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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 23, 2022 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and jon kay. our headlines today. thousands more youngsters will end up in care unless there's a "radical reset" of the system. that's the warning from a landmark review of child protection in england. almost 700 fewer services a day. scotrail, the company running most trains in scotland, brings in a severely reduced timetable over a driver shortage and pay dispute. putting a figure on the rising cost of living. families are facing a £400 a month hike as energy, transport and childcare costs soar. i'll have the details. a dramatic comeback on an extraordinary final day. i'm at the home of the premier
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league champions manchester city. they lift the trophy after coming from behind to beat aston villa. but a pitch invasion and an attack on the villa keeper sparks a club investigation. good morning from the chelsea flower show now back in its regular showcase in may. we will be bringing you some of the show garden this morning. the weather this week will be cooler, breezy and a bit more unsettled from last week with some showers. it's monday 23rd may. our top story. children's social care needs radical
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change to avoid tens of thousands more youngsters being taken away from theirfamilies. that's the warning following a major review into child protection services in england. the report says the current system is too heavily based on crisis intervention, and calls for a windfall tax on the profits of the biggest privately run children's homes. here's our social affairs editor, alison holt. ok, so let me know how it's been going since the panel. henriette, who works with young people to help them pitch ideas her own life was shaped by the crisis in the children's care system that today's report wants to change. after two difficult years, she was removed from her mother by social services. she was 1a and in the next month she was moved between five different homes. to me, being in care felt like a never—ending storm, just, like, every day not knowing where the support is going to be from, where am i even going to lay my head, where is the support
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for the families at the start when they are struggling, why does it need to be when they are taken away? and you can't put kids into dysfunction, when you have taken them out of dysfunction. it makes no sense. today's review said a radical reset is needed to shift the focus of kids social care away from crisis intervention. it wants more early help available in schools and communities, a new expert social worker role to strengthen child protection. the phasing out of what is described as wholly unsuitable young offenders institutions. a windfall tax on the profits of large children's homes companies, and to ensure change happens, an extra £2.6 billion funding for services over the next five years. it's crucial that when families hit crisis and they have got difficulties, that there is low stigma, really intensive help on offer. and the system that we have got at the moment is very well resourced to assess and check
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what is going on with families. but pretty strapped in terms of the help that it is able to offer. so empowering to know that your trauma doesn't define you. that is where places like new beginnings in stockport come in. these parents have had either children taken into care or they have come close to it. you know, we all understand that each day is different for everybody. here they have found support, counselling and advice which has turned their lives around. my little boy has been in with me a year and i never, thought that would be possible again. and any time i need support, i reach out to new beginnings. they're like family, they are family, they are family that i never had. they have given me so much support the tools and strategies to work with, with my son who has got needs, special needs. and, again, they have given me strength to push on to not make the mistakes again. the government says it is piloting additionalfamily hubs providing early support. it also accepts more needs to be
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done to support family members, kinship carers, who take on a child who would otherwise go into care, and to find more foster carers. i think there is a real opportunity for us to get those children a loving, supportive home, and we know that family relationships and kinship care is equally important. the system needs to obsess about those relationships because that is how you get great outcomes for the children that need the most help in our society. the government says it will consider other recommendations over the longer term. alison holt, bbc news. a drastically reduced rail timetable comes into force in scotland today. around 700 daily services, a third of the normal number, are being cut. it's due to a shortage of drivers and a pay dispute between the newly nationalised scotrail and the aslef union, as alexandra mackenzie reports. many rely on the rail network,
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but the new temporary timetable means a significant cut to services. there's two reasons for this. the first is that the pandemic meant we couldn't train enough drivers. that's resulted in a driver shortage. and the second issue is that aslef, the train drivers union, is in dispute with us over pay. that's meant fewer drivers are making themselves available for overtime and for rest days, and that's resulted in cancellations for customers, which have been unacceptable. the last train from edinburgh to glasgow queen street, which is usually at 23.45, will leave at 22.15. if you're travelling from glasgow to dundee, the last train was at 23.10. that changes to 19.10. the glasgow to mallaig train. the last one was at 18.21. that now leaves around lunchtime. i think it's really disappointing because i like to go into town at the weekend, it's my only time off, and i don't want to have to drive because driving is awful in town. a lot of bus gates now. so yeah, i'm really disappointed
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that this is how it's ended up, but hopefully they'll figure something out. i will probably choose not to take the train in the future. i willjust plan to take the bus instead of the train. coming somewhere like glasgow shouldn't really have that - uncertainty because you feel like you're in a city centre i and you should be able to get in and out and things as well. i the reduced timetable is likely to impact scotland's world cup play—off against ukraine here at hampden onjune1st. the scottish conservatives have called on scotrail to lay on extra trains for thousands of fans. the scottish government has said that plans are being worked up for events like this one. alongside this disruption, rail workers are to be balloted on strike action over pay. every one of us is facing a cost of living crisis. we've seen our council tax, ourwater, oursewerage, gas, electricity, food, all going up. 0urfuel, everyone. we have a standard of living and we're trying to maintain that for our membership. scotrail said the temporary timetable would provide more
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certainty, but it will take some time for more drivers to be trained so the next few weeks could be challenging. alexandra mackenzie, bbc news, glasgow. the senior civil servant sue gray is finalising her report on lockdown gatherings in downing street and is expected to release her findings in the next few days. 0fficials she intends to name in the document had until 5pm yesterday to raise any objections. 0ur deputy political editor vicki young is in westminster. good vicki young is in westminster. morning. the wait i over, good morning. the wait is nearly over, but has some of the heat now gone out of the partygate scandal? i think we have to look at this as several phases. 0ne phase is over, the metropolitan police investigation, and of course in the end there were dozens and dozens of
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vines, 126 overall with 83 people in downing street and the cabinet office breaking the law including 0ffice breaking the law including the prime minister and the chancellor. so that phase is over, thatis chancellor. so that phase is over, that is damaging. this phase, sue grey �*s report, will go into the detail of exactly what happened. we have heard lots about that, lots of speculation but this will be here in black and white, what the parties were and what the events were and who went to them. lots of people expecting that to be pretty damaging. although people think that sue grey is likely to criticise senior civil servants, in her interim report she talked about failures ofjudgment at number 10 and the cabinet office. the pressure is on boris jay and borisjohnson —— borisjohnson. there is an inquiry into whether he misled parliament when he said that all rules were followed at all times. the pressure
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is not over yet, lots of people will be relieved that finally we will get to see her report this week. but we do not quite — to see her report this week. but we do not quite when, _ to see her report this week. but we do not quite when, it _ to see her report this week. but we do not quite when, it could - to see her report this week. but we do not quite when, it could be - do not quite when, it could be tomorrow or thursday, we are not sure. tomorrow or thursday, we are not sure. birmingham children's hospital has suspended a member of staff following the unexpected death of a child in its intensive care unit. west midlands police has been asked to investigate the death. the hospital says it's supporting the child's family. russia has lost as many soldiers in its three—month invasion of ukraine as the soviet union lost in their entire nine—year war in afghanistan. that's according to british military intelligence who say both tactical and strategic failings are to blame. it comes as russia continues its offensives in the east of the country with attempts to encircle the city of mariupol. 0ur correspondent in kyiv, joe inwood, has the latest. how do you read the state of play at the moment is between russia and ukraine? conflicting reports really
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about what is going on in the ground. yes, having taken the city of mariupol, they are now moving and continuing their advance and they are trying to take another city which is the last ukrainian holdout in the furthest east point. this assessment the british military intelligence is an extraordinary headline figure. the idea that in three months of what russia says is not even a wall, is a special military operation, they have lost 15,000 men killed and 35,000 wounded, say 50,000 men unable to fight any more as a consequence of the actions. that is the same as nine years in afghanistan, a long time ago but an astonishingly bloody and brutal campaign which contributed to the collapse of the soviet union. british military intelligence to say there are a number of reasons for this failure, strategic and fact —— tactical, poor
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air support, strategic and fact —— tactical, poor airsupport, people strategic and fact —— tactical, poor air support, people will remember seeing what happens around kyiv at the start of the measurement that huge armoured column got stuck down and was taken up by light and agile ukrainian inventory. it is a combination of these factors which have led to the disastrous outcome in terms of numbers for the russians. but on the ground they are still pushing forward. russia has a weight of numbers that the ukrainians cannot always cope with. so although the russians are suffering, they are still pushing forward. thank you very much, joe, in kyiv. australia's new prime minister anthony albanese has officially taken up office. his swearing—in ceremony took place overnight and one of his first duties will be to meet the us presidentjoe biden, along with other world leaders, injapan. he'll lead australia's first labour government in almost a decade. a special five—pound coin will be released to mark prince william's 40th birthday onjune 21st.
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he is getting £5 for his birthday! but rather special! the coin features his portrait, his initial and the number a0. it's the first time prince william will appear alone on an official coin by the royal mint. that is a pub quiz question for the future. . , ., ., ., that is a pub quiz question for the future. . , ., ~ ,, future. that is a good likeness. plen of future. that is a good likeness. plenty of oils — future. that is a good likeness. plenty of oils also _ future. that is a good likeness. plenty of oils also -- _ future. that is a good likeness. plenty of oils also -- royals - plenty of oils also —— royals heading to the chelsea flower show. the chelsea flower show makes a return to its traditional spring slot this week after two years of disruption caused by the pandemic. this year's displays include several gardens which honour one of the show�*s biggest and most longstanding supporters, the queen. daniela relph has been for a look around. months of graft. it's in studios and gardens well away from chelsea that the flower show is designed and prepared. simon lycett is making the royal horticultural society's officialjubilee tribute
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to their patron, the queen. a familiar image in a heavy steel framework. it will be filled with flowers and plants the queen loves. in 2021, her majesty revealed to the rhs that her favourite flower is lily of the valley. that combined with knowing that she adores native trees, things like hornbeams and oaks and beeches and birches, those were the ingredients i wanted to encapsulate, but it also needed to be hefty, significant, enough of a statement to stand out within the great pavilion amongst all those amazing world class gold medal gardens. so no pressure! on site at the flower show looking more like a building site in recent days. but examine things more closely and you see the meticulous work going on to create these prizewinning pieces of horticulture. and this year, the smaller gardens really do get a look in. for the first time ever, judges will be finding a winner
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from amongst the balcony and container gardens. and this is one of the container gardens. jane porter has created a mini scotland. whisky casks reversioned. slate to recreate the harbour walls of the western isles. heather and thistles among the plants. i think that's what people are relating to now because people with really small spaces have started gardening. you know that whatever you do, it has to be the absolute best it can be. it's tonnes and tonnes of pressure, but that's also very exciting and motivating. all right. so you have to stoop when you're on your way in here. a garden with a younger viewpoint. it's a child—sized hole. this is for children. so it's got to be fun. it's exactly sized for them. designed for alder hey children's hospital in liverpool, where it will eventually be relocated, emphasising the link between alder hey and the local community. we've designed - a garden for children. this isn't a stuffy space.
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where bankers can come and entertain their clients. this is a place for children to have fun and we want people _ to take that away from it. but the big draw here will be the chance to go foraging. not everything in the garden is edible because that would be like a sweet shop. it's more like an easter egg hunt. try a bit of that. can i swallow? yeah, yeah, i'm not going to poison you. that's mint. yeah, that is water mint. water mint. and children are a big feature here, too. the new blue peter garden, where you'll be encouraged to get your hands dirty. it's an invitation to children to learn about soil, get down in the soil, feel it, smell it, and in the end, love it. after the covid interruption and postponements, the chelsea flower show has returned to the comfort of may with its spring flowers in full bloom. the aim is to create a show that is innovative, celebratory and thoughtful. daniela relph, bbc news,
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at the chelsea flower show. there are some moments where we feel a little bit like life is getting back to normal and the reason i feel one of those today is because carroll is a chance of fire that for us! somewhere in one of those glorious gardens, good morning. hello? good morning! iam in the good morning! i am in the morris and coe garden, which is lovely. you can see all of the beautiful flowers here, it has attracted a lot of bees, the trellis is very prominent in this garden, as other boughs. it's designed for its colour, very contemporary, it is lovely, and it also attracts lots of birds as well. the weather today, this morning it is quite mild but for this week the forecast is more unsettled than last
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week. it will be cloudy, breezy and there will be some showers at times as well. there will be some sunshine in between. this morning what we haveis in between. this morning what we have is quite a cloudy start, some rain across northern scotland, showers already in parts of the west, and rain starting to show its hand coming in across the south—east of england. if we pick up the band of england. if we pick up the band of rain through the course of today, it will push north across the south—east quarter, it might affect part of the chelsea flower show later on but it should clear and eventually become restricted to the coast of east anglia. meanwhile further showers will develop in the north—west which will be heavy and thundery. top temperature 18 degrees. this evening the band of rain moves north, but there is a band of rain in this —— north moving south which will meet in the middle of england. showers and breezy and a mild night. tomorrow, the rain across south—east scotland and north—east england moves away into
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the north sea, then there will be more sunshine around tomorrow than today but we will see a fair few showers and again some of those could be heavy and thundery especially in northern ireland and southern and western scotland. they could be heavy across parts of wales, the south—west the midlands. thereafter it remains unsettled but high pressure comes back by the time we come to the weekend. lovely to see you somewhere so beautiful this morning, talk to you soon. we will hear all about the gardens and the messages behind them during the day, each of them has a story today. we will hear about them. the parents of a young teacher who took his own life while struggling with a gambling addiction have described the government's response as "disappointing" and "inadequate". jack ritchie was just 2a when he died five years ago. in march, a coroner ruled he'd been failed by "woefully inadequate" warnings and treatments. the government has now promised a comprehensive
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review of gambling laws, but jack's parents charles and liz say more urgent action is needed. they've been speaking to tomos morgan. jack was a real star. he was... he was very popular. he was a very, very happy baby. and he retained that kind of cheeriness throughout his life, really. jack richie began gambling with his friends as a teenager at school. he quickly became hooked, so he self—excluded himself from the local betting shop, along with the help of his parents. but then the addiction went online. he didn't bet ridiculous amounts. and i think, again, that's one of the myths of gambling, is that jack always gambled pretty much within his means. after seven years of betting, atjust 2a years of age, jack took his own life, blaming himself for his addiction. it was like a bomb had gone off. a 5—year—old knows that smoking kills. who knows that gambling kills?
