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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  April 29, 2022 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today... russian missile strikes on kyiv, as the head of the united nations visits the ukrainian capital. translation: this says a lot about russians' attitude - to global institutions. about the efforts of the russian leadership to humiliate the un and everything the organisation represents. a british man has been killed while fighting in ukraine. military veteran, scott sibley, was serving with ukrainian forces. tennis legend boris becker could face jail. he'll be sentenced later for trying to hide financial assets when he was declared bankrupt.
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families with disabled children say rising energy bills could make their conditions worse as they struggle to make ends meet. it isa it is a long way down, a long, long way down. good morning. iwill it is a long way down, a long, long way down. good morning. i will be speaking to you live from 60 metres below the river thames as work is completed on london's super sewer. i will explain why it is needed and what will happen when we flush. a frustrating night for the british clubs, trying to reach the final of the europa league. rangers are undone by a late goal in germany in their semi final first leg, while west ham face an even harder task, after losing at home. how is your allotment and garden looking in this dry weather? i have tips on how to keep them looking fresh stop also news of range heading our way. before you get excited, it is not for everyone.
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it's friday, the 29th of april. our main story. president zelensky has accused russia of trying to "humiliate" the united nations, by launching a missile strike on the capital kyiv during a visit by the organisation's secretary general. antonio guterres was visiting the city to hold talks with the president, and criticised the un security councilforfailing to prevent or stop the war. gareth barlow reports. missile strikes in the centre of kiev, the first for two weeks. two russian rockets strike a 25—storey building, close to where the head of the un was staying during a visit to the country. several people were left injured by the attack. i was shocked to be informed that two rockets had exploded in the city where i am. so this is a dramatic war, and we absolutely need to end this war, and we absolutely need to have a solution for this war. the missile struckjust hours after the un secretary general
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criticised the organisation's security council for failing to prevent or end the war, saying the situation was a source of anger, frustration and disappointment. ukraine's president when further, saying russia was trying to humiliate the un.- saying russia was trying to humiliate the un. this says a lot about russians _ humiliate the un. this says a lot about russians attitude - humiliate the un. this says a lot about russians attitude to - humiliate the un. this says a lot| about russians attitude to global institutions, about efforts of the russian leadership to humiliate the un and everything the organisation represents. it's scenes like these that the us presidentjoe biden says he's trying to prevent, with a proposed new aid package worth $33 billion, the majority of which to help increase ukraine's air defense and artillery capacity, as well as offering further economic and humanitarian support. translation: this is a very - important step by the united states, and i am grateful to the american people
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and personally to president biden. i hope that the congress will quickly support this request for help for our state. nato says it's ready to support ukraine for years to come, as it warns the war could drag on. and, as russia shows its fully prepared to strike at the heart of the country during an official visit by the un, and as president putin increasingly warns the west to back off, it seems nato's warning could easily prove to be true. gareth barlow, bbc news. let's go now to our correspondent, joe inwood, who is in kyiv this morning. joe, those strikes in the city were the first there for two weeks. absolutely. easy to get lulled into a false sense of security. kyiv had seemed to be a place that is relatively safe and so much so we have had high profile visitors.
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yesterday the sense of peace was shattered. the un secretary general was standing where i am now doing an interview with the bbc and he was physically shaken, the united nations angrily attacked happened while he was in town. it is worth bearing in mind it is notjust a missile attack, it is a missile attack in kyiv a couple of miles from where the un secretary—general was staying. the un says his safety was staying. the un says his safety was notjeopardised, he is fine. the principle of this has really got people angry. principle of this has really got peeple angry-— principle of this has really got --eolean~ . . , . the foreign office has confirmed that a british national has been killed in ukraine. the person has not yet been formally named, but sources in the country say the man is simon sibley, a military veteran who was fighting for ukrainian forces. 0ur diplomatic correspondent james landale reports. scott sibley was a former member of the british army, part of the commando logistics support
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squadron, now named by sources in ukraine as having died fighting russian forces. on a fundraising page in his memory, friends offered their tributes, one saying... scott sibley was in his mid 30s. he had a family. four years ago, he had his hair shaved to raise money for his daughter when she had cancer. the foreign office would not confirm mr sibley�*s identity, saying only that a british national had died in ukraine and they were supporting the family. the foreign office also said a second british national was missing, and they were urgently seeking more information about their whereabouts. diplomatic sources said it was most likely the two individuals were foreign volunteers, serving with ukrainian forces in the donbas. the authorities in ukraine estimate about 20,000 foreigners have come
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to fight for them, likely to include hundreds of britons. there have been reports before that british fighters have died in ukraine. some were thought to have been killed during a missile attack on this military training centre near poland but the deaths were never confirmed. so it would seem that mr sibley is the first briton confirmed to have died fighting in a war in which many thousands have already perished. james landale, bbc news. the leader of the british virgin islands has been arrested for alleged drug smuggling and money laundering in the us. premier andrew fahie was detained in miami by us agents posing as cocaine traffickers from a mexican drug cartel. his charges say he agreed a £560,000 payment to allow traffickers to use
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the islands' ports. the tennis star boris becker could face jail later today, when he is sentenced for failing to disclose all of his assets after being declared bankrupt. the three—time wimbledon champion netted millions of pounds in a glittering career, but fell into financial difficulties in recent years. 0ur sports correspondent, natalie pirks, has the details. commentator: that's it. he's done it. it was the moment boris becker forged an instant bond with centre court. in 1985, the unseeded german became the youngest man to ever win wimbledon. commentator: game, set and match to becker. - he came back a year later, and did it all again. the press dubbed him boom boom for his playing style, and the public adored him. it was the start of an incredible career that saw him win 49 singles titles, six of them grand slams. it also made him a rich man with a successful stint as a bbc pundit, and novak djokovic's coach afterwards.
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his career earnings totalled £38 million. but boom boom was soon bust. i've been fortunate enough for the last 33 years to make a lot of money. i made my first million at 17 years old, winning at swi9. i've been blessed. i come from a good family background, so money was never the incentive, never the issue. i think there were different problems that came along. problems like his expensive lifestyle commitments. £22,000 a month on rent for his home in wimbledon, but also problems in his personal life, including a high—profile divorce and payments for a child conceived at london restaurant, nobu. after being declared bankrupt in 2017, becker had been accused of hiding millions of pounds worth of assets, including two wimbledon trophies, to avoid paying his debts. three weeks ago, a jury found him guilty of four of the 2a counts
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against him, including failing to disclose property in germany and hiding a £700,000 loan. in theory, today, he could be jailed for up to seven years for each count. that's highly unlikely, but some form of custodial sentence is a very real threat. with brand becker now in tatters, he'll learn his fate here at southwark crown court at midday. natalie pirks, bbc news. the government's stepping up efforts to resolve supply issues affecting hormone replacement therapy products. there's a shortage of a gel used by women to help with menopause symptoms. the health secretary has appointed the former director general of the vaccine taskforce, madelaine mcternan, to take charge. it comes as demand for hrt products in the uk has been increasing over the last few years due to greater menopause awareness and gp confidence in prescribing treatments. amazon has reported losses of £3
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billion for the first three months of the year — its first quarterly loss since 2015. the online retail giant said the pandemic and subsequent war in ukraine had created unusual challenges, and its figures were dragged down by its investment in an electric vehicle maker, which has seen its value plummet. james corden has announced he will be leaving the us talk show "the late late show" next year. the comedian has hosted the show since 2015. in an interview last year, he said that he'd never intended for the programme to be his "final destination." i have decided to sign for one more year on the show, and that this will be my last year hosting late late show. don't you dare! there will be tears, there will be so many tears. this has been the hardest decision i have ever had to make it really has.
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i've never taken this job for granted, ever. now let's get the weather with matt, who's at an allotment in east london for us this morning. iam not i am not hard—working enough to have an allotment. here, rainwater collection is essential. it has been so dry. dry weather. continues at the moment. the dry has had consequences with allotments and gardens. take a look at this footage from the highlands in the past few days. they had been fighting wildfires. a number of wildfires in scotland and a number of other parts of the country as well. in desperate need of rain in these areas. if you are looking out for rain, it is set to arrive but not for all. let's take a look at the forecast, taking
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you through what will be the bank holiday weekend. most places will be dry and there will be one or two showers around. most places staying dry with more sunshine and we saw yesterday. the clouded conditions in the north and east of scotland. east anglia and the south—east are the areas most prone to some light rain. most of us will avoid it completely. clearer skies than yesterday. more sunshine around and it will feel warmer. 17 in glasgow, 16 in enniskillen and 16 in parts of west wales as well. through tonight the cloud will start to break up a bit more. with clear skies around, a bit of mist and fog and a chilly night more widely. another thing gardeners are not particularly keen on of course. you canjust see are not particularly keen on of course. you can just see west of scotland and northern ireland starting to pushing for tomorrow morning, the first sign of what
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could be some substantial rain in scotland and northern ireland. the rain will push eastwards making cumbria, isle of man and maybe anglesey by the end of the day. temperatures up to 17, 18. the cloud and patchy rain will push its way into england and wales. they but not everyone will see it. details on the bank holiday weekend forecast as we go through the morning. that is how it is looking in redbridge stop he loves being at the allotment, doesn't he? families with disabled children fear rising household bills could make their child's condition worse, as many rely on energy—intensive equipment, like electric hoists and wheelchairs. the disability charity, contact, says hundreds of parents are concerned they'll be forced to cutback, or stop using the equipment altogether. 0ur disability correspondent nikki fox reports. 0h. what film is it, molly—moo? they're making the best of it
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but molly and her mum, adele, are going through the toughest of times. shall we put some songs on? three years ago, molly was an active 10—year—old. let's wipe that chin. but then she was diagnosed with a rare, life—limiting condition called batten disease, which has taken her mobility and her vision. she's always full of beans, giggling. funny. just lets nothing get in her way whatsoever. she's amazing. ready in the swing? there's no escaping the amount of specialist equipment molly uses each day. 0k, mummy�*sjust going to move that chair now. adele is a single mum, so she can't do without it, but it all needs power. 0oh. i'll push you that way a bit, molly. we've got two wheelchairs, two ceiling track hoists, a through floor lift, two suction machines and an electric bed. if this isn't on charge,
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24/7 and the battery goes flat, the whole battery will break completely and it will need replacing. she does wear pads. however, by morning, she's usually leaked. it's notjust the equipment bumping up the bills. it's the extraordinary amount of washing she gets through every single day. that whole load is just from this morning? this whole load willjust be pretty much most of that. so how many washes are you doing a day? easily three. really? easily three. some days more. it depends. adele is struggling to keep up with the bills. you can see here that i was £92 in credit. now the balance i owe them is £283. her only option is to cut back on essentials. it's getting to a point, do we put fuel in the car and take molly for a day out, or do we need to put that aside to be able to pay for gas and electric? there's no extra help for us whatsoever. don't get me wrong, everybody should get help. parents with disabled children who aren't able to go out and work and earn a decent living, you know, there should be something out there to help support us because our electric bills straightaway are much higher
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than everybody else's. adele is not alone. in a survey by the charity, contact, almost 2,000 families feared their child's condition could get worse as a result of rising energy prices. more than 50 organisations have written to the chancellor asking for benefits to be increased in line with inflation. we would like to see the government just recognise that disability means extra costs and build that into their response. at the moment, the measures that the government has taken don't go anywhere near far enough in terms of supporting families who are doing their best under incredibly challenging circumstances. i'm getting a smile. say, hi, nikki. hey, molly. the government says it's announced a £22 billion package of support for the hardest hit this year, including over £9 billion to help with rising energy bills. come on, then. but as those bills are expected to rise again later this year,
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adele fears the short time she may have left with her daughter will be spent worrying about how she'll financially get by. she's spending what is potentially the last few years of her life stuck in because we can't afford to go out and do things. it's absolutely ridiculous. it's just so unfair. how does it make you feel that you can't give molly the best quality of life? obviously, you have times where you do break down and things kind of do hit you again. get a bit on top of you. yeah. mm. but you have to keep going. you have no choice. you have to keep going. and you just don't let these things get you down. i've got to stay strong for molly, because if i'm not strong, then there's nobody else to be strong for her. really moving how that is so practical and so difficult for those families. thank you to the families
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for talking to us. we will be talking about it later in the programme as well. and you can hear more about this on the bbc�*s new "access all" disability podcast with nikki fox on bbc sounds. let's take a look at today's papers. some of the front pages feature a photo of the former british solider, who's said to have been killed while fighting in ukraine. tributes to scott sibley have flooded in, with the metro saying that one former comrade described him as having a "commando spirit until the end." the guardian says that the us presidentjoe biden has defied threats from vladimir putin, by doubling the country's aid to ukraine. the uk government plans to send 8,000 troops to eastern europe, in what the daily telegraph is calling "one of the largest deployments since the cold war." and the times is reporting that millions of people suffering from arthritis will be advised to lose weight and exercise instead of taking painkillers under new nhs guidance, which the paper says could save the health
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service billions of pounds. looking at some of the stories inside, any stories involving sleep patterns working on this programme are of interest. if you work shifts, whatever you do, there is a resisting about what is the perfect length of time to sleep. lots of studies over the years. you know yours? i would agree with this. this study saying it studied 5000 adults between the ages of 38 and 73. found too much or too little sleep is linked to lower cognitive performance generally. the figure they come up with is seven hours being exactly the right amount of sleep. any less and you underperform and any more and you as well. this is the figure. did you get seven hours last night? no, more like six.
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i think a lot of people go by the seven hours figure. they used to say eight didn't they? curiously, they say they don't know why having more sleep is worse for you, it is just what they found. they say in theory if seven hours is good, then why wouldn't als be good? my ears prick up wouldn't als be good? my ears prick up when i hear a sleep story. i could read a story every week about the hours and it changes next week. i bet next week whether we culture, we will be reading it says a different number. that feels about right to me that everyone is different. four, iam happy. 0ne right to me that everyone is different. four, iam happy. one of the points it is raising here, often people who have a lot more sleep aren't actually sleeping more, they aren't actually sleeping more, they are spending more time trying to get to sleep and getting stressed about
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it. i need ten hours! you spend three hours not to sleep. something we could talk about forever. black children are disadvantaged in schools because they are viewed as "less innocent" and more adult—like, according to a new report. the commission on young lives in england says this process, known as "adultification", means black children feel over—policed and has a negative impact on their lives. here's our community affairs correspondent, adina campbell. black girls and boys, they're treated differently. yeah, 100%. i do think that there's a lot of like problems with racism. in south london, these teenagers say the way they look affects their experiences in and out of school. a few days ago, i got stopped and searched. did you understand the nature of the search? did they kind of go through why they stopped you and explained? i asked for the police station, the name, they didn't give me nothing, theyjust left. this is their reality. and last month, the shocking case
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of child 0, the 15—year—old black girl who was strip—searched at school by police led to angry protests. this case, yet again, adds to the wider issue of how black people are treated by the authorities in this country, exposing more resentment, more fear and more mistrust in places where young people should feel safe. today, a new report chaired by england's former children's commissioner, looking at how to improve support for vulnerable young people, has made a number of recommendations. it starts with training for teachers, i think, to have anti—racist practice and racial discrimination as part of that initial teacher training. it isn't at the moment. to have recruitment drives to get more black teachers into the classroom and in senior leadership roles, and in governor roles, too. at the moment, 90% of teachers are white, especially in primary school. he is actually huge. the government says the teaching workforce is becoming more diverse
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and it's strengthened, safeguarding guidance for schools with regular training for staff. but child safeguarding leaders are becoming increasingly worried about a racial bias, known as adultification, where black children, like child 0, are met with suspicion rather than care. black girls tend to be perceived as being loud, as being aggressive and being hyper resilient. so if you want to again explore the adultification of black girls, let's look at the history. we have to root it within, or place it within slavery and colonialism. these mums, who are also school governors, say everyone has a responsibility. if you have an understanding of the injustices and the discrimination that is happening towards young black girls, you are more than capable to be in a position to say, "hang on, i don't agree with this." let me insert myself onto a governing board and actually use my privilege to be able to speak
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up on behalf of that community or on behalf of young black girls. my black skin isn't a threat. their black skin isn't a threat. her tears are just as important as your tears. in the case of child 0, the metropolitan police has apologised, and the independent office of police conduct is expected to release the findings of its investigation next month. adina campbell, bbc news. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. bus drivers will go on strike next month in a dispute over pay. unite members who are employed by arriva will walk out on may 11 and may 16.
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unite said the action will involve 1,000 drivers at garages in brixton, croydon, norwood and thornton heath. today marks the end of tunnelling for london's thames tideway tunnel, also known as the super sewer. the 25km tunnel runs from acton to beckton, and when it opens, it'll reduce sewage pollution into the thames by 95%. it's the largest tunnel to have been built under a river anywhere in the world. its deepest point is 65 metres below the thames, and its wide enough to fit three double—decker buses side by side. when laura kennedy founded spanners with manners with her partner siobhan, they didn't expect the surge of women who applied. they now claim to be london's first all—female garage, and want to encourage more women
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to get into the industry. gem 0'reilly went to meet them. representation is really important. if girls don't know that other girls are mechanics, they're never going to walk into a college and give it a go. you don't have to be male to be able to be good at it. i think the stereotype for women not being able to do certain things is changing, but there's still quite a long way to go. well, if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now. there are minor delays on the metropolitan line this morning, the northern line is partially closed, but all good elsewhere. and for all the latest travel news where you are, tune into your bbc local radio station for regular updates throughout the morning. 0nto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello. good morning. well, the high pressure that's been keeping us dry is still with us, but it's quite a mixed bag. it will be warmer and brighter at times, but we're also expecting
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a few spits and spots of rain on saturday night and into sunday. this morning, while we're starting off with temperatures in mid—single figures, there's plenty of cloud out there. some of that cloud will thicken at times, but there should also be some brighter spells here and there as well, especially as we head towards the end of the day, a little bit of sunshine here and there, but it's feeling colder than it was yesterday. temperatures won't make it much past 1a degrees celsius for many of us. and we've still got that northeasterly wind blowing as well. 0vernight tonight, though, the skies will clear and we'll see temperatures drop low enough for a touch of frost on the grass into saturday morning. it's a chilly start to the day, but there should be a lot of sunshine around. bit more fair weather cloud bubbling up on saturday afternoon. highs of 17 degrees celsius, not a bad day at all, but sunday is looking cloudy and damp with a few outbreaks of drizzle. temperatures recover again as we head into bank holiday monday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. coming up on breakfast this morning — downton abbey's back! we've been catching up with some of the all—star cast about what to expect as the tv sensation hits cinema screens again. ex—manchester united ace rio ferdinand will be here to talk about his former club's fortunes, and how to tackle social media abuse faced by some players off the pitch. and ross kemp will bejoining us to say "cheers to volunteers," as he celebrates the work carried out by the thousands of people across the uk who give their time and support to help others. millions of ukraine's children have had to flee their homes since the war began, with unicef estimating that two thirds of them are now displaced.
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for some, it's an even harder journey, because they don't have their parents with them. 0ne children's home on the eastern front line in luhansk had to move all its children hundreds of miles across the country to the western city of lviv, where our correspondent danjohnson has been to meet them. watch for the flash of panic across her face. watch for the flash of panic across herface. serve but she knows the drill. she has been through more air raids than any 11—year—old should. the lives of these orphanage children are now dominated by running from war and taking cover from attacks. are you scared? she
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tells us to stay down and keep away from the windows. she is a veteran even before she has reached her teenage years. smartphone apps show alerts spreading across the country, and thoughts turn to homes. angelina leads memories of the town she was evacuated from. i want to go home. the more they shoot, the more i want to go back, she says. but angelina has no idea what the weights. her mother could not look after her, and they were separated before covid hit. angelina was placed in a children's home, and the last she heard was a call from her uncle in a month ago. translation: i heard was a call from her uncle in a month ago. tuna/mom- heard was a call from her uncle in a month ago. translation: i miss them ve much.
