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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  May 19, 2022 7:00pm-8:02pm BST

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telehealth. this is outside source. a russian soldier charged with milder in the first war crimes trial in ukraine asked to be forgetting. the 21—year—old commander shot a ukrainian man in the early days of the war and today he faced the victims laid out in court. a married couple, hundreds more ukrainian soldiers surrendered the city is now under control of russian forces. parties in the uk closed their investigation into party gate with no further fines issue for the prime minister. he no further fines issue for the prime minister. . , ,., ., minister. he has paid a fixed enal minister. he has paid a fixed penalty notice _ minister. he has paid a fixed penalty notice that _ minister. he has paid a fixed penalty notice that he - minister. he has paid a fixed l penalty notice that he receives minister. he has paid a fixed - penalty notice that he receives some time ago. they concluded their investigations. {iii
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time ago. they concluded their investigations.— time ago. they concluded their investiuations. , , ., investigations. of course he should resin. investigations. of course he should resign- ease _ investigations. of course he should resign. ease responsible _ investigations. of course he should resign. ease responsible for - investigations. of course he should resign. ease responsible for the . resign. ease responsible for the culture. we'll be looking at the outbreak of monkeypox. an infectious disease with more cases found in europe and north america. we start inthe ukrainian capital kyiv, where the first trial of a russian soldier accused of war crimes has resumed. early on thursday, the victim has my wife confronted the russian soldier in court. she asked him what he felt when he cold her husband. he said he didn't want to fire the fatal shots
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but was threatened by another soldier. here is a little of that exchange. please tell me, do you repent of the cloud you have committed? yes, iadmit repent of the cloud you have committed? yes, i admit cool. repent of the cloud you have committed? yes, iadmit cool. i apologise for everything i have done. our chief international correspondent lyse doucet is in kyiv. there have been two days of dramatic testimony in a court in kyiv. the 21—year—old from russia, vadim shishimarin, admitting his cool in cooling a 62—year—old, saying to the court that he opened fire after his commander ordered him to do so. when he was confronted with the victim's widow in a court weather he repented, not only did he say he was guilty, he apologised to the widow.
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he struck notjust a sad figure in the court, younger than his 21 years. he also looked very lonely. the bbc spoke to his lawyer, who said no russian official has been in touch with him. two witnesses expected to be cold to take a bit in the car at the time of the cooling, it turns out they are already back in russia as part of an exchange of prisoners. this was not the only case in the course he in ukraine. it is quite unusual in a warfor war crimes trials to take place even as the war grinds on, but ukraine is trying to prove it can wind this war against russia notjust on the battlefield, but also by a high standard ofjustice in the course. so ukraine and the world are
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watching. also in ukraine, russia says around 900 more fighters from the besieged steelworks in mariupol have surrendered in the past 2a hours. the international committee of the red cross says it's registered hundreds of them as prisoners of war. these pictures were released by the russian ministry of defence and appear to show them leaving the site. the icrc says the operation to track fighters leaving the plant, including around 80 who are wounded, began on tuesday and is ongoing. joe inwood is in lviv with the latest. these reports will take the total number who have surrendered and left the azovstal steelworks to 1730, we understand about 80 of those are severely wounded and have been evacuated, but the rest have been taken to detention facilities in the their dense peoples republic. what happens to dump next? we have had the base and the russian parliament that some of them should not be treated as prisoners of war, but as
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war criminals. these are people that the russians they accused of being nazis, something which the ukrainians tonight and has been widely discredited. but it does seem not all of them potential it will be treated according to the geneva conventions. that is going to pose difficult questions for anyone who remains inside. we don't really have confirmed numbers of this, but it has been said that the leaders of the azov battalion are yet to give themselves up. but we understand the united nations and red cross have been monitoring their treatment. they say they are documenting the locations of these people. but what happens to them, weather they are given over in some sort of prisoner exchange, or weather you are put on trial for exchange, or weather you are put on trialfor some exchange, or weather you are put on trial for some charges as yet unknowing, is going to be a really important question, the answer is of which we will find out in the coming days, weeks and months even.