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the type of gambling jack was into was the most addictive. nearly half of all people playing online casino games and slots are addicted or at risk. and more than 400 suicides every year in england alone are due to this issue. earlier this year, a coroner ruled that the information about the dangers and associated treatments available were woefully inadequate to jack, and senior coroner david irpeth added thatjack did not understand that being addicted to gambling was not his fault. last week, his parents received the uk government's response to the coroner's prevention of future deaths report. what's your response to what the uk government have said following the coroner's report? to be honest, it was pretty disappointing. why is that? i think it's inadequate, in that it doesn't feel as if it has recognised the real scale of the problem. later this year, a white paper is due to be published on this issue
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and his parents are looking for affordability checks of as little as £100 or so for those losing money online to be a part of it. but above all, they're fighting to make sure that this doesn't happen to any other family. i can't see us living to see the changes that need to happen, to be honest. we're in our 60s and this is worse than smoking. tomos morgan, bbc news. we'll speak to jack's parents, liz and charles, on the sofa just after eight this morning. let's take a look at some of today's front pages. the times reports that one in five households are already in fuel poverty, defined as spending more than 10% of disposable income on energy bills. it warns that the figure
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could double in october when the energy cap rises again. the mirror also leads on energy costs, reporting comments by the uk head of the firm e.0n, who has urged the prime minister to step in to help people pay their bills. the scottish daily mail reports that rail chaos will "take a toll" such on businesses as a third of train services are cut from timetables in scotland, taking effect from today. and this picture of man city fans celebrating at the etihad stadium makes the front of the guardian. blimey! exactly! it's after their premier league win yesterday, narrowly beating liverpool to the title. we are seeing a lot of pitch invasions recently.- we are seeing a lot of pitch invasions recently. we are seeing a lot of pitch invasions recentl . ., , invasions recently. there have been five or six in — invasions recently. there have been five or six in the _ invasions recently. there have been five or six in the last _ invasions recently. there have been five or six in the last few _ invasions recently. there have been five or six in the last few weeks. - five or six in the last few weeks. john is at the etihad this morning, reflecting on the manchester city win but also asking about pitch
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invasions and what a weekend it was four football on and off the pitch. we've been speaking a lot about the rising cost of living in recent weeks, but sometimes you just want to know the bottom line. now some new research has calculated just how much family budgets are going up by, and it's a lot. nina has the details. he talked about the front pages of the paper notes, the daily mirror and the times referencing prices going up, that's the usual news now, these figures actually put some numbers on the rices and prizes. —— the raise in prices. these numbers have been worked out by looking at the costs a year ago of what's considered a minimum acceptable standard of living, then comparing that to today. a family with two children are paying at least £390 pounds more each month.
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just to afford the bare minimum. a single parent with two kids is facing extra costs of more than £360. unsurprisingly, household energy is draining the most cash. that's setting families back by nearly £130 a month. transport, social activities and childcare have also gone up quite significantly. that's leading to difficult decisions for people like stacey who's had to remove things days out from the budget. things like alton towers, taking my nine—year—old to alton towers, we can't do that any more. they are noticing the difference when their french schools can go to places like that and ijust french schools can go to places like that and i just can't afford it. french schools can go to places like that and ijust can't afford it. —— when their friends at school can go to places like that. it affected me at the minute, mentally and physically. i love doing stuff like kids, i love going out on my days off and making sure they are happy and i cannot fulfil that. it makes me feel like a little bit less of a mum. ijust don't know what i've got to do or what i got to cut down on
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to do or what i got to cut down on to pay for stuff. food has gone up as well. my average food bill is to be £50 per week and it is now £90 a week. that is a noticeable difference for me. i am having to shop, and try and eat healthy, and although healthy is more expensive than the junk food now. stacey's stituation is not unusual. if you're on a low wage a bigger proportion of your income goes on food and energy. inflation was 9% in april, but for the most vulnerable in society it's more like 13%. when it comes to food, which? has found hundreds of grocery prices have gone up by more than 20%. that includes many of the basics, things like butter and milk. the consumer group also found there were fewer offers available, on vegetables and fresh fruit. lots of people are finding themselves struggling for the very first time. we asked the money advice trust what you should do if you're worried. not everyone claims all of the benefits they are entitled to and as
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your situation changes, in regard to what you are entitled to, that can change as well. so if you have not looked at that for some time, it is worth looking at that again. there are lots of grants and support that people can access and it is worth considering talking to debt advice charities like the citizens advice bureau or national debt line who can help you understand what else it might be that you can access in your situation. that is on the income side. on the spending side, the advice there is, we will be familiar with it, looking at ways that you can cut your budget. that's very difficult for lots of people at the moment particularly people who are already managing quite a tight budget. they also told us what not to do: don't ignore the problem and don't cancel direct debits. but they did warn that the options for lots of people are running out. the government could be forced to step in and go further. get in touch with your thoughts.
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let us know what it is if anything that you are having to cut back on, some decisions over the upcoming summer holidays because of the stretches on the budget perhaps? and something to note is that there will be ripple effects from mesee family is like that deciding that they cannot go to a theme park or a holiday season, there will be less money going into the economy and that has an impact on businesses. the world economic forum begins in davos today, we have already heard from the head of the international monetary fund saying that the global economy is facing a series of calamities in her words. there is a big deal and it is happening all around the world we don't know what the impact will be.— the impact will be. staggering numbers- _ time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm tolu adeoye.
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new figures on the number of monkeypox cases are expected today with most of the 20 cases so far confirmed in london. some sexual health doctors have expressed concerns about how the virus could impact services. the government says it provides billions of pounds of funding through public health grants. there's been a lot of enquiries but perhaps not overwhelmingly so and i think at the moment we are managing. i think the difficulty is that sexual health services have been so squeezed over the last decade or so. we've seen huge cuts in funding. we've seen reductions in staff and we don't have an awful lot of capacity or resilience for dealing with new issues. a new report suggests that black and asian women in the uk are being harmed by racial discrimination in maternity care. a year—long inquiry by the charity, birthrights, found mothers reported feeling unsafe, were denied pain relief, and faced stereotyping. the department of health said a taskforce had been set up
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to address factors linked to disparities in the quality of maternity care. final preparations are under way for the opening of the elizabeth line tomorrow morning. three and half years late and billions of pounds over budget, the line stretching from reading in the west to shenfield in the east will serve up to 200 million passengers a year. the first train will run at 6.30am. let's take a look at the tube situation. the district line is part suspended and the wterloo and city line has a planned closure. other services running well. 0nto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. we've got a rather unsettled week of weather ahead. yesterday we got 2a celsius and plenty of sunshine. today there's not quite so much sun. it's quite an unsettled picture. you can see various fronts moving through so first thing maybe a little bit of brightness. you might see a little bit of blue sky but fairly quickly the cloud will increase. coming up from the south we've got a heavy band of rain
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largely affect in the south—east but we could get showers everywhere. a breezy day too. temperatures reaching 18 celsius. so quite a bit cooler than yesterday. now overnight we're still going to see some showers blowing through. it stays breezy. it stays cloudy overnight. the minimum temperature dropping down to nine celsius so another cloudy start tomorrow. but the cloud tomorrow a little more willing to break up. we will however see further showers. now with the sun we'll see the heat of the daytime and more frequent showers through the course of tomorrow. you might even get the odd rumble of thunder. temperatures tomorrow very similar at around 18 celsius. now, as we head further through the week for wednesday, a largely cloudy start, some brighter spells in the afternoon. more sunshine for thursday and gradually the temperature getting a little bit warmer as we head towards the weekend. well, there's not long to go now until the queen's platinum jubilee. we'd love to know how you will be celebrating and might even bring our cameras. if you're doing something special get in touch by emailing us.
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i'll be back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. now though it's back tojon and sally. bye for now. hello this is breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent. coming up on the programme this morning, we're at the etihad stadium after manchester city's premier league victory was marred by a pitch invasion in which an opposition player was allegedly attacked. a new scheme to secure the future of small music venues is being launched today. we'll be inside one of the first places to benefit. chilling out there, aren't we? and the birmingham city captain
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troy deeney will be telling us why he's campaigning to make sure black and asian history is taught in our schools. now a story been talking about for a few days now. anyone at high risk of having caught monkeypox should isolate for 21 days. that's the latest official guidance from the uk health security agency. lots of people talking about this and we thought we would calmly look at the stats this morning. what we need to know and try to be useful for you and get into some context. monkeypox does not present the same dangers as covid but the advice to those who may be infected is to cancel travel plans, and to avoid contact with immunosuppressed people, pregnant women, and children under 12. on friday there were 20 confirmed cases in the uk, but that number is expected to rise today, after taking the weekend into account. let's put those numbers into some context. so far more than 80 cases have been confirmed in at least 15 countries.