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month ago. translation: i miss them very much- i — month ago. translation: i miss them very much- i don't _ month ago. translation: i miss them very much. i don't want _ month ago. translation: i miss them very much. i don't want to _ month ago. translation: i miss them very much. i don't want to stay - month ago. translation: i miss them very much. i don't want to stay in - very much. i don't want to stay in lviv any more. i want be with my family. lviv any more. i want be with my famil . , , , , lviv any more. i want be with my famil. ,, , , family. this is why they came west. bombs landed _ family. this is why they came west. bombs landed close _ family. this is why they came west. bombs landed close to _ bombs landed close to their orphanage in the luhansk region. local officials sent us these pictures of the damage. the un says nearly 5 million ukrainian children are now refugees. the spy tells me he had shooting early on the morning of the invasion. translation: i did of the invasion. translation: i did not know exactly _ of the invasion. translation: i c c not know exactly what the sounds were. then russian tanks invaded luhansk. we packed all our stuff. the manager was thinking we would have accurate took luhansk on kyiv. lviv it was, but even this far west they are not safe. his phone now holds footage of a missile strike close by. holds footage of a missile strike close b . ., , , ., ., close by. the windows were blown out and some shrapnel _ close by. the windows were blown out and some shrapnel flew— close by. the windows were blown out and some shrapnel flew in. _ close by. the windows were blown out
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and some shrapnel flew in. it - close by. the windows were blown out and some shrapnel flew in. it was - and some shrapnel flew in. it was here on the floor, i was working on fragments of glass. bud here on the floor, i was working on fragments of glass.— fragments of glass. and that is a reminder that _ fragments of glass. and that is a reminder that those _ fragments of glass. and that is a reminder that those who - fragments of glass. and that is a reminder that those who nurture j reminder that those who nurture these children are vulnerable, too. this woman got these children to safety, but her own family, her own son, were left behind. translation: it is hard to go. hard, impossible, how can you live? how can you work? knowing that this is happening there, relatives endanger every moment of their lives. angelina offers a lesson _ moment of their lives. angelina offers a lesson in _ moment of their lives. angelina offers a lesson in the _ moment of their lives. angelina offers a lesson in the attempt l moment of their lives. angelina | offers a lesson in the attempt to redraw the geography of ukraine. take me back, she says, and i will live with my family. mum, if you see this, i love you. i love all my
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relatives, and i want to be more to be over. then we will rebuild our country. danjohnson, bbc news, lviv. what a great spark angelina is. just making me think, it was unforgivable that children will have these memories. the time now is 6.34. time now for all your sport news. we would love an all british final between west ham and rangers, both involved against german sides in their semifinal first leg last night, both cursing their luck a little bit, as you can see from the expression on a jarrod bowen's face there. both british clubs left in the europa league
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have it all to do if they're to reach the final. rangers and west ham both lost narrowly against german opponents in the first legs of their semifinals, as joe lynskey reports. for the first time in a while, west ham's thursday night fell flat, beaten in the first leg by frankfurt, but it could still change. over two legs, there's so much time. but their german opponents were in a hurry, and a goal straightaway! frankfurt scored in the first minute. their 3,000 fanatics made the east london noise. but west ham last got this far in europe in the �*705. west ham have equalised, rice! they won't let it just slip by. michail antonio scored on the stretch and they hoped the breakthrough would bring more. frankfurt are ninth in their league back home, but on thursdays, they're a force. in the last round, they beat barcelona. now they pass through teams themselves.
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west ham need a rethink when they go there next week, but still, just one moment could bring them level. over the bar! antonio! this was a night where things just didn't come off. rangers were beaten in leipzig, but stayed in touch. for most fans, a 1—0 loss is still a good first leg result. rb leipzig are in the bundesliga top four. rangers went to keep them out any way they could. few expected them to win here. still, they might have struck on the counter. it's kent! and as rangers grew in confidence, so too, they got some luck. it's christopher nkunku! rb missed the best chance of the match, but then scored from distance. only a great goal broke the scottish champions' resolve, and now they know what's coming. in the noise of ibrox, rangers
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believe that a one—goal deficit can still be turned around. so in glasgow and in london, there's still hope. joe lynskey, bbc news, in germany. meanwhile, leicester came from behind to force a 1—1 draw, withjose mourinho's roma in their europa conference league semifinal — a second—half own goal, from gianluca mancini means leicester will go to rome next week with everything to play for, as they try to reach their first european final. manchester united will now have to win their last three league games to avoid their worst points tally in the premier league era after drawing 1—1 with chelsea. it was the london side who dominated the first hour, and they struck first through marcos alonso. butjust a couple of minutes later, cristiano ronaldo, who's rescued his side so often this season, popped up with the equaliser. so while chelsea look secure in third place, manchester united, stay sixth, and afterwards, their interim boss ralf rangnick, said he'll still be involved at united in some form next season, despite considering an offer to take over as austria's national team boss.
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i will definitely continue after the end of the season with my consultancy role. this is what we have agreed between the club and myself. this will definitely happen, and i'm very much looking forward to that. and yes, this consultancy role would give me some time and space for otherjobs. and later on we have manchester united royalty on the sofa, the ferdinand coming upjust after 8.30. talking of next season, and those beyond, liverpool fans have been celebrating some news that feels almost as good as winning a trophy. managerjurgen klopp is staying. he's signed a contract extension until 2026. this will be a huge relief forfans, because just last month, he told the media he intended to quit liverpool and take a break from the game at the end of his contract in a couple of years' time. but now he says there's a freshness at the club that energises him. chelsea's women have
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stretched their lead over arsenal at the top of the women's super league to four points by beating tottenham 2—1. beth england's opener was cancelled out by kerys harrop's equaliser before sam kerr struck the winner for the blues. chelsea have played a game more than title rivals arsenal, but will secure a third consecutive league title if they win theirfinal two games. huddersfield giants bounced back from successive super league defeats to win 111—12 away to wakefield. theo fages kicked through for ricky leutele to pounce on it and hand ian watson's side victory which lifts them up to fourth in the table. the world snooker championship has reached the semi—final stage, and it's all square between ronnie o'sullivan and john higgins, who have ten world titles between them. o'sullivan came back from 3—1 down to level the match at 4—4, delighting his fans as he finished the evening session with a century break. play will resume in that match this afternoon.
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while the 2019 champion judd trump will start the morning with a lead of 7—1 against the three—time winner mark williams. that's live on bbc two from 10.00. 17 frames needed for victory. we'll use prevail over experience? thank you, mike. —— will youth prevail? the koko nightclub in camden was where madonna held her first ever british gig, and the venue where prince liked to play secret shows when he came to london. it closed three years ago for a major renovation, before being struck by fire, a flood, and covid. tonight, it'll reopen with a concert by the rock band arcade fire. our music correspondent mark savage has been for a look around. from lady gaga to the rolling
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stones, koko has played host to some of the biggest names in music. three years ago, it closed for renovation. then disaster struck.— years ago, it closed for renovation. then disaster struck. 150,000 litres of water damage — then disaster struck. 150,000 litres of water damage during _ then disaster struck. 150,000 litres of water damage during the - then disaster struck. 150,000 litres of water damage during the fire, - then disaster struck. 150,000 litres of water damage during the fire, so | of water damage during the fire, so thatis of water damage during the fire, so that is quite something to deal with, which can rip through the fabric of the building. the with, which can rip through the fabric of the building.— fabric of the building. the fire dama . e fabric of the building. the fire damage could _ fabric of the building. the fire damage could actually - fabric of the building. the fire damage could actually have . fabric of the building. the fire i damage could actually have been worse, but the dome at the top of the building melted and acted like a chimney to draw the flames away. it was a lucky escape for the venue, which first opened in 1900 as the camden theatre. charlie chaplin was an early performer, and after the second world war, the bbc used it to stage shows by monty python and the goons. he stage shows by monty python and the goons. , ., ., ~ , stage shows by monty python and the goons. ,., ., ~ , .. �*, goons. he is one of mrs thatcher's in comprehensives. _ goons. he is one of mrs thatcher's in comprehensives. after- goons. he is one of mrs thatcher's in comprehensives. after the - goons. he is one of mrs thatcher's in comprehensives. after the bbc. in comprehensives. after the bbc left in the 1983, _ in comprehensives. after the bbc left in the 1983, it _ in comprehensives. after the bbc left in the 1983, it was _ in comprehensives. after the bbc left in the 1983, it was named - in comprehensives. after the bbcj left in the 1983, it was named the best nightclub in europe. iii left in the 1983, it was named the best nightclub in europe.- best nightclub in europe. if you do
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we want to — best nightclub in europe. if you do we want to be _ best nightclub in europe. if you do we want to be exotic _ best nightclub in europe. if you do we want to be exotic and - best nightclub in europe. if you do we want to be exotic and impress| we want to be exotic and impress somebody. — we want to be exotic and impress somebody, the cocktails are exotic and cost _ somebody, the cocktails are exotic and cost £2 — somebody, the cocktails are exotic and cost £2 50, but they are nice. the cocktails might cost a bit more now, but they are ready to open their doors again. with just 2a hours to go, the final touches are being put to the auditorium where on friday night, arcade fire will be the first band to take to the stage. whenever we play it venue that has been host to so many incredible performers over the years, you feel at onstage, so much more exciting to play at a venue like that. it is at onstage, so much more exciting to play at a venue like that.— play at a venue like that. it is or was amazing — play at a venue like that. it is or was amazing when _ play at a venue like that. it is or was amazing when you - play at a venue like that. it is or was amazing when you can - play at a venue like that. it is or - was amazing when you can visualise what it _ was amazing when you can visualise what it was — was amazing when you can visualise what it was like when somebody like charlie _ what it was like when somebody like charlie chapman was there, it still looks_ charlie chapman was there, it still looks like — charlie chapman was there, it still looks like that.— looks like that. everybody was lookin: looks like that. everybody was looking at _ looks like that. everybody was looking at the _ looks like that. everybody was looking at the same _ looks like that. everybody was looking at the same thing. - looks like that. everybody was i looking at the same thing. after looks like that. everybody was - looking at the same thing. after the fire ushed looking at the same thing. after the fire pushed back _ looking at the same thing. after the fire pushed back opening _ looking at the same thing. after the fire pushed back opening night- looking at the same thing. after the fire pushed back opening night by i looking at the same thing. after the fire pushed back opening night by a| fire pushed back opening night by a further 18 months, the venue's owner
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says it is relief that the state has finally arrived. this looks great, first show tomorrow night. yes. finally arrived. this looks great, first show tomorrow night. yes, an incredible moment _ first show tomorrow night. yes, an incredible moment for _ first show tomorrow night. yes, an incredible moment for us, - first show tomorrow night. yes, an incredible moment for us, we - first show tomorrow night. yes, an incredible moment for us, we willl first show tomorrow night. yes, an l incredible moment for us, we will go into 27 shows in a row, which is quite special. abs, into 27 shows in a row, which is quite special-— quite special. a mercury prize nominee says _ quite special. a mercury prize nominee says he _ quite special. a mercury prize nominee says he has - quite special. a mercury prize nominee says he has missed | quite special. a mercury prize - nominee says he has missed playing venue. , . , nominee says he has missed playing venue. , ., . , nominee says he has missed playing venue. , . , , nominee says he has missed playing venue. , ., . , , ., nominee says he has missed playing venue. , . , , ., ., venue. this has always been one of my favourite _ venue. this has always been one of my favourite places _ venue. this has always been one of my favourite places to _ venue. this has always been one of my favourite places to play. - my favourite places to play. sonically, in terms of energy and the vibe, — sonically, in terms of energy and the vibe, i— sonically, in terms of energy and the vibe, i have seen so many good shows— the vibe, i have seen so many good shows on— the vibe, i have seen so many good shows on the stage. this the vibe, i have seen so many good shows on the stage.— shows on the stage. this balcony is a new feature. _ shows on the stage. this balcony is a new feature, you _ shows on the stage. this balcony is a new feature, you can _ shows on the stage. this balcony is a new feature, you can play- shows on the stage. this balcony is a new feature, you can play to - shows on the stage. this balcony is a new feature, you can play to be l a new feature, you can play to be behind you on the stage, how will that change things for you? i behind you on the stage, how will that change things for you? i think that change things for you? i think that is incredible, _ that change things for you? i think that is incredible, if _ that change things for you? i think that is incredible, if i _ that change things for you? i think that is incredible, if i had - that change things for you? i think that is incredible, if i had a - that is incredible, if i had a choice. _ that is incredible, if i had a choice. i_ that is incredible, if i had a choice, i would that is incredible, if i had a choice, iwould be playing that is incredible, if i had a choice, i would be playing every night _ choice, i would be playing every night with— choice, i would be playing every night with an audience around me. but it_ night with an audience around me. but it is— night with an audience around me. but it is not— night with an audience around me. but it is notjust the main stage coming back. koko is now seven venues, including a jazz lounge, a piano bar, and a dj space inside the dome. latte piano bar, and a dj space inside the
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dome, . , ., ~' , , ., dome. we painstakingly reinstated every beam. _ dome. we painstakingly reinstated every beam, trust _ dome. we painstakingly reinstated every beam, trust and _ dome. we painstakingly reinstated every beam, trust and panel- dome. we painstakingly reinstated every beam, trust and panel as - dome. we painstakingly reinstated | every beam, trust and panel as per the original specification. it is a break—out space from the roof terrace next door, and it connects back into our bar here and the other tournament theatre below. 50 back into our bar here and the other tournament theatre below.- back into our bar here and the other tournament theatre below. so you can walk straight — tournament theatre below. so you can walk straight from _ tournament theatre below. so you can walk straight from here _ tournament theatre below. so you can walk straight from here into _ tournament theatre below. so you can walk straight from here into the - walk straight from here into the main concert space? i love the idea of a secret staircase, that sounds like harry potter. it of a secret staircase, that sounds like harry potter.— like harry potter. it does, yeah. every inch _ like harry potter. it does, yeah. every inch of— like harry potter. it does, yeah. every inch of the _ like harry potter. it does, yeah. every inch of the venue - like harry potter. it does, yeah. every inch of the venue is - like harry potter. it does, yeah. every inch of the venue is now. like harry potter. it does, yeah. i every inch of the venue is now set “p every inch of the venue is now set up for live streaming, an idea that sounds obvious now after the pandemic, but was a bit of a risk when it was first designed in 2013. being set up for live streaming is definitely— being set up for live streaming is definitely the way of the future. after _ definitely the way of the future. after venues struggled during the pandemic, koko's new template could help live music rediscover its rhythm. mark savage, bbc news.
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looks very impressive what they have done with it. from the inside to the outside this morning. we have been having a dry spell in the uk for quite some time. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. and the dry spell hasn't been good for the gardens, has it, matt? yes, it has been very dry, a tough month for gardeners, especially here in parts of london, east anglia and the south—east where we have had about a third of the normal amount of rainfall. the farmers as you can see in suffolk have been watering their fields, see in suffolk have been watering theirfields, watering see in suffolk have been watering their fields, watering their crops, a bit more abundantly than they probably would have done normally, but for the allotment owners in the gardeners, it has been a struggle. they have been relying on water buts, rain collection, and here in the north—east of london, no running water, so collection is key for
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that. i think as we head towards the summer, you have to make sure that you do have some water buts to hand to keep those water supplies topped up. and be careful how you water and when you water your plants. the best to leave until the evening. if you don't during the day, a lot of the water is to evaporate away, and any water is to evaporate away, and any water in the weeds could damage the plants, too. if you're after some rain, there is some in the forecast, but not for everyone. let's look at the details, because today, only a few splashes of lightning around with the chart across eastern areas. in fact, more sunshine today than we saw yesterday, especially in western areas. high pressure firmly in charge at the moment, high pressure is what keeps the rain clouds at bay, sitting right on top of us. light winds for most, that has led to a bit better if ross this morning across parts of southern scotland and northern england and northern ireland, but some changes in these areas as we go into tomorrow. today,
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western areas, lots of sunshine around. a bit more cloud or eastern part of scotland, and dan in south anglia —— down in east anglia and the south—east. maybe 17 in glasgow, 16 in parts of cumbria, but rather: parts of east anglia, ten of 11 celsius here under the clouds. into tonight, some of the low cloud starting to break up a bit across parts of the south—east and east anglia, clearskies parts of the south—east and east anglia, clear skies around, parts of the south—east and east anglia, clearskies around, lighter winds, a few mist and fog patches and a greater chance of the other enemy of the gardener, a bit of frost around. on the light frost and not everyone will see it, but certainly a chilly start to the weekend for most, but you can just see there, west of scotland, northern ireland, signs of a change for tomorrow, at last the scent of some substantial rain, particularly for western scotland and northern ireland, dealing a bit more erratic through the day, but much of england and wales, it will be a sunny morning, but more cloud into the
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afternoon, but a warmer day than today, up to 17 or 18 celsius, a cooler day for scotland and northern ireland. saturday night, cloud in removing southwards, not much in the way of blue left on the map, so remy bit more scattered across england and wales, some places sustain particularly dry, no real sign of substantial rain here yet. it will feel cooler for all and thundery, and as we go bank holiday monday, dry forjust about and as we go bank holiday monday, dry for just about all, i and as we go bank holiday monday, dry forjust about all, i saw and as we go bank holiday monday, dry for just about all, i saw was dry forjust about all, i saw was a child for the west, with a few sunny glimpses coming through, fewer and warmer again on monday. but even next week, only a couple of showers in the forecast, staying dry for many. the fog is waiting behind you, matt, we expect to see some serious digging later on. —— the fork is waiting behind you.
