling less welcome. around 35,000 syrian refugees have arrived in denmark since 2015. these protests in copenhagen last year were against laws making it harder for them to stay here. the government announced plans to revoke the visas of over 1000 syrian�*s, claiming that it was now safe for them to go home. this group of syrians have been here for over five years. translation: however my supposed — translation: however my supposed to _ translation: however my supposed to integrate - translation: however my supposed to integrate in - translation: however my supposed to integrate in a l supposed to integrate in a society that reject me? everywhere i see it promoted that they don't want me here. translation:— that they don't want me here. translation: syrians are the most sympathetic _ translation: syrians are the most sympathetic to _ translation: syrians are the most sympathetic to the - most sympathetic to the ukrainian. we endured the same tax and — ukrainian. we endured the same tax and weapons but we got different treatment from the government. in different treatment from the government-— government. in parliament, refu . ee government. in parliament, refugee status _ government. in parliament, refugee status as _ government. in parliament,
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refugee status as a - refugee status as a controversial issue. but the government says they cannot help everyone. we government says they cannot help everyone-— government says they cannot help everyone. we will have to sa that help everyone. we will have to say that we — help everyone. we will have to say that we are _ help everyone. we will have to say that we are a _ help everyone. we will have to say that we are a very - help everyone. we will have to say that we are a very small i say that we are a very small country compared to most other countries in the world. it seems you are a small country for the syrian�*s not that ukrainians. for the syrian's not that ukrainians.— for the syrian's not that ukrainians. ., ., , , ukrainians. know, that is why we think that _ ukrainians. know, that is why we think that we _ ukrainians. know, that is why we think that we have - ukrainians. know, that is why we think that we have a - we think that we have a responsibility in europe to bring refugees here and we think the people in the middle east have a responsibility for helping refugees there quite there is no doubt about the warm welcome ukrainians have received from everyone in denmark including syrian refugees. denmark including syrian refugees-_ denmark including syrian refu . ees. ., . ., ., , refugees. that welcome has left s rians refugees. that welcome has left syrians and _ refugees. that welcome has left syrians and others _ refugees. that welcome has left syrians and others wishing - refugees. that welcome has left syrians and others wishing they| syrians and others wishing they could be treated the same. let's get some of the day's other news. three of the main covid vaccine manufacturers have seen off a shareholder—led attempt to get them to release data on how they make theirjabs. some pfizer, johnson &johnson and moderna investors had argued that sharing this intellectual property would speed up the rollout of vaccines
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by boosting manufacturing. but other shareholders voted them down. one—third of the global population has yet to receive a first covid vaccine shot. the world health organization and unicef say producers of baby milk formula are using unethical and aggressive social media marketing practices in violation of international commitments to protect breastfeeding. new research found the industry was using apps, social media influencers and online baby clubs to promote infant formula. the tennis star boris becker could face jail later today when he is sentenced for failing to disclose all of his assets after being declared bankrupt. the three—times wimbledon champion netted millions of pounds in a glittering career, but fell into financial difficulties in recent years. authorities in beijing have closed more gyms, malls and cinemas as they try to contain the spread of covid.
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in the chaoyang district, the first to undergo mass testing this week, it started the last of three rounds of screening on friday among its 3.5 million residents. meanwhile, shanghai has been under lockdown for the past five weeks in an effort to contain the spread of infection there. but the government is now considering a shift from its zero—covid policy. alessandro pavanello is a shanghai resident and has spent time in isolation at home and also in a make—shift hospital. well, i spent almost three, no, almost two weeks in isolation in my home at first but then i tested positive for covid and went to a makeshift hospital. i was taken back home again, however, one of my latest results is positive again from the 22nd of april, so there is a bit of confusion
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about what is going to be of me and there is a chance i might have to go back to one of these makeshift hospitals again, so i am just waiting. i personally could not really see the logic of placing thousands of people into one space and hoping that they would get better with time instead of maybe leaving them at home to recover. actually, last night, there was an organised event at 8pm where everybody was just standing outside of their windows or their balconies and just making noise with pots and pans to just show their — i guess — disappointment and struggle in terms of finding food and getting food, and there is a lot of — ifeel there is a lot of unhappiness around the city and the situation is not really 0k. it feels like it is slightly
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getting better but at the same time, i personally cannot see the light at the end of the tunnel and i think a lot of people are feeling that way as well. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: it once hosted the likes of charlie chaplin. one of london's most famous venues, koko nightclub, reopens later after a huge renovation. nothing, it seemed, was too big to withstand the force of the tornado. the extent of the devastation will lead to renewed calls for government help to build better housing. internationally, there have already been protests. sweden says it received no warning of the accident. indeed, the russians at first denied anything had gone wrong. only when radioactivity levels began to increase outside russia were they forced to admit the accident.