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in the region of kharkiv, ukrainian forces have pushed russian troops all the way back to the border with russia. they say they have liberated all the villages in the region. 0ur correspondent 0lga malchevska is in kharkhiv with the latest on the situation there. this city is quite big. you probably know that it is the second biggest city in ukraine, so the situation might be different in different parts of khaki. we are right now in the centre of the city. today we woke up to the sound of blasts, it was quite uncomfortable to be here. later on we found out it was a shilling around 4am. later on we found out that the ukrainian military reported they hit a russian plane above kharkiv, but it happened around 1am. there are speculations it might be the response of the russian army but it is very difficult to verify that information in the conditions of war. basically,
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i canjust in the conditions of war. basically, i can just tell what we see around. but in the other parts of kharkiv, we see that people are starting to claim their lives back. some shops are open, some cafe started to open as well. there is a huge shortage of staff because many people went away from the city and just a few of them came back. but also we see that public transport also starts to get back, we saw buses running. but still it is quite empty and those sounds of shelling can be constantly her, especially if you go to northern parts of the city. in the morning, we could hear the shelling in the northern part of the city almost every two hours. finland and sweden submitted their official bid
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for membership to nato as a direct consequence of russia's invasion of ukraine. it is a historic move and end both countries' policies of non—alignment. president biden says the pair meet every requirement, and then some. here he is speaking earlier. ., , earlier. the bottom line is quite sim - le earlier. the bottom line is quite simple and _ earlier. the bottom line is quite simple and straightforward- - earlier. the bottom line is quite - simple and straightforward- finland simple and straightforward— finland and sweden make nato stronger. they are strong, strong democracies. a strong united nato is the foundation of america's security. next let's talk about global food supplies, because the war in ukraine is having a huge impact on these. russia and ukraine produce around 30% of the world's wheat. the conflict is disrupting that production. the united nations is warning it could lead to food shortages for tens of millions of people around the world. here's the un secretary general,
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antonio guterres. eddie threatens to tip tens of millions of people over the edge. malnutrition, mass hunger and famine that could last for years. russia must permit the safe export of ukraine grain stores. we know by itself they will not be enough to solve the problem. motion fertiliser must have unrestricted access to world markets without direct impediments. the un says around 20 million tonnes of grain are currently stuck in ukraine from the previous harvest which, if released, could ease pressure on global markets. 0ur correspondent caroline davies is in the ukrainian port city of 0desa, where some of that grain is currently stored. ukraine's wheat helps to feed the world. but while most of its ports remain closed, much of it is beyond
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the world's reach. 0ver remain closed, much of it is beyond the world's reach. over 300 tonnes of grenfell this warehouse, but because of issues transporting it out of the country, no one wants to buy it. translation: i buy it. translation: ., �* ~ ., ., translation: i don't know who in the world to ask for _ translation: i don't know who in the world to ask for help. _ translation: i don't know who in the world to ask for help. we _ translation: i don't know who in the world to ask for help. we would - translation: i don't know who in the world to ask for help. we would like i world to ask for help. we would like to sell this grain at any price, as long as the people don't go hungry. you need to bank your fist on the table, opening at the ukrainian ports, stop the russian invasion and take out this grain. h0??? ports, stop the russian invasion and take out this grain.— take out this grain. how do you feel that there are _ take out this grain. how do you feel that there are many _ take out this grain. how do you feel that there are many people - take out this grain. how do you feel that there are many people around | that there are many people around the world's that there are many people around the worlds that would be desperate for this crop? it is the world's that would be desperate for this crap?— for this crop? it is a feeling of desair. for this crop? it is a feeling of despair- i'm _ for this crop? it is a feeling of despair. i'm talking _ for this crop? it is a feeling of despair. i'm talking now- for this crop? it is a feeling of despair. i'm talking now with | for this crop? it is a feeling of- despair. i'm talking now with tears in my eyes. it is hard to see. his problems _ in my eyes. it is hard to see. his problems are — in my eyes. it is hard to see. his problems are faced by farmers across the country. this crop is due to be harvested injust the country. this crop is due to be harvested in just over a the country. this crop is due to be harvested injust over a month's time, but the pharmacy here still have no idea where they are going to
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store it or how they are going to get out of the country. —— the farmers here. some goods can be taken out by road, or by rail, but not in the same quantities as it used to be transported by sea. the sea has also been mined, which could take months to donate. andre is the owner of one of the largest ports in ukraine. we owner of one of the largest ports in ukraine. ~ . ., j~:: , ,, ., ukraine. we have about 80 ships that are basically — ukraine. we have about 80 ships that are basically ghost _ ukraine. we have about 80 ships that are basically ghost ships _ ukraine. we have about 80 ships that are basically ghost ships in _ ukraine. we have about 80 ships that are basically ghost ships in ukraine i are basically ghost ships in ukraine right now. the crews have left them, some are full, some are empty, they are inside or outside the ports. they are standing and idle. for the cruise to combat, companies have to get clearance from insurance companies, and these insurance companies, and these insurance companies are obviously not allow this to happen because the sea is full of mines.— this to happen because the sea is full of mines. ., ., ., , ., ~' full of mines. how long do you think it will be before _ full of mines. how long do you think it will be before you _ full of mines. how long do you think it will be before you can _ full of mines. how long do you think it will be before you can reopen - it will be before you can reopen newport again? we it will be before you can reopen newport again?— it will be before you can reopen newport again? it will be before you can reopen newort auain? . ., ., . newport again? we have no idea when we can reopen — newport again? we have no idea when we can reopen newport. _ newport again? we have no idea when we can reopen newport. we _ newport again? we have no idea when
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we can reopen newport. we are - newport again? we have no idea when we can reopen newport. we are facing| we can reopen newport. we are facing a disaster in the next few weeks when the new crop this year and the old crop is not exported.— old crop is not exported. russia said sanctions _ old crop is not exported. russia said sanctions on _ old crop is not exported. russia said sanctions on it _ old crop is not exported. russia said sanctions on it would - old crop is not exported. russia said sanctions on it would need | old crop is not exported. russia l said sanctions on it would need to be looked at if the world wants to solve the crisis was up whilst many in the westfield russia is holding safe passage through the sea at hostage, ukraine's grain could rot while other staff. michael dunford, the world food programme's regional director for eastern africa, is in nairobi in kenya. give us an example of how reliant countries like kenya are on russian and ukrainian grain. we countries like kenya are on russian and ukrainian grain.— countries like kenya are on russian and ukrainian grain. we estimate in this reuion and ukrainian grain. we estimate in this region about _ and ukrainian grain. we estimate in this region about 3096 _ and ukrainian grain. we estimate in this region about 3096 of _ and ukrainian grain. we estimate in this region about 3096 of all - and ukrainian grain. we estimate in this region about 3096 of all the - this region about 30% of all the cereals that are imported are coming from russia and from ukraine. what we need at this moment, as reported in your earlier story, the food to