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11 of those countries are in europe, along with israel, the us, canada and australia. the world health organization has said another 50 suspected cases are being investigated and warned more cases are likely to be reported. professor tom solomon from the pandemic institute joins us now. good morning to you. great to see you. i know we talked to you a bad coronavirus over the last several months. our concern should be be about monkeypox? itide]!!! months. our concern should be be about monkeypox? well monkeypox is like coronavirus. _ about monkeypox? well monkeypox is like coronavirus. it _ about monkeypox? well monkeypox is like coronavirus. it is _ about monkeypox? well monkeypox is like coronavirus. it is transmitted - like coronavirus. it is transmitted in a different way. it's a virus we have known about for decades now. it circulates in africa. normally, in a place like the uk, we get the occasional case from a returning traveller, but what's different this time is that we seem to have ongoing transmission, so people have become infected from contact with that first case and, as we've heard, there's quite a lot of cases in countries around the world that
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haven't had this kind of transmission before. so the numbers are not great. we are not too alarmed. and it's generally a mild disease, but we do need to try and understand what has changed and why we are seeing a different pattern. why do we think it is spreading in this way within the uk, within other countries? is it a different strain? we don't yet know. we are looking at various things. one possibility is the virus different? has it changed a little bit and become more easily transmitted? the second possibility is it is bad luck, a chance event. somebody, may be the first person who brought it out of africa was in close contact with a lot of people perhaps at a party or a nightclub or something and it spread from there but the third thing is that we used to all be vaccinated against smallpox, which is a related virus and that also protected against monkeypox. that vaccination, people under 50 don't have that vaccine knows that may be contributing as well. , ., ., .,,
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knows that may be contributing as well. , ., ., ., knows that may be contributing as well. , . ., ., , ., well. does that mean those of us who are over 50 — well. does that mean those of us who are over 50 are _ well. does that mean those of us who are over 50 are fine _ well. does that mean those of us who are over 50 are fine in _ well. does that mean those of us who are over 50 are fine in this _ are over 50 are fine in this situation?— are over 50 are fine in this situation? ~ . , , ~ , ., situation? we are less likely to have difficulties _ situation? we are less likely to have difficulties but _ situation? we are less likely to have difficulties but the - situation? we are less likely to have difficulties but the other. have difficulties but the other thing we know is that so far the people, most of the people affected are homosexual men and bisexual men and we think that's not necessarily that it's sexually transmitted but just that it's the kind of close physical contact that group has allowed the spread. you physical contact that group has allowed the spread.— physical contact that group has allowed the spread. you say is not a serious disease _ allowed the spread. you say is not a serious disease but _ allowed the spread. you say is not a serious disease but how— allowed the spread. you say is not a serious disease but how dangerous l allowed the spread. you say is not al serious disease but how dangerous is it? how severe can it be? iliai’eilii. serious disease but how dangerous is it? how severe can it be?— it? how severe can it be? well, in africa there _ it? how severe can it be? well, in africa there are _ it? how severe can it be? well, in africa there are two _ it? how severe can it be? well, in africa there are two strains - it? how severe can it be? well, in africa there are two strains of- it? how severe can it be? well, in africa there are two strains of the | africa there are two strains of the virus, the milder one has a death rate of about 1%. but doubts in people who may be malnourished, we've not had a death in this country from monkeypox ever as far as i know. and all the people who have been affected so far as far as we know have just had mild symptoms so the fever, headache, muscle aches, and then this quite characteristic rash.- aches, and then this quite characteristic rash. , ., characteristic rash. there were some re orts at characteristic rash. there were some reports at the _ characteristic rash. there were some reports at the weekend _
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characteristic rash. there were some reports at the weekend i _ characteristic rash. there were some reports at the weekend i saw - characteristic rash. there were some reports at the weekend i saw about | reports at the weekend i saw about speculation one person in the uk was in intensive care. is that confirmed?— in intensive care. is that confirmed? �* ., ., confirmed? i'm not able to comment further on that. _ confirmed? i'm not able to comment further on that. 0k. _ confirmed? i'm not able to comment further on that. 0k. what _ confirmed? i'm not able to comment further on that. 0k. what can - confirmed? i'm not able to comment| further on that. 0k. what can people do if they are — further on that. 0k. what can people do if they are at _ further on that. 0k. what can people do if they are at home _ further on that. 0k. what can people do if they are at home now _ further on that. 0k. what can people do if they are at home now thinking l do if they are at home now thinking i'm worried about a relative or myself? what would your main tip be for us to protect ourselves and stay safe? , ., , ., for us to protect ourselves and stay safe? , .,, ., , ., ., , safe? the people who should worry about themselves _ safe? the people who should worry about themselves are _ safe? the people who should worry about themselves are those - safe? the people who should worry about themselves are those who i safe? the people who should worry| about themselves are those who are known to have had contacts, so the advice from the uk health security agency is if you are one of the people who's had contact with a known case, you should isolate for three weeks and they will be in touch with you about this and also looking out for symptoms. for most people, it's really barely worth thinking about it all. obviously, ou're thinking about it all. obviously, you're from _ thinking about it all. obviously, you're from the _ thinking about it all. obviously, you're from the pandemic - thinking about it all. obviously, - you're from the pandemic institute. 0ver you're from the pandemic institute. over the last couple of years, there must be lessons which have been learned from handling outbreaks, obviously the coronavirus pandemic, what lessons can you apply to this situation that we are in now? the andemic situation that we are in now? iie: pandemic institute is
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situation that we are in now? "iie: pandemic institute is newly situation that we are in now? i“ie: pandemic institute is newly launched in liverpool, it was launched at the end of last year, and it was too very much address these kinds of emerging infection problem is we are seeing. 0ne emerging infection problem is we are seeing. one big lesson is we should stop treating these as unusual exceptional things. we have to be ready to deal with these kinds of problems in the future because they are going to continue to increase, so we need to have funding for research, diagnostics, drugs available, vaccines available, and also so we can understand why and how these diseases emerge, so we can do something about them. the how these diseases emerge, so we can do something about them.— do something about them. the latest firures do something about them. the latest fi . ures we do something about them. the latest figures we had _ do something about them. the latest figures we had at _ do something about them. the latest figures we had at the _ do something about them. the latest figures we had at the end _ do something about them. the latest figures we had at the end of- do something about them. the latest figures we had at the end of last - figures we had at the end of last week were about 20 cases in the uk. more figures are due today. what can we expect? what should we be prepared for in terms of numbers? well, it's hard to say. if the numbers had doubled, i wouldn't be that surprised because we are now actively looking for cases and this is a very mild disease. if you didn't look forward you probably wouldn't even know it had been a caring, so the numbers will go up. but the important thing is by identifying those cases we can
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isolate them and isolate their contacts and stop the spread. thanks so much for — contacts and stop the spread. thanks so much for coming _ contacts and stop the spread. thanks so much for coming in, _ contacts and stop the spread. thanks so much for coming in, that - contacts and stop the spread. thanks so much for coming in, that was - so much for coming in, that was reassuring i think. we've seen those images on the internet, some of it looks pretty terrifying but you have to understand that this morning. thanks so much. 0h to understand that this morning. thanks so much. oh my goodness, it was a stressful couple of hours for football fans yesterday. have you got any nails left? top and bottom of the premier league table. good morning. i know, what a day. what drama. unbelievable once again. manchester city certainly know how to deliver on it when it comes to the final day. cast your minds back to that match back here in 2012 when sergio aguero scored a 94th minute winner to hand manchester city their first premier league title. well, they were at it again yesterday. they were trailing 2—0 down against aston villa and needed to win yesterday to get the premier league title. well they had to score three
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goals in five crazy minutes to turn that game around which they did to hand them their fourth title in five seasons. it really was a dramatic final day once again. the only unsavoury moment was the pitch invasion here at the stadium after which saw the aston villa goalkeeper attacked. city have apologised, pep guardiola apologised and they've launched an investigation but it certainly appears a worrying trend. we've seen a lot of that in recent weeks. very different emotions is one of the other end of the table as well with matters to be decided, that final place being, the final relegation spot confirmed as well with burnley being relegated. then croucher can bring us the story of a dramatic final day. this day is manchester city's. premier league champions again. well, that's the simple version. they did it in a very manchester city way. ten years on from their first premier league, and you know who, it was deja vu. 2—0 down against aston villa,
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title on the line, city did their final day thing again. ilkay gundogan and then rodri threaded a new story into city's modern premier league tapestry. all it needed now was the finishing touch. de bruyne cross, gundogan scores! you cannot imagine the joy of our tears, was today, it was incredible relief, satisfaction. i want to shout for the whole organisation, for man city. there were tears of a different kind at anfield as liverpool's late win over wolves was too little, too late. they will still have the champions league to play for next weekend. this, though, was a day for highs and lows, the ups and downs. leeds started sunday staring at relegation. they finished it up on cloud nine. 0h, brilliant! leeds are safe! that's a bit burly were not. defeat by newcastle ends their
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six—year stay in the top flight. just devastated, really. all the season, we have just not been good enough, frankly. too many mistakes and not enough goals and that's going to result in you being down lower down the table. higher up, tottenham seized fourth spot and champions league football with a 5—0 win at norwich. son heung—min�*s brace means he shares the golden boot with mo salah. manchester united stumbled into sixth after losing at crystal palace. they will play in the europa league under new boss erik ten hag. and amongst city's celebrations, more unsavoury conduct in the pitch invasion. the club say they will investigate after and amongst city's celebrations, more unsavoury aston villa's robin 0lsen was attacked. what the hell is going through fans minds when they have just won the title, and we saw it in the forest sheffield united game, we saw it in the everton v palace game, we have seen it again today. it has to stop. yeah, we have seen one culprit, we have seen one jailed. but the premier league and the fa, they need to protect. that's the players place of work.
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they have got to do more. once the fans had dispersed, city were able to savour the latest addition to their trophy cabinet. and as the sun sets on another memorable premier league season, the blue moon has risen again. ben croucher, bbc news. wasn't it just? what wasn't itjust? what a finish. there was drama on the final day of golf�*s us pga championship. england's matt fitzpatrick and tommy fleetwood both just fell short of winning golf�*s us pga championship — finishing two shots behind the winnerjustin thomas. the american won the second major of his career — after producing a stunning final round. thomas trailed by seven shots at the start of the day — but produced a 3—under par round of 67 to move joint top of the leaderboard — and then beat fellow american will zalatoris on the third hole of a play—off. max verstappen is top of the formula one drivers' standings after being gifted victory in the spanish grand prix.
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title rival charles leclerc was forced to retire with engine problems. then red bull team orders meant sergio perez gave way for verstappen to take the win. britons george russell and lewis hamilton were third and fifth. the second major tennis tournament of the year is already under way in paris and a number of britain's top players will be in action later at the french open. they'll be hoping to avoid an upset at roland garros — something which the women's number six seed 0ns jabeur was unable to do. the tunisian was knocked out by madga linette losing by two sets to one. the pole will face harriet dart next, if the briton wins today. emma raducanu is also in action this afternoon as she prepares to make her french open debut. the us open champion will face czech qualifier linda noskova in the opening round. britain's heather watson, dan evans and cameron norrie are all also on court
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throughout the day. and finally, scottish runner eilish mccolgan had a day to remember at the great manchester run. a really impressive performance from her. she finished second to kenya's hellen 0biri in 30 minutes 19 seconds, a new british and european 10k record at the race. that shaved two seconds off paula radcliffe's record that had stood for almost two decades. what a run from her. and it's going to be an exciting day once again for those manchester city fans who will be able to relive all that drama once again and there will be a bus parade, we will see pep guardiola, the players on the streets of central manchester parading the trophy. that will get under way at around 6pm this evening and then of course worth mentioning liverpool in all of this were pushed manchester city is so close once again. the two standard teams in the premier league this season. no celebrations just yet for them with the two trophy
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they already have in the bag but they already have in the bag but they have the small matter don't day of the champions league final to come. 0ut of the champions league final to come. out in paris against real madrid no less. what a week, john. thanks very much indeed. what another week. can we cope with another week. can we cope with another week. can we cope with another week like last week? all good fun. unless you are on the wrong team. carol is at the chelsea flower show for us this morning. she is going to bring us all the weather. good morning, carol. it looks gorgeous there. it absolutely is, sall . looks gorgeous there. it absolutely is, sally. 0h _ looks gorgeous there. it absolutely is, sally. on every— looks gorgeous there. it absolutely is, sally. on every level, _ looks gorgeous there. it absolutely is, sally. on every level, as- looks gorgeous there. it absolutely is, sally. on every level, as well. l is, sally. on every level, as well. this morning and currently in the saint mungo is putting down roots garden and i'm going to talk to one of the garden designers. daryl, good morning. now this is fabulous. tell us a bit about it. this morning. now this is fabulous. tell us a bit about it.— us a bit about it. this is an urban ocket us a bit about it. this is an urban pocket park _ us a bit about it. this is an urban pocket park on — us a bit about it. this is an urban pocket park on a _ us a bit about it. this is an urban pocket park on a small— us a bit about it. this is an urban pocket park on a small increase l us a bit about it. this is an urban l pocket park on a small increase in city space — pocket park on a small increase in city space where people can enjoy the health and well—being city space where people can enjoy the health and well— being benefits of plants — the health and well— being benefits of plants. find the health and well-being benefits of lants. �* ., , i. of plants. and what is your connection _ of plants. and what is your connection of _ of plants. and what is your connection of saint -
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of plants. and what is your connection of saint mungo| of plants. and what is your i connection of saint mungo is charity? connection of saint mungo is chari ? ,,. connection of saint mungo is chari ? ~ ., , connection of saint mungo is chari ? ~ ., ., charity? saint mungo is as a homeless — charity? saint mungo is as a homeless charity _ charity? saint mungo is as a homeless charity which - charity? saint mungo is as a | homeless charity which helps charity? saint mungo is as a - homeless charity which helps people on the _ homeless charity which helps people on the pathway to recovery from homelessness and we got horticultural programme and we've been working on it for the last ten years _ been working on it for the last ten years so — been working on it for the last ten ears. ., " been working on it for the last ten ears. ., ~ ., , ., , ., years. so what kind of plants are in here? there's _ years. so what kind of plants are in here? there's an _ years. so what kind of plants are in here? there's an array _ years. so what kind of plants are in here? there's an array of _ years. so what kind of plants are in here? there's an array of plants . here? there's an array of plants from firms _ here? there's an array of plants from firms in _ here? there's an array of plants from firms in the _ here? there's an array of plants from firms in the deep - here? there's an array of plants from firms in the deep shade i here? there's an array of plants i from firms in the deep shade here here? there's an array of plants - from firms in the deep shade here to grasses— from firms in the deep shade here to grasses and — from firms in the deep shade here to grasses and perennials in the lighter— grasses and perennials in the lighter shaded area. one grasses and perennials in the lighter shaded area. one thing i have noticed _ lighter shaded area. one thing i have noticed is _ lighter shaded area. one thing i have noticed is there's - lighter shaded area. one thing i have noticed is there's lots - lighter shaded area. one thing i have noticed is there's lots of i lighter shaded area. one thing i i have noticed is there's lots of bees in this garden. mas have noticed is there's lots of bees in this garden-— have noticed is there's lots of bees in this garden. was that deliberate? biodiversity is _ in this garden. was that deliberate? biodiversity is really _ in this garden. was that deliberate? biodiversity is really important i biodiversity is really important particularly in urban areas so we are keen — particularly in urban areas so we are keen to— particularly in urban areas so we are keen to get their bees and invertebrates in here. you were tellinu invertebrates in here. you were telling me _ invertebrates in here. you were telling me a _ invertebrates in here. you were telling me a lot _ invertebrates in here. you were telling me a lot of _ invertebrates in here. you were telling me a lot of things i invertebrates in here. you were telling me a lot of things in i invertebrates in here. you were telling me a lot of things in this garden have been recycled. the?r garden have been recycled. they have, garden have been recycled. they have. some _ garden have been recycled. they have, some of _ garden have been recycled. they have, some of come _ garden have been recycled. they have, some of come from i garden have been recycled. they have, some of come from the chelsea flower— have, some of come from the chelsea flower show _ have, some of come from the chelsea flower show last year, and other spaces _ flower show last year, and other spaces as— flower show last year, and other spaces as well. paving, woodwork, so, yeah. _ spaces as well. paving, woodwork, so, yeah, recycling is really important. so, yeah, recycling is really important-— so, yeah, recycling is really important. so, yeah, recycling is really imortant. ~ . ., ,, , ., , important. what happens to this carden at important. what happens to this garden at the — important. what happens to this garden at the end _ important. what happens to this garden at the end of— important. what happens to this garden at the end of the - important. what happens to thisj garden at the end of the chelsea flower show? it garden at the end of the chelsea flower show?— garden at the end of the chelsea flower show? , .,. ., , ., flower show? it will be relocated so --eole can flower show? it will be relocated so people can enjoy — flower show? it will be relocated so people can enjoy it _ flower show? it will be relocated so people can enjoy it in _ flower show? it will be relocated so people can enjoy it in a _ flower show? it will be relocated so people can enjoy it in a public i people can enjoy it in a public space — people can en'oy it in a public sace. ~ ., ., people can en'oy it in a public sace. ~ ., space. well good luck and i hope you win a rize space. well good luck and i hope you win a prize because _ space. well good luck and i hope you win a prize because it _ space. well good luck and i hope you win a prize because it is _ space. well good luck and i hope you win a prize because it is fabulous. i win a prize because it is fabulous. thank you so much. look at the colours. a real kaleidoscope here.