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for the mujahideen, the mood here is . of great celebration. this is the end of- a 12—year war for them. they've taken the capital, which they've been fighting for for so loud _ it was seven o'clock in the morning on the day when power began to pass from the minority to the majority, when africa, after 300 years, reclaimed its last white colony. hello there. this is bbc world news. a reminder of our top story. ukraine's president condemns a russian missiles strike on the capital, kyiv, which came during a visit by the un secretary general, antonio guterres. let's get a full round—up of all the sports news now. hello, i'm tulsen tollett and this is your sports news
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where we start with football where manchester united needed another goal from cristiano ronaldo to salvage a draw at home to chelsea in the premier league. it was spanish defender marcos alonso who opened the scoring, putting chelsea in front after an hour. but within two minutes, united were level, ronaldo the scorer. he's now got 23 goals for the season in all competitions, including eight of united's last nine. staying with united, their interim boss, ralf rangnick, has insisted that his planned consultancy role at the club will not be impacted if he becomes the new coach of the austrian national team. i would only continue after the end of the season with my consultancy role. this is what we agreed between the cloud and myself, this will definitely happen and i'm looking forward to that and yes, this consultancy role will give me some time and space for other jobs. west ham will head to germany next week, trailing eintracht frankfurt 2—1 after the opening leg of their europa league
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semifinal. japanese international daichi kamada scored the decisive goal 10 minutes into the second half while a late goal for rb leipzig gave them a 1—0 win over scottish champions rangers. we are not looking forward with the fear but with happiness. it's a big pleasure to play in such stadiums with such atmospheres and we played in 82,000, we played in bergen on with a really good atmosphere and i think it's special. we are happy to be there in one week. in the europa conference league semifinal first legs, cyriel dessers scored twice for feyenoord in their 3—2 home win over marseille, while leicester city and roma finished 1—1 ahead of the second match in italy next week. we lost the ball too easily. they are very good offensive
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team. they are very expensive team. they are very expensive team. when they lose possession, they are a team that gives some space and we didn't use that space because we lost so many balls. the world snooker championship semifinals continue later in sheffield. six—time champion ronnie 0'sullivan and four—time winner john higgins are all level after their opening session on thursday. despite trailing 3—1 at the mid session interval, the �*rocket�* turned it around after the break, finishing with a century for the packed crucible crowd, and the players will now resume in the coming hours all level at four frames each. 2019 championjudd trump holds a commanding 7—1 lead over three—time winner mark williams heading into their second session with the welshman facing a huge uphill task to reach his fifth crucible final from this best—of—33 encounter. defending champion aryna sabalenka has been knocked out in the first round of
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the madrid 0pen by 20—year—old american amanda anisimova. the third seeded belarusian was back on the clay in madrid after losing the final of the stuttgart 0pen against world number one iga swiatek on sunday. the world number 33 anisimova held on for a 6—2, 3—6, 6—4 win and will now play croatia's petra martic for a place in the last 16. you can get all the latest sports news at our website — that's bbc.com/sport. but from me, tulsen tollett, and the rest of the team, that's your sports news for now. the koko nightclub in camden, north london, was the sight of madonna's first ever british gig, and the venue where prince liked to play secret shows when he came to london. it closed three years ago for a major renovation before tonight, it will reopen with a concert by us rock band arcade fire. our music correspondent, mark savage, has been down for a look.