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the time now is 6.48. work on a new super sewer beneath the river thames, which will support london's sewage network, is a step closer to finishing. ben's in the tunnel for us to find out more. you sent matt to an allotment, and you sent me to a server, i am not sure quite what to make of that. —— a sewer. this tunnel is designed to solve the problem of too much sewage going into the river thames. construction work began seven years ago, and today is a rather big day because the tunnelling bit of that work has just been completed. the two have come a long way, and so
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have we. let me just talk you through some of the mind—boggling numbers. right now, i'm 60 metres underground, but at its deepest point, this tunnel reaches depths of 65 metres. at its widest point, just up there, it is the width of three london double decker buses, more than seven metres. and it stretches right across london for more than 15 miles from east to west, roughly following the route of the river. so why is it needed? i've been taking a look, and just a quick warning, some of these pictures may put you off your breakfast. london's sewers are a victorian marble, built over 150 years ago by the engineerjoseph basiljet now it is coping with a larger population,
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and more people means more waste. every time you flush or run water, the water runs into a series of pipes more than nine miles long. when the drains flood, raw sewage spills directly into river thames. it means 39 million tonnes of raw sewage flow into the river every year. the super sewer will divert as much as 95% of the spill directly to a treatment plant, helping to keep the river clean. and after today, london's super sewer will be one step closer to completion. under construction since 2016, the tens tideway will ease the pressure on the capital's ageing sewer network. the tunnel will be operational in 2025, delayed a year by covid lockdowns and social distancing. it does not come cheap, londoners will face higher bills to meet the costs, but should gain clear pipes and a
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cleaner river. there you have it, that is the reason behind it. it takes a huge team to make this construction project work. i'm delighted to see one of the team who has been working with me, shannon, whojoined as an apprentice, now locomotive operator. people will be surprised there is a whole train network and are here. how did you get involved become an apprentice, learning how to drive the train? i started off, i got interested in it reason behind the project, and i decided to apply for the apprenticeship and i got chosen. stand apprenticeship and i got chosen. and what is it like? this is a predominantly male working environment, what is it like being one of the few women involved? it doesn't really faze me, i think it is very accommodating for females, and i think more females should be in the industry, because there's not much to deter you from it, so it is
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quite common. it is hard work but it is fulfilling. quite common. it is hard work but it is fulfillinu. ~ . , quite common. it is hard work but it is fulfilling-— is fulfilling. what is the best thing about _ is fulfilling. what is the best thing about working - is fulfilling. what is the best thing about working on - is fulfilling. what is the best thing about working on thisl is fulfilling. what is the best - thing about working on this project? knowing what the end result is, working from the beginning of a project to see the end result and know what the reason behind it is. when you come to work, this is not a typical workplace, when you come to work, this is not a typicalworkplace, not when you come to work, this is not a typical workplace, not your typical dayjob, what do people make of it when you explain to them what you do? , . . , ., do? they are quite what is going on underground- _ do? they are quite what is going on underground- l _ do? they are quite what is going on underground. i do _ do? they are quite what is going on underground. i do try _ do? they are quite what is going on underground. i do try to _ do? they are quite what is going on underground. i do try to promote i do? they are quite what is going on| underground. i do try to promote it. —— they are quite amazed at what is going on underground. i try to explain the business minded, by the river needs cleaned up, but a lot of people do not get the opportunity to see what goes on under here. sharon, thank ou see what goes on under here. sharon, thank you for— see what goes on under here. sharon, thank you for speaking _ see what goes on under here. sharon, thank you for speaking to _ see what goes on under here. sharon, thank you for speaking to us _ see what goes on under here. sharon, thank you for speaking to us this - thank you for speaking to us this morning, and congratulations on reaching the end of the tunnel and phase. reaching the end of the tunnel and hase. . ~' ,, reaching the end of the tunnel and hase. . ~ ,, i reaching the end of the tunnel and phase._ i should - reaching the end of the tunnel and phase._ i should say - reaching the end of the tunnel and | phase._ i should say that phase. thank you. i should say that the whole project _ phase. thank you. i should say that the whole project is _ phase. thank you. i should say that the whole project is designed - phase. thank you. i should say that the whole project is designed to - the whole project is designed to last long into the future, it is
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designed to serve london's sewer system for the next 120 years, so thatis system for the next 120 years, so that is an awful lot of flushing well into the future. then, an absolutely fascinating image. the perspective is a bit hard to understand here. are you allowed to walk off into the distance into the tunnel so we can prove it exists? because it almost looks like it is not real. i tell you what, i will start talking, i will keep going until they stop me, so that will give you an idea of the perspective. i am not being rude, give you an idea of the perspective. iam not being rude, charlie, i would not normally give you my back. tell me when you have lost sight of me. it is massive, that is more than seven metres wide in diameter. here we go, i will stand by the light, you might be able to see me a
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bit better. that gives you an idea of the perspective. it really does, it is like something from a science movie. ben, thank you so much. we were all sitting looking at it, we couldn't quite understand how it works. if you are a fan of downton abbey and the crawley family, you'll be pleased to hear they're back with a new feature film which is out in cinemas today. in downton abbey: a new era, theyjourney to the south of france to uncover the mystery of the dowager countess's newly inherited villa. alex stanger caught up with some of the cast. have you told them, lady grantham? she's told us nothing. do sit down. we've all managed to get back together because we don't throw chairs at each other. and we enjoy being in julian fellowes' story. it's more than that. for me, hollywood is the ultimate dream factory, and i need dreams as much as the next man. how do you feel when you pick up a downton script? i count my lines. his own name.
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yeah, yeah, yeah. "does he survive to the end?" but it is like christmas getting a script every time. it's like opening a lovely present. before you were born, i met a man. - i remember in the first film i got very excited because my character moved some chairs around in the rain. that's a very downton climax. bravely went out into the rain. exactly. were you waiting for the mustard pot to be stolen or something dramatic like that? so in this to actually physically see half the half the cast get on a on a boat and go across the seas was very exciting. we've all known each other on and off for
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sort of, — worked together on and off for 12 years now. so it really is like rejoining the family and we do have a ridiculous amount of fun. it'sjust lovely, ridiculous amounts of fun. who's the biggest prankster? we were all sat around that big table having a dinner and he said to me, "listen, just, you know, julian is really easygoing "about you making the text your own and adlibbing "and just warming it up." just make it feel like you're ready. the script i read somewhere that the costumes because there are a lot of them are authentic. yeah. it's too many people's sweat in one dress. over the years, it's not good. is there going to be a trilogy of the downton abbey movies trilogy? trilogy? you know, there could be the the slow and stately nine. it's such a nice job. so if people wanted to see more and julian wanted to write more, we're all in love with it. so we'd love to always come back.
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i'm not quite ready to say goodbye to the characters yet. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm tara welsh. a man has died after being attacked at a busy shopping centre in essex yesterday afternoon. emergency services were called to lakeside at it.30pm. the victim was pronounced dead at the scene. it is believed the man was attacked by two men. police want any shoppers who may have seen anything to come forward and said "i know this attack will cause concern," that they belive it was a "targeted attack" and there's "no risk to the wider public." bus drivers will go on strike next month in a dispute over pay. unite members who are employed by arriva will walk out on may 11th and may 16th. unite said the action will involve 1,000 drivers at garages in brixton,
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croydon, norwood and thornton heath. when laura kennedy founded spanners with manners with her partner siobhan, they didn't expect the surge of women who applied. they now claim to be london's first all—female garage and want to encourage more women to get into the industry. representation is really important. if girls don't know other girls are mechanics that are never going to walk into a college and give it a go. you don't have to be male to be able to be good at it. i think the stereotype for women not being able to do certain things is changing, but there's still quite a long way to go. well, if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now. there are minor delays on the metropolitan line this morning. the northern line is partially closed but all good elsewhere.
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and for all the latest travel news where you are, tune into your bbc local radio station for regular updates on to the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello. good morning. well, the high pressure that's been keeping us dry is still with us, but it's quite a mixed bank holiday weekend of weather ahead. it will be warmer and brighter at times, but we're also expecting a few spits and spots of rain on saturday night and into sunday. this morning, while we're starting off with temperatures in mid—single figures, there's plenty of cloud out there. some of that cloud will thicken at times, but there should also be some brighter spells here and there as well, especially as we head towards the end of the day, a little bit of sunshine here and there, but it's feeling colder than it was yesterday. temperatures won't make it much past 1a degrees celsius for many of us. and we've still got that northeasterly wind blowing as well. overnight tonight, though, the skies will clear and we'll see temperatures drop low enough for a touch of frost on the grass into saturday morning. it's a chilly start to the day, but there should be a lot of sunshine around. bit more fair weather cloud bubbling up on saturday afternoon. highs of 17 degrees celsius,
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not a bad day at all, but sunday is looking cloudy and damp with a few outbreaks of drizzle. temperatures recover again as we head into bank holiday monday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today... russian missile strikes on kyiv, as the head of the united nations visits the ukrainian capital, and criticises his own organisation for failing to stop the war. the security council failed to do everything in its power to prevent
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and end the war. this is a source of great disappointment, frustration and anger. a british man has been killed while fighting in ukraine. military veteran scott sibley was serving with ukrainian forces. tennis legend boris becker could face jail. he'll be sentenced later for trying to hide financial assets when he was declared bankrupt. tackling a shortage of hrt. the head of a new task—force is appointed to help more than one million women who are waiting for treatment. this is what one of the world's biggest construction project looks like. good morning from 60 metres below the river thames where tunnelling work has just been completed on london's see pursuer. —— super sewer. i will be finding out why it's needed and how it will change what
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happens when we flush. a frustrating night for the british clubs, trying to reach the final, of the europa league. rangers were undone by a late wonder strike, away in germany in their semi final first leg, while west ham face an even harder task now after losing at home. and the blossom may be looking great and fresh at the moment but the gardens are looking dry. the dry speu gardens are looking dry. the dry spell continues for many. we have hints and tips about how to keep the flowers going. also maybe some rain in a forecast this weekend. it is all coming up in breakfast. it's friday, the 29th of april. our main story. president zelensky has accused russia of trying to "humiliate" the united nations, by launching a missile strike on the capital kyiv during a visit by the organisation's secretary general. antonio guterres was visiting the city to hold talks with the president, and criticised the un security council for failing to prevent or stop the war. gareth barlow reports. missile strikes in the centre of kyiv, the first for two weeks. two russian rockets strike a 25—storey building, close to where the head of the un was staying during a
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visit to the country. several people were left injured by the attack. i was shocked to be informed that two rockets had exploded in the city where i am. so this is a dramatic war, and we absolutely need to end this war, and we absolutely need to have a solution for this war. the missile struckjust hours after the un secretary general criticised the organisation's security council for failing to prevent or end the war, saying the situation was a source of anger, frustration and disappointment. ukraine's president went further, saying russia was trying to humiliate the un. this says a lot about russians' attitude to global institutions, about efforts of the russian leadership to humiliate the un and everything the organisation represents. it's scenes like these that the us presidentjoe biden says he's trying to prevent, with a proposed new aid
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package worth $33 billion, the majority of which to help increase ukraine's air defense and artillery capacity, as well as offering further economic and humanitarian support. translation: this is a very - important step by the united states, and i am grateful to the american people and personally to president biden. i hope that the congress will quickly support this request for help for our state. around 8000 british troops are due to take part in long hand exercises across europe later this summer. nato says it's ready to support ukraine for years to come, and warns the war could drag on. and, as russia shows its fully prepared to strike at the heart of the country during an official visit by the un, and as president putin increasingly warns the west to back off, it seems nato's warning could easily prove to be true. gareth barlow, bbc news.
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let's go now to our reporter, jenny hill, who is in moscow. morning to you. this strike that was seenin morning to you. this strike that was seen in kyiv, antonio guterres's response as well, that tension that president putin must be aware of ratcheting up is quite incredible. yes. i think it is done deliberately. this was an illustration of the contempt in which vladimir putin holds many international institutions, certainly western ones. russia is a permanent member of the un security council. this action is extraordinary. certainly the view from here, not really surprising. he gave antonio guterres a cool reception when he came to moscow when he was here to talk about
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trying to end the war, civilians and humanitarian corridors. mr putin spent much of his day giving out medals to olympic athletes and talking about the future of russian sport. here there is an intensification of anti—western sentiment and patriotically sentiment. we are a week away from the 9th of may when they celebrate the 9th of may when they celebrate the soviet victory over nazi germany in the second world war. already the streets in the centre of moscow are close. sometimes tanks rumbled along with a big military parade and shops putting up decorations. it is thought vladimir putin wants to use the day to present rations with a victory of his own. we do not know if he will have one but probably it will not stop him declaring one. he will not stop him declaring one. he will use that day to whip up support for his action in ukraine. three quarters of russians expect his
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special military operation in ukraine to be victorious. vladimir putin is a man who is used to doing what he wants. at the moment he does not see there is anybody perhaps in the world who is able to stop him. thank you very much. it's been confirmed a british man has been killed in ukraine. the man has been named by sources as scott sibley, who's understood to be a military veteran who was fighting with ukrainian forces. the foreign office has not confirmed the man's identity and says another person is also missing. we're joined now by the defence specialist, glen grant, who is in latvia. very good morning to you. first of all, tell us what you make of this news of the first british citizen killed in action. to news of the first british citizen killed in action.— news of the first british citizen killed in action. to be honest, i'm surrised killed in action. to be honest, i'm surprised it's _ killed in action. to be honest, i'm surprised it's not _ killed in action. to be honest, i'm surprised it's not more _ killed in action. to be honest, i'm surprised it's not more and - killed in action. to be honest, i'm surprised it's not more and not i surprised it's not more and not sooner. the foreign soldiers have been there now for i think a month. most of them have gone into really
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hot fighting areas. it is actually a surprise. yesterday there were two americans injured and a latvian was killed about ten days ago. the foreign soldiers seem to be, you could say, holding up quite well, given the intensity of the fighting that they are in. i given the intensity of the fighting that they are in.— that they are in. i suppose necessarily _ that they are in. i suppose necessarily it _ that they are in. i suppose necessarily it is _ that they are in. i suppose necessarily it is a - that they are in. i suppose necessarily it is a bit - that they are in. i suppose necessarily it is a bit of. that they are in. i suppose necessarily it is a bit of a i that they are in. i suppose . necessarily it is a bit of a grey area as to how many people are there and how they come to be serving with ukrainian forces. what do we know about that? the ukrainian forces. what do we know about that?— ukrainian forces. what do we know about that? ,., , , about that? the soldiers, when they want to come. _ about that? the soldiers, when they want to come, they _ about that? the soldiers, when they want to come, they logon _ about that? the soldiers, when they want to come, they logon with - want to come, they logon with ukrainian embassy wherever that may be. they then have to get themselves their own equipment and, you know, helmets and everything like this and can properly equipped for the front. when they come into the country, they are met, they are assessed to make sure they are not ultimately
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type characters who are going to kill more of their own side than the enemy. and then they are sent somewhere to a unit in the front line. they do not know where they are going. they are not rumours but real stories that quite a few of them, having gone there, i realise in —— are realising the intensity of the artillery firing and have left immediately.— the artillery firing and have left immediately. the artillery firing and have left immediatel . ., , ., . ., immediately. people from all of the world have become _ immediately. people from all of the world have become part _ immediately. people from all of the world have become part of- immediately. people from all of the world have become part of this. - world have become part of this. literally all parts of the world. i think there seems to be a desire to keep it to western nato armies. there is quite a large finnish contingent. i was sent a picture of them yesterday, 20, 25 finish people fighting. generally, it is one or
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two from most countries with their large contingent of americans and a large contingent of americans and a large contingent of canadians. titer? large contingent of canadians. very much appreciate — large contingent of canadians. very much appreciate your _ large contingent of canadians. very much appreciate your time this morning. much appreciate your time this morninu. . ~ much appreciate your time this morninu. . ,, i. , much appreciate your time this morninu. . ~ ,, , . let's go now to our correspondent, joe inwood, who is in kyiv this morning. morning to you. lots to talk about after antonio guterres's visit to the capital. of course that strike and the strikes he then had witnessed himself.- and the strikes he then had witnessed himself. , . , ,., , witnessed himself. yes, absolutely. it was a dramatic _ witnessed himself. yes, absolutely. it was a dramatic and _ witnessed himself. yes, absolutely. it was a dramatic and emotional- witnessed himself. yes, absolutely. it was a dramatic and emotional day for the un secretary—general. the idea, and i think this is worth us emphasising the point of the idea that a missile strike was carried out on the city where the united nations secretary—general was staying by a member of the permanent security council committee is a
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really extraordinary event. they were not targeting him but it has been explicitly described by president zelensky as an assault on the united nations and indeed the security council itself came in full some criticism from the secretary—general itself for its inaction. that was the end of the day. the day started with him travelling to areas where alleged war crimes had happened, the town square commuter towns, suburbs north of the city centre stop he went to her pain and bucha. —— irpin and bucha. he was looking at the destroyed buildings and thinking of his own granddaughters. this has really provoked some anger. latte his own granddaughters. this has really provoked some anger. we were heafina really provoked some anger. we were hearing from — really provoked some anger. we were hearing from jenny — really provoked some anger. we were hearing from jenny hill _ really provoked some anger. we were hearing from jenny hill before - really provoked some anger. we were hearing from jenny hill before in - hearing from jenny hill before in moscow. it was a very conscious
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decision by president putin and the russian forces to ramp this up. as president zelensky has reflected, it was specifically because antonio guterres was in town. i was specifically because antonio guterres was in town.— was specifically because antonio guterres was in town. i guess maybe the were guterres was in town. i guess maybe they were angry _ guterres was in town. i guess maybe they were angry about _ guterres was in town. i guess maybe they were angry about some - guterres was in town. i guess maybe they were angry about some of- guterres was in town. i guess maybe they were angry about some of his . they were angry about some of his statements earlier in the day or about the statements he made when in moscow on tuesday. he used the phrase, wall is evil when he was here when he was seeing what was happening in irpin and bucha. maybe the russians thought, if that is your position, this is ours. latte the russians thought, if that is your position, this is ours. we have been talking _ your position, this is ours. we have been talking about _ your position, this is ours. we have been talking about this _ your position, this is ours. we have been talking about this operation i your position, this is ours. we have been talking about this operation in mariupol. in time now, in the steelworks, where civilians are trapped. i understand there is some perhaps hope that today could be a day where that could change. yes. day where that could change. yes, this was another _ day where that could change. yes, this was another things _ day where that could change. yes this was another things antonio guterres said in advance that he wanted to try to achieve a humanitarian corridor to get the
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people trapped in the steelworks out. i think i said yesterday and i say it again today, this is hoped more than expectation. there has been some suggestion of movement of some negotiated position. where both sides have such contrasting objectives and contrasting red lines, how they will do that, how they will negotiate you should of injured soldiers stuck inside. will they be allowed out? the russians have said no, the ukrainians would say that is a red line. they will have to try to find some middle ground and we do not know if they can achieve that.— the labour party has admitted its deputy leader, angela rayner, was with sir kier starmer when he was pictured having a beer during lockdown last year. the party has said its previous denial of her being there was an "honest mistake." let's speak to our political correspondent, iain watson. just take us through what has been
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said. , ., ., ~ just take us through what has been said. , , .. just take us through what has been said. , , ~ , said. this event took place in april last ear said. this event took place in april last year in — said. this event took place in april last year in the _ said. this event took place in april last year in the run-up _ said. this event took place in april last year in the run-up to - said. this event took place in april last year in the run-up to the - said. this event took place in april last year in the run-up to the local last year in the run—up to the local elections. effectively an online rally was being hosted from these offices in durham where keir starmer was photographed sipping a beer. at the time the story broke a few months ago, labour said angela rayner, the deputy leader, was not there. today they said she is. i suppose the evidence was incontrovertible because the daily mail has video footage of her taking part in the online rally. they said the answer at the time is in good faith, they had simply made a mistake and there was no reason to cover up the attendance because the party leader was there and neither of them were doing anything wrong. there has been pressure from a conservative mp for the police to reopen an investigation into what may have happened. at that time, indoor social gatherings were banned. labour says it was taking
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part in a work event, they had a brief breakfor a part in a work event, they had a brief break for a takeaway, including keir starmer�*s there are no rules were broken. durham police say they have received further communications about this event that they have not reopened the investigation. no suggestion yet that the labour leader of the deputy leader are facing a fine. from the point of view of labour they say this is simply a distraction of the focus on partygate.— this is simply a distraction of the focus on partygate. maybe you have been enjoying _ focus on partygate. maybe you have been enjoying the — focus on partygate. maybe you have been enjoying the sunshine - focus on partygate. maybe you have been enjoying the sunshine and - focus on partygate. maybe you have i been enjoying the sunshine and maybe you have been enjoying the lack of rain. not everyone has been. matt is in an allotment in london. what are you seeing?— what are you seeing? things are lookin: what are you seeing? things are looking very _ what are you seeing? things are
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looking very dry- _ what are you seeing? things are looking very dry. the _ what are you seeing? things are looking very dry. the soil - what are you seeing? things are looking very dry. the soil is - looking very dry. the soil is falling apart in my hands. it is owned dry filter that is causing problems but notjust from allotments and gardens. this footage from the highlands in the last couple of days. we have seen wildfires quite abundantly in scotland because it has been so dry. and wild flowers elsewhere across the country. it has been a very dry april. seven of the last ten april had a much drier than normal. could it be a sign of an emerging trend? there could be some rain in the forecast for some. let's take a look at the details. today there will be one or two spots of rain around. a lot more sunshine around then we saw three yesterday. the cloudless conditions in the north and east of scotland, east anglia and parts of the south—east as well where there are one two light showers. temperatures 17, 18 degrees. ten or
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11. men east anglia. this evening and overnight the cloud will start to clear away. clearer skies like mist and fog patches with light winds and the chance of frost to take us into tomorrow morning. after the frosty start a lovely sunny start to saturday across england and wales. for scotland and northern ireland a lot more cloud around and rain. substantial rain for the west of scotland and parts of northern ireland. the rain tends more erratic. later in the day cambrian, the isle of man and anglesey. much of england and wales had a dry day stock temperature is warmer than today, 17, 18. we flip things round.. in england and wales not much rain around with most places dry on bank holiday monday. more tips on how to look after your garden in less dry weather coming
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up. you need to make sure you are feeling strong. you know you promised charlie you would be digging away a little later. get practising. ! digging away a little later. get ractisina. ., ., practising. i will get the hoe out! just warming _ practising. i will get the hoe out! just warming up _ practising. i will get the hoe out! just warming up the _ practising. i will get the hoe out! just warming up the arms, - practising. i will get the hoe out! l just warming up the arms, charlie. it is cold. i just warming up the arms, charlie. it is cold. , .,, just warming up the arms, charlie. it is cold. , , .,, just warming up the arms, charlie. it is cold. , , , . it is cold. i bet those people have said categorically _ it is cold. i bet those people have said categorically not _ it is cold. i bet those people have said categorically not to - it is cold. i bet those people have said categorically not to touch - it is cold. i bet those people have| said categorically not to touch the allotments. that is what has happened. we've talked a lot on this programme about the cost of living crisis, and people visiting food banks to help feed their families. well, some pet owners are struggling with the cost of looking after their animals too, and turning to "pet food banks" for support. our reporter dave guest is at one in bury for us this morning. if you only had the sigh of
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committees and he lovely? you have you got with you?— you got with you? morning from me and from jessica _ you got with you? morning from me and from jessica here. _ you got with you? morning from me and from jessica here. she - you got with you? morning from me and from jessica here. she is - you got with you? morning from me and from jessica here. she is isn't i and from jessica here. she is isn't she? the love, affection and companionship she gives to her owner is priceless. there is a price to having a pet. it may surprise you to learn that according to the pdsa, keeping a small breed dog like this will cost about £50 a month. that is including things like that is reckoned that is not including things like vet fees. it is costly. it is not only dogs that cost money. i'm going to send my cameraman through here and introduce you to another friend of through here and introduce you to anotherfriend of mine. throughout here we have —— down here we have got phoebe. if you had to have them, to set them up with what they need, it would cost 500 quid and £70 a
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month thereafter to look after them. pet owners are increasingly having to weigh up, do they feed their pets or their children? that sadly has led to a number of animals like the beke being given out by heartbroken owners because they cannot afford to keep them any more. —— like phoebe. we went to find out more. we've never been as busy with dogs, cats, rabbits, all needing space here at thornbury. we are currently up to maximum capacity, with many staff members having dogs and cats in their own homes because we've just literally run out of space here. a lot of people are bringing animals in because theyjust can't afford their medical fees as well as the general upkeep of them. at the moment, everyone's feeling the pinch with the cost of living going up. this is a typical dog that's come into site recently. this is patch, he's 12 months old. he's a dog that needs increased socialisation, lots of exercise, definitely in need of some training.