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start to move, now supports to start to move the grain through the black sea and down into the horn of africa. ~ ~ ., ., , , , africa. when antonio guterres is sa in: , africa. when antonio guterres is sa inc, at africa. when antonio guterres is saying. at the — africa. when antonio guterres is saying, at the moment, - africa. when antonio guterres is saying, at the moment, there i africa. when antonio guterres is saying, at the moment, there is| africa. when antonio guterres is i saying, at the moment, there is the possibility that tens of will be affected. in the region you represent, east africa, can you put a sum on the number of people that could potentially be affected? currently the world food programme estimates there are 82 million people who are acutely food insecure, acutely hungry. this is an increase of 30 million people in just the last 12 months. we have a drought currently in ethiopia, somalia and kenya. upwards of 15 million people currently affected. we have had three failed rainy seasons, and we estimate the current rains will also underperform. the number of people could increase by
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“p number of people could increase by up to 20 million people, this includes over 7 million children, many who are on the brink of death. is there is risk of famine in the region? is there is risk of famine in the reuion? ~ , ,., is there is risk of famine in the reuion? �* , ,., region? absolutely there is a risk of famine- _ region? absolutely there is a risk offamine- if— region? absolutely there is a risk of famine. if the _ region? absolutely there is a risk of famine. if the world _ region? absolutely there is a risk of famine. if the world food i of famine. if the world food programme and other humanitarian actors are unable to scale up now, people will die. unfortunately, they could die on a very large scale. and could die on a very large scale. and tony gutierrez _ could die on a very large scale. and tony gutierrez saying that the world needs to act now. what kind of support does your programme need while we wait to see what happens with that grain that is stuck? first and foremost. _ with that grain that is stuck? first and foremost, we _ with that grain that is stuck? f “st and foremost, we need money. we have calculated that we need for the drought response allowing almost $1 billion between now and at the end of the year. if we had that money, we would be able to meet the majority needs of the population. beyond that, in the next six months,
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across the region where wfp is supporting almost a0 million people, we need over $2 billion. with that money, we can save lives, we can make a real difference. but without it, we simply will not be able to meet the requirements of the populations. fin meet the requirements of the pepulations-— meet the requirements of the --oulations. ., ., ., ,, , ., populations. on that note, thank you ve much populations. on that note, thank you very much for— populations. on that note, thank you very much forjust — populations. on that note, thank you very much forjust talking _ populations. on that note, thank you very much forjust talking us - very much forjust talking us through the issues that you are facing. borisjohnson will face no further action from police over partygate. the metropolitan police announced it's issued 126 fixed penalty notices in its investigation into gatherings at downing street when covid restrictions were in force. it says that investigation is now complete.
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the police found events held on each of the eight dates it looked into involved a criminal offence. they include the prime minister's own birthday party back injune 2020. george eustice is a minister in borisjohnson's cabinet. obviously, there's been a very thorough investigation, and rightly so. because of course those of us who set rules get additional scrutiny, that's always understood. some of these parties should not have happened, and the prime minister has acknowledged that and apologise for that. he paid a fixed penalty for the one event he was at, and others will pay theirs as well. there were that, we acknowledge the anger that some people will feel, and people should now pay the fixed penalties they have got. altogether, 83 people received fines. 28 of those received more than one fine, with at least one person, receiving as many as five.
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the prime minister attended many of the events, but was only fined once. adam wagner is a barrister and an expert in covid law. we do now the police gave fixed penalty notices for one of the event the prime minister attended. it may be that the prime minister argued that he had a reasonable excuse, because he only attended to give a speech, he raised a glass and at then he left. that is part of his working day, part of what he does as prime minister. maybe that's why they couldn't be sure that he committed an offence. where is the people who stayed into the night and drank, they could be sure that was not reasonably necessary for work. the labour leader keir starmer says he still wants to see the prime minister resign. my view of the prime minister hasn't changed _ my view of the prime minister hasn't changed up— my view of the prime minister hasn't changed up of course after an investigation that shows 120 plus
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breaches— investigation that shows 120 plus breaches of the law in downing streel— breaches of the law in downing street was that of course he should resign _ street was that of course he should resign he — street was that of course he should resign. he is responsible for the culture — the investigation took the metropolitan police four months, with officers working through hundreds of documents and photos. the force described the work as "painstaking and thorough". we have had a full—time team of 12 detectives working on this investigation. that's been supported by other people as the need has arisen. we have also had a group of people who have carried out the assessments, and theyjointly assessments, and they jointly full—time assessments, and theyjointly full—time team as and when it wasn't necessary. all of that, the cost of those officers and staff, and the overtime costs, have totalled £a60,000. borisjohnson's spokesman says the prime minister is "pleased" the investigation has finished, but its overall findings are unlikely to please many others. lets go back to adam, a barrister specialising in covid law. it is worthjust it is worth just stepping it is worthjust stepping back it is worth just stepping back and are saying — it is worth just stepping back and are saying there were eight illegal
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gatherings at downing street over the course of 2020—2021. all those gatherings, i guess, would be fairly defined as — gatherings, i guess, would be fairly defined as parties, which downing street_ defined as parties, which downing street has— defined as parties, which downing street has always denied there were any parties. it is difficult to see how they— any parties. it is difficult to see how they were anything but if the police _ how they were anything but if the police gave out criminal penalties in respect — police gave out criminal penalties in respect to them. it is worth asking — in respect to them. it is worth asking how that pattern of behaviour was allowed to happen, like there seems _ was allowed to happen, like there seems to— was allowed to happen, like there seems to have been a sort of lackadaisical approach to the reals that these people themselves were creating _ that these people themselves were creating during the pandemic. a creating during the pandemic. lackadaisical approach to the rules may have been proven in boris johnson's downing street, but by avoiding further fines himself, johnson's downing street, but by avoiding furtherfines himself, the prime minister has one round at least one critic. back in february, charles walker said he would appoint out borisjohnson not resigned.