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from lady gaga to the rolling stones, koko has hosted some of the biggest names in music. three is ago it closed for a novation. and then disaster struck. i novation. and then disaster struck. ' i: i: i: i: novation. and then disaster struck. ' :: :::::: , novation. and then disaster struck. ' :: :::::: struck. i 150,000 litres of water damage _ struck. i 150,000 litres of water damage in - struck. i 150,000 litres of water damage in the - struck. i 150,000 litres of water damage in the fire i struck. i 150,000 litres of| water damage in the fire so that quiet something to deal with, which ripped through the fabric of the building. the fire damage _ fabric of the building. the fire damage could - fabric of the building. the fire damage could have been worse but they don't at the top of the building melted and acted like a chimney to draw the flames away. it was a lucky escape for the venue which first opened in 1900 as the camden the eder. charlie chaplin was an early performer and after the second world war, the bbc is that 2—stage shows by monty python and the goons. it's one of mrs thatcher's in comprehensives!— it's one of mrs thatcher's in
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comprehensives! after the bbc left in 1983, — comprehensives! after the bbc left in 1983, it _ comprehensives! after the bbc left in 1983, it was _ comprehensives! after the bbc left in 1983, it was named - comprehensives! after the bbc left in 1983, it was named the l left in 1983, it was named the best nightclub in europe. about 90 - best nightclub in europe. about 90 are best nightclub in europe. about 90p are not _ best nightclub in europe. about 90p are not boebert _ best nightclub in europe. about 90p are not boebert if- best nightclub in europe. about 90p are not boebert if you're i 90p are not boebert if you're to be allotted and impress a body, the cocktails are exotic and cost £2.50 but they are nice. . ~' ., , and cost £2.50 but they are nice. ., , nice. the cocktails might cost a bit more — nice. the cocktails might cost a bit more now— nice. the cocktails might cost a bit more now but _ nice. the cocktails might cost a bit more now but the - nice. the cocktails might cost a bit more now but the venue j nice. the cocktails might cost l a bit more now but the venue is ready to open its doors again. with 24—hour is to go with the final touches being put to the auditorium, on friday night arcade fire will be the first band to take stage. when i replay of a new that's been host to so many incredible performers over the years, it takes centre stage at some level and you feel that and it's always so much more exciting to play a venue like that. �* , exciting to play a venue like that. �*, ., , ., ., that. it's always amazing when ou can that. it's always amazing when you can visualise _ that. it's always amazing when you can visualise what - that. it's always amazing when you can visualise what it's - you can visualise what it's like — you can visualise what it's like when someone like charlie chaplin — like when someone like charlie chaplin was there. it still looks_ chaplin was there. it still looks like that and oh, charlie chaplin — looks like that and oh, charlie chaplin was here.—
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chaplin was here. everyone is lookin: chaplin was here. everyone is looking at _ chaplin was here. everyone is looking at the _ chaplin was here. everyone is looking at the same - chaplin was here. everyone is looking at the same thing. i looking at the same thing. after fire pushed looking at the same thing. afterfire pushed back opening night by a further 18 months, the value's bonuses he has relieved the day has finally arrived. ., �* , relieved the day has finally arrived. ., h ., relieved the day has finally i arrived._ this arrived. how's it going? this looks great- _ arrived. how's it going? this looks great. first _ arrived. how's it going? this looks great. first show - looks great. first show tomorrow _ looks great. first show tomorrow night. - looks great. first show tomorrow night. it's i looks great. first showj tomorrow night. it's on looks great. first show l tomorrow night. it's on a gravel moment for us and we're going to 27 shows in a row which is quite special. mercury rize which is quite special. mercury prize nominee _ which is quite special. mercury prize nominee moses - which is quite special. mercury prize nominee moses boyd i which is quite special. mercuryl prize nominee moses boyd says he has missed playing the venue. , . , he has missed playing the venue. , ., , , ., venue. this has always been one ofthe venue. this has always been one of the most _ venue. this has always been one of the most favourite _ venue. this has always been one of the most favourite places i venue. this has always been one of the most favourite places to l of the most favourite places to play, sonically, just energy wise the vibe has always been an amazing experience. i have seen so many good shows on the stage. seen so many good shows on the state. , seen so many good shows on the state, , , seen so many good shows on the state. , , ,., stage. this balcony is a new feature and _ stage. this balcony is a new feature and you _ stage. this balcony is a new feature and you see - stage. this balcony is a new feature and you see people| feature and you see people behind you on stage. it’s behind you on stage. it's incredible. _ behind you on stage. it's incredible. if— behind you on stage. it's incredible. if i _ behind you on stage. it's incredible. if i had i behind you on stage. it�*s incredible. if i had the choice, i'd play in the centre of the audience. it’s choice, i'd play in the centre of the audience.— of the audience. it's not 'ust the main i of the audience. it's not 'ust the main stage i of the audience. it's not 'ust the main stage that's i of the audience. it's notjust| the main stage that's coming back. koko is now seven menus including a jazz, a piano bar