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we are getting very, very close to breaking point. we are struggling to pay for our own costs at the moment, and we are now picking up all those costs of people that just haven't got the money or the funds available to pay for much—needed medical treatments for their own pets. so dougie is a real classic example of a dog that could potentially have been purchased through lockdown. these are a real fashionable breed at the moment. we're seeing lots and lots of these flat—faced dogs coming in to rescue. the brachycephalic surgery that dougie requires is going to cost usjust over £1,500. we're not going to be able to afford to pay for surgery like that for a lot of these dogs, because the money is going to dry up, just as people's cost of living bites. it bites here at the sanctuary. a lot of people did decide to get pets throughout the lockdown. i think people saw rabbits as an easy animal
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to have, and that they didn't need an awful lot of care, which is completely wrong. the major challenge - of fundraising is that we're not government—funded, so we kind i of rely on supporters' donations i and the kindness of our followers. it's a constant battle trying to bring the money in. - we're seeing more animals than ever now with more complex needs. - so it's about kind of raising the money that we can use| towards their vetinary care and kind of day—to—day living. _ we are really worried about the future. we are onlyjust holding our heads above water as it is now. increased utility bills is a real pressure for us. we are worried about our vet bills. we really need support from people to ensure that we are here for pets in the future. the last thing that we want to do is to turn any animal away, and it's quite heartbreaking that at the moment our waiting lists are high.
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well, before you start writing and offering jess a home, she has a very good home. she is not one of those that need to rehoming. in order to try and keep pets with owners, blue cross has set up a number of pet food banks like this, working much along the same lines as a human food bank. i'm going to hand just back to her owner, gina, from the blue cross. how do you decide who you are going to help?— going to help? people that are attendin: going to help? people that are attending the _ going to help? people that are attending the food _ going to help? people that are attending the food banks, - going to help? people that are attending the food banks, the | going to help? people that are - attending the food banks, the human food banks— attending the food banks, the human food banks also get referred to us for pet _ food banks also get referred to us for pet food, so theyjust let people — for pet food, so theyjust let people know that they have got animals — people know that they have got animals as well and they come and supply— animals as well and they come and supply all— animals as well and they come and supply all the food. this animals as well and they come and supply all the food.— supply all the food. this one in radcliffe is _ supply all the food. this one in radcliffe is one _ supply all the food. this one in radcliffe is one of _ supply all the food. this one in radcliffe is one of three - supply all the food. this one in radcliffe is one of three you i supply all the food. this one in i radcliffe is one of three you have got set up at the moment. there is obviously a need for this.
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sheffield, manchester and grimsby and it— sheffield, manchester and grimsby and it is— sheffield, manchester and grimsby and it is spreading. a lot of people are struggling financially, they desperately do not want to give up their pets — desperately do not want to give up their pets. this is a way to help them _ their pets. this is a way to help them keep— their pets. this is a way to help them keep them, hopefully. this is one of a number— them keep them, hopefully. this is one of a number of— them keep them, hopefully. this is one of a number of rooms - them keep them, hopefully. this is one of a number of rooms that - them keep them, hopefully. this is one of a number of rooms that is i one of a number of rooms that is well—stocked with everything that might need. where does it come from? where do you get donations from? the aeneral where do you get donations from? the general public can donate. they get major— general public can donate. they get major generations from branded makes — major generations from branded makes. people may donate to us. to see a makes. people may donate to us. see a need to makes. people may donate to us. trr see a need to create more of these pet food banks?— pet food banks? there is, unfortunately. _ pet food banks? there is, unfortunately. we - pet food banks? there is, unfortunately. we need i pet food banks? there is, | unfortunately. we need to pet food banks? there is, - unfortunately. we need to help pet food banks? there is, _ unfortunately. we need to help more and more _ unfortunately. we need to help more and more people as they struggle through— and more people as they struggle through these hard times. hopefully rolling _ through these hard times. hopefully rolling it— through these hard times. hopefully rolling it out across the blue cross — rolling it out across the blue cross. it _ rolling it out across the blue cross. ., , . , rolling it out across the blue cross. . cross. it does mean hopefully people can keep hold — cross. it does mean hopefully people can keep hold of— cross. it does mean hopefully people can keep hold of their _ cross. it does mean hopefully people can keep hold of their beloved - cross. it does mean hopefully people
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can keep hold of their beloved pets. | can keep hold of their beloved pets. people sometimes feed their pets over themselves. hopefully between human— over themselves. hopefully between human food banks and asked where people _ human food banks and asked where people can — human food banks and asked where people can stay together. you human food banks and asked where people can stay together.— people can stay together. you were an absolute — people can stay together. you were an absolute star, _ people can stay together. you were an absolute star, wasn't _ people can stay together. you were an absolute star, wasn't she? - people can stay together. you were an absolute star, wasn't she? jessl an absolute star, wasn't she? jess is absolutely _ an absolute star, wasn't she? jess is absolutely wonderful, the bunnies as well. thank you so much. i wonder if you will carry on stroking her. i feel like cutting back to see if he is. he is, he is. he properly likes jess. i wonder if we cutback now, whether he still... good morning from bbc london. a man has died after being attacked at a busy shopping centre in essex yesterday afternoon. the emergency services were called
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to lakeside at it.30pm. and the victim was pronounced dead at the scene. it's believed he was attacked by two men. police want any shoppers who may have seen anything to come forward and said they "know this attack will cause concern," that they belive it was a "targeted attack," and there's "no risk to the wider public." bus drivers will go on strike next month in a dispute over pay. unite members who are employed by arriva will walk out on may 11 and may 16. unite said the action will involve 1,000 drivers at garages in brixton, croydon, norwood and thornton heath. when laura kennedy founded spanners with manners with her partner siobhan, they didn't expect the surge of women who applied. they now claim to be london's first all—female garage, and want to encourage more women to get into the industry.
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representation is really important. if girls don't know that other girls are mechanics, they're never going to walk into a college and give it a go. you don't have to be male to be able to be good at it. i think the stereotype for women not being able to do certain things is changing, but there's still quite a long way to go. well, if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now. there are minor delays on the metropolitan line this morning, the northern line is partially closed, but all good elsewhere. and for all the latest travel news where you are, tune into your bbc local radio station for regular updates throughout the morning. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello. good morning. well, the high pressure that's been keeping us dry is still with us, but it's quite a mixed bank holiday weekend of weather ahead. it will be warmer and brighter at times, but we're also expecting a few spits and spots of rain
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on saturday night and into sunday. this morning, while we're starting off with temperatures in mid—single figures, there's plenty of cloud out there. some of that cloud will thicken at times, but there should also be some brighter spells here and there as well, especially as we head towards the end of the day, a little bit of sunshine here and there, but it's feeling colder than it was yesterday. temperatures won't make it much past 1a degrees celsius for many of us. and we've still got that northeasterly wind blowing as well. overnight tonight, though, the skies will clear and we'll see temperatures drop low enough for a touch of frost on the grass into saturday morning. it's a chilly start to the day, but there should be a lot of sunshine around. bit more fair weather cloud bubbling up on saturday afternoon. highs of 17 degrees celsius, not a bad day at all, but sunday is looking cloudy and damp with a few outbreaks of drizzle. temperatures recover again as we head into bank holiday monday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. a charity claims two british humanitarian aid workers have been captured by russian forces in ukraine. presidium network, a uk—based not—for—profit organisation, says that the two men, who are working as civilian humanitarian relief volunteers, were captured on monday at a checkpoint south of the city of zaporizhzhia. the bbc has confirmed that story would the charter directly, we will bring you more information as soon as we have it. —— confirmed that story with the charity directly. more than a million women in the uk currently use some form of hrt,
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but there's been a lot of concern this week around the national shortage of products after an increase in demand. now the government has appointed the former director general of the vaccine task force, madelaine mcternan, to lead a new hrt team. but will it solve the shortage? we're joined now by one of our regular gps, dr nighat arif. good to see you, nighat. so we have a bug, what happens now? l good to see you, nighat. so we have a bug, what happens now?— a bug, what happens now? i think it is fantastic news, _ a bug, what happens now? i think it is fantastic news, the _ a bug, what happens now? i think it is fantastic news, the government l a bug, what happens now? i think it| is fantastic news, the government is taking it seriously, because this has been over a year, and we have had difficulties with the hrt which sometimes as gps and health care professionals we are not able to prescribe. madelaine mcternan already procured the vaccines back in autumn 2020, we have never had shortages of the covid vaccine, and
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she was still overseeing that. so i think this is a good news story, we have somebody who is now taking it seriously because she comes with really great credentials and she has done something already which has been really successful. l done something already which has been really successful.— been really successful. i suppose this is the problem, _ been really successful. i suppose this is the problem, it _ been really successful. i suppose this is the problem, it is - been really successful. i suppose this is the problem, it is all - been really successful. i suppose this is the problem, it is all very| this is the problem, it is all very well saying that this needs to be tackled, we know the numbers, we know the issues that women have been facing when it comes to getting medicine, but nothing has been done so far, so this is encouraging, and i get the feeling from you, because this is somebody who knows how to coordinate and make things happen. the one it always is that she might be doing too much because she has already overseen the vaccination programme, which has now been increased to five to 11—year—olds, so we need to be absolutely sure that sajid javid and the government, the conservative government, who are currently in power, no that this is a really important thing, and we cannot allow this to go on the back burner. things are absolutely perfect when it comes to women's health in this country, we have
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spoken about that many times already, and the thing is we already are still waiting for a women's health ambassador to be appointed. last week, we were talking about the hrt, we did not even know there was going to be a tsar then. sajid javid said on sunday there would be a tsar appointed, and towards the end of the week, it has been appointed, and so we know that when pressure is applied, the viewers on bbc breakfast, and we have covered this, things can happen, but we need to make sure things do not get put onto the back burner because other things need looking at. let’s the back burner because other things need looking at.— need looking at. let's put your doctor's out — need looking at. let's put your doctor's out on _ need looking at. let's put your doctor's out on as _ need looking at. let's put your doctor's out on as well, - need looking at. let's put yourl doctor's out on as well, nighat, need looking at. let's put your- doctor's out on as well, nighat, not that you have a really take it off, for anybody who is trying to get hold of the gel for hrt treatment, what should be sent to their gps? —— put your doctor's hat on.
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what should be sent to their gps? -- put your doctor's hat on.— put your doctor's hat on. please talk to your _ put your doctor's hat on. please talk to your doctor _ put your doctor's hat on. please talk to your doctor first. - put your doctor's hat on. please talk to your doctor first. if - put your doctor's hat on. please talk to your doctor first. if i - put your doctor's hat on. please talk to your doctor first. if i can | talk to your doctor first. if i can in the interview on a related note, actually, on this friday, i will give you a good news bad news good news sandwich. last thursday when i was on the sofa talking to charlie and i said, we are struggling getting hold of this hrt at the moment, to this gel, and with lots of work with my lovely pharmacists, this is equivalent to me, not for everybody in the uk, but we have worked very hard, and my lovely pharmacists have managed to get hold of all this apply we needed for our prescriptions for this month. so the company who make this gel have actually made sure that they can meet all their orders that we are putting through at the moment, so work is going on. so for women who are struggling, please bear with us, you will get your hrt supply, and there are alternatives. so the attendance of that i give, sad news that our practice is that unfortunately it is still in low
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supply —— the alternative that i give. by the other good news is that a combined body identical hrt which has oestrogen and progesterone which our body identical in a capsule, is available, and actually yesterday, i ordered some for my patient, and we managed to get hold of it in our local area, so i think there's some great stuff that is happening, but the most important thing is they are very safe alternatives that we can give you, please bear with your health care provider, and now hopefully that we have a tsar, it should be sorted soon.- hopefully that we have a tsar, it should be sorted soon. thank you very much. _ should be sorted soon. thank you very much. and — should be sorted soon. thank you very much. and l _ should be sorted soon. thank you very much, and i like _ should be sorted soon. thank you very much, and i like that - should be sorted soon. thank you| very much, and i like that phrase, should be sorted soon. thank you i very much, and i like that phrase, a good news bad news good news sandwich. take care, doctor nighat arif. with symptoms like memory loss, anxiety, and loss of confidence, the impact the menopause can have on women in the workplace is huge. so when carrianne lackie began hers, she realised she needed
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extra support at work and started holding coffee mornings with staff to break the taboo. she joins us now along with rachel suff, who advises employers on how to address the issue. let's start with you, c, you work for the co—op. —— lets start with you, carrianne. what of your colleagues done to help? l you, carrianne. what of your colleagues done to help? i was suffering. _ colleagues done to help? i was suffering. and _ colleagues done to help? i was suffering, and i _ colleagues done to help? i was suffering, and i mean - colleagues done to help? i was suffering, and i mean really . suffering, and i mean really suffering. ijoined the co—op because they had a menopause policy so i knew that i would be supported, but i wanted to take bit further. i started a menopause coffee morning, and i thought, if i am still not great, didn't know who i was, and that got up to about 60 people come on. ~ . , that got up to about 60 people come on, ~ ., , ., ., that got up to about 60 people come on, . .,, ., ., ., it that got up to about 60 people come on. . ., . . ., it was on. was that all women? it was to everybody- — on. was that all women? it was to everybody- l _ on. was that all women? it was to everybody- i had _ on. was that all women? it was to everybody. i had a _ on. was that all women? it was to everybody. i had a couple - on. was that all women? it was to everybody. i had a couple of- on. was that all women? it was to everybody. i had a couple of menl everybody. i had a couple of men coming as well to listen, because it is a problem for everybody in the workplace, really, so that is great.