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today, however, he has told newsnight,... the moment of highest danger seems to have passed for borisjohnson. kitty donaldson covers westminster for bloomberg. tory mps are angry, they might be angry still. but i think on balance, the prime minister has ridden this out. it has been going on for more than six months, and i think the prime minister refusing to go when he was at the most acute pressure, i think the decision was made then and he has ridden it out. of course, the water has been muddied somewhat by the fact that durham police are now looking into keir starmer as well over the so—called beergate allegations. in the conservative party, there doesn't seem to be the sort of ground swell of rebellion. there are pockets of people, you see them talking in corners, wondering if the prime minister is the right man for thejob. but
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if the prime minister is the right man for the job. but on partygate, if the prime minister is the right man for thejob. but on partygate, i think things will probably draw to a close. the prime minister is not out of the woods yet. parliament's privileges committee is investigating whether borisjohnson lied to parliament over the affair. their work could potentially unearth photos that the police used as evidence. more immediately the, final report by senior civil servant, sue gray, which was held back whilst the police investigated, can now be released. so, it could see the prime minister under pressure again. jill rutter is a former senior civil servant in downing street. sue gray is updating her report, potentially for publication next week. she did talk on her redacted report we got at the end of january about failures of leadership, a culture taking hold in downing street that both the can optically think the rules applied there, but also it was rather impervious to the
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attitudes in the rest of the country. i do think that is the next critical step in this, to see what sue gray really size, and to what extent you has the political leadership in at number 10 and the civil service leadership, to what extent she holds them responsible for allowing that culture to take hold. �* , for allowing that culture to take hold. 2 . ., for allowing that culture to take hold. ., , hold. let's crossover live to its david wallace _ hold. let's crossover live to its david wallace lockhart - hold. let's crossover live to its david wallace lockhartjoins i hold. let's crossover live to its | david wallace lockhartjoins us. hold. let's crossover live to its i david wallace lockhartjoins us. for the moment, i want to focus in on the moment, i want to focus in on the fine for the prime minister. it was for a birthday party, not for any of the events that could arguably be much more damaging to him. for example, the bring your own booze party in the number 10 garden. that's right, that was actually an event he apologise in the house of commons for. one part of this that raised some eyebrows is that we know that some people who attend that
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event have been fine, but the prime minister is not one of them. i don't think you could accuse the metropolitan police of not being quite forensic and all of this. they had 12 officers working on the case, almost half £1 million spent on getting to the bottom of these parties at downing street to stop but i think there will be a sigh of relief in downing street that the prime minister only got that one fine. however, for plenty of people one fine for the prime minister is one fine for the prime minister is one find too many. labour leader sir keir starmer saying that shows there is lawbreaking going on in downing street on an industrial scale. and we know the lib dems and snp are still calling for the prime minister to go. still calling for the prime minister to no. �* still calling for the prime minister to .o_ �* ., still calling for the prime minister tom, �* .,, still calling for the prime minister to .o_ �* .,, ., still calling for the prime minister to no. �* ., ., ., to go. also a sigh of relief for the prime minister's _ to go. also a sigh of relief for the prime minister's wife? _ to go. also a sigh of relief for the prime minister's wife? that's i to go. also a sigh of relief for the l prime minister's wife? that's right, carrie johnson _ prime minister's wife? that's right, carrie johnson only _ prime minister's wife? that's right, carrie johnson only getting - prime minister's wife? that's right, carrie johnson only getting one i carriejohnson only getting one fine. the chancellor, rishi sunak, also getting one the fine. simon case, the country's highest civil
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servant, who at one point was tasked with doing a report into this until it was revealed he was connected with events, he was not fined either. i think it has been a sorry cycle for those at the top of government. but there was a lot of speak later at point is that boris johnson could be walking away with multiple fines. the fact that does not seem to have come to pass, i think people in downing street will be quite happy about. even with the inquiry concluding today, there has not been a groundswell of conservative mp saying borisjohnson has to go. right now, as of today, still quite safe in his position as prime minister.— still quite safe in his position as prime minister. ., ~ , ., ., prime minister. david, thank you for talkin: us prime minister. david, thank you for talking us through _ prime minister. david, thank you for talking us through that. _ before we go — let me bring you this might gaffe from george w bush. vladimir putin's invasion of iraq, before correcting himself by saying he was talking about ukraine.