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it looks beautiful here and it is and it is mild but this week the forecast is a bit more unsettled thanit forecast is a bit more unsettled than it was last week. we are looking at some rain at times. it's going to be cooler. and it also going to be cooler. and it also going to be fairly breezy. today, we have various weather fronts connected with low pressure. 0ne have various weather fronts connected with low pressure. one is sinking southwards from scotland and the other one is moving up the east coast across the south—east of england. both are going to bring rain and eventually they will merge. so it's a fairly cloudy start to the day. we got some rain as i mentioned in the north. a few showers in the west. that rain coming in across the far south—east moving upwards across east anglia and parts of the south—east. we might see the chelsea flower show are a bit later on. as temperatures rise through the day, we will see further showers develop especially in western areas but not exclusively and some of those will be heavy and sundry. temperatures today ranging from 12 in the north today ranging from 12 in the north to about 18 in the south. an increasing strengthening breeze in the south itself. as we head onto
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this evening and overnight, eventually the front coming south and heading north they will meet and produce rain across south—east scotland and also north—east england. there will still be a few showers around and there will be some clear skies but it's going to be another mild night. so tomorrow morning we start off with the rain which will be heavy at times across south—east scotland and north—east england, and it clears off into the north sea and behind it we will see a return to sunshine and showers. more sunshine around tomorrow. but some of the showers again could be heavy and sundry. temperature is very similar to what we are looking at today. again about up to 18 or 19 degrees at best. then, as we head into wednesday, a new weather front coming in from the atlantic will bring some heavy rain into the west especially western scotland. and that's going to be advancing eastwards and weakening so any rain in the south—east for example will be fairly patchy. and behind it we see a return to sunshine and showers but one thing you will notice about wednesday is it's going to be windy,
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more widely with temperatures again up more widely with temperatures again up to the high teens. john and sally, it's lovely here and i can't believe how many bees there are even at this time of day. you believe how many bees there are even at this time of day.— at this time of day. you are so ha - at this time of day. you are so happy to _ at this time of day. you are so happy to be — at this time of day. you are so happy to be back _ at this time of day. you are so happy to be back there, i at this time of day. you are so happy to be back there, aren't at this time of day. you are so i happy to be back there, aren't you? i canjust happy to be back there, aren't you? i can just tell. happy to be back there, aren't you? i can just tell-— happy to be back there, aren't you? i can just tell._ it's - i canjust tell. yes. yes. it's . reat i canjust tell. yes. yes. it's great to _ i canjust tell. yes. yes. it's great to see _ i canjust tell. yes. yes. it's great to see carol— i canjust tell. yes. yes. it's great to see carol back i i canjust tell. yes. yes. it's great to see carol back at i i can just tell. yes. yes. it's i great to see carol back at chelsea. carol, it's lovely to see you and we will talk to you very soon. we can kind of stay with horticultural theme. grass roots. sorry. we are talking about small grassroots pubs and clubs. the lifeblood of the music industry where up—and—coming artists can cut their teeth. meet the fans. get a bit sweaty. yes. smelly. you're not selling it to me, john. they were great venues. in the last two decades however more than third of them have closed down, often because of the high rents charged by commercial landlords. today the music venue trust is launching a new scheme to stop the rot and it's all about music—lovers clubbing together to own
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a stake in the buildings. abi smitton went to one of them to find out more. all schools, the music schools. what more do you want, like? people travel hundreds of miles to come here to see gigs. llt'sjust a beautiful, beautiful, | really beautiful, beautiful vibe. it's so laid back and relaxed and you can't do anything i but just enjoy it. it's the spine—tingling, foot—tapping sound of live music. jazz might at the ferret in preston. jazz night at the ferret in preston. you can't beat a really good audience reaction. it makes you play better. and obviously as a musician, you enjoy it more. you know, it's fantastic. live music, come and see some live music. that's the thing. that's what we're all about. the ferret is a staple
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of the grassroots music scene. # angels fly, fly, fly... before the slick polished lights and action of the arena tour, ed sheeran played here in 2011. despite its rich history, there are concerns for its future. earlier this year, the landlord put the building up for sale. we've come through the pandemic and we're still putting on gigs. then there's been the cost of living crisis, so people are a bit more reluctant to go out and spend money on gigs. but the biggest worry now is that the property is in the hands of a private landlord and they've put the property up for sale. it just shows that you can fight through the pandemic and you can get through all sorts of problems, but the landlord could take this away at any point by selling the building. it's thought nearly all grassroots music venues are owned by commercial landlords. 35% of them have had to close over the past 20 years. a new scheme from the charity the music venues trust is hoping to protect the future of nine grassroots venues,
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including the ferret. they want to raise enough money to buy the sites. we're really, really chuffed to be one of the first venues to be to be involved in this. it's come at exactly the right time with our building going up for sale in the last couple of months. it's thought it'll cost around £3.5 million. the trust is offering fans the chance to purchase shares, meaning they'll own a little part of a venue that means so much to them. it's really, really, really important to come and have live music, especially since lockdown ended. one of the things that's kept me going is coming to live gigs, seeing music and just chatting with people and even like this can sound really weird, but random people, you have gig buddies, you'll sit and chat to someone for the entire night watching music and you can't get that without music or comedy or people just trying to get out there on stage. the stage is set. it's hoped the new scheme will strike the right chord with certain music fans.
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yes, absolutely. i buy shares in it and i don't know whether you know, but ed sheeran played here a while back. and if ed's listening, would you buy some shares as well? i know you've got a few quid. abi smitton, bbc news. are you watching, ed sheeran? did you get that message? i think you did. it's great, isn't it, it's great going to an arena or a stadium but smaller is better. definitely. megan paterson in glasgow at one of the venues that's going to be helped by the scheme. good morning, megan. good morning. welcome to the glad cafe in glasgow's outside. for almost ten years has pace been getting new musicians a chance and putting on gig nights, running workshops, and
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also connected to a thrift shop so there's a lot going on here. but it's a not—for—profit company so paying the rent can be difficult and it is one of the beneficiaries of the music venue trust scheme hopefully making things a lot easier here. i'm pleased to say rory hayes, the manager, is with us this morning. rory, how difficult can it be to run an independent venue like this? it be to run an independent venue like this? .. be to run an independent venue like this? , , this? it can be extremely challenging. _ this? it can be extremely challenging. i— this? it can be extremely challenging. i mean, i this? it can be extremely i challenging. i mean, putting this? it can be extremely - challenging. i mean, putting aside covid _ challenging. i mean, putting aside covid and — challenging. i mean, putting aside covid and all the pressures that put on, businesses like ours, we are in a listed _ on, businesses like ours, we are in a listed victorian building with extensive issues, we've got a massive — extensive issues, we've got a massive roofing project going on, which _ massive roofing project going on, which we — massive roofing project going on, which we had to raise £40,000 towards — which we had to raise £40,000 towards. in 2019. and as a not—for—profit business it is our priority— not—for—profit business it is our priority to — not—for—profit business it is our priority to try and make all of our activities — priority to try and make all of our activities as — priority to try and make all of our activities as accessible as possible which _ activities as accessible as possible which means our margins are tight. it's which means our margins are tight. it's a _ which means our margins are tight. it's a challenge. the music venue trust are taking over the freehold here, owning the building, what difference will that make to you? i
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difference will that make to you? i mean, it could make all the difference in the world to be honest _ difference in the world to be honest. the music venues trust has been _ honest. the music venues trust has been such— honest. the music venues trust has been such an — honest. the music venues trust has been such an amazing support to us directly— been such an amazing support to us directly and — been such an amazing support to us directly and just to grassroots music— directly and just to grassroots music venues through covid, and i think— music venues through covid, and i think having — music venues through covid, and i think having a landlord that has first-hand — think having a landlord that has first—hand experience of the difficulties of running these kinds of businesses, that's invested in supporting us, to maintain the building. — supporting us, to maintain the building, and prioritise what we ought _ building, and prioritise what we ought to— building, and prioritise what we ought to be doing, which is investing in nurturing new talent and helping just get music out there — and helping 'ust get music out there. ., , ., , there. you were playing here last niuht and there. you were playing here last night and had _ there. you were playing here last night and had a _ there. you were playing here last night and had a late _ there. you were playing here last night and had a late one - there. you were playing here last night and had a late one so - there. you were playing here last night and had a late one so we i there. you were playing here last| night and had a late one so we are very grateful you are here with us this morning. tell us what the atmosphere is like when you get people down here to be small intimate venues hearing different musicians we in week out. what is it like? �* , , musicians we in week out. what is it like? �*, , ., ., like? it's my favourite thing in the world to be _ like? it's my favourite thing in the world to be honest _ like? it's my favourite thing in the world to be honest and _ like? it's my favourite thing in the world to be honest and i've - like? it's my favourite thing in the world to be honest and i've been l world to be honest and i've been playing _ world to be honest and i've been playing music for 20 years really and i_ playing music for 20 years really and i came — playing music for 20 years really and i came to glasgow specifically for the _ and i came to glasgow specifically for the music and i love big shows but for— for the music and i love big shows but for me. — for the music and i love big shows but for me, these kind of smaller venues _ but for me, these kind of smaller venues are — but for me, these kind of smaller venues are where the real magic is and you _ venues are where the real magic is and you have such an opportunity to
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kind of— and you have such an opportunity to kind of connect with your friends and with— kind of connect with your friends and with the musicians in a way which _ and with the musicians in a way which is — and with the musicians in a way which is unbeatable so it's a real pleasure. — which is unbeatable so it's a real pleasure, yeah. which is unbeatable so it's a real pleasure. yeah-— which is unbeatable so it's a real pleasure, yeah. rory, i can see the twinklin: pleasure, yeah. rory, i can see the twinkling in — pleasure, yeah. rory, i can see the twinkling in your— pleasure, yeah. rory, i can see the twinkling in your eyes _ pleasure, yeah. rory, i can see the twinkling in your eyes when - pleasure, yeah. rory, i can see the twinkling in your eyes when you - pleasure, yeah. rory, i can see the| twinkling in your eyes when you talk about playing music here. this is one of nine venues across the country which will take part in the music venue trust pilot and hopefully keeping the doors open and getting more new musicians through their man performing for audiences across the country.— across the country. absolutely, let's try and — across the country. absolutely, let's try and save _ across the country. absolutely, let's try and save them. - across the country. absolutely, | let's try and save them. megan, thank you so much. it's great to see that. it's so important. just four places which don't have huge venues you can't get there, it's too expensive to get to. they make a massive difference. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we will see you in just a bit. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. new figures on the number of monkeypox cases are expected today with most of the 20 cases so far, confirmed in london. some sexual health doctors have expressed concerns about how the virus could impact services.