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we have a women's network in co—op, and that kind of grew, because we busy so that there was a bit of an issue there, that women were suffering, they were not getting the right answers from their gps, but it was brilliant because what co—op allowed me to do is get a platform to look at that policy, see if we could bring it to life, and what he did with that policy as got in manager's guide, manager training, so that you could identify things, have an open and honest conversation.— have an open and honest conversation. carrianne, you mentioned — conversation. carrianne, you mentioned the _ conversation. carrianne, you mentioned the first - conversation. carrianne, you| mentioned the first meeting, conversation. carrianne, you - mentioned the first meeting, what was that like? l mentioned the first meeting, what was that like?— was that like? i was fine, but it was that like? i was fine, but it was 'ust was that like? i was fine, but it was just generally _ was that like? i was fine, but it wasjust generally me - was that like? i was fine, but it wasjust generally me being . was just generally me being incredibly vulnerable, and actually talking about the journey that i've been on, how i have suffered, how i had not really got the support, that i had even been turned away by female gynaecologists, saying it was just a time of life, and i thought, if i am doing this, how many other people are actually struggling? so
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let's see what we can do, let's almost make a movement. so let's see what we can do, let's almost make a movement. so how did ou almost make a movement. so how did you transfer — almost make a movement. so how did you transfer that _ almost make a movement. so how did you transfer that conversation - almost make a movement. so how did you transfer that conversation into - you transfer that conversation into practical help from work —— practical help from work —— practical help? latte practical help from work -- practical help?— practical help from work -- --racticalhel?~ ., practical help? we got everybody's feedback, what _ practical help? we got everybody's feedback, what is _ practical help? we got everybody's feedback, what is it _ practical help? we got everybody's feedback, what is it so _ practical help? we got everybody's feedback, what is it so that - practical help? we got everybody's feedback, what is it so that you - practical help? we got everybody's| feedback, what is it so that you can do so that you are not within work and you're feeling better? so we had and you're feeling better? so we had a look at what the policy could be, bringing that to life, and when i say bring that to life, that means to me, if i'm not feeling that, i do not want to get out of bed in the money, what can i do, how can i have had open conversation with my manager? one of the key thing is that women are really scared of is mentioning menopause can actually go to your mailbox and saying, can i have a bit of time for sleep in? the wa ou have a bit of time for sleep in? the way you explain it, it sounds very positive, that has clearly made a big difference for you. was there any point at which somebody somewhere, an e—mail or somewhere in the background, was kind of go on, do you know what? why are you making a fuss about this? did you get any kind of a push back? i know you have
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been very positive about your employers, but whether any voices sing, hold on, what is the fuss? i am very honest, not at all. i sing, hold on, what is the fuss? u am very honest, not at all. i have friends who are menopausal, who at that age, but it is not on the table, does not even discussed. rachel, obviously what carrianne has done is great, added benefits those people who work with her, and her employer has reacted. why on earth is it incumbent on employees to get a menopause package and a menopause plan strategy for companies to recognise and be aware of the issues? a, recognise and be aware of the issues? �* . recognise and be aware of the issues? . . , ., . issues? a related question, and i think we have _ issues? a related question, and i think we have seen _ issues? a related question, and i think we have seen in _ issues? a related question, and i think we have seen in a - issues? a related question, and i think we have seen in a lot - issues? a related question, and i think we have seen in a lot of- think we have seen in a lot of organisations, there is such a movement on the part of women's networks— movement on the part of women's networks and so on. we are now
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seeing _ networks and so on. we are now seeing times start to change. i was on your— seeing times start to change. i was on your sofa — seeing times start to change. i was on your sofa three years ago, and at that point, _ on your sofa three years ago, and at that point, just one in ten organisations had any kind of framework policy, training, guidance for line _ framework policy, training, guidance for line managers come on the menopause. now we are seeing about 30% according to research, so things are starting _ 30% according to research, so things are starting to turn, but you're absolutely _ are starting to turn, but you're absolutely right, it is incumbent on the employer to create that environment, that culture, have a policy— environment, that culture, have a policy and — environment, that culture, have a policy and create a menopause friendly — policy and create a menopause friendly workplace. it is in their interests, — friendly workplace. it is in their interests, too. i friendly workplace. it is in their interests, too.— interests, too. i tell you what, ritual, the _ interests, too. i tell you what, ritual, the thought _ interests, too. i tell you what, ritual, the thought that - interests, too. i tell you what, | ritual, the thought that springs interests, too. i tell you what, i ritual, the thought that springs to mind, carrianne very briefly put it out there, she went, i am going to do something, and i want you to support me. it sounds like it took some guts to do that, but if you are a small fish in a big company, to be that voice saying you have to do something about this, that is a brave thing to do. it is quite a big step to take. it
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brave thing to do. it is quite a big step to take-— step to take. it is so brave and slow moving. _ step to take. it is so brave and slow moving, and _ step to take. it is so brave and slow moving, and to _ step to take. it is so brave and slow moving, and to hear- slow moving, and to hear carrianne speak, _ slow moving, and to hear carrianne speak, the — slow moving, and to hear carrianne speak, the fact that co—op has reacted — speak, the fact that co—op has reacted on— speak, the fact that co—op has reacted on that and taken that forward, — reacted on that and taken that forward, their policy is great, let us examine _ forward, their policy is great, let us examine what we need to see more of, us examine what we need to see more of. but _ us examine what we need to see more of. but we _ us examine what we need to see more of, but we need to see more employers taking the initiative, because — employers taking the initiative, because still 70% of employers who do not _ because still 70% of employers who do not have a policy, do not have any guidance, and i think what is great _ any guidance, and i think what is great about the co—op policy, i have read it. _ great about the co—op policy, i have read it. it _ great about the co—op policy, i have read it. it is— great about the co—op policy, i have read it, it is great, it is what we would _ read it, it is great, it is what we would advocate, it starts with the importance of talking, and breaking down _ importance of talking, and breaking down that— importance of talking, and breaking down that silence and stigma. it is a natural— down that silence and stigma. it is a natural stage of life, what we want _ a natural stage of life, what we want is — a natural stage of life, what we want is for— a natural stage of life, what we want is for the atmosphere, the culture — want is for the atmosphere, the culture in— want is for the atmosphere, the culture in the organisation, to be such— culture in the organisation, to be such that — culture in the organisation, to be such that somebody who needs support can openly— such that somebody who needs support can openly talk about their symptoms. small changes can make a real difference.— real difference. rachel, if you ask our real difference. rachel, if you ask your employer— real difference. rachel, if you ask
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your employer to _ real difference. rachel, if you ask your employer to think _ real difference. rachel, if you ask your employer to think about i real difference. rachel, if you ask your employer to think about this | your employer to think about this and they say we do not have the ability or resources to do this, what do you do then? that ability or resources to do this, what do you do then?- ability or resources to do this, what do you do then? that is really difficult. i think— what do you do then? that is really difficult. i think hopefully _ what do you do then? that is really difficult. i think hopefully in - what do you do then? that is really difficult. i think hopefully in that i difficult. i think hopefully in that organisation, if there is an hr department, i cannot imagine there being _ department, i cannot imagine there being that _ department, i cannot imagine there being that response. if there is pressure — being that response. if there is pressure from below, we have seen that really— pressure from below, we have seen that really make a difference, it is worth— that really make a difference, it is worth pointing out perhaps, too, an employer— worth pointing out perhaps, too, an employer that doesn't sympathetic, the citizen _ employer that doesn't sympathetic, the citizen of their interests, because actually can help you manage absence. _ because actually can help you manage absence, and crucially, you have got to recognise — absence, and crucially, you have got to recognise the menopause as an additional— to recognise the menopause as an additional health condition. as you are talkin: additional health condition. as you are talking there, _ additional health condition. as you are talking there, carrianne's i additional health condition. as you are talking there, carrianne's face | are talking there, carrianne's face is a picture, because i think you have some ideas if they say no. hf have some ideas if they say no. hf they say no, co—op has the policy and the manager's died on open ——
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manager's guide. anybody in the world can download this and print it off, and say, i actually think we need this here. i want an open conversation. you may as welljust get it, have a conversation, it does takes a little step and sunday being brave, but it can make a difference. how often your coffee mornings? latte how often your coffee mornings? we do them every month, people can sit in the _ do them every month, people can sit in the background and not say anything. _ in the background and not say anything, but some of the messages i have had _ anything, but some of the messages i have had is, _ anything, but some of the messages i have had is, i— anything, but some of the messages i have had is, iwas depressed, iwas suicidal. _ have had is, iwas depressed, iwas suicidal. i_ have had is, iwas depressed, iwas suicidal, i was brutal with work and now because of the coffee mornings, i am now because of the coffee mornings, lam in _ now because of the coffee mornings, lam in a _ now because of the coffee mornings, i am in a betterjob, now because of the coffee mornings, lam in a betterjob, better space, i lam in a betterjob, better space, i have _ iam in a betterjob, better space, i have taken— lam in a betterjob, better space, i have taken control of my hormones, and i_ i have taken control of my hormones, and lam _ i have taken control of my hormones, and lam so _ i have taken control of my hormones, and i am so happy, this is all because _ and i am so happy, this is all because of you. it and i am so happy, this is all because of you.— and i am so happy, this is all because of you. it must make you feel very proud- — because of you. it must make you feel very proud. yes, _ because of you. it must make you feel very proud. yes, it _ because of you. it must make you feel very proud. yes, it is - feel very proud. yes, it is 'ust talkin: feel very proud. yes, it is 'ust talking about i feel very proud. yes, it is 'ust talking about it, ii feel very proud. yes, it is 'ust talking about it, i don't i feel very proud. yes, it isjust talking about it, i don't know| feel very proud. yes, it isjust i talking about it, i don't know why women do notjust talk about it. we need to talk more about it. hot women do notjust talk about it. we need to talk more about it.- need to talk more about it. not 'ust ask everybody. fl
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need to talk more about it. not 'ust ask everybody. carrianne, i need to talk more about it. notjust ask everybody. carrianne, thank i need to talk more about it. notjust| ask everybody. carrianne, thank you very much and well done and only what you have done. and rachel, thank you for your advice as well. now let's get the weather with matt, who's at an allotment in east london for us this morning. you morning. have not been working hard at all! you have not been working hard at all! let's be honest, do you think any allotment owner would let me near their prized allotments? i am in redbridge in the north—east of london, one of the allotments, in the london area alone there are around six hyde parks worth of allotments here. it has been quite dry. i have tedi it with me from the national allotment society. —— terry. how are allotment owners
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coping with the dry weather? it is coping with the dry weather? it is unfortunate _ coping with the dry weather? it is unfortunate to _ coping with the dry weather? hi 3 unfortunate to have this dry spell in spain, makes it doubly difficult when you're putting young plants at especially, but we have never had running water here since 1913, we just have to live with it. we do our best to encourage people to collect what are the best ways they can, what are the best ways they can, what about, sheds, greenhouses, some people construct a lean to just to collect water. we have some very innovative systems for draining water into the water buts. we have some central community tanks which we refill from a local stream, and we refill from a local stream, and we dry to pump people's tanks up. some very interesting ways of collecting water. what about for those who are gardening on allotments? little tips in this dry weather? . . allotments? little tips in this dry weather? , , ., . weather? the thing is, it is often a case of you — weather? the thing is, it is often a case of you do _ weather? the thing is, it is often a case of you do not _ weather? the thing is, it is often a
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case of you do not need _ weather? the thing is, it is often a case of you do not need to - weather? the thing is, it is often a case of you do not need to water l case of you do not need to water quite as much as you think you do need if you have got the soil in the right condition. it comes back to the soil. if you would have the soil, do not turn the soil so often. so often, people turn their soil. it was moist when they turned at, five hours later, it is dried out. the other thing is the mulching and the compost, put the mulches down around your plants, your fruit trees, bushes, run your young plants, either use the compost you made, get hold of some compost you got from a local farm, hold of some compost you got from a localfarm, some local hold of some compost you got from a local farm, some local stables, hold of some compost you got from a localfarm, some local stables, even woodchip, grass mowing is, anything that covers up the soil, even cardboard, keeps the moisture in the soil. . . . cardboard, keeps the moisture in the soil. . , , . ~ cardboard, keeps the moisture in the soil. . ,, . ,, , soil. perfect tips, thank you very much. soil. perfect tips, thank you very much- l'm _ soil. perfect tips, thank you very much. i'm sure _ soil. perfect tips, thank you very much. i'm sure people _ soil. perfect tips, thank you very much. i'm sure people will- soil. perfect tips, thank you very much. i'm sure people will be i soil. perfect tips, thank you very i much. i'm sure people will be taking notes of that. the dry weather continues here. thank you for joining us this morning, terry. dry
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weather continuing today and on the weekend, but there is some rain in the forecast. some showers in eastern areas today, but staying dry for the vast majority. at the moment, we have high pressure in charge, which has been with us for the past few weeks, but at the moment it is right on top of us, keeping winds light, leading to a frost this morning. that is a southern scotland, northern england and northern ireland especially. that will move a little bit and northern ireland especially. that will move a little hit this weekend. underthe that will move a little hit this weekend. under the high pressure today, some high cloud, north and east of scotland, across east anglia and the south—east, seeing one or two isolated showers here, the vast majority of the uk another dry day, and western areas sunnier than we saw through yesterday, so a bit warmer, 17 celsius across western districts, only around ten or 11 celsius in cooler parts of east anglia. overnight, cloud picking up a bit more, clearer skies around, light winds, a recipe for some mist and fog patches, and a greater
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chance across england and wales of some frost around. only a slight frost, but still not welcome at the moment. and across northern and western areas, temperatures rising later. into tomorrow morning, saturday, western scotland, northern ireland, outbreaks of rain starting to push on, welcome substantial rain for some, to push on, welcome substantial rain forsome, central to push on, welcome substantial rain for some, central eastern scotland leaving a bit more erratic, we could see the event push into cumbria and the isle of man and anglesey by the end of the day, but for much of england and wales, another dry day, bit of patchy cloud into the afternoon, and few warm up, up to around 17 or 18 celsius to the south and east, coolerfor around 17 or 18 celsius to the south and east, cooler for scotland around 17 or 18 celsius to the south and east, coolerfor scotland and northern ireland, with inhibition southwards for sunday, but fragmented, not a southwards for sunday, but fragmented, notajudgment southwards for sunday, but fragmented, not a judgment of blue on this chart for sunday, only a few shops dotted around. some gardeners will be lucky, some will still be wanting for more. a cloudy day for most on sunday, monday through and warmer, drieragain, that will most on sunday, monday through and warmer, drier again, that will be a bit sunnier. even next week, only a few showers in the forecast. the overall dry story continues into the
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start of may, that is how it is looking. we have your ferdinand joining us later —— and rio ferdinand. time now for all your sport news with mike. both british clubs left in the europa league have work to do if they're to reach the final. rangers and west ham both lost to german opponents, but at least the scottish champions, have a home match to come, as they look to turn their tie around. rangers had looked like they might hold out for a goaless draw, away at rb leipzig until a wonder strike from distance from angelino five minutes from time
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gave the german club the advantage. rangers could only muster a single shot on target, and will need to find more when they're roared on by their home crowd in the second leg at ibrox next week. we had many, many great european nights at home, and the fans will definitely give us energy, will give us all the ambience we need, and my players should fight for the final. in west ham's biggest game since moving to the london stadium, they suffered a blow after just 49 seconds when eintracht frankfurt scored. west ham got back on level terms thanks to michail antonio. but his work was undone when daichi kamada put the germans back in control ahead of next week's second leg away in germany. meanwhile, leicester came from behind to force a 1—1 draw withjose mourinho's roma
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in their europa conference league semifinal. a second—half own goal from gianluca mancini means leicester will go to rome next week with everything to play for, as they try to reach their first european final. manchester united now have to win their last three league games to avoid their worst points tally in the premier league era after drawing 1—1 with chelsea. it was the london side who dominated the first hour, and they struck first through marcos alonso. butjust a couple of minutes later, cristiano ronaldo, who's rescued his side so often this season, popped up with the equaliser. so while chelsea look secure in third place, manchester united stay sixth, and afterwards, their interim boss ralf rangnick, said he'll still be involved at united in a consultsancy role next season, despite considering an offer to take over as austria's national team boss. rio ferdinand joins us in an hour's time. chelsea's women have stretched their lead over arsenal at the top of the women's super league to four points after beating tottenham. after a match of twists and turns,
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sam kerr popped up with a brilliant header to secure the 2—1win. and it's really significant, because chelsea will secure a third consecutive league title if they win their final two games. i will go and put the kettle on, get a cup of tea for rio.— i will go and put the kettle on, get a cup of tea for rio. what about us? you can get — a cup of tea for rio. what about us? you can get your _ a cup of tea for rio. what about us? you can get your own. _ a cup of tea for rio. what about us? you can get your own. can _ a cup of tea for rio. what about us? you can get your own. can i - a cup of tea for rio. what about us? you can get your own. can i give i a cup of tea for rio. what about us? | you can get your own. can i give him a breakfast mug? you you can get your own. can i give him a breakfast mug?— you can get your own. can i give him a breakfast mug? you can lenten one, those are pressures. _ a breakfast mug? you can lenten one, those are pressures. thanks, - a breakfast mug? you can lenten one, those are pressures. thanks, mike. i those are pressures. thanks, mike. -- ou those are pressures. thanks, mike. -- you can — those are pressures. thanks, mike. -- you can lend _ those are pressures. thanks, mike. -- you can lend him _ those are pressures. thanks, mike. -- you can lend him one, _ those are pressures. thanks, mike. -- you can lend him one, those i those are pressures. thanks, mike. -- you can lend him one, those are| —— you can lend him one, those are pressures. a trial to extend the school day in wales is coming to an end. for the last ten weeks, 1,800 pupils at 1a schools have been offered an extra five hours a week, with the focus more on activities
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than academic learning. so how have they been getting on? let's find out from our correspondent hywel griffith. it is strange for me, something to look forward to at the end of the day. the deer flies look forward to at the end of the day. the deerflies past look forward to at the end of the day. the deer flies past really fast. �* ., , ., , . day. the deer flies past really fast. �* ., , . , fast. before it used to be a bit borin: , fast. before it used to be a bit boring, nothing _ fast. before it used to be a bit boring, nothing really- fast. before it used to be a bit boring, nothing really to i fast. before it used to be a bit boring, nothing really to do, l fast. before it used to be a bit i boring, nothing really to do, but now there's something to look forward — now there's something to look forward to and to do after school. so you _ forward to and to do after school. so you will— forward to and to do after school. so you will be sad to see it end? yeah. . . so you will be sad to see it end? yeah. , , ., ,. so you will be sad to see it end? yeah. , ,., ,. , yeah. time is up on the school's big experiment. — yeah. time is up on the school's big experiment. an _ yeah. time is up on the school's big experiment, an extra _ yeah. time is up on the school's big experiment, an extra hour- yeah. time is up on the school's big experiment, an extra hour every i yeah. time is up on the school's big | experiment, an extra hour every day for ten weeks to stretch and excite these children about learning again coming out of the pandemic. so, did it work? . . , . . it work? yeah, it has made it feel a little bit different, _ it work? yeah, it has made it feel a little bit different, because - it work? yeah, it has made it feel a little bit different, because when i l little bit different, because when i wasn't doing these activities, i was looking forward to going home and playing on my ipad, but now after school i get to do other activities and get to see my friends more time. from tae kwon do to lego and ceramics, they have been put through
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their paces, not in traditional academic subjects, but sessions that help build confidence. it also helps out many parents likejordan, whose daughter took part. l out many parents like jordan, whose daughter took part.— daughter took part. i would say it has definitely _ daughter took part. i would say it has definitely been _ daughter took part. i would say it has definitely been beneficial- daughter took part. i would say it has definitely been beneficial as. daughter took part. i would say it| has definitely been beneficial as a working parent, because instead of thinking about our childcare costs, they are staying in school that extra time. they are staying in school that extra time-— they are staying in school that extra time. after ten weeks of cookin: , extra time. after ten weeks of cooking, drumming, - extra time. after ten weeks of cooking, drumming, dancing l extra time. after ten weeks of. cooking, drumming, dancing and nothing else, one lesson has already been learned, that rolling out the extra hourfor every been learned, that rolling out the extra hour for every school and every pupil in wales would be hugely complicated and expensive. flame every pupil in wales would be hugely complicated and expensive. come on in, complicated and expensive. come on in. welcome — complicated and expensive. come on in. welcome to _ complicated and expensive. come on in, welcome to the _ complicated and expensive. come on in, welcome to the lego _ complicated and expensive. come on in, welcome to the lego club. i complicated and expensive. come on in, welcome to the lego club. the i in, welcome to the lego club. the school have _ in, welcome to the lego club. the school have the _ in, welcome to the lego club. tue: school have the freedom to in, welcome to the lego club. tt2 school have the freedom to piece together its own plan, with staff offered extra pay if they wanted to help and local companies employed to come in, too. only years five and six took part, offering up to every child would be tough. tt six took part, offering up to every child would be tough.— child would be tough. it would be a very difficult _ child would be tough. it would be a very difficult task _ child would be tough. it would be a very difficult task to _ child would be tough. it would be a very difficult task to run _ child would be tough. it would be a very difficult task to run for - child would be tough. it would be a