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this happened at an event in dallas, texas. the result is an absence of checks and balances in russia. the decision of one man to launch a wholly unjustified and brutal invasion of iraq... i mean, of ukraine. anyway. 75. laughter. george w bush their recovering from that miss naming of the country. he was laughing about it, but it's important to stress he was president during the us led invasion of iraq back into his in a three over weapons of mass destruction that were indeed neverfound. —— in 2003. if you want to get in touch about
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any of our stories, i'm on twitter. how loud, after the thunder storms last night, the weather has calmed down. today actually turned into a beautiful day for many places with lots of sunshine overhead. last night was my weather looked a lot more dramatic, with these vicious thunder storms pushing up from the south. thousands of lightning strikes. they have cleared away, the weather has calmed down. tonight is certainly a quieter night although we will see more cloud drifting up from the south, a bit of rain from the cloud later in the night. showery wring getting into enough with scotland and may be northern ireland later on. tomorrow at this frontal system will be pushing in the from the north—west, bringing
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some showery rain. this one will bring some very heavy profundity rain across the near continent that may just graze rain across the near continent that mayjust graze into parts of kent. generally there will be more up bits of rain tomorrow morning across south—eastern england. showery rain drifting across northern ireland, wales and england. quite breezy tomorrow and a little cooler than it has been. those temperatures are around the average for the time of year. the weekend, high pressure will be to the south of us, close enough to give us a decent amount of dry weather. some frontal systems to the north—west bringing some outbreaks of rain. the best of the sunshine across england and wales on saturday. thicker cloud for northern ireland and much of scotland. a good part of north—east scotland will stay dry with some sunshine. 1a
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degrees in glasgow, 21 day high in london. overthe degrees in glasgow, 21 day high in london. over the weekend, degrees in glasgow, 21 day high in london. overthe weekend, more frontal systems across the north—west. this system drifting over at the bay of biscay could introduce some showers on sunday. a lot of mist and low cloud for western parts to start the day. some showery rain throughout northern island. elsewhere, spells of sunshine, top temperatures between 16-22 .
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become a russian soldier charged with milder in the first war crimes trial in ukraine asked to be forgiven. the 21—year—old commander shot a ukrainian man in the early days of the war. today he places that they can's widow in court. also coming up will be looking at the outbreak of monkeypox. an infectious disease with my cases found in europe and north america. and a shortage of baby milk powder in the us prompts presidentjoe biden to use legislation designed for wartime emergencies to boost production. i know parents all across the country are worried about finding enough infant formula to feed their babies, as a parent and grandparent and ella just how stressful that is.
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now we turn to a growing outbreak of the monkeypox virus — a man in massachusetts has tested positive for monkeypox, making it the first confirmed case of the virus in the united states. the massachusetts health authority said the patient had recently travelled to canada, where there are reports of a dozen unconfirmed cases. cases have also been confirmed, or are suspected, in the uk, spain, portugaland italy. there was an outbreak in 2020 in africa, where cases were identified and contained in the democratic republic of congo, nigeria, cameroon and central african republic. two more cases of monkeypox have been confirmed in the south east of england, bringing the total number of infections in the uk to nine. there are concerns the latest
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infections were the result of community transmission, as our health correspondent katherine dacosta explains. if iris is usually linked to travel to west africa but with the latest cases there was no travelling for that region. hail officials are investigating how they caught it. investigating how they caught it and they think that monkeypox might be spreading in the community but they say the risk of infection is still low. monkeypox is similar to chicken pox, and has symptoms including a rash, fever, headaches and swollen lymph nodes. the disease is usually associated with travel to west africa, but as we've been hearing health authorities believe some cases have begun to spread within communities. the largest known outbreak of the disease occurred in nigeria in 2017 when there were 175 suspected cases, the vast majority in men aged between 21 and a0. monkeypox is a viral infection, but it is not as transmissable as coronavirus.
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here's dr sarahjarvis to explain. this is transmitted by large respiratory droplets. if you remember at the beginning of the pandemic we were saying face coverings will not make a lot of difference because you need to be face—to—face with someone for quite some time and those droplets are big they don't spread very far away. because these droplets need to be fairly large you have to be face—to—face or close contact with somebody for quite some time or it can be spread by contaminated clothing or linen for instance or it can be spread by cuddling each other and holding somebody who is infected but it needs quite prolonged contact. in the second case is where people who live together in london. there are two main types of monkeypox. the west african, with a mortality rate of around 1%, that's according to the world health organisation. and the one from the congo basin, which could have a fatality
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rate as high as 10%. dr louise ivers, is the director of the center for global health at massachusetts general hospital, where a patient is currently being treated for monkeypox? how is the patient doing how is the patient being treated? the how is the patient doing how is the patient being treated?— patient being treated? the patient is re orted patient being treated? the patient is reported to _ patient being treated? the patient is reported to be _ patient being treated? the patient is reported to be doing _ patient being treated? the patient is reported to be doing well. i i patient being treated? the patient is reported to be doing well. i am | is reported to be doing well. i am not personally caring for the patient but the hospital release that information that he is stable and doing well. we have a specialised word in the hospital to deal with special pathogens. unusual or rare infections. so he is being cared for and that special units with highly trained infection control and other physicians and nurses taking care of him. can you talk us through _ nurses taking care of him. can you talk us through how _ nurses taking care of him. can you talk us through how transmissible | talk us through how transmissible is this particular virus? we have lived
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through the pandemic and everybody is going to be concerned but we heard that it's slightly different when it comes to monkeypox compared to coronavirus. when it comes to monkeypox compared to coronavirus— to coronavirus. yes. we know historically — to coronavirus. yes. we know historically about _ to coronavirus. yes. we know historically about the - to coronavirus. yes. we know historically about the two i to coronavirus. yes. we know. historically about the two types to coronavirus. yes. we know- historically about the two types of monkeypox is that they are not really highly transmissible from human—to—human. it is rare, it does happen but it's a rare infection to begin with as you have mentioned already. it is totally different with coronavirus. we see even in the most recent variants we are seeing here in massachusetts, highly transmissible coronavirus and highly transmissible coronavirus and highly transmissible infection and what's unusual in these cases is that we are typically seen a connection to travel to the african continent and it's rare for us to see exposure at this. it seems to be happening from humid to humid in the community and other outbreaks in the us in 2003 is