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the government says it provides billions of pounds of funding through public health grants. there's been a lot of enquiries but perhaps not overwhelmingly so and i think at the moment we are managing. i think the difficulty is that sexual health services have been so squeezed over the last decade or so. we've seen huge cuts in funding. we've seen reductions in staff and we don't have an awful lot of capacity or resilience for dealing with new issues. a new report suggests that black and asian women in the uk are being harmed by racial discrimination in maternity care. a year—long inquiry by the charity, birthrights, found mothers reported feeling unsafe, were denied pain relief, and faced stereotyping. the department of health said a task force had been set up to address factors linked to disparities in the quality of maternity care. final preparations are under way for the opening of the elizabeth line tomorrow morning. three and half years late, billions of pounds over—budget,
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the line stretching from reading in the west to shenfield in the east will serve up to 200 millions passengers a year. the first train will run at 6.30am. let's take a look at the tube situation this morning. there are minor delays on the district line. other services running well. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. we've got a rather unsettled week of weather ahead. yesterday we got 24 celsius and plenty of sunshine. today there's not quite so much sun. it's quite an unsettled picture. you can see various fronts moving through so first thing maybe a little bit of brightness. you might see a little bit of blue sky but fairly quickly the cloud will increase. coming up from the south we've got a heavy hand of rain largely affecting the south—east but we could get showers everywhere. a breezy day too. temperatures reaching 18 celsius. so quite a bit cooler than yesterday. now overnight we're still going to see some showers blowing through. it stays breezy. it stays cloudy overnight.
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the minimum temperature dropping down to nine celsius so another cloudy start tomorrow. but the cloud tomorrow a little more willing to break up. we will however see further showers. now with the sun we'll see the heat of the daytime and more frequent showers through the course of tomorrow. you might even get the odd rumble of thunder. temperatures tomorrow very similar at around 18 celsius. now, as we head further through the week for wednesday, a largely cloudy start, some brighter spells in the afternoon. more sunshine for thursday and gradually the temperature getting a little bit warmer as we head towards the weekend. there's not long to go now until the queen's platinum jubilee. we'd love to know how you will be celebrating? and we might even bring our cameras. if you're doing something special — get in touch by emailing us. i'll be back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back tojon and sally. bye for now.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent. our headlines today. thousands more youngsters will end up in care unless there's a radical reset of the system. that's the warning from a landmark review of child protection in england. almost 700 fewer services a day. scotrail, the company running most trains in scotland, brings in a severely reduced timetable, over a driver shortage and pay dispute. a dramatic comeback on an extraordinary final day, i'm at the home of the premier league champions manchester city. this day is manchester city's. premier league champions again. they lift the trophy after coming from behind to beat aston villa but a pitch invasion and an attack on the villa keeper sparks a club investigation.
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hello, i'm harry. welcome to my house. i love it here. i like to listen to music and read and hang out with my friends. harry styles as you've never seen him before, in his pyjamas no less, as he gets in the mood for reading a children's bedtime story. it's monday 23rd may. children's social care needs radical change to avoid tens of thousands more youngsters being taken away from theirfamilies. that's the warning following a major review into child protection services in england. the report says the current system is too heavily based on crisis intervention, and calls for a windfall tax on the profits of the biggest privately run children's homes. here's our social affairs editor, alison holt. ok, so let me know how it's been going since the panel. henrietta works with young people to help them pitch ideas and get their voices heard.
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and also it would be good to know, like, how you found working on the project as well. her own life was shaped by the crisis in the children's care system that today's report wants to change. after two difficult years, she was removed from her mother by social services. she was 14 and in the next month she was moved between five different homes. for me, being in care felt like a never—ending storm, just, like, every day not knowing where the support is going to be from, where am i even going to lay my head, where is the support for the families at the start when they are struggling, why does it need to be when they are taken away? and you can't put kids into dysfunction, when you have taken them out of dysfunction. it makes no sense. today's review said a radical reset is needed to shift the focus of children's social care away from crisis intervention. it wants more early help available in schools and communities, a new expert social worker role to strengthen child protection. the phasing out of what is described as wholly unsuitable young
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offenders institutions. a windfall tax on the profits of large children's homes companies, and to ensure change happens, an extra £2.6 billion funding for services over the next five years. these parents have had either children taken into care or they have come close to it. you know, we all understand that each day is different for everybody. here they have found support, counselling and advice which has turned their lives around. my little boy has been in with me a year and a half now and i never thought that would be possible again. and any time i need support, i reach out to new beginnings. they're like family, they are family, they are family that i never had. they have given me so much support the tools and strategies to work with, with my son who has got needs, special needs. and, again, they have given me the strength to push on to not make the mistakes again.
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the government says it is piloting additionalfamily hubs providing early support. it also accepts more needs to be done to support family members, kinship carers, who take on a child who would otherwise go into care, and to find more foster carers. i think there is a real opportunity for us to get those children a loving, supportive home, and we know that family relationships and kinship care is equally important. the system needs to obsess about those relationships because that is how you get great outcomes for the children that need the most help in our society. the government says it will consider other recommendations over the longer term. alison holt, bbc news. we're joined now by the report author, josh macalister. thank author, josh macalister. you forjoining us from london. thank you forjoining us from london. dysfunctional is the word that you are using, just describe what you mean by that, how broken is
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the system?— the system? what we have seen throu~h the system? what we have seen through having _ the system? what we have seen through having thousands - the system? what we have seen through having thousands of- through having thousands of conversations with people over the last 14 months who have lived through and in the children's social care system as children or parents, carers and grandparents, it is a system tilted towards crisis prevention, people working in it recognise that, and we need to see it tilts towards backing those people who love and care for children most in need whether it be family members, foster carers, and other people in the community. that is the big reset that we are calling for today. is the big reset that we are calling for toda . ~ ., ., ., , for today. what would that reset look like, how— for today. what would that reset look like, how would _ for today. what would that reset look like, how would it - for today. what would that reset look like, how would it change i for today. what would that reset | look like, how would it change in terms of what those families and kids see in the future if you got your way?— kids see in the future if you got our wa ? ., , , your way? one of the big things we are callin: your way? one of the big things we are calling for _ your way? one of the big things we are calling for is _ your way? one of the big things we are calling for is a _ your way? one of the big things we are calling for is a new— your way? one of the big things we are calling for is a new family - your way? one of the big things we are calling for is a new family help| are calling for is a new family help system which is less complicated, less bureaucratic than the current setup that we have got in the system at the moment. and it brings a whole range of different professionals, multidisciplinary teams, into
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community settings that the public recognise and trust. so schools, family helps, as other community settings, and puts significant resources and a new framework around that kind of work. so when parents are struggling with addiction or in are struggling with addiction or in a violent relationship, they actually get really meaningful, intensive support at that time. that's one of the major recommendations we are making that would shift resources in the system and support families at the right time. . , and support families at the right time. ., , ., ., time. that is on the ground in the community- _ time. that is on the ground in the community- i _ time. that is on the ground in the community. i was _ time. that is on the ground in the community. i was struck - time. that is on the ground in the community. i was struck as - time. that is on the ground in the community. i was struck as well. time. that is on the ground in the | community. i was struck as well by your suggestion that we may be phased out young offender institutions in england altogether, why would that be? we institutions in england altogether, why would that be?— institutions in england altogether, why would that be? we are calling for those institutes _ why would that be? we are calling for those institutes to _ why would that be? we are calling for those institutes to be - why would that be? we are calling for those institutes to be phased l for those institutes to be phased out and to make better use of and more use of secure children's homes which have got a much better outcome. one of the things i was struck by going into young offenders institutes over the last year is how wholly unsuitable they are for the most vulnerable children. there was a report out on friday about one
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institute in stoke, where they have beenin institute in stoke, where they have been in the last six months 100 assaults between children in that institution. they are failing on their own terms of rehabilitation as many children who were there have not been sentenced. they are there on remand. it'sjust one example not been sentenced. they are there on remand. it's just one example of a system where if you just look at one or two of the issues, you can see the scale of the challenge and the scale of the change that we now need to see as well. you the scale of the change that we now need to see as well.— need to see as well. you are calling this a reset. — need to see as well. you are calling this a reset. a _ need to see as well. you are calling this a reset, a reboot _ need to see as well. you are calling this a reset, a reboot of _ need to see as well. you are calling this a reset, a reboot of the - need to see as well. you are calling this a reset, a reboot of the whole l this a reset, a reboot of the whole system. which of course is expensive, isn't it? one of your suggestions is a windfall tax to help pay for it, explain how that would work and who it would affect. we have seen dysfunction in the way that the children's social care and reluctance, —— i am reluctant to call at this, the market works for fostering and social care. as a result of that dysfunction, the private companies which have grown
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over the last decade or so have made handsome profits. we are saying some of that money should be reinvested into the system to fix that problem. the transformed care system that we are arguing for here links back to the package we had earlier with henrietta. we need to find a care system where homes are available filled with the sorts of people who can provide stable, long—term, loving relationships, near schools and communities these young people already live in. that's the big change we need to see in the care system. change we need to see in the care s stem. . ., ., ,., change we need to see in the care s stem. . ., ., i. ., ., system. the challenge for you on a da like system. the challenge for you on a day like this _ system. the challenge for you on a day like this is _ system. the challenge for you on a day like this is you _ system. the challenge for you on a day like this is you do _ system. the challenge for you on a day like this is you do all _ system. the challenge for you on a day like this is you do all of - system. the challenge for you on a day like this is you do all of this - day like this is you do all of this work for months, you present the paper and it gets out there and you have the debate, how convinced are you that these proposals will at least in part to be taken in by the government, that this will not end “p government, that this will not end up in a filing cabinet somewhere? there are some positive noises today and we have said the government need to go away and consider full recommendations and respond to this calendar year, recommendations and respond to this calendaryear, not later recommendations and respond to this calendar year, not later so in the
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next few months, with the detailed implementation plan. we have done a review differently, we have not come up review differently, we have not come up with broad recommendations, we have also said how and when they should began and what the costing is. the money argument is irrefutable, the costs of the system are rising and we are looking at a system in 2032 in ten years that will cost £15 billion a year if we don't do anything. and outcomes will not be any better. the investment are arguing for will tilts the system, reset it so it works for the children of families who need it the most. , ., , children of families who need it the most. �* , children of families who need it the most. , ., most. josh macalister, who chaired the review for _ most. josh macalister, who chaired the review for the _ most. josh macalister, who chaired the review for the children's - most. josh macalister, who chaired the review for the children's social. the review for the children's social care review in england, thinking. a nurse at a children's hospital has been arrested on suspicion of administering poison with intent to endanger life after a young child died on thursday. the child was being treated in the intensive care department at birmingham children's hospital,
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which confirmed it has suspended a member of staff. the nurse, a 27—year—old woman, has been released pending further inquiries. russia has lost as many soldiers in its three—month invasion of ukraine as the soviet union lost in their entire nine—year war in afghanistan. that's according to british military intelligence who say both tactical and strategic failings are to blame. it comes as russia continues its offensives in the east of the country with attempts to encircle the eastern city of severodonetsk. our correspondent in kyiv, joe inwood, has the latest. good morning. russia seems to be faring badly at the moment, but how will it affect putin's tactics? i will it affect putin's tactics? i think it is worth saying that a lot of these deaths would have come at the start of the war, which really was disastrous for the russians. i'm sure viewers will remember seeing that huge column of armoured vehicles was trundling ominously down towards kyiv, and then
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basically got wiped out. they had a lot of disasters at the start. now it is fair to say they are faring better on the battlefield. you mention to the city of severodonetsk, having consolidated their hold of the city of mariupol, they are now trying to encircle the forces that are defending this easternmost point of ukrainian lines. they have started to break through but it is still tough going. the ukrainians are very well dug in, they are very determined. these are battle hardened soldiers. so we are seeing an increasingly bloody, attritional battle, very heavy artillery being brought to bear. attritional battle, very heavy artillery being brought to hear. the question for the ukrainians is how quickly they can get the promised equipment coming from the west, how quickly can they get it to the front lines and how far will the russians have advanced by the time it enters the fight? have advanced by the time it enters the fiuht? . ~' have advanced by the time it enters the fiuht? ., ~ i. , have advanced by the time it enters the fiuht? . ~ ,, y . have advanced by the time it enters thefiuht? . , . anyone at high risk of having caught monkeypox should isolate for 21 days. that's the latest official guidance
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from the uk health security agency. those who may be infected are asked to cancel travel plans, and avoid contact with immunosuppressed people, pregnant women, and children under 12. on friday there were 20 confirmed cases in the uk, but that number is expected to rise today. we seem to have ongoing transmissions so people have become infected from contact with that first case and, as we've heard, there's quite a lot of cases in countries around the world that haven't had this kind of transmission before, so the numbers are not great. we're not too alarmed and it's generally a mild disease. but we do need to try and understand what's changed, why we're seeing a different pattern. australia's new prime minister anthony albanese has officially taken up office. his swearing—in ceremony took place overnight and one of his first duties will be to meet the us presidentjoe biden, along with other world leaders, injapan. he'll lead australia's first labor government in almost a decade.