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very difficult task to run for every l very difficult task to run for every year group. — very difficult task to run for every year group, especially for very difficult task to run for every year group, especially for us very difficult task to run for every year group, especially for us being over three — year group, especially for us being over three sites, it would definitely need possibly one or two full-time _ definitely need possibly one or two full—time employees. so huge, definitely. full-time employees. so huge, definitel . �* full-time employees. so huge, definitel. �* . . definitely. and expensive, i guess? yeah. definitely. and expensive, i guess? yeah- when — definitely. and expensive, i guess? yeah- when you — definitely. and expensive, i guess? yeah. when you go _ definitely. and expensive, i guess? yeah. when you go home, - definitely. and expensive, i guess? yeah. when you go home, you i definitely. and expensive, i guess? yeah. when you go home, you are| yeah. when you go home, you are going _ yeah. when you go home, you are going to _ yeah. when you go home, you are going to kick— yeah. when you go home, you are going to kick these, they will have to go— going to kick these, they will have to go in_ going to kick these, they will have to go in the — going to kick these, they will have to go in the oven, 0k?— going to kick these, they will have to go in the oven, 0k? some unions o- ose to go in the oven, 0k? some unions oppose the — to go in the oven, 0k? some unions oppose the extra — to go in the oven, 0k? some unions oppose the extra hours, _ to go in the oven, 0k? some unions oppose the extra hours, warning i to go in the oven, 0k? some unionsl oppose the extra hours, warning they could turn schools into childcare centres. the welsh government says it will evaluate what has been learned here before making any decisions. hywel is at a school now. it was
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always about what a difference this has made. . ., always about what a difference this has made. , ., ., always about what a difference this has made. . ., ., ,, has made. yes, how do you evaluate what a difference _ has made. yes, how do you evaluate what a difference and _ has made. yes, how do you evaluate what a difference and are _ has made. yes, how do you evaluate what a difference and are at - has made. yes, how do you evaluate what a difference and are at the i has made. yes, how do you evaluate what a difference and are at the end | what a difference and are at the end of the day it has made? we have seen some real enthusiasm over the last ten weeks. let's speak to the head of learning here. we have seen things there like tae kwon do, kick in, give us an idea of some of the other thing the children have been doing. other thing the children have been doin:. .. . other thing the children have been doin:. , ., doing. the activities of men within around health _ doing. the activities of men within around health and _ doing. the activities of men within around health and well-being, i around health and well—being, trickery, — around health and well—being, trickery, ceramics, sports leadership, some drumming activities, and dance as well. so not so activities, and dance as well. not so much activities, and dance as well. 5r not so much academic sense. so then how do you measure how that feeds into their normal learning, there numeracy or literacy or those things? numeracy or literacy or those thins? ~ . . numeracy or literacy or those thins? ~ , . , things? we will begin that this would not be _ things? we will begin that this would not be solely _ things? we will begin that this would not be solely academic. things? we will begin that this i would not be solely academic focus, our rationale, focusing on their well—being and social our rationale, focusing on their well— being and social and our rationale, focusing on their well—being and social and emotional skills. _ well—being and social and emotional skills. we _ well—being and social and emotional skills, we know that has suffered during _ skills, we know that has suffered during the — skills, we know that has suffered during the pandemic. so we are gauging — during the pandemic. so we are gauging anecdotally how that has been transferred into the classroom, their confidence to try new skills and activities has transferred on to their learning so they are more
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willing — their learning so they are more willing to — their learning so they are more willing to make mistakes, to have a lo, willing to make mistakes, to have a go. to— willing to make mistakes, to have a go. to have — willing to make mistakes, to have a go, to have a voice and an active say in _ go, to have a voice and an active say in their— go, to have a voice and an active say in their learning.— go, to have a voice and an active say in their learning. when i spoke to some of — say in their learning. when i spoke to some of the _ say in their learning. when i spoke to some of the children _ say in their learning. when i spoke to some of the children a - say in their learning. when i spoke to some of the children a couple i say in their learning. when i spokej to some of the children a couple of weeks ago, one thing i noticed was they were talking about being sociable again. during the pandemic, that has maybe been the side of their life that really suffered. that is what they reported, particularly in the second lockdown, in the _ particularly in the second lockdown, in the winter, they reported they were _ in the winter, they reported they were lonely and miss their friends, and it— were lonely and miss their friends, and it is— were lonely and miss their friends, and it is not— were lonely and miss their friends, and it is not the same, we were very flexible _ and it is not the same, we were very flexible and — and it is not the same, we were very flexible and transferred to blended learning. _ flexible and transferred to blended learning, but does not same as the interaction — learning, but does not same as the interaction of learning face—to—face with their— interaction of learning face—to—face with their friends, that was the focus _ with their friends, that was the focus they wanted to be with their friends _ focus they wanted to be with their friends after school, which is why they participated. this friends after school, which is why they participated.— they participated. this was not meant to just _ they participated. this was not meant to just be _ they participated. this was not meant to just be about - they participated. this was not meant to just be about catch l they participated. this was not i meant to just be about catch up, and the idea is that could change the school day in wales forever. based on what you have seen over the last ten weeks, how realistic would it be to rule this out across your three campuses and potentially across every year group? that campuses and potentially across every year group?— every year group? that is our bi est every year group? that is our biggest challenge, _ every year group? that is our biggest challenge, we i every year group? that is our| biggest challenge, we needed every year group? that is our. biggest challenge, we needed to every year group? that is our- biggest challenge, we needed to have that equitable offer. beyond one or
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two year _ that equitable offer. beyond one or two year groups, there is a financial— two year groups, there is a financial implication. we would need to consider— financial implication. we would need to consider how we would be move this delivery model forward, but to roll it out to a wider year groups. — but to roll it out to a wider year groups, across many events, would certainly— groups, across many events, would certainly be — groups, across many events, would certainly be our biggest challenge. and you _ certainly be our biggest challenge. and you would have to employ more staff and all that sort of thing? yes, we would try to keep the impact to staff— yes, we would try to keep the impact to staff to— yes, we would try to keep the impact to staff to a _ yes, we would try to keep the impact to staff to a minimal, but you need to staff to a minimal, but you need to perhaps — to staff to a minimal, but you need to perhaps have a role dedicated to offering _ to perhaps have a role dedicated to offering that sort of provision, and we would — offering that sort of provision, and we would like to develop links within— we would like to develop links within the community. we have shown we are _ within the community. we have shown we are flexible, and perhaps it could — we are flexible, and perhaps it could be — we are flexible, and perhaps it could be a _ we are flexible, and perhaps it could be a community—based project moving _ could be a community—based project moving forward. could be a community-based pro'ect moving forwardfi could be a community-based pro'ect moving marofi could be a community-based pro'ect moving forward.�* could be a community-based pro'ect moving forward. thank you very much for our moving forward. thank you very much for your time — moving forward. thank you very much for your time and _ moving forward. thank you very much for your time and for _ moving forward. thank you very much for your time and for the _ moving forward. thank you very much for your time and for the last - moving forward. thank you very much for your time and for the last ten i for your time and for the last ten weeks, we will hopefully get to speak to some of the children later on in the programme. hater? on in the programme. very interesting, _ on in the programme. very interesting, hywel, - on in the programme. very interesting, hywel, thank. on in the programme. very i interesting, hywel, thank you on in the programme. very interesting, hywel, thank you very much, talk to you later on.
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stay with us, headlines coming up. good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today... two british humanitarian aid workers have been captured by russian forces in ukraine, according to a charity. russian missile strikes on kyiv, as the head of the united nations visits the ukrainian capital, and criticises his own organisation
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for failing to stop the war. tennis legend boris becker could face jail. he'll be sentenced later for trying to hide financial assets when he was declared bankrupt. this is what one of the world's biggest construction project looks like. good morning from 60 metres below the river thames where tunnelling work has just been completed on london's super sewer. i will explain why it's needed and how it will change what happens when we flush. as manchester united limp towards what's likely to be their worst premier league season, we are joined by one of theirformer greats, rio ferdinand, to talk about their future, and also the issue of online abuse aimed at players. as our gardens and allotments bring to life, they are struggling a bit moment due to of rainfall. we will have tips and whether there is any rainfall in the forecast. all the
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details on bbc breakfast. a charity claims two british humanitarian aid workers have been captured by russian forces in ukraine. presidium network, a uk—based not—for—profit organisation, says that the two men, were captured on monday. it's as president zelensky has accused russia of to "humiliate" the united nations by launching a missile strike on the capital kyiv during a visit by the organisation's secretary general. let's go now to our correspondentjoe inwood, who is in kyiv this morning. very good morning to you. in the last half—an—hour or so we have heard about the two british humanitarian aid workers captured by russian forces. what do we know so far? ., . ., . , russian forces. what do we know so far? ., . ., ., _, ., far? the information has come from the presidium _ far? the information has come from the presidium network. _ far? the information has come from the presidium network. they i far? the information has come from | the presidium network. they deliver humanitarian aid and medical supplies and help to evacuate
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civilians. they say the two people who were allegedly captured when working here as independent humanitarian aid workers. we do not know what work they were involved in. the other information that is being reported, the two men were captured at a russian checkpoint. what is surprising is that you would be able to get to a russian checkpoint through a ukrainian checkpoint. there are quite strict checks. i would checkpoint. there are quite strict checks. iwould be checkpoint. there are quite strict checks. i would be surprised if you can easily pass through. there are many questions and answers we will have to be getting in the coming hours. ~ . , ., have to be getting in the coming hours. ~ . ,~. ,, ., have to be getting in the coming hours. ~ . ,, ., ., hours. what you will know from first-hand _ hours. what you will know from first-hand experience _ hours. what you will know from first-hand experience is - hours. what you will know from first-hand experience is those i first—hand experience is those humanitarian organisations are working in very difficult circumstances. .., . , circumstances. extraordinarily difficult circumstances, i circumstances. extraordinarily i difficult circumstances, dangerous circumstances. we have been kind of lucky, i guess, the people working have been lucky there have not been
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that many examples of aid workers being killed. it is notjust aid workers, there are 20,000 foreigners here, many of them are fighting. yesterday we had reports of scott sibley, a former army veteran, he was killed fighting. this is a war zone, and very dangerous place and people will get hurt and lose their lives. . ~ . people will get hurt and lose their lives. w , ., people will get hurt and lose their lives. , ., , . lives. pick up for us about the strike that — lives. pick up for us about the strike that hit _ lives. pick up for us about the strike that hit the _ lives. pick up for us about the strike that hit the capital i strike that hit the capital yesterday. that happened as the head of the un, while he was walking the streets and looking around for himself to see the damage. yes. streets and looking around for himself to see the damage. yes, it was an extraordinary _ himself to see the damage. yes, it was an extraordinary event. i himself to see the damage. yes, it was an extraordinary event. worth| was an extraordinary event. worth reflecting on the idea a missile strike was carried out more than two miles away from where the secretary—general of the united nations was holding a conference, was meeting with president lenski, seeing for himself the damage that has been done to this city met by a
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member of the security council, russia. president zelensky says it shows the disregard russia has for the international order and the united nations. there has been criticisms of the security council. they said it demands action. difficult to see how there will be action when anything that the security council says can be vetoed by russia. let's get more on this now from dominik byrne. he isa he is a co—founder of the presidium network. what can you tell us? what situation where they in and how did
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you find out they were in trouble? just to clarify, they were not working with us directly at all. a few weeks ago, people who were in contact with them said they were quite worried about them doing certain work they supposedly were doing in ukraine. they went over there as individuals. i was introduced to them two weeks ago. basically i was trying to get them to come and work with us because i was quite worried they were doing some quite dangerous work, to be honest. we know they were trying to do evacuations themselves with some small support from the uk but unverified support. i ended up giving thing my contact details —— giving thing my contact details —— giving them my contact details. what we know so far and what has been verified so far, basically we know
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they were trying to evacuate a lady and two children. basically, the text message screenshots we were sent from their contacts, they were finally after five or six hours managed to get through the ukraine checkpoint to go south into russian —controlled area. what we do know is that their contacts lost contact with them on monday afternoon. all monday morning. monday afternoon, the lady that was being evacuated got some strange text messages and basically we have confirmed they were not consistent with how one of the individuals was texting beforehand. basically she got a text message saying they were five minutes away. around two hours
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later, her house was stormed by russian soldiers. my team have talked to her directly and her statement has been that the soldiers had detained her husband on the ground. they were shouting, saying, why do you know these two british people? how do you know them? you should not be talking to them, we think they are spies, they are the exact words. from that we can confirm that they are more than likely to be under russian catcher. i was alerted wednesday night about this and verified the details, trying to find the family yesterday. we know this is very time crucial and we know how the russians had been operating. at the moment this is an assumption that these two people have been captured by the russians, by russian soldiers stop
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has been, there must have been an attempt to try and get in contact with them, or has the been any indication from anywhere that they are being held?— are being held? yes, family and friends have _ are being held? yes, family and friends have tried _ are being held? yes, family and friends have tried to _ are being held? yes, family and friends have tried to get - are being held? yes, family and friends have tried to get in i are being held? yes, family and i friends have tried to get in contact with them. they have had some very strange messages coming back and very strange numbers trying to call them. we have told them not to contact the strange numbers. basically from the text messages, that we have seen, there are inconsistencies between the messages on monday morning and monday afternoon. it seems that the phone one of them was using was only now contactable on viper and not whatsapp, like before. that is the evidence we have got. we have had experts on our side verifying that. what help you getting? i know you
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said you were introduced to the may couple of weeks ago. i assume you now asking for help, where is that coming from? we now asking for help, where is that coming from?— now asking for help, where is that comin: from? ~ ., ., ., , coming from? we have asked for help from the scba — coming from? we have asked for help from the scba directly. _ coming from? we have asked for help from the scba directly. we _ coming from? we have asked for help from the scba directly. we are - from the scba directly. we are waiting for them to come back to confirm with us. they have not got back yet. the reason we are doing this is to get an appeal out, to get the support we need from the uk government and from the international community as well as on the ground and also to really appealfor their on the ground and also to really appeal for their safety and on the ground and also to really appealfor their safety and get appeal for their safety and get clarification appealfor their safety and get clarification on how they are and how safe they are and that they are being treated properly. we really want conversation on the ground they are well and safe. for want conversation on the ground they are well and safe.— are well and safe. for the moment i will say thank _ are well and safe. for the moment i will say thank you. _ are well and safe. for the moment i will say thank you. thank _ are well and safe. for the moment i will say thank you. thank you - are well and safe. for the moment i will say thank you. thank you for . will say thank you. thank you for talking to us. the founding partner of presidium network talking there.
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the labour party has admitted its deputy leader, angela rayner, was with sir kier starmer when he was pictured having a beer during lockdown last year. the party has said its previous denial of her being there was an "honest mistake". keir starmer was pictured with a bottle of beer at an event in durham. that was an online rally. what he said at the time as he was simply enjoying a takeaway between what was otherwise work events, therefore this was within the rules. at that time, indoor social gatherings outside your household were banned. labour were approached several months ago as to whether angela rayner had been at the event. today they confirmed she was, having initially denied this. they say this
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was an honest mistake but also they answered in good faith at the time. equally, they could not deny it this time because the daily mail has video footage of her taking part in this online rally very clearly in the same venue as keir starmer. the labour argument is they have no reason to cover it up, it was a mistake because they had not done anything wrong stop there was pressure from a local conservative mp for durham police to reopen investigations of the incident to find out if any lockdown rules have been broken. the charge they are trying to make his labour is hypocritical ns. the bbc has contacted durham police and they say they have received further communications about this event but they have not reopened the investigation and they intend not to issue any retrospective finds. labour says it is an attempt to distract attention from so—called partygate where fines have been issued in the very heart of
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government, including downing street, no comparison with an event that took place on the campaign trail which they claim was largely about work, rather than any kind of socialising. about work, rather than any kind of socialisinu. . ~ , ., , . the tennis star boris becker could face jail later today, when he is sentenced for failing to disclose all of his assets after being declared bankrupt. the three—time wimbledon champion netted millions of pounds in a glittering career, but fell into financial difficulties in recent years. our sports correspondent, natalie pirks, has the details. commentator: that's it. he's done it. it was the moment boris becker forged an instant bond with centre court. in 1985, the unseeded german became the youngest man to ever win wimbledon. commentator: game, set and match to becker. - he came back a year later, and did it all again. the press dubbed him boom boom for his playing style, and the public adored him. it was the start of an incredible
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career that saw him win 49 singles titles, six of them grand slams. it also made him a rich man with a successful stint as a bbc pundit, and novak djokovic�*s coach afterwards. his career earnings totalled £38 million. but boom boom was soon bust. for the last 33 years to make a lot of money. i made my first million at 17 years old, winning at swi9. i've been blessed. i come from a good family background, so money was never the incentive, never the issue. i think there were different problems that came along. problems like his expensive lifestyle commitments. £22,000 a month on rent for his home in wimbledon, but also problems in his personal life, including a high—profile divorce and payments for a child conceived at london
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restaurant, nobu. after being declared bankrupt in 2017, becker had been accused of hiding millions of pounds worth of assets, including two wimbledon trophies, to avoid paying his debts. three weeks ago, a jury found him guilty of four of the 2a counts against him, including failing to disclose property in germany and hiding a £700,000 loan. in theory, today, he could be jailed for up to seven years for each count. that's highly unlikely, but some form of custodial sentence is a very real threat. with brand becker now in tatters, he'll [earn his fate here at southwark crown court at midday. natalie pirks, bbc news. now let's get the weather with matt. matt is doing outdoors stuff on his allotment. i
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matt is doing outdoors stuff on his allotment. . ., ., ., ., allotment. i am at an allotment in north-east — allotment. i am at an allotment in north-east london. _ allotment. i am at an allotment in north-east london. this _ allotment. i am at an allotment in north-east london. this is - allotment. i am at an allotment in north-east london. this is super i north—east london. this is super smart quarterback one of ten she has got all trying to stave off the dry conditions we have got at the moment. dry stubble in the south and east of england where we have seen rant about a third of what we would normally expect to see for this time in april. —— round about a third. there is rain in the forecast. they will be one or two showers around, very few. most will stay dry. there will be sunshine around which could dry out the ground more. it will be sunny for most of the day. in the north and east of scotland there could be the old isolated shower with the shower in east anglia and the south—east. the emphasis for just about all on the dry conditions. a big cool weather cloud is in place in east anglia. in the west got the best of the sunshine,
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to 17, 18. in glasgow, enniskillen, parts of cumbria and west wales, we could see the highest of the temperatures this evening and overnight, the cloud in the east were thin and break a lot more. tonight light went with mist and fog which could develop. a bit of frost to take us into tomorrow morning just about anywhere. tomorrow, a chilly start. full england and wales a dry and chilly day. some significant rain. just a shame it is on a bank holiday weekend. more rain in the east of scotland, spreading into cambria and the isle of man later. that will push its way south on sunday. not much rain throughout the week and met many will stay dry. the full bank holiday full coming up. the full bank holiday full coming u -. �* the full bank holiday full coming u . _ �* ., ,., ~' the full bank holiday full coming
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up. being a bank holiday had completely _ up. being a bank holiday had completely passed _ up. being a bank holiday had completely passed me - up. being a bank holiday had completely passed me by - up. being a bank holiday had i completely passed me by until up. being a bank holiday had - completely passed me by until matt mentioned it. families with disabled children fear rising household bills could make their child's condition worse, as many rely on energy—intensive equipment, like electric hoists and wheelchairs. the disability charity contact says hundreds of parents are concerned they'll be forced to cutback, or stop using the equipment altogether. 0ur disability correspondent nikki fox reports. 0h. what film is it, molly—moo? they're making the best of it but molly and her mum, adele, are going through the toughest of times. shall we put some songs on? three years ago, molly was an active io—year—old. let's wipe that chin. but then she was diagnosed with a rare, life—limiting condition called batten disease, which has taken her mobility and her vision. she's always full of beans, giggling. funny. just lets nothing get in her way whatsoever. she's amazing. ready in the swing?
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there's no escaping the amount of specialist equipment molly uses each day. 0k, mummy�*sjust going to move that chair now. adele is a single mum, so she can't do without it, but it all needs power. ooh. i'll push you that way a bit, molly. we've got two wheelchairs, two ceiling track hoists, a through floor lift, two suction machines and an electric bed. if this isn't on charge 24/7 and the battery goes flat, the whole battery will break completely and it will need replacing. she does wear pads. however, by morning, she's usually leaked. it's notjust the equipment bumping up the bills. it's the extraordinary amount of washing she gets through every single day. that whole load is just from this morning? this whole load willjust be pretty much most of that. so how many washes are you doing a day? easily three. really? easily three. some days more. it depends. adele is struggling to keep up with the bills. you can see here that i was £92 in credit. now the balance i owe them is £283.