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a connection to the relevance and paths that have been infected during transfer to the us so this is what's unusual. it's not been spread very rapidly but it seems to be a bit unusual compared to what we are used to. fix. unusual compared to what we are used to. �* , , . , unusual compared to what we are used to. ~ , , ., , ., unusual compared to what we are used to. ., ., to. a bit unusual but how worried should we — to. a bit unusual but how worried should we be? _ to. a bit unusual but how worried should we be? what _ to. a bit unusual but how worried should we be? what we - to. a bit unusual but how worried should we be? what we see i to. a bit unusual but how worried should we be? what we see is i to. a bit unusual but how worried | should we be? what we see is the images look unpleasant and it looks like an unpleasant pirates. but when it comes to the mortality rate, two different types, one higher mortality than the other, how worried should we be his neck there is no cause for an alarm at this time. i is no cause for an alarm at this time. ., �* , is no cause for an alarm at this time. ~ �*, ,., ., ., is no cause for an alarm at this time. ~ �*, ., ., , time. i think it's important for us to be aware _ time. i think it's important for us to be aware of— time. i think it's important for us to be aware of it. _ time. i think it's important for us to be aware of it. this _ time. i think it's important for us to be aware of it. this type i time. i think it's important for us to be aware of it. this type of. to be aware of it. this type of surveillance and outbreak response is happening and it's important for people in the community to know what the symptoms are so desperately make symptoms but then this kind of
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characteristic rash that occurs. i don't think there is any special cause for alarm but it's important for people to know what they should look out for a fair suspect in a case or think they have been in contact with a case to be able to contact their doctors. i'm losing my sleep at the moment about covid—19 and transmission of covid—19 and long—term impacts of that and the possibility of new variance so especially because of what we've been through in the last few years of covid—19 everybody is on high alert when they hear. there's a lot to learn and not seeing and not concerned at all, i have concerns and a specialist in infectious diseases and watching to see what happens and want to know what the case in the us is and want to understand what the transmission is but i don't think it's a reason for the public to be alarmed. it’s but i don't think it's a reason for the public to be alarmed. it's good of ou to the public to be alarmed. it's good of you to come _ the public to be alarmed. it's good of you to come on _ the public to be alarmed. it's good of you to come on here. _ the public to be alarmed. it's good of you to come on here. thank i the public to be alarmed. it's good | of you to come on here. thank you. presidentjoe biden has evoked a korean war era piece
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of legislation to help solve a critical shortage of baby formula in the us. here is mr biden signing the executive order, under the so called defence production act. the president desribes how the order will increase supply to consumers... the defence production act gives the government the ability to require suppliers to direct needed resources to infant formula manufacturers before any other customer who may have ordered that good. (sot) charities in the us say the support cannot come soon enough. here's one grocery store in washington dc. non—profits organisations that assist mothers say this is a typical site, and women are coming to them in state of desperation. they are in crisis. when they are calling to us sometimes they are angry, often they are frustrated and very often they are sobbing. the bbc has spoken to mothers in the us who say the crisis is causing unimaginable stress. let's hear from them.
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i can't be running for ten different stories every month trying to find formula. what else can i do? every time we would see it in a store we would just by it even though she did not necessarily the can was not empty yet because we were like who knows the next time will see it. it's hard physically, mentally, financially, sometimes i do cry at night. let's take a look at what's causing the shortage. according to market data site datassembley, the industry has emerged from the pandemic with existing shortages 11% of formula was out stock in november last year. but by early may that had shot up to to a3%. a large extent it's because of events at this site — the abbott nutrition's principle formula plant in sturgis michigan. it began when the company ordered a recall of 3 types of formula in february this year — as reported by the new york times. cbs news's elise preston describes how events progressed.
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several babies developed bacterial infections. two of them died after drinking the formula that was made and they were recalls but again that plant was shut down. a deal was also reached recently to ramp that plants back up but it would take a couple months before it is fully in production. this raises a further questions. how can the closure of one manufacturers plant fuel a nationwide scarsity. well part of the issue is a lack of market competition. abbott and 3 other formula manufaturers — mead johnson, nestle us and perringo account for 90% of baby formula sales, according to the congressional committee on oversight and reform. data on abbott's market share is limited, but one 2011 estimate put it at a3%. can you help us understand how can this situation become so critical
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and how can such few companies have such a monopoly over something that is so important?— is so important? thank you for havin: is so important? thank you for having me- — is so important? thank you for having me. as _ is so important? thank you for having me. as you _ is so important? thank you for having me. as you mentioned | is so important? thank you for- having me. as you mentioned there are only four major companies that account for about 90% of market share and some of the reasons have to do with our rolls and regulations around infant formula. so only 2% of our infant formula is important which 90% of our infant formula having to be to mystically produce. there is also rolls around new infant formula being introduced to the market maybe discouraging for other companies to try to enter the market and so you have a small market and so you have a small market to begin with and you have tough rolls for new competitors to enter the market and some also argue that new companies may be hesitant to enter the market into infant
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formula being a less lucrative market compared to other products. what about the low in, support scheme that they look up support scheme that they look up support scheme which means that states have to take formula from one particular distributor and to get a rebate for that. they save a lot of money but it creates a problem with supply? you are talking about a special supplemental nutrition programme also known as weak in the united states and is something that is interesting about week as you mentioned companies compete for exclusive contracts at the state able to offer their products to participants and what many people don't know is that wic participants accounts for 50% of all infant formula practices in the united states and so if you're thinking about one company dominating the market at the state level and about half of the folks living there on average are just buying that one product you don't have any
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competition unless you receive a special waiver to be able to purchase other products. so that's another disincentive for competitors entering the market. we another disincentive for competitors entering the market.— entering the market. we have got this wartime _ entering the market. we have got this wartime legislation _ entering the market. we have got this wartime legislation that's i this wartime legislation that's being enacted. idistill this wartime legislation that's being enacted.— this wartime legislation that's being enacted. will this help? i think it will — being enacted. will this help? i think it will help _ being enacted. will this help? i think it will help in _ being enacted. will this help? i think it will help in the - being enacted. will this help? i think it will help in the long i being enacted. will this help? i i think it will help in the long term. i am not sure how it will help with immediate need. as you showed earlier, there are families who are desperate and trying to feed their infants now. if you take some time to ramp up production and get the products to market it will take some time for those families to feel any relief. in the long term, yes, there are things that should be done immediately to support these families. there is more on our website. still
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to come. ., , to come. the trail between the football his _ to come. the trail between the football his wife's _ to come. the trail between the football his wife's jaw - to come. the trail between the football his wife's jaw and i to come. the trail between the i football his wife's jaw and andras atkins will here with an explainer. a couple from gloucestershire have just become the uk's biggest ever lottery winners after scooping 18a million pounds with a euromillions lucky dip ticket. navtej johal reports. popping open the champagne lifestyle. joe and jess thwaite, a married couple in their a0s, have just become multi—multi. .. ..multimillionaires. joe and jess. joe, a communications sales engineer, and jess, who runs a hair salon, have bagged £18a,262,899.10.