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a special five—pound coin will be released to mark prince william's 40th birthday onjune 21st. here it is, there he is! the coin features his portrait, his initial and the number 40. it's a very good likeness, i think. it's a very good likeness, i think. it looks just like it's a very good likeness, i think. it looksjust like him.— it's the first time prince william will appear alone on an official coin by the royal mint. i don't know if you can actually spend them. i don't know if you can actually spend them-— spend them. let's find out. presentation _ spend them. let's find out. presentation packs. - spend them. let's find out. presentation packs. now. spend them. let's find out. | presentation packs. now the spend them. let's find out. - presentation packs. now the news spend them. let's find out. _ presentation packs. now the news we have all been waiting for! the cbeebies channel has a habit of bagging some of the world's biggest names to read its bedtime stories, from dolly parton to the actor tom hardy... he was a very big success!
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and the duchess of cambridge. well, they've done it again. harry styles is in the chair tonight and he's worn his pyjamas for the occasion. hello, i'm harry. welcome to my house. i love it here. i like to listen to music and read and hang out with my friends. tonight's bedtime story is about a house full of love and laughter. it's called, in every house, on every street and it's byjess hitchman with pictures by lili la baleine. and you can watch harry styles' bedtime story tonight at 6.50pm on cbeebies and bbc iplayer. is this for the benefit of the children or the parents? {lit is this for the benefit of the children or the parents? of course! that twinkly _ children or the parents? of course! that twinkly parents _ children or the parents? of course! that twinkly parents always - children or the parents? of course! that twinkly parents always takes l children or the parents? of course! l that twinkly parents always takes me back to my little kids. so cute. when we were with our kids, harry
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styles is probably what you get! good to see him rocking his pyjamas! carol is just up as well. she good to see him rocking his py'amas! carol isjust up as mat carol is 'ust up as well. she has one carol isjust up as well. she has gone floral. _ carol isjust up as well. she has gone floral, what _ carol isjust up as well. she has gone floral, what else - carol isjust up as well. she has gone floral, what else would i carol isjust up as well. she has| gone floral, what else would you wear at the chelsea flower show than a gorgeous floral dress! thank you, both! good morning. i thank you, both! good morning. lam at one of the 13 show gardens here in the chelsea flower show, this is the mind garden, designed by andy sturgeon, it's a place to sit and listen and relax. there are lots of wild flowers here, listen and relax. there are lots of wildflowers here, attracting listen and relax. there are lots of wild flowers here, attracting lots of bees, either that or i am and they are following me! the other thing which adds to the tranquillity of this garden is the running water. it is a very calming place to be. it's quite mild this morning as well. the forecast for the rest of this week isn't as settled as it was last week, it will be cooler, it will be breezy at times, and some
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rain at times. having said that there will be some sunshine in between as well. today we have rain across the north of scotland, rain coming in across the south—east of england, that rain will push across east anglia. it could get into the chelsea flower show this afternoon or it might stay a little further east. the rest of us will have a cloudy start, showers, we have them in the west already. further will develop during the day and some of those could be heavy and plundering. temperatures ranging from 12 to 18 degrees. the breeze is picking up in the south. this evening and overnight the rain sinks southwards, the rain in south—east england moves north. and they meet in north—east england and south to scotland. some showers around, not a cold night. tomorrow we start with the rain across south—east scotland and north—east england, that pulls away into the north sea. there will be more sunshine tomorrow than today
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but we are lookingj once again of sunshine and showers, some will be heavy and thundery with highs similar to today, up to 18 or 19 degrees. if you wanted it a bit more settled, you will have to wait till the end of the week when high pressure re—establishes itself across the uk. we pressure re-establishes itself across the uk.— pressure re-establishes itself across the uk. pressure re-establishes itself acrossthe uk. ., ., ., across the uk. we look forward to it, thank across the uk. we look forward to it. thank you. _ across the uk. we look forward to it, thank you, glorious _ across the uk. we look forward to it, thank you, glorious pictures. i if you're planning to catch a train in scotland today, you'd better check it's still running because 700 services a day have been slashed in a new timetable. it's down to a dispute over pay between drivers who are refusing to work overtime and scotrail. our correspondent jamie mclvor is outside glasgow queen street station. jamie, how bad is this disruption going to be? jamie, how bad is this disruption going to be? selig. jamie, how bad is this disruption going to jamie, how bad is this disruption auoin to be? , , jamie, how bad is this disruption going to jamie, how bad is this disruption auoin to be? , , , jamie, how bad is this disruption going to jamie, how bad is this disruption oaianto be? , , , , going to be? sally, this is very substantial _ going to be? sally, this is very substantial disruption - going to be? sally, this is very substantial disruption to - going to be? sally, this is very i substantial disruption to services all across scotland. roughly a third
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of the services in the normal summer timetable having taken of, someone —— taken out, 700 a day. the trains will be far less frequent than usual on some lines so customers should go online to check the timetable. a particular problem will be in the evening. the last train home will often be significantly earlier than usual. for example, the last train from glasgow to dundee will be at temple seven in the evening, and to stirling will be before eight o'clock. —— at ten past seven. so pubs, bars and restaurants, just getting back to normal after the past two years, they are worried customers may stay away. they are also worried about some of their staff being unable to get home easily. the problem here is basically about a shortage of drivers linked to a pay dispute. drivers are not happy about a 2.2% pay offer, so many of them have been
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turning out over time. scotrail is backin turning out over time. scotrail is back in the public sector in scotland, brought back into public ownership by the scottish government seven weeks ago. it's very difficult to see how drivers could be offered a substantial pay rise unless other public sector workers could be offered a bigger pay rise. so it's not at the point of official industrial action although aslef, the drivers union, is balloting. thank you very much indeed. we will stay with that story. meanwhile, a strike ballot of 40,000 rail workers across the uk which could result in strikes over the summer closes tomorrow. let's speak now to railway operations consultant, anna—jane hunter. good morning, thank you for coming in. a very significant week this week for rail travel. we had about scotland but across the uk this could be an issue for lots of people. could be an issue for lots of a-eole. , , . ,
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could be an issue for lots of a-eole, , , . , ., , people. yes, this affects thousands of a-eole, people. yes, this affects thousands of people. they _ people. yes, this affects thousands of people, they are _ people. yes, this affects thousands of people, they are being _ people. yes, this affects thousands of people, they are being balloted l of people, they are being balloted for action and we await the outcome in the next day or so and see what the members feel and what impact that will have on the industry. what that will have on the industry. what are the reasons _ that will have on the industry. what are the reasons behind _ that will have on the industry. what are the reasons behind this call for strike action?— strike action? lots of reasons, it has been a _ strike action? lots of reasons, it has been a difficult _ strike action? lots of reasons, it has been a difficult few- strike action? lots of reasons, it has been a difficult few years, i has been a difficult few years, everyone has felt that during the pandemic. there were some issues from before the pandemic, the industry has been trying to modernise and it needs to, they have been trying to do that for many years and some of those issues have been exacerbated by the pandemic and accelerated. so a change in working practices, the need to modernise ways in working, the way that staff interact with passengers, the way people buy tickets, all of this is in the mix and it is extremely complicated. in the mix and it is extremely complicated-— in the mix and it is extremely complicated. in the mix and it is extremely com-licated. ~ ,, ,, ._ complicated. when you say the way staff interact _ complicated. when you say the way staff interact with _ complicated. when you say the way staff interact with passengers, - complicated. when you say the way| staff interact with passengers, what did that mean? the staff interact with passengers, what did that mean?— staff interact with passengers, what did that mean? the victorian system at the heart — did that mean? the victorian system at the heart of _ did that mean? the victorian system at the heart of the _ did that mean? the victorian system at the heart of the railways, - did that mean? the victorian system at the heart of the railways, there i at the heart of the railways, there are ways in which that hasn't changed in 100 years. the way people
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buy tickets has changed a lot, on apps and on the phone is an online, the railways are playing catch up on trying to keep it running at the same time. trying to keep it running at the same time-— trying to keep it running at the same time. ., ., ., same time. you have mentioned the randemic same time. you have mentioned the pandemic a — same time. you have mentioned the pandemic a couple _ same time. you have mentioned the pandemic a couple of— same time. you have mentioned the pandemic a couple of times, - same time. you have mentioned the pandemic a couple of times, the i pandemic a couple of times, the industry was already changing and now you don't know what it is changing too, because you don't know how much people will be commuting, things like season tickets, will people be going into work every day like they used to? it's hard to plan. it like they used to? it's hard to ian, ., , , ., like they used to? it's hard to ian. ., , , ., ., plan. it really is and the railway is therefore _ plan. it really is and the railway is therefore a _ plan. it really is and the railway is therefore a lot _ plan. it really is and the railway is therefore a lot of _ plan. it really is and the railway is therefore a lot of things, i plan. it really is and the railway is therefore a lot of things, not | is therefore a lot of things, not just commuters. and one of the things which came to the fore in the pandemic was freight, the railway keeps a lot of critical freight traffic moving in the realm needs to be sustainable for all of those things. —— said the railway needs to be sustainable for all of those things. be sustainable for all of those thinas. �* ., ., , ,, , things. and all the while fares keep oaain u-, things. and all the while fares keep going op. how _ things. and all the while fares keep going op. how do — things. and all the while fares keep going up, how do they _ things. and all the while fares keep going up, how do they modernise i things. and all the while fares keep i going up, how do they modernise and change things without passing costs onto communities —— commuters? it is
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onto communities -- commuters? it is interestina onto communities —— commuters? it 3 interesting because people need to feel like they value the railway, people dubai tickets but there is also taxpayer money going into it. it's the bits that you do not see, not the bits that you buy tickets for. it's like the freight and the things behind the scenes. nobody wants to pay _ things behind the scenes. nobody wants to pay more. _ things behind the scenes. nobody wants to pay more. we _ things behind the scenes. nobody wants to pay more. we want i things behind the scenes. nobody wants to pay more. we want to i things behind the scenes. nobody. wants to pay more. we want to see prices stay the same or go down especially with all the other pressures at the moment but we do not like change either on the railways. a lot of us have an emotional... you talk about the victorians, we like to see staff at the station and we like to have a chat with somebody at the counter, we are resistant. it is chat with somebody at the counter, we are resistant.— we are resistant. it is emotional, it reminds _ we are resistant. it is emotional, it reminds me — we are resistant. it is emotional, it reminds me of— we are resistant. it is emotional, it reminds me of the _ we are resistant. it is emotional, it reminds me of the nhs - we are resistant. it is emotional, it reminds me of the nhs and i we are resistant. it is emotional, i it reminds me of the nhs and things that we feel emotionally invested in as a nation. and the railway is definitely one of those things. that's why it is so sensitive when we talk about fares and cost—cutting, these things, but at the end of the day we need to run a
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good safe service and that is at the heart of everything at the railway. anne—jane hunter, thank you for coming in and explaining all of that. �* coming in and explaining all of that. . , ., ., that. are you getting the train home? i'm — that. are you getting the train home? i'm not, _ that. are you getting the train home? i'm not, actually? i that. are you getting the train | home? i'm not, actually? why that. are you getting the train i home? i'm not, actually? why not! thank ou home? i'm not, actually? why not! thank you for— home? i'm not, actually? why not! thank you for coming _ home? i'm not, actually? why not! thank you for coming in. _ more than 53,000 ukrainian refugees have arrived since the invasion began, many of them staying in peoples houses. but one woman has given her entire hotel over to the refugees. we went to meet her. it has been welcoming holiday—makers to western for the past 60 years. this hotel opened in 1962, and has been open every single summer since. but for the first time, there will
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be no tourists this year. the hotel owner will still have plenty of guests, though. she is turning all 54 rooms, her entire hotel, into a home for ukrainian refugees. fin 54 rooms, her entire hotel, into a home for ukrainian refugees. on the 24th of february, _ home for ukrainian refugees. on the 24th of february, it _ home for ukrainian refugees. on the 24th of february, it was _ home for ukrainian refugees. on the 24th of february, it was very - home for ukrainian refugees. on the 24th of february, it was very loud, i 24th of february, it was very loud, and very bright. and i understood that it and very bright. and i understood thatitis and very bright. and i understood that it is war. she and very bright. and i understood that it is war.— and very bright. and i understood that it is war. she left her home in south-eastern _ that it is war. she left her home in south-eastern ukraine _ that it is war. she left her home in south-eastern ukraine when i that it is war. she left her home in south-eastern ukraine when the i south—eastern ukraine when the explosions started. she is one of the first to arrive here. it is explosions started. she is one of the first to arrive here.— the first to arrive here. it is a very bad _ the first to arrive here. it is a very bad situation, _ the first to arrive here. it is a very bad situation, because l the first to arrive here. it is a i very bad situation, because they haven't got gas, they have got heating, they haven't got ukrainian money. because they can't pay with a card, because they have not got into that. so card, because they have not got into that. , card, because they have not got into that, , , ., card, because they have not got into that. , , ., ., , that. so this is one of the rooms, but it is full— that. so this is one of the rooms, but it is full of _ that. so this is one of the rooms, but it is full of stuff, _ that. so this is one of the rooms, but it is full of stuff, what - that. so this is one of the rooms, but it is full of stuff, what is i that. so this is one of the rooms, but it is full of stuff, what is in i but it is full of stuff, what is in here? it but it is full of stuff, what is in here? , , . ~ but it is full of stuff, what is in here? , , ., . ., here? it is, yeah. when we told
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everybody _ here? it is, yeah. when we told everybody what _ here? it is, yeah. when we told everybody what we _ here? it is, yeah. when we told everybody what we were - here? it is, yeah. when we told everybody what we were doing, j here? it is, yeah. when we told i everybody what we were doing, they decided _ everybody what we were doing, they decided that they wanted to help. so decided that they wanted to help. sc this is decided that they wanted to help. this is all decided that they wanted to help. sr this is all donations from the local area who want to get involved? amazing. area who want to get involved? amazina. , , ., , amazing. yes. some people are using gooale amazing. yes. some people are using google translate _ amazing. yes. some people are using google translate to _ amazing. yes. some people are using google translate to get _ amazing. yes. some people are using google translate to get here - amazing. yes. some people are using google translate to get here and i google translate to get here and when _ google translate to get here and when they get here they need help, so we _ when they get here they need help, so we are _ when they get here they need help, so we are grateful to have people who can _ so we are grateful to have people who can speak english as well, they are speaking to people on what's happened over the internetjust happened over the internet just reassuring happened over the internetjust reassuring them and making sure they know when _ reassuring them and making sure they know when they get here they will be safe and _ know when they get here they will be safe and taken care of. the know when they get here they will be safe and taken care of.— safe and taken care of. the owner came to the _ safe and taken care of. the owner came to the uk — safe and taken care of. the owner came to the uk from _ safe and taken care of. the owner came to the uk from cyprus i safe and taken care of. the owner came to the uk from cyprus in i safe and taken care of. the owner| came to the uk from cyprus in the 60s. this family photo was taken a few years later. but many of her relatives back home also became refugees when turkey invaded cyprus in 1974. she says when she saw pictures of the war, she began planning how to help. remembering what her own family had gone through, forced to leave their homes almost half a century before. thea;r almost half a century before. they left with a t-shirt _ almost half a century before. they left with a t-shirt and _ almost half a century before. the: left with a t—shirt and flip—flops. they don't have nothing with them.