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her only option is to cut back on essentials. it's getting to a point, do we put fuel in the car and take molly for a day out, or do we need to put that aside to be able to pay for gas and electric? there's no extra help for us whatsoever. don't get me wrong, everybody should get help. parents with disabled children who aren't able to go out and work and earn a decent living, you know, there should be something out there to help support us because our electric bills straightaway are much higher than everybody else's. adele is not alone. in a survey by the charity, contact, almost 2,000 families feared their child's condition could get worse as a result of rising energy prices. more than 50 organisations have written to the chancellor asking for benefits to be increased in line with inflation. we would like to see the government just recognise that disability means extra costs and build that into their response. at the moment, the measures that the government has taken don't go anywhere near far enough in terms of supporting families
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who are doing their best under incredibly challenging circumstances. i'm getting a smile. say, hi, nikki. hey, molly. the government says it's announced a £22 billion package of support for the hardest hit this year, including over £9 billion to help with rising energy bills. come on, then. but as those bills are expected to rise again later this year, adele fears the short time she may have left with her daughter will be spent worrying about how she'll financially get by. she's spending what is potentially the last few years of her life stuck in because we can't afford to go out and do things. it's absolutely ridiculous. it's just so unfair. how does it make you feel that you can't give molly the best quality of life? obviously, you have times where you do break down and things kind of do hit you again. get a bit on top of you. yeah. mm.
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but you have to keep going. you have no choice. you have to keep going. and you just don't let these things get you down. i've got to stay strong for molly, because if i'm not strong, then there's nobody else to be strong for her. powerful stuff. many thanks to adele and molly showing us what life is like. someone who can really resonate with that story is emma foster. we'rejoined now by emma foster, whose 14—year—old son has complex disabilities. with emma is una summerson, from the charity, contact. morning. emma, we were watching that report and we were just saying there are so many similarities, when you saw adele going through the loads of washing each day, looking at the hoist, the electricity used to
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access in the house. you have a very similar picture with bailey, your son. a , similar picture with bailey, your son, �* . , . , similar picture with bailey, your son. , , , , son. bailey has complex needs. he is blind, wheelchair-bound. _ son. bailey has complex needs. he is blind, wheelchair-bound. he - son. bailey has complex needs. he is blind, wheelchair-bound. he is - blind, wheelchair—bound. he is doubly incontinent and has growth and hormone deficiencies. we use a lot of equipment in the home to get him around our house. he has a floor left to get him from downstairs to upstairs. we will use a ceiling track hoist to get him from his wheelchair crash into bed, into a shower chair. a mobile hoist downstairs to get him onto furniture and then back into his wheelchair. because he is incontinent, we have the washer going constantly, there dryer going constantly. henge the washer going constantly, there dryer going constantly.— dryer going constantly. have you manaued dryer going constantly. have you managed to _ dryer going constantly. have you managed to work _ dryer going constantly. have you managed to work out _ dryer going constantly. have you managed to work out what - dryer going constantly. have you - managed to work out what difference these costs are actually making? have you done the maths? so far we have got the new statement and -
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have got the new statement and a bill has gone up over £100 a month. they are talking about it going up again in the winter. it has impacted us quite a lot already.— us quite a lot already. these are thins us quite a lot already. these are things you _ us quite a lot already. these are things you cannot _ us quite a lot already. these are things you cannot compromise l us quite a lot already. these are l things you cannot compromise on us quite a lot already. these are - things you cannot compromise on what you are doing, can you? it is not like you can rethink things and try to do it differently.— to do it differently. there are different things _ to do it differently. there are different things you - to do it differently. there are different things you can - to do it differently. there are different things you can turn | to do it differently. there are i different things you can turn up, kettles and things like that in the home. this equipment is constantly on charge. you cannotjust turn that off. full bailey, it is quite a little amount of equipment. other families are using breathing equipment, suction, dialysis machines, oxygen machines. that is equipment they cannot tell. help machines, oxygen machines. that is equipment they cannot tell.- equipment they cannot tell. help is available? we _ equipment they cannot tell. help is available? we have _ equipment they cannot tell. help is available? we have been _ equipment they cannot tell. help is available? we have been told - equipment they cannot tell. help is| available? we have been told about the £150 rebate on council tax which has been put through. the £200 loan over five years for people on lower incomes to help with energy bills. what about families who are dealing
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with children such as bailey and molly? with children such as bailey and moll ? ., w , , molly? contact is extremely disappointing _ molly? contact is extremely disappointing the _ molly? contact is extremely l disappointing the government molly? contact is extremely - disappointing the government has not introduced any measures that recognise the higher energy costs because of disability, because of all the equipment that emma has talked about. they're really does need to be action to recognise those extra energy costs. it need to be action to recognise those extra energy costs.— extra energy costs. it also comes down to hayward _ extra energy costs. it also comes down to hayward targeted - extra energy costs. it also comes down to hayward targeted to - extra energy costs. it also comes i down to hayward targeted to make extra energy costs. it also comes - down to hayward targeted to make it easy enough to access. not going through reams and reams of forms, emma is busy enough and does not need to do that. we emma is busy enough and does not need to do that.— need to do that. we would like the government _ need to do that. we would like the government to _ need to do that. we would like the government to say, _ need to do that. we would like the government to say, these - need to do that. we would like the government to say, these familiesj need to do that. we would like the i government to say, these families do not have to pay back the £200 energy rebate because of their extra costs. we would like the government to increase disability benefits that are there to help with some of the extra costs, in line with inflation, so that means all families would be able to have a little bit of extra
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help. importantly, our charity would like to encourage families to give us a call and ensure they are getting everything they should. sadly, we have lots of calls of contact when families are not claiming everything they should be. once or twice, we have already spoken to bosses of the energy companies on this programme and we put the very blunt question to them, what happens if someone cannot a in the circumstances? —— cannot pay in those circumstances? if the time comes when you cannot pay the bill and it is absolutely necessary for the well—being of a child or someone with a disability in the household, have you had reassurances you will not cut off? categorical that cannot happen. we not cut off? categorical that cannot ha en. ~ ., , ~' not cut off? categorical that cannot ha en. ~ ., , ~ ,, happen. we would definitely like to see ener: happen. we would definitely like to see energy companies _ happen. we would definitely like to see energy companies doing - happen. we would definitely like to see energy companies doing more| happen. we would definitely like to i see energy companies doing more to help families that are really
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worried about that situation. will it always encourage families to give energy companies a cool —— a call. we have not had of any situations where a family has been cut off. that is not something we have come across. it would be life threatening if the family in emma's situation could not afford to pay their energy bills. we would definitely like energy companies to be more reassuring to families, like emma. how does it deal? you are paying £100 more a month now. i don't want to be the voice of doom and gloom that you are more than aware that prices are predicted to rise even further. so are you reassured you are being supported by your energy company? also, how are you going to pay for this? you
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company? also, how are you going to pay for this?— pay for this? you start to think what other— pay for this? you start to think what other bills _ pay for this? you start to think what other bills can _ pay for this? you start to think what other bills can you - pay for this? you start to think what other bills can you cut - pay for this? you start to think i what other bills can you cut back what other bills can you cutback on? where else can you do to save money? families are not in a position to pay the amount of money it is going up to. it is very daunting and a scary time for children with disabilities. tell us what ou children with disabilities. tell us what you will. — children with disabilities. tell us what you will, it _ children with disabilities. tell us what you will, it is _ children with disabilities. tell us what you will, it is private - what you will, it is private business in a way but have you had dialogue with your supplier along the lines of the concerns you are having now?— the lines of the concerns you are havin: now? , . ., ., , having now? they are aware we use ea-uiment having now? they are aware we use equipment because _ having now? they are aware we use equipment because we _ having now? they are aware we use equipment because we are - having now? they are aware we use equipment because we are on - having now? they are aware we use equipment because we are on an i equipment because we are on an emergency list, so if there is ever a power cut we are the first to know. we have not had any correspondence or letters to say anything about any equipment that would be used or anything like that. well, we wish you, bailey and your family very well. we will maybe keep in touch. the bills are going to go up in touch. the bills are going to go up further and you know this very
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well. really interesting talking to you. energy companies are bound by the suppliers code that if you chil and you do say we are in trouble, they are bound by this code to help you and look into ways of helping —— helping to pay your bill. and you can hear more about this on the bbc�*s new "access all" disability podcast with nikki fox on bbc sounds. morning live follows breakfast on bbc one this morning. gethin and kym can tell us what they have in store. good morning. coming up on morning live... it's one of the most frightening symptoms of long covid. over half a million people suffer from breathlessness after having the virus. at the beginning, i used to have numerous — at the beginning, i used to have numerous panic attacks. it is the scariest — numerous panic attacks. it is the scariest thing ever, not being able to breathe —
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scariest thing ever, not being able to breathe is petrifying. today we find out how singing techniques used by the english national opera can help patients recover. and from long covid to fibromyalgia and chickenpox, we've had so many health questions this series, so dr ranj will be going though our inbox to help give you some answers. lots of you lovely people have been in touch _ lots of you lovely people have been in touch i _ lots of you lovely people have been in touch. i have been going through the inbox — in touch. i have been going through the inbox. we will try to get through— the inbox. we will try to get through as many of your queries as possible _ through as many of your queries as possible. he through as many of your queries as ossible. , ., ., , ., , _ possible. he is going to be a busy man! plus, as food prices continue to rise, chef anna haugh's here to help keep costs down in the kitchen. in honour of british beef week, i'll show you how to make the cheapest cuts of meat melt in your mouth with a technique used —— you — — you may —— you may not have heard before. and we've got a double helping of chefs in the studio today. former masterchef contestant turned guestjudge, theo michaels tells us why a "buttery biscuit base challenge" could make contestants crumble in tonight's semi—final. i feel a ifeel a gregg i feel a gregg wallace song ifeel a gregg wallace song coming on at some point! and we're setting mark lane and wayne perrey a special challenge of our own to help support bbc radio 2. and the one show�*s go green initiative. they're teaming up to transform our terrace.
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we are mainly blaming mark. it needs a bit of work. but find out how an old tyre and some pansies could have you growing your own veg in no time. and katya's putting us to work in a strictly fitness that we guarantee will give you that friday feeling! see you at 9:15am. she has done theirs perfectly, this week. , , ., ., she has done theirs perfectly, this week. , ,, ., ~ , she has done theirs perfectly, this week. , ., ~ . week. see you later. always perfect. take care. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. a man has died after being attacked at a busy shopping centre in essex yesterday afternoon. the emergency services were called to lakeside at li.30pm. and the victim was pronounced dead at the scene. it's believed he was attacked by two men. police want any shoppers who may have seen anything to come forward and said they "know this attack will
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cause concern," that they belive it was a "targeted attack," and there's "no risk to the wider public." bus drivers will go on strike next month in a dispute over pay. unite members who are employed by arriva will walk out on may 11 and may 16. unite said the action will involve 1,000 drivers at garages in brixton, croydon, norwood and thornton heath. when laura kennedy founded spanners with manners with her partner siobhan, they didn't expect the surge of women who applied. they now claim to be london's first all—female garage, and want to encourage more women to get into the industry. gem o'reilly went to meet them. representation is really important. if girls don't know that other girls are mechanics, they're never going to walk into a college and give it a go. you don't have to be male to be able to be good at it. i think the stereotype for women not being able to do certain things
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is changing, but there's still quite a long way to go. well, if you're heading out on public transport this morning, this is how tfl services are looking right now. there are minor delays on the metropolitan line this morning, and the central, and the northern line is partially closed, but all good elsewhere. and for all the latest travel news where you are, tune into your bbc local radio station for regular updates throughout the morning. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello. good morning. well, the high pressure that's been keeping us dry is still with us, but it's quite a mixed bank holiday weekend of weather ahead. it will be warmer and brighter at times, but we're also expecting a few spits and spots of rain on saturday night and into sunday. this morning, while we're starting off with temperatures in mid—single figures, there's plenty of cloud out there. some of that cloud will thicken at times, but there should also be some brighter spells here and there as well, especially as we head towards the end
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of the day, a little bit of sunshine here and there, but it's feeling colder than it was yesterday. temperatures won't make it much past 11i degrees celsius for many of us. and we've still got that northeasterly wind blowing as well. overnight tonight, though, the skies will clear and we'll see temperatures drop low enough for a touch of frost on the grass into saturday morning. it's a chilly start to the day, but there should be a lot of sunshine around. bit more fair weather cloud bubbling up on saturday afternoon. highs of 17 degrees celsius, not a bad day at all, but sunday is looking cloudy and damp with a few outbreaks of drizzle. temperatures recover again as we head into bank holiday monday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty.
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mike is here with all your sport news. and rio ferdinand is here with his breakfast mark. —— mug. you're going to talk about manchester united and other things as well, aren't you? but first, of the europa league. both british clubs left in the europa league have to win the second legs of their semifinal ties if they're to have a chance of making the final after they both lost last night to german opponents. rangers will at least have a home match to come, as they look to turn their tie around. they had looked on course for a goaless draw away at rb leipzig. all their resilience was undone five minutes from time by a wonder strike.
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to go there, all they want to do is get a clean sheet to bring back home, and i think they would have needed that. i think it is still all to play for, though. rangers could only muster a single shot on target and will need to find more when they're roared on by their home crowd in the second leg at ibrox next week. west ham's hopes of reaching a first european final since the mid 1970s suffered a blow after just 49 seconds when eintracht frankfurt scored. west ham got back on level terms thanks to michail antonio. but his work was undone when daichi kamada put the germans back in control ahead of next week's second leg away in germany. but of course, no away goals rule any more. but of course, no away goals rule any more-— but of course, no away goals rule an more. , ~ , ., . any more. yes, i was keenly watching that game. — any more. yes, i was keenly watching that game. west _ any more. yes, i was keenly watching that game, west and _ any more. yes, i was keenly watching that game, west and one _ any more. yes, i was keenly watching that game, west and one of- any more. yes, i was keenly watching that game, west and one of my - that game, west and one of my old clubs. i think west ham again, the emotion, all they have done this season, thejourney emotion, all they have done this season, the journey they have been on, it wants to play for in that tie, too. —— a lot to play for. meanwhile, leicester will head to rome next week all square in the semi—finals of the europa conference
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league after the gift of an own goal from jose mourinho's roma meant it finished 1—1 on the night at the king power stadium. manchester united now have to win their last three league games to avoid their worst points tally in the premier league era after drawing 1—1 with chelsea. it was the london side who dominated the first hour, and they struck first through marcos alonso. butjust a couple of minutes later, cristiano ronaldo, who's rescued his side so often this season, popped up with the equaliser. so while chelsea look secure in third place, manchester united stay sixth, and afterwards, their interim boss ralf rangnick said he'll still be involved at united in a consultancy role next season, despite considering an offer to take over as austria's national team boss. it was supposed to be the season when manchester united challenged for the title again with the return of cristiano ronaldo, but instead they seem set to miss out on the top four.
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and it could well be their worst premier league season ever. what has gone wrong? everything you can imagine- — what has gone wrong? everything you can imagine- just _ what has gone wrong? everything you can imagine. just you _ what has gone wrong? everything you can imagine. just you have _ what has gone wrong? everything you can imagine. just you have another. can imagine. just you have another has been talked about is the problem, but without him they would have been in tenth or 15th place. him and dated daguerre are the only players coming out of the season with any type of positivity. —— him and that of the gaia —— david de gea. they want to do at the club so far, they are doing all they can to build the foundations and get things in place of the stockton start forming some sort of come back into the area of where we are used to seeing them, which is challenging for titles. what about the future, a new era, and the much heralded new boss, erik ten hag, will that be enough to turn it around? personally, i don't think a manager has been to be the answer, and it'll have be a collective fight and bringing all the different
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components together and the layers around management, recruitment especially. that is going to be sorted out, but the culture of the football club has to be improved and changed. the football club has to be improved and chanced. . , . football club has to be improved and chanced. ., , ., ., , _ changed. the fans are unhappy. it was the matchwinner _ changed. the fans are unhappy. it was the matchwinner did - changed. the fans are unhappy. it was the matchwinner did not - changed. the fans are unhappy. it| was the matchwinner did not come changed. the fans are unhappy. it i was the matchwinner did not come in until the 17th minute, protesting the glaze is' involvement, the ownership, how much does it matter to the players when the fans are that unhappy?— to the players when the fans are that unhappy? to the players when the fans are that unha- ? ., ,., ., that unhappy? from the point of view of a player. — that unhappy? from the point of view of a player. you're — that unhappy? from the point of view of a player, you're just _ that unhappy? from the point of view of a player, you're just there - that unhappy? from the point of view of a player, you're just there to i of a player, you're just there to play football, you do not get involved in the politics behind the scenes, you take it in but you are paid to play football, and as a player, you cannot really have any impact in that area. you're just there to come in and train, you want to do the best you can, three points on the saturday and challenge. 50 it on the saturday and challenge. so it doesnt on the saturday and challenge. so it doesn't affect _ on the saturday and challenge. so it doesn't affect their _ on the saturday and challenge. so it doesn't affect their mood when they know the fans are so unhappy, we have empty parts of the stands for the first quarter of an hour? h0. the first quarter of an hour? no, because if— the first quarter of an hour? no, because if you — the first quarter of an hour? no, because if you said _ the first quarter of an hour? llfr, because if you said to me did you hear the fans singing during the
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game, if i am in the zone, i don't... game, ifi am in the zone, i don't-u— game, ifi am in the zone, i don't... but if you are being cheered _ don't... but if you are being cheered for, _ don't... but if you are being cheered for, surely - don't... but if you are being cheered for, surely you i don't... but if you are being| cheered for, surely you hear don't... but if you are being i cheered for, surely you hear that? don't... but if you are being - cheered for, surely you hear that? i hear the volume, but i do not hear specifics. as a professional you have to drown out all the noise to do your job, have to drown out all the noise to do yourjob, you understand and appreciate the fans not to make but as a player, please get that sorted outside, and there are people paid to do that within the club. you know ou said a to do that within the club. you know you said a moment _ to do that within the club. you know you said a moment ago, _ to do that within the club. you know you said a moment ago, it - to do that within the club. you know you said a moment ago, it is - to do that within the club. you know you said a moment ago, it is not i you said a moment ago, it is not just bringing in a new manager, that is in itself is not a solution, but then what little i know about football, people say look atjurgen klopp, and people say it is all about the manager, the guy has brought amazing energy and talent and everything has kind of come through him. and everything has kind of come through him-— and everything has kind of come through him. yes, but behind him there are people _ through him. yes, but behind him there are people doing _ through him. yes, but behind him there are people doing fabulous i there are people doing fabulous work, they have done fabulous work at the beginning, michael edwards etc, there are people, a good nucleus of people, that have facilitated behind the scenes. yes, jurgen klopp is the front and centre
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of it, and he has to take it on, but without those people behind, then... so you're saying there's a kind of caught man united who are more of a problem? it goes beyond what we see? —— a core at man united? it has gone far beyond football, the season, some of the abuse end of the manchester united players online. —— aimed at the manchester united players. like harry maguire, horrendous threats, including a bomb threat? that is disgraceful, that shouldn't be happening. social media plays a big role now, but they are negative elements that come with that. people should not have to deal with the skin of comments and threats that are being spat out there. what skin of comments and threats that are being spat out there. what can be done? i — are being spat out there. what can be done? i know— are being spat out there. what can be done? i know you _ are being spat out there. what can be done? i know you have - are being spat out there. what can be done? i know you have got i are being spat out there. what can be done? i know you have got a i are being spat out there. what can i be done? i know you have got a new concept that could help to challenge the issue. , .,
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concept that could help to challenge the issue. , . , the issue. yes, i met a very inspiring — the issue. yes, i met a very inspiring lady _ the issue. yes, i met a very inspiring lady behind i the issue. yes, i met a very inspiring lady behind a i the issue. yes, i met a very inspiring lady behind a new| the issue. yes, i met a very i inspiring lady behind a new app which is no hate on there, which is a real problem for everyone on social media. but we are in an economic crisis, climate is a problem, the environment, and this helps all those areas, just by doing one thing. she has read engineered the whole system, you download the 3pp, y°u the whole system, you download the app, you can get paid for watching an advert for two minutes a day. so ou an advert for two minutes a day. so you have got the advert, that pays the advertising pays for a lot of it, and it gives back through carbon offsetting, and a new challenge as well. it is small at the moment, and when you say it has no hate, isn't it easy to have no hate on something so small, because it can be monitored? one of the biggest problems levied against all social media companies at the moment as you're not doing enough to regulate
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hateful posts, certain words are not being picked up, if this gets bigger, how can it guarantee it will stay? bigger, how can it guarantee it will sta ? �* , bigger, how can it guarantee it will sta? , . ., stay? because technology can do that. the stay? because technology can do that- they say — stay? because technology can do that. they say that _ stay? because technology can do that. they say that the _ stay? because technology can do | that. they say that the algorithms are not a choice. _ that. they say that the algorithms are not a choice. don't _ that. they say that the algorithms are not a choice. don't be - that. they say that the algorithms are not a choice. don't be filled i that. they say that the algorithms| are not a choice. don't be filled by that, it is a _ are not a choice. don't be filled by that, it is a choice. _ are not a choice. don't be filled by that, it is a choice. when - are not a choice. don't be filled by that, it is a choice. when we're i that, it is a choice. when we're talking about making sure that copyright issues not infringed upon, people can work quickly, the algorithms and technology move very quickly, but obviously hate speech, conspiracy theories, that facilitates money on social media platforms. ll facilitates money on social media latforms. . , . ~ ., facilitates money on social media latforms. ., platforms. it was back to football and the players. _ platforms. it was back to football and the players, mike _ platforms. it was back to football and the players, mike was i platforms. it was back to football and the players, mike was saying about the heat that is out there, you have been there, albeit kind of earlier in the department of social media, but do you have direct dealings with players who say they are really struggling, what do you say to them? ll are really struggling, what do you say to them?—
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are really struggling, what do you say to them? it is a huge problem, es i say to them? it is a huge problem, yes i have — say to them? it is a huge problem, yes i have had _ say to them? it is a huge problem, yes i have had conversations i say to them? it is a huge problem, yes i have had conversations with i yes i have had conversations with players, and you have to understand players, and you have to understand players come off the pitch nowadays, and one of the first things they do is put there phone on and look. sometimes you have to say no and stay away from it, that is why i feel that the social media platforms, government legislation even, have to play a bigger role, thatis even, have to play a bigger role, that is where weare8, that is why i'm so behind it, because children, i'm so behind it, because children, i am worried about my children to certain social media platforms, and i cannot govern that 21i hours a day. lovely having you on the sofa. l lovely having you on the sofa. i enjoy being here. 0h, - lovely having you on the sofa. i enjoy being here. oh, thank- lovely having you on the sofa. i | enjoy being here. oh, thank you lovely having you on the sofa. i i enjoy being here. oh, thank you so much. enjoy being here. oh, thank you so much- mike. _ enjoy being here. oh, thank you so much. mike, see— enjoy being here. oh, thank you so much. mike, see you _ enjoy being here. oh, thank you so much. mike, see you tomorrow. i work on a new super sewer beneath the river thames, which will support london's sewage network, is a step closer
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to finishing. ben's in the tunnel for us to find out more. it looks like something from outer space, doesn't it, ben? it doesn't look like a movie set, but this is a very real place, we are an extraordinary location to be speaking live from this morning. this is the thames tideway tunnel, one of the biggest underground tunnels anywhere in the world, the biggest revamp of london's solar system since victorian times, with one simple aim, to cut the amount of sewage going into the river. —— london's sewar system. the team have —— will finish the tunnelling stage of the work to date, they have come a long way, to be honest some of me this morning. let me talk you through some of the mind—boggling
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numbers. right now, i'm 60 metres underground, but at its deepest point, this tunnel reaches depths of 65 metres. at its widest point, just up there, it is the width of three london double decker buses, more than seven metres. and it stretches right across london for more than 15 miles from east to west, roughly following the route of the river. so why is it needed? i've been taking a look, and just a quick warning, some of these pictures may put you off your breakfast. london's sewers are a victorian marvel, built over 150 years ago by
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the engineerjoseph bazalgette when two million people lived in london. now it is coping with a larger population, 9 million, and more people means more waste. every time you flush or run water, the water runs into a series of pipes more than nine miles long. when the drains flood, raw sewage spills directly into river thames. it means 39 million tonnes of raw sewage flow into the river every year. the super sewer will divert as much as 95% of the spill directly to a treatment plant, helping to keep the river clean. and after today, london's super sewer will be one step closer to completion. under construction since 2016, the thames tideway will ease the pressure on the capital's ageing sewer network. the tunnel will be operational in 2025, delayed a year by covid lockdowns and social distancing. it does not come cheap, londoners will face higher bills to meet the costs, but should gain clearer pipes and a cleaner river.