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at a 5—star hotel the pair, who live in gloucester with their two young children, were revealed as the uk's biggest ever lottery winners. but they haven't always been so fortunate. your luck is pretty terrible. yeah, my luck is terrible. it got to the point where i said tojess and her mum, "i think you guys need to start doing this because i'm failing miserably." i think if i got over £2.a0, you know, we were high—fiving. it was at that point. let's start the draw. but that all changed last week whenjoe received an e—mail about his ticket for the previous night's euromillions draw. at first i thought it was thousands, and i was looking at it going, "0h, that's life changing — we've won £18a,000, you know, that's going to be amazing." yeah. and then i started counting the digits and i thought, "oh, my god, it really is the jackpot." well, this is clearly an incredible moment for the couple, but many previous winners have remained anonymous. so the £18a million question is, why
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have these two decided to go public? the burden is hard and i would never want to lie to the people we love. yeah, this week's been bad enough. yeah. soi... and we want to share and enjoy it with them. what is the one thing you would love to buy? i'm going to upgrade the hyundai to something a bit better. my kids are so excited. they've never stayed in a hotel before. so we're going to take them on some adventures, and that's what we want to do. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. 0ur lead story is? a russian soldier asked a ukrainian soldier to now let's turn to that celebrity libel trial here in the uk, between two wives of english footballers — rebekah vardy and coleen rooney.
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today was the final day in court — now it's up to thejudge to make her decision as to who has won. my colleague ros atkins takes us through the past seven days. this is what happened. rebekah vardy is at the centre of the story. she's married to leicester city strikerjamie vardy and she's suing coleen rooney who was there with her husband wayne. at stake is rebekah vardy�*s reputation and potentially an awful lot of money. and this story dates back to october 2019 and this social media post by coleen rooney. she claimed that stories about her were being leaked to the sun and having looked for the source, she concluded, it's rebekah vardy�*s account. rebekah vardy has always denied leaking these stories, and in time she sued for defamation. in court, she said, "i didn't do anything wrong and i wanted to clear my name, notjust for me, but for my family and for my children." and while there's pressure on both sides, the onus here is on coleen rooney. under english defamation law, she has to prove her post was substantially true.
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on that, here's the lawyer, mark stephens. suspicions are not evidence. you've got to be able to prove your suspicions. and that, i think, is the fundamental weakness of coleen's case. in the end, that will be for thejudge to decide. and across the seven days, both women would take the stand. rebekah vardy was first. central to the questions she faced were a series of whatsapp messages between her and her agent, caroline watt. they connected to a story in the sun in january 2019 about a car crash coleen rooney had been in. she posted about it on a private instagram account. and after that story ran, she tweeted, it's sad to think someone who i've accepted to follow me is betraying for either money or to keep a relationship with the press. and we know that caroline watt mentioned this tweet to rebekah vardy. in another message, rebekah vardy referenced the car crash and told caroline what that she would love to leak those stories. now, caroline watt was found to be
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not fit to take part in the trial, but in court the whatsapp messages were raised. and because of that, coleen rooney's barrister drew this conclusion about caroline watt�*s involvement, telling rebekah vardy, "it's not her who betrayed you. it was you who was betrayed her by throwing her under a bus. and the issue of the whatsapp messages would get more complicated still because in a pre—trial hearing, coleen rooney's barrister had told the court, regrettably, ms watt�*s phone was apparently dropped overboard into the north sea, and the loss of the phone led to this exchange, as described by the bbc�*s colin paterson.
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caroline watt had lost her phone. we also learned rebekah vardy had lost nine months worth of whatsapp messages. she told the court she had potentially switched phones during that time and added, "i can neither confirm or deny that." but coleen rooney's lawyers saw it differently. on a line that grabbed the headlines on day one, he told rebekah vardy, you deleted all of the messages between you and caroline watt and that she had deliberately sought to destroy evidence. rebekah vardy denies this, but she did admit leaking a story the sun. it was about the footballer danny drinkwater being arrested for drink—driving. here's more on that from telegraph reporter izzy lyons on what rebekah vardy had put in this whatsapp.