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and a dj space inside the dome. painstakingly we've reinstated every beam, trust and panel to original specification. it's a breakout space from the roof terrace next door and connect back to a secret staircase just behind our bar worker next to the auditorium and theatre below. ., .., the auditorium and theatre below. ., ., ~ , ., below. you can walk straight from year — below. you can walk straight from year to _ below. you can walk straight from year to the _ below. you can walk straight from year to the main - below. you can walk straightl from year to the main concert space? you can. i love the secret staircase, it's like harry potter. it does. every inch is set up for livestreaming, an idea that sounds obvious after the pandemic but was a gamble when the plans were originally drawn up the plans were originally drawn up in 2013. the plans were originally drawn up in 2011— up in 2013. livestreams opens ou u- up in 2013. livestreams opens you up to _ up in 2013. livestreams opens you up to performance - up in 2013. livestreams opens you up to performance are i you up to performance are people beyond the four walls so venues like this where every room is set up for livestreaming is definitely a way of the future.— livestreaming is definitely a way of the future. after venues are struggled — way of the future. after venues are struggled during _ way of the future. after venues are struggled during the - are struggled during the pandemic, koko's new template could help live music rediscover its rhythm.
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mark savage, bbc news. and that is how you and a package. thanks, mark. we will talk about pop—up many airports coming to a neighbourhood near you. hello there. the month of april has been an exceptionally dry month up and down the country. that's because we've had high pressure dominating the weather scene. now, as we head into the may bank holiday, it looks like this area of low pressure will bring some rainfall, some of it heavy across the north—west. as it spreads south across the uk, it will tend to weaken. but high pressure will bringing another fine day for friday. a chilly start, mind you, across northern and western areas. plenty of sunshine here. again, more cloud for east and south—east england and north—east scotland. here, we'll see a few showers into the afternoon, the odd one across the far south—east. and temperatures will reach highs around the mid—teens for many of us, but we could see 17 or 18 through the central belt of scotland. 0ur winds will be light but still fresh through the channel. now, as we head through
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friday night, under largely clear skies, certainly for england and wales, it'll turn quite chilly. but we'll start to see the first signs of that area of low pressure pushing into the north—west, so here, less cold as the cloud and the breeze starts to pick up. but a touch of frost across parts of england and wales. so for the weekend, it's quite a different feel. we will see this rain pushing its way southwards and eastwards. like i mentioned, it will be weakening somewhat. so into saturday, high pressure holds on again for much of england and wales. low pressure will start to pile into scotland and northern ireland, so here, it will be turning breezier and quite wet. some moderate bursts of rain across the north and the west of scotland. after that chilly start, though, england and wales will see another fine day with quite a bit of sunshine around, though cloud will tend to thicken across northern and western areas. so where we have the rain, then, that'll impact the temperatures, the low teens. quite a warm day to come for england and wales where we have all that sunshine. now, as we head through saturday night, that area of cloud and rain in the north begins to push its way southwards into much of england and wales, but it will be a weakening feature and conditions will dry up
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across the far north of scotland. but we hold onto a lot of cloud, so saturday night will be a milder one across the board. sunday promises to be a rather cloudy day, quite damp for parts of england and wales. the rain at this stage will be quite light and patchy, some drizzly rain. but the northern half of the country will see the driest of the conditions on sunday, so it's a reversal of fortunes and a bit of sunshine. we could make 16, 17 degrees. a little bit fresher further south because we'll have the thickest of the cloud. bank holiday monday looks a little bit drier. there could be a little bit of rain at times on tuesday. generally, it's a dry week next week, and there are just hints of it turning a little bit warmer across the south by friday.
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makeshift hospitals again, so i am just waiting. this is bbc news with the latest business headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. missed delivery. amazon shares slump as the pandemic online shopping boom starts to fade. into reverse. the us economy shrank in the last quarter, for the first time since the covid recession of 2020. hard brexit gets softer. the uk delays new border checks on eu foods yet again, amid fears they could make inflation worse. plus, landing in a neighbourhood near you? the pop up mini airports you could soon be using to catch a flying taxi.

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