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with me is the chairman of tideway behind this whole project, why is this such a big day? iirate behind this whole pro'ect, why is this such a big day?_ this such a big day? we have finished the _ this such a big day? we have finished the tunnelling, i this such a big day? we have finished the tunnelling, we i this such a big day? we have - finished the tunnelling, we started just iii months ago, and here we are at the centre. just 14 months ago, and here we are at the centre-— at the centre. when the londoners feel the benefit _ at the centre. when the londoners feel the benefit of— at the centre. when the londoners feel the benefit of all— at the centre. when the londoners feel the benefit of all we _ at the centre. when the londoners feel the benefit of all we are - feel the benefit of all we are showing them? it’ll feel the benefit of all we are showing them?— feel the benefit of all we are showing them? it'll take a little while because _ showing them? it'll take a little while because we _ showing them? it'll take a little while because we are _ showing them? it'll take a little while because we are still - showing them? it'll take a littlej while because we are still finish off the tunnel, this is the tunnelling finished, not everything completed on the job. tunnelling finished, not everything completed on thejob. we tunnelling finished, not everything completed on the job. we still have to connect ourselves to the sewer network, and we then have to make all the systems that bring you sewage down into here work, so it'll be a few years yet, but it will not be a few years yet, but it will not be long once be a few years yet, but it will not belong once those connections are done, we will be seeing the fish coming back to the river, the river being much safer.—
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being much safer. good news for --eole being much safer. good news for peeple who _ being much safer. good news for people who want _ being much safer. good news for people who want to _ being much safer. good news for people who want to enjoy - being much safer. good news for people who want to enjoy the - being much safer. good news for. people who want to enjoy the river, paddle boarding or something like that, they might worry about falling in at the moment, the state of the water, but there will be people watching this thinking, this is going to cost london is money, an extra 20 or £25 on top of the bill on top of all the other cost of living pressures, what do you say to those who say recently cannot afford the extra? the those who say recently cannot afford the extra? ., ., the extra? the truth of the matter is ou the extra? the truth of the matter is you cannot _ the extra? the truth of the matter is you cannot afford _ the extra? the truth of the matter is you cannot afford in _ the extra? the truth of the matter is you cannot afford in an - is you cannot afford in an environmental matter not to afford it. it is simplistic to have an unhealthy river running through the heart of our capital city. the project is notjust for the sake of vanity, this is for londoners. londoners need this river. 20 to £25 may sound a lot on a bill every year, but basically, bearing in mind the huge scale of this project, it is almost amazing that following particularly pandemic that we have managed to stay within another�*s initial budget estimates, we have stayed inside them.— initial budget estimates, we have stayed inside them. thank you for 'oinin: us
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stayed inside them. thank you for joining us down — stayed inside them. thank you for joining us down here, _ stayed inside them. thank you for joining us down here, we - stayed inside them. thank you for joining us down here, we are - joining us down here, we are broadcasting 60 metres below the river thames, so thank you very much indeed. and we have to say that this is not a short—term project by any means, this is designed to last for the next 120 years, so that is a lot of flushing well into the future. i have so many questions, my first is, when the pipe is open, how high does the sewage filled the pipe? how much is the pipe filled? in terms of a level, i think it depends on a lot of factors, how much rainwater that is, because that is a lot of the reason for why we get overspill into the river thames. it will take about 95% of the overspill that currently doesn't thames, and take it straight to a treatment plan. so the level would vary, but this is designed to deal with most of what currently gets pumped into the river. and
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final question, can you walk into the distance for us? this worked well for us before, and it gives an idea of the scale. so if you can walk around the u bend, as it were. i will keep going until you cannot hear me any more. it kind of feels you need to place on a plane music as i walk off into the distance, allegedly at the end of the soap operas. and the echo, it is so impressive, it is such an impressive scale, the all works, they even have a small railway down here as part of all the construction, it is like a small village down here. i think we willjust small village down here. i think we will just leave small village down here. i think we willjust leave him to talk to himself, shall we? he isjust off talking down the tunnel, keep going, enjoy it. just keep saying in his ear, three minutes to go. but it is fascinating, one of the highlights
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of the morning. he's known for making documentaries on gangs and armed police, but during the pandemic, the actor and tv presenter ross kemp turned his hand to celebrating the volunteers doing their bit for the community. now he's asking you to do the same on thank you day, and say "cheers for volunteers" on the queen's jubilee weekend. we'll speak to ross injust a moment, but first, let's remind ourselves of some of the inspiring people he met back in 2020. the parent to deliver 400 bags of vegetables to the hospital every week, and i am going to help out. 0k, week, and i am going to help out. ok, i week, and i am going to help out. 0k, iwill week, and i am going to help out. ok, i will do that. week, and i am going to help out. ok, i will do that.— 0k, iwill do that. mainly it is very healthy. _ ok, iwill do that. mainly it is very healthy, nutritional- ok, i will do that. mainly it is| very healthy, nutritional stuff,
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starts off with vegetables at that end, there are also some sweets that go in, as we move further, salad items, and as we get to the end of the conveyor belt, it is the fruit and pasta and a very nice bottle of olive oil. that is inspiring just to see that amount of food that has all been paid for by donations from the public. been paid for by donations from the ublic. �* , been paid for by donations from the ublic. h u, . been paid for by donations from the ublic. �* , u, . , been paid for by donations from the ublic. �*, . , public. let's catch up with ross now. and john aylward, who's a volunteer coordinator with kensington and chelsea community companions service. everyone started hunting a bit more about little things that can make a big difference during the pandemic.
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it was amazing, 12.4 million people step forward to help other people in their communities, whether it was helping them to roll—out of the vaccines, or knocking on a neighbour's door to make sure they were 0k. and i think that is something that should be celebrated, obviously i will be raising a glass to her majesty the queen on the 5th ofjune because she is probably our greatest volunteer, she has been serving us for 70 years. but we also want people to raise a glass of some of the unsung heroes that have helped over the last two years and say cheers to volunteers.— say cheers to volunteers. john, of the companion — say cheers to volunteers. john, of the companion service _ say cheers to volunteers. john, of the companion service that - say cheers to volunteers. john, of the companion service that you i the companion service that you operate, tell us about that. i coordinate 13 volunteers and beavers of the _ coordinate 13 volunteers and beavers of the elderly, people with no friends, — of the elderly, people with no friends, who have no family, and there _ friends, who have no family, and there are — friends, who have no family, and there are quite a lot of them, and we also _ there are quite a lot of them, and we also visit — there are quite a lot of them, and we also visit the geriatric ward at
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the kensington and chelsea hospital, all of this— the kensington and chelsea hospital, all of this we did until the pandemic stopped us, we are trying to start _ pandemic stopped us, we are trying to start that again. i also volunteer at the city cemetery for the royal— volunteer at the city cemetery for the royal voluntary service have the cafe, _ the royal voluntary service have the cafe, that _ the royal voluntary service have the cafe, that is— the royal voluntary service have the cafe, that is where the elephant man and sir— cafe, that is where the elephant man and sir bobby moore are buried. i also paint— and sir bobby moore are buried. i also paint a — and sir bobby moore are buried. i also paint a bit. you and sir bobby moore are buried. i also paint a bit.— also paint a bit. you sound like a very busy — also paint a bit. you sound like a very busy person- _ also paint a bit. you sound like a very busy person. i _ also paint a bit. you sound like a very busy person. i suppose - also paint a bit. you sound like a very busy person. i suppose for. very busy person. i suppose for anyone who is looking at this and seeing how volunteers are being championed, what do you get out of it? ~ ., �* championed, what do you get out of it? . ., �* ., championed, what do you get out of it? ~ ., �* ., ., it? well, we don't do it for me thanks, it? well, we don't do it for me thanks. we — it? well, we don't do it for me thanks, we do _ it? well, we don't do it for me thanks, we do it _ it? well, we don't do it for me thanks, we do it because - it? well, we don't do it for me thanks, we do it because it - it? well, we don't do it for me - thanks, we do it because it makes us feel good _ thanks, we do it because it makes us feel good and other people feel good _ feel good and other people feel good i— feel good and other people feel good. i have been very fortunate in life, good. i have been very fortunate in life. that _ good. i have been very fortunate in life. that is — good. i have been very fortunate in life, that is on the right to give something back. | life, that is on the right to give something back.— something back. i think that is the oint something back. i think that is the point about _ something back. i think that is the point about this, _ something back. i think that is the point about this, it _ something back. i think that is the point about this, it is _ something back. i think that is the point about this, it is a _ something back. i think that is the point about this, it is a very - point about this, it is a very british thing to be embarrassed about being thanks, so this is an opportunity for us who have been helped over the last two years to say a thank you, a big thank you,
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and raise a glass and say cheers, whether it is a mug of tea or a glass of finest red or a pint of ale, raise a glass and say cheers to volunteers on the 5th ofjune. ross, when we last _ volunteers on the 5th ofjune. ross, when we last spoke _ volunteers on the 5th ofjune. ross, when we last spoke to _ volunteers on the 5th ofjune. ross, when we last spoke to you, - volunteers on the 5th ofjune. ross, when we last spoke to you, we - volunteers on the 5th ofjune. ross, j when we last spoke to you, we were talking about breaking records when it comes to this, talk to me a little bit more about the plans now. i miss that, sorry.— i miss that, sorry. when we spoke last, we i miss that, sorry. when we spoke last. we were _ i miss that, sorry. when we spoke last, we were talking _ i miss that, sorry. when we spoke last, we were talking about - i miss that, sorry. when we spoke last, we were talking about plansl i miss that, sorry. when we spoke i last, we were talking about plans to break a british record by building the country's biggest ever thank you party. the country's biggest ever thank you .a . ., the country's biggest ever thank you party. yeah. so we are hoping to get over 10 million _ party. yeah. so we are hoping to get over10 million people _ party. yeah. so we are hoping to get over 10 million people to _ party. yeah. so we are hoping to get over 10 million people to come - party. yeah. so we are hoping to get over 10 million people to come out l over 10 million people to come out and celebrate our volunteers on the fifth, and let's break a record. if you mix it in with what the queen has done for us over the last 70 years, and if you think about what we have been through, just over the last two years, i think it is a
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great opportunity to bring the greatest monarch, celebrate her reign, but also celebrate some of the sacrifices made by members of the sacrifices made by members of the public for other members of the public. also we have to —— it doesn't have to be a great big organisation, we should thank the nhs of course, but i'm good to think a guy called jeff cooper who looks after my mum and dad than i could not get up to norfolk to do the lockdown. we are honestly trying to get over 10 million people out to celebrate, whether it is a barbecue, a picnic, whether it is a street party, get out on the streets, say thank you to the people that have helped in your community, but also helped in your community, but also help bring our community together, because by golly we need a party after the last two years. i because by golly we need a party after the last two years.- after the last two years. i was listenin: after the last two years. i was listening to — after the last two years. i was listening to what _ after the last two years. i was listening to what john - after the last two years. i was listening to what john said - after the last two years. i was listening to what john said a l listening to whatjohn said a moment ago, i think we all kind of think because of social media and the content you can have, that maybe there are not people who are really lonely, who don't have friends or
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family, john has said himself, the currency people who do not see anyone, and that is just a reality check, isn't it? plenty of people like that. ~ , ., ~' like that. absolutely, and i think, ou like that. absolutely, and i think, you know. _ like that. absolutely, and i think, you know. do _ like that. absolutely, and i think, you know, do not _ like that. absolutely, and i think, you know, do not be _ like that. absolutely, and i think, you know, do not be scared - like that. absolutely, and i think, you know, do not be scared or . like that. absolutely, and i think, i you know, do not be scared or afraid of knocking on someone's door. if you are having a party in that street, they may not want to come, but at least offer them the opportunity, and it may mean so much. we have not been able to quantify the amount of mental health issues that have been created because of the pandemic. it really is the little things that can sometimes have the biggest impact on individuals. so please, if you are having a party, and you know somebody in your streets that hasn't been out that often, please knock on their door and ask them. they can only say no, but at least you have tried. , ., , .,, ., . tried. john, when people watch items like this on bbc— tried. john, when people watch items like this on bbc breakfast, _ tried. john, when people watch items like this on bbc breakfast, the - like this on bbc breakfast, the often french, i would like to do
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that or, could i do that? but they perhaps don't have the confidence. it is the confidence of approaching and organisation and offering to volunteer but not doing knowing what you have to offer. what would you say to somebody? because often it is the simplest things that they can offer. ,, , , ., , , the simplest things that they can offer. ,, , , ., ,, ., offer. surely there is a website for the r0 al offer. surely there is a website for the royal voluntary _ offer. surely there is a website for the royal voluntary service, - offer. surely there is a website for the royalvoluntary service, all- the royal voluntary service, all information is there, they are very good _ information is there, they are very good at _ information is there, they are very good at assisting people to learn, a series— good at assisting people to learn, a series of— good at assisting people to learn, a series of training we have to go through— series of training we have to go through for being safe and secure, health— through for being safe and secure, health and — through for being safe and secure, health and safety and so on, and i have _ health and safety and so on, and i have really— health and safety and so on, and i have really recommend that everybody -ive have really recommend that everybody give it _ have really recommend that everybody give it a _ have really recommend that everybody give it a try. _ have really recommend that everybody give it a try, an hour or two a week and it— give it a try, an hour or two a week and it helps— give it a try, an hour or two a week and it helps so much.— give it a try, an hour or two a week and it helps so much. yes, the rds are always — and it helps so much. yes, the rds are always looking _ and it helps so much. yes, the rds are always looking for— and it helps so much. yes, the rds are always looking for volunteers, l are always looking for volunteers, we have got a hike in the price of living, a war going on in europe —— de rvs. the demand is not going
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away, we don't know what is happening with the pandemic, so if you want to volunteer, just get in contact with the rvs. you want to volunteer, 'ust get in contact with the rvs._ you want to volunteer, 'ust get in contact with the rvs. lovely garden ou are contact with the rvs. lovely garden you are in- — contact with the rvs. lovely garden you are in- nice _ contact with the rvs. lovely garden you are in. nice talking _ contact with the rvs. lovely garden you are in. nice talking to _ contact with the rvs. lovely garden you are in. nice talking to both - contact with the rvs. lovely garden you are in. nice talking to both of. you are in. nice talking to both of you are in. nice talking to both of you this morning, and keep up the good work. thank you very much. you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8.59.
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this is bbc news. i'm rebecca jones with the latest headlines. reports that two british volunteers providing aid in ukraine have been captured by russian forces. russian missiles blast ukriane's capital kyiv, as the un secretary general visits the city. a new hormone replacement therapy tsar is appointed as more than a million women are affected by supply issues. musicians stuggle with venues taking commission on merchandise stands — reports suggest some are taking 25% or more. former tennis star boris becker could be jailed later today as he faces bankruptcy sentencing.

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