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because think they are going back the next way. and it has been 48 years and they are still waiting to go back. so, when we heard ukraine with russia, the war, we feel the same, like, we used to feel for our people as well. and myself and my family, we decided to help if we can. �* , ., family, we decided to help if we can. �* y ., ., family, we decided to help if we can. �* , ., ., , ., family, we decided to help if we can. �* ., , ., ., family, we decided to help if we can. ., , ., ., ., can. and you are helping a lot of a-eole? can. and you are helping a lot of people? a _ can. and you are helping a lot of people? a lot. — can. and you are helping a lot of people? a lot. it _ can. and you are helping a lot of people? a lot, it well, _ can. and you are helping a lot of people? a lot, it well, as- can. and you are helping a lot of people? a lot, it well, as many. can. and you are helping a lot of i people? a lot, it well, as many as we can in — people? a lot, it well, as many as we can in the _ people? a lot, it well, as many as we can in the hotel. _ people? a lot, it well, as many as we can in the hotel. we _ people? a lot, it well, as many as we can in the hotel. we are i people? a lot, it well, as many as we can in the hotel. we are going| people? a lot, it well, as many as i we can in the hotel. we are going to have them- — we can in the hotel. we are going to have them. there _ we can in the hotel. we are going to have them. there are _ we can in the hotel. we are going to have them. there are more - we can in the hotel. we are going to have them. there are more and i we can in the hotel. we are going to l have them. there are more and more ukrainians arriving here every day. all forced to leave their homes by the russian invasion. most arrived with a single suitcase and with no idea if they will ever go home. this seafront hotel now becoming a sanctuary for 60 people of all ages, so they can begin to rebuild their lives that have been so disrupted by war. andrew plant, bbc news, in
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weston—super—mare. really interesting to see the human stories of the people who are arriving. stories of the people who are arrivina. ~ . . stories of the people who are arrivina. ~ ., ., _, stories of the people who are arrivin_ . ., ., .., ., stories of the people who are arrivin_ . ., ., ., , arriving. what a commitment that is, brilliant, fantastic. _ time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm tolu adeoye. new figures on the number of monkeypox cases are expected today with most of the 20 cases so far, confirmed in london. some sexual health doctors have expressed concerns about how the virus could impact services. the government says it provides billions of pounds of funding through public health grants. there's been a lot of inquiries but perhaps not overwhelmingly so and i think at the moment we are managing. i think the difficulty is that sexual health services have been so squeezed over the last decade or so. we've seen huge cuts in funding. we've seen reductions in staff and we don't have an awful lot
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of capacity or resilience for dealing with new issues. a new report suggests that black and asian women in the uk are being harmed by racial discrimination in maternity care. a year—long inquiry by the charity, birthrights, found mothers reported feeling unsafe, were denied pain relief, and faced stereotyping. the department of health said a task force had been set up to address factors linked to disparities in the quality of maternity care. final preparations are under way for the opening of the elizabeth line tomorrow morning. three and half years late, billions of pounds over—budget, the line stretching from reading in the west to shenfield in the east will serve up to 200 million passengers a year. the first train will run at 6.30am. well, let's take a look at the tube situation this morning. other services running well. onto the weather now with kate kinsella.
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good morning. we've got a rather unsettled week of weather ahead. yesterday we got 24 celsius and plenty of sunshine. today there's not quite so much sun. it's quite an unsettled picture. you can see various fronts moving through so first thing maybe a little bit of brightness. you might see a little bit of blue sky but fairly quickly the cloud will increase. coming up from the south we've got a heavy hand of rain largely affecting the south—east but we could get showers everywhere. a breezy day too. temperatures reaching 18 celsius. so quite a bit cooler than yesterday. now overnight we're still going to see some showers blowing through. it stays breezy. it stays cloudy overnight. the minimum temperature dropping down to nine celsius so another cloudy start tomorrow. but the cloud tomorrow a little more willing to break up. we will however see further showers. now with the sun we'll see the heat of the daytime and more frequent showers through the course of tomorrow. you might even get the odd rumble of thunder. temperatures tomorrow very similar at around 18 celsius. now, as we head further through the week for wednesday, a largely cloudy start,
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some brighter spells in the afternoon. more sunshine for thursday and gradually the temperature getting a little bit warmer as we head towards the weekend. well, there's not long to go now until the queen's platinum jubilee. we'd love to know how you will be celebrating and we might even bring our cameras. if you're doing something special, get in touch by emailing us. i'll be back with the latest from the bbc london in an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back tojon and sally. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent. good morning. we've been talking about changes to the care system in england this morning and calls for the government to impose a windfall tax on some private providers. let's speak now to the chief secretary to the treasury, simon clarke.
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good morning to you, i'm interested in your response to that review calling for a windfall tax to be imposed on private children home providers. to help fund england's care system. what do you make of that idea? we care system. what do you make of that idea? ~ . , care system. what do you make of that idea? ~ ., , ., ., that idea? we are very grateful for the mcallister_ that idea? we are very grateful for the mcallister review _ that idea? we are very grateful for the mcallister review which - that idea? we are very grateful for the mcallister review which is i the mcallister review which is something obviously an enormously important societal issue. i'm not going to respond to individual recommendations today but this is an important area of policy to get right. we commissioned this precisely because we want to understand what our options are here to try and make sure we are looking after some of the most vulnerable young people in society and the department for education will bring forward a detailed response in due course. i forward a detailed response in due course. , ., ., ., ., course. i 'ust want to ask you one further course. i just want to ask you one further question _ course. i just want to ask you one further question on _ course. i just want to ask you one further question on this, - course. i just want to ask you one further question on this, the i course. i just want to ask you one further question on this, the ten l further question on this, the ten largest providers of children's social care placements made more than £300 million in profits last year, so code perhaps a higher tax
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rate on those profits be reinvested? as i say, it's not for me to rule on what they going to do in response to this report which hasjust landed, but it is vitally important we get this right. we obviously want to make sure this is working as a system for the benefit of the children who need it most. the information the review sets out will be enormously helpful i know in terms of shaping the government response. i’m terms of shaping the government resonse. �* , m terms of shaping the government resonse. �* , i, i, response. i'm sure you would have read this morning _ response. i'm sure you would have read this morning newspapers, - response. i'm sure you would have l read this morning newspapers, the times newspaper is one of several reporting this morning that the chancellor, your boss, is currently drawing up plans for a windfall tax on oil and gas companies. what do you know about the situation around a windfall tax there?— a windfall tax there? well, this is a windfall tax there? well, this is a very complicated _ a windfall tax there? well, this is a very complicated situation - a windfall tax there? well, this is i a very complicated situation because obviously we want to make sure that we get the investment we need to see in the north sea, to deliver the next generation of oil and gas extraction which is vital for ending the west's over dependence on
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russian oil and gas because obviously it's also critical in terms of supporting uk households come in terms of energy supply, and has related benefit obviously for the wider economy and forjobs. we want to see the record profits that the industry is making at this time reinvested in productive capacity for our economy. insofar as that doesn't happen, the chancellor has been clear we can't rule anything out. and i think that must be the right position to adopt. philosophically, i don't want to be raising taxes but nor obviously can we ignore the fact that there is a very challenging situation in terms of the cost of energy at the moment that will likely worsen ahead of next winter and the government is going to need to take action to address that and so it is in that context that the chancellor and his team will be looking at all the options open to us and i think people will expect that to be the case at this point. so people will expect that to be the case at this point.— people will expect that to be the case at this point. so you say the chancellor _ case at this point. so you say the chancellor and _ case at this point. so you say the chancellor and his _ case at this point. so you say the chancellor and his team - case at this point. so you say the chancellor and his team will - case at this point. so you say the chancellor and his team will be l chancellor and his team will be looking at all the options that are
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open but people are struggling right now. we talk every day on this programme are at the rising cost of an income of the increased costs, huge percentage of which related to fuel. people need help now. looking at this, how long will it take, weeks, months?— at this, how long will it take, weeks, months? the first thing to sa is i weeks, months? the first thing to say is i absolutely _ weeks, months? the first thing to say is i absolutely understand - weeks, months? the first thing to l say is i absolutely understand that and that's why the government is putting in place a package of measures already this year worth £22 billion, including action on the national living wage, making universal credit more generous in terms of the upcoming cuts to national insurance that will take effect injuly, worth an average of £330. 0uraction effect injuly, worth an average of £330. 0ur action on fuel duty. these are all things which are designed to make sure we support households and critically there is a 9 billion section of that package devoted to energy costs including £150 people in council tax bands a— d ought to have received or will very shortly receive in terms of immediate help.
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clearly, we monitor the situation very, very closely, recognising it as fast evolving and to some extent of course it's linked to how long covid disruption continues in places like shanghai and obviously the progress of the war in ukraine. we will always act as a situation demands. i think we have shown that frankly during the course of the last two dreadful years with the pandemic. the treasury will step up as a situation warrants. it's obviously vital that when we do act that we do it in the most targeted way we can because we spent 400 billion responding to the pandemic which means our debt interest payments this year are £83 billion. when spending taxpayers money, making this next round of decisions, we have to be conscious of the pressure the public finances are under as well and that means targeting is essential. £31 under as well and that means targeting is essential. of course. you did mention _ targeting is essential. of course. you did mention national- targeting is essential. of course. i you did mention national insurance going up in april by 1.2 5p in the pound, a threshold at which workers start paying income tax has been frozen, so that effectively a tax rise. i want to ask you about
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colleagues and your party though. some people i know are calling you, calling for the government to take action on universal credit. how likely is that? fin action on universal credit. how likely is that?— likely is that? on a national insurance — likely is that? on a national insurance first, _ likely is that? on a national insurance first, after- likely is that? on a national insurance first, after the . likely is that? on a national| insurance first, after the july likely is that? on a national- insurance first, after the july cuts insurance first, after the july cuts come insurance first, after thejuly cuts come in, insurance first, after the july cuts come in, 70% of people will be paying less national insurance overall, even after the health and social care levy came into effect in april, so for all but the highest earning 30%, national insurance afterjuly will be lower. 0n universal credit, we have adjusted what is called the tay parade, to say the rate at which benefits are withdrawn as earnings go up which change from 63p in the pound down to 55p, worth an average of £1000 for 2 million of the lowest earners in society. that i think is the right conservative solution to this problem, allowing people to keep more of what they earn as they work more of what they earn as they work more hours and that must be the right thing to do. we obviously want
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to make sure that we are always incentivising the right choices when it comes to providing support and the action the chancellor took was a really important step back in december. all really important step back in december-— really important step back in december. �* ., , ., ,, december. all of this was happening in the context _ december. all of this was happening in the context of— december. all of this was happening in the context of very, _ december. all of this was happening in the context of very, very - december. all of this was happening in the context of very, very high - in the context of very, very high inflation. i want to press it would limit on universal credit. are you considering any changes to it? these are decisions — considering any changes to it? these are decisions ultimately _ considering any changes to it? these are decisions ultimately for - considering any changes to it? these are decisions ultimately for the - are decisions ultimately for the chancellor. no options are off the table. but our action on universal credit was focused in december on what was a major change in terms of the taper rate, the withdrawal rate of benefits as earnings go up, allowing people to keep much more of what they earn, effectively a tax cut for 2 million people. it's worth an average of £1000. that is real decisive targeted help through universal credit, a system which obviously attracted enormous controversy when it was first introduced but which has seamlessly supported millions of people during the pandemic and done so very well.