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on a possible demand for payment, rebekah vardy told the court this wasn't a serious comment. she denied ever leaking for money. watching all of this was tom peck of the independent. she spent ten hours in rebekah vardy in the last two and a half days in the witness box, having her whatsapp messages read out her which very, very, very, very heavy on long and complicated discussions about how they might sell certain stories to the sun. also watching was coleen rooney's barrister who accused rebekah vardy of lying under oath. she denies that. but as the evidence went into day two, the pressure of the cross—examination began to show. she began to cry while reminded of the online abuse she had faced. both women have talked of the toll this has taken, though some argue this could and should have been avoided. the sun reporter simon boyle wrote one of the 2019 stories at the centre of this saga. i really do feel that they have both had any number of ample opportunities, and i do mean both of them to come to the table to discuss this. we also knowjudges have repeatedly pleaded for them to settle
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the matter out of court. they haven't, though. they've both spent an estimated million pounds on legal costs. to the media lawyer, jonathan cohen. it makes no sense for either of them. but neither woman has taken a backward step, and on day four, it was coleen rooney's turn to testify. she told the court she was surprised by how much interest her social media post caused in 2019. and i'm not sure any of us expected to see a trial of this nature. but here it was. and coleen rooney faced a significant hurdle because, as we heard earlier, this trial isn't about suspicions, it's about evidence. here's the lawyer, mark stephens, again. coleen has to be able to prove it. that is with direct evidence. the problem in this case is it's almost unique in the annals of legal history that it's completely untrammelled by actual evidence. and coleen rooney was pushed hard on this. here's the bbc correspondent andrew plant. he said, so you don't actually have any evidence to link ms.. vardy to the leaks, do you? coleen rooney replied,
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yes, i believe i do. i believe it came from that account and that rebekah vardy knew about it. and rebekah vardy barrister replied, what you believe isn't evidence. you might believe that derby county could win the league in two years time, but that isn't evidence the derby county reference because wayne rooney is the club's manager. he's been at the trial most days and on day six he too gave evidence telling the court, i've watched my wife over the past two, two and a half years really struggle with everything that's gone on, become a different mother, a different wife. it's been very traumatic for my wife, he said. and what we heard from wayne rooney, one person we didn't hear from is simon boyle from the sun. he wrote this story about flooding at the rooney's house here. he describes the pressure he's been under to say who gave him the story. he went to extraordinary lengths and the extraordinary expense in the high court a week or so ago after being pushed by both sides actually to come to court and both hand over some documents and take the witness stand, that's simply not something that we would do. and so the source remains a secret.
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but we have learnt plenty about the broader interactions between celebrities and the media. the guardian'sjim waterson has live tweeted the whole trial. it has been a fairly extraordinary exposure of howjournalism works. and it's rare that you ever want to see how a sausage is made. and it's not necessarily a particularly pleasant sausage in this case. for many, though, they couldn't look away. and the seven days ended with closing arguments. coleen rooney's barrister told us it's what she believed at the time and it's what she believes even more so now. rebekah vardy, barrister, argued coleen rooney should pay a substantial award of damages and now there appear to be three possible conclusions for the judge. one is that rebekah vardy did them. the other is that one of her team did her request. a third is that one of her team did them of their own initiative. now, if it's the third, then rebekah vardy is ok because it's not her fault. if it's one or two, she loses.
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we have no data. and when the judge will tell us what she's decided in the meantime, all other aspects of the trial have finished. rebekah vardy was there to see the closing arguments. coleen rooney, though, wasn't. she'd gone on holiday with wayne and their children. her barrister told the judge it was a long standing travel arrangement booked on the advice the trial would have finished. he added they intended no disrespect to the court, to which mrs. justice steyne replied, i don't take offence, it's fine. but this hasn't been fine for either rebekah vardy or coleen rooney. and now, after over two years of accusations, after seven days of a trial, after millions of pounds spent, they and all of us are waiting on a verdict. when i hear we are all waiting the verdict there is lots more on the weather was that there is also a podcast and you can rewatch the explanation as well. and you can get in touch with me if you would like to.
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after the thunderstorms that brought some of us a 90 night last night the weather has calmed down and today turned into a beautiful day for many places with lots of sunshine overhead. last nights later lets march a medic with these vicious thunderstorms pushing up from the south. thousands of lightning strikes with heavy rain and gusty winds and more thunderstorms in the south—east corner resting this morning but they have clearly and the weather has calmed down tonight, a quiet night but we will see my clouds drifting from the south with some rain later in the nights. some showers getting into parts of northwest scotland and northern ireland later on. sinclair spells and cold for ethan scotland with a mild night elsewhere. tomorrow the frontal system will push in from the northwest bringing rain. this one
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here will bring heavy thunder and rain across the continental which may grace into parts of kent but my january there will be outbreaks of rain tomorrow morning across the maidens and eastern england and we have got this brand —— band of cloud drifting into western scotland and england and a few heavy downpour is popping up elsewhere. also with sunny spells in between. breezy tomorrow and cooler than it has been. although those temperatures are around the average for the time of year. high pressure will be in the south and close enough to give a decent amount of dry weather. frontal systems in the northwest bringing outbreaks of rain. some chain on saturday across england and wales and here will be large amounts of cloud. much of scotland bringing some outbreaks of rain although good part of northeast scotland will stay dry with sunshine. 1a degrees and 21 is the highest in london. we will
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see more frontal systems in the northwest and this weather system drifting across the bay and could introduce some showers sunday across the channel islands but maybe into southern counties of england as well. taste and low cloud for western parts to start the day with rain and scotland some parts of northwest england and wales but some spells of sunshine and top temperatures between 16 and 22 degrees.
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