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simon clark, thank you very much indeed. i think there are some sore heads after manchester city last night. and they may get even more saw later on. it was very stressful. a weekend of sport generally, but particular in the premier league. here'sjon with the latest sport news. it's all a bit quieter at the etihad stadium than yesterday. good morning, both. latertoday there stadium than yesterday. good morning, both. later today there is a prey to come of course for manchester city and that trophy. 0n the streets of manchester later but they are very nearly might not have been a parade at all when you consider the drama that unfolded here yesterday. certainly when it comes to the final day, man city know how to do drama and they do it well. when you consider sergio aguero bought back in 2012, scoring the 94th minute winner with his shirt above his head, as they won theirfirst premier shirt above his head, as they won their first premier league title and they served up more drama yesterday. they had to beat aston villa to guarantee themselves the premier league title. they were 2—0 down
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with around 15 minutes to go. they turned things around with three goals in five dramatic minutes. pep guardiola called sight legends and said they would go down in history and this is how it unfolded. 2—0 down, they came back to win 3—2. they came from 2—0 down at the etihad stadium to beat aston villa 3—2. substitute ilkay gundogan was the hero, scoring either side of rodri's equaliser in a sensational five minute comeback. the title winning recovery completed with just nine minutes left. for those fans not fortunate enough to be in the etihad the trophy will be paraded through manchester this evening. these guys are legends already, i'm sorry. so people have to admit it. this group of people, these players, are absolutely eternal in this club, because what we achieved is so difficult to do. the only sour note after the final lesson was a pitch invasion of what looked like the aston villa goalkeeper being attacked on the pitch here at the etihad stadium. you can see him in these pictures wearing orange. he appeared to be
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struck more than once by home fans as a steward tried to guide him to safety. steven gerard was asked afterwards if his players were played off the pitch safely and he said no. pep guardiola has apologised and the club said in a statement the investigation is launched and once identified individual responsible will be issued with an indefinite stadium ban. it's certainly a worrying trend when you consider billy sharp was recently attacked, the sheffield united captain. it's a fifth pitch invasion in the last week. what the hell is going through fans minds when they have just won the title, and we saw it in the forest sheffield united game, we saw it in everton v palace game, we have seen it again today. it has to stop. the premier league and the fa, they have to protect them. that's the players' place of work. they have got to do more. what, we're going to go back to cages, fencing people? no, they've got to do something and do it quick.
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yes, a worrying trend indeed. we have to mention liverpool in all of this. they passed man city so close once again. well, city's victory meant that liverpool's 3—1 win over wolves at anfield was all in vain. man city eventually did the business here. liverpool also had to come from behind to win. it wasn't straightforward for them either. mo salah finally put them in front with a quarter of an hour to go. his 23rd goal of the season sees him share the golden boot with tottenham's son heung—min. liverpool have more to come on the horizon. liverpool will now be focusing on the champions league final in paris on saturday. they could finish their season with three cups. the only thing we can do in this league now, we have to constantly develop. we did that and we have to carry on developing and we will be even more difficult to play against. if we are that, we can win football games, and if we win football games, we have to make sure it will be enough in the end.
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you know, we play in the league with man city, that's crazy difficult. but that will not stop us trying and, yeah, next season again. contrasting emotions though at the other end of the table. burnley became the final team to be relegated ending a six—year stay in england's top division. it looked like they may have got themselves out of this one. a started the day above leads on goal difference but were 2—0 down to newcastle after an hour and would have stayed and had the yorkshire side loss. they lost 2—1 at home to newcastle united and that defeat, combined with leeds'2—1win at brentford, meant burnley dropped into 18th place and were relegated. it's just a lot of emotion in it, and i'mjust, i'm gutted for everyone involved. but proud in another way for the group of lads because they have been, they have been brilliant with me and i couldn't have asked for from them. there was drama on the final day of the goals us pga championship as
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well. england's matt fitzpatrick and tommy fleetwood both just fell short of winning golf�*s us pga championship finishing two shots behind the winnerjustin thomas. the american won the second major of his career after producing a stunning final round. thomas trailed by seven shots at the start of the day, but produced a 3—under par round of 67 to move joint top of the leaderboard, and then beat fellow american will zalatoris on a third hole play—off. max verstappen is top of the formula one drivers' standings after being gifted victory in the spanish grand prix. title rival charles leclerc was forced to retire with engine problems. then red bull team orders meant sergio perez gave way for verstappen to take the win. britons george russell and lewis hamilton were third and fifth. it's set to be a big day at the french open today with novak djokovic, rafael nadal and a number of british
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players all in first round action at the grand slam. and all of them will be hoping to avoid a shock early exit, something which the women's number six seed 0ns jabeur was unable to do. the tunisian was knocked out by madga linette losing by two sets to one. the pole will face harriet dart next if the briton wins today. emma raducanu is also in action this afternoon as she prepares to make her french open debut. the us open champion will face czech qualifier linda noskova in the opening round. britain's heather watson, dan evans and cameron norrie are all also on court throughout the day. and finally, scottish runner eilish mccolgan had a day to remember at the great manchester run. she set a new british and european 10k record. she set a new british and european 10k record. she finished second to kenya's hellen 0biri in 30 minutes 19 seconds, a new british and european 10k record at the race. that shaved two seconds off paula radcliffe's record that had stood for almost two decades.
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they will need to get the streets cleaned up. and the barriers put away because of course we will be seeing the manchester city bass on those very streets in the centre of manchester a little later on. pa rading manchester a little later on. parading the premier league trophy. pep guardiola will be there once again alongside his players. and you just wonder, don't you, with pep guardiola potentially committing his future to manchester city, jurgen klopp is done the same having signed a contract extension at liverpool. this is the great modern rivalry in english football at the moment. pushing each other every step of the way and after how close it was this season, you just think is this what we are going to be seeing over the seasons to come? great drama that's what we love to see, don't we? john. what we love to see, don't we? john, i can't take — what we love to see, don't we? john, i can't take the _ what we love to see, don't we? john, i can't take the stress. _ what we love to see, don't we? john, i can't take the stress. don't - what we love to see, don't we? john, i can't take the stress. don't even - i can't take the stress. don't even do that to me. thanks very much indeed. we can't have another four years of that. it’s indeed. we can't have another four years of that-— years of that. it's exhausting. it's not 'ust years of that. it's exhausting. it's not just the _ years of that. it's exhausting. it's not just the street _ years of that. it's exhausting. it's not just the street forgot - years of that. it's exhausting. it's not just the street forgot to - years of that. it's exhausting. it's not just the street forgot to clean up not just the street forgot to clean up but the pitch as well, haven't they, fix the goalposts. they got a
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few weeks. here's carol with a look at the weather. and she's at the chelsea flower show. good morning, carol. good morning, everyone. this morning i'm now in the hands of mangrove show garden. it's rather attractive, you can see this big sculpture above me four metres high representing a mango tree. and each of its nine main routes honouring each mangrove 9—member. now i'm surrounded by lots of plants, some are edible, some decorative, for example in front of me i've got tomatoes, irises, and also some lupins. like all the other gardens here at the chelsea flower show, it is stuffed with beautiful flowers. now this morning it's quite a mile start to the day across the board. it's also quite a cloudy one, as well and the forecast for this week is going to be more unsettled thanit week is going to be more unsettled than it was last week. we are not good cooler conditions, some rain at times, it will be breezy at times as
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well, but in between all of that we will see a bit of sunshine. high pressure not exerting itself across our shores until the end of the week. low pressure is in charge of the weather at the moment with a weather front in scotland heading south and a weather front coming in from the south—east moving north. hence the cloudy start to the day. we've also got some rain across northern scotland, some showers already in the west and the rain coming in across the south—east will move northwards through the day, moving through the south—east and quarter potentially getting as far as the chelsea flower show but hopefully it will stay further east and will remain dry but one thing you will notice is we are looking at further showers developing. some of those will be heavy and sundry and, granted, still a lot of us do need some rain. temperatures today, 12—18 with the breeze picking up across the south. as we head on through the evening and overnight period the rain across scotland sinks south into south—east scotland. the rain into south—east scotland. the rain in the south—east of england moves north into north—east england. with
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all this going on it does mean is not going to be a cold night and it will be a breezy one. tomorrow we start off with that rain across south—east scotland and north—east england clearing off into the north sea. and then we have a day of sunshine and showers, more sunshine around than we have today. but, like today, some of the showers will be heavy and they will also be thundery with temperatures very similar to today but again breezy. temperatures widely between 12—18, 19. for wednesday, a weather front coming into the west will produce rain in the west, heaviest of which will be across western scotland. now, as this pushes eastwards, it will tend to weaken so any rain getting into the far east will tend to be more patchy in nature and behind it, we are back in the sunshine and showers. it's going to be noticeably windy wherever you are during the course of wednesday the temperature is again up to around about the high teens. and it's after that, from friday onwards, that we see things settling down a touch. high pressure starts to build a cross is once
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more. .. y starts to build a cross is once more. y . starts to build a cross is once more. , ., g ., ., ., starts to build a cross is once more. ., ., ., more. sally and john. carol, thanks very much — more. sally and john. carol, thanks very much indeed _ more. sally and john. carol, thanks very much indeed and _ more. sally and john. carol, thanks very much indeed and we _ more. sally and john. carol, thanks very much indeed and we look- more. sally and john. carol, thanks i very much indeed and we look forward to that. i'm a little bit concerned about you this morning. i don't know how you are managing to stand up with that giant rock on your left hand, carol. with that giant rock on your left hand. carol-— with that giant rock on your left hand, carol. ., ~ ., hand, carol. oh... thank you. i got enuuaed. hand, carol. oh... thank you. i got engaged- it's _ hand, carol. oh... thank you. i got engaged. it's the _ hand, carol. oh... thank you. i got engaged. it's the happiest - hand, carol. oh... thank you. i got engaged. it's the happiest knees. l hand, carol. oh... thank you. i got. engaged. it's the happiest knees. we are so, so delighted. _ are so, so delighted. congratulations. can we confirm to the nation what has happened? thank ou. yes, i the nation what has happened? thank you- yes. ithink— the nation what has happened? thank you. yes, i think you _ the nation what has happened? thank you. yes, i think you just _ the nation what has happened? thank you. yes, i think youjust have, - you. yes, i think you just have, sadly. yes, i got engaged, we got engaged when we were on holiday. so it's lovely news and we are both thrilled so thank you. we it's lovely news and we are both thrilled so thank you.— it's lovely news and we are both thrilled so thank you. we are all thrilled, so _ thrilled so thank you. we are all thrilled, so chuffed _ thrilled so thank you. we are all thrilled, so chuffed for - thrilled so thank you. we are all thrilled, so chuffed for you, - thrilled so thank you. we are all. thrilled, so chuffed for you, carol, and on behalf of all the team here and on behalf of all the team here and everybody watching, absolutely delighted. a round of applause in the studio. that's great. are you looking for a spot for the marquee while you are at chelsea? she's not
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giving anything away. i’m while you are at chelsea? she's not giving anything away.— giving anything away. i'm taking a note of all of— giving anything away. i'm taking a note of all of the _ giving anything away. i'm taking a note of all of the flowers, - giving anything away. i'm taking a note of all of the flowers, john. . note of all of the flowers, john. that's brilliant news. we look forward to it. congratulations, carol. we love you both. congratulations. brilliant, brilliant, brilliant news. how have you managed to keep that a secret? i have known for a while and it's been very hard. i managed to keep that secret. .. , very hard. i managed to keep that secret. , , , secret. sally spotted the ring 'ust after six o'clock i secret. sally spotted the ring 'ust after six o'clock and i secret. sally spotted the ring 'ust after six o'clock and you i secret. sally spotted the ring just after six o'clock and you were - secret. sally spotted the ring just. after six o'clock and you were like, she is wearing it. well done. i4541431111 she is wearing it. well done. well s - otted. she is wearing it. well done. well spotted- we _ she is wearing it. well done. well spotted. we are _ she is wearing it. well done. -ii spotted. we are going to have a bbc breakfast wedding, everyone. i can look for a hat.— look for a hat. time for a hat. brilliant news, _ look for a hat. time for a hat. i brilliant news, congratulations. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. this is a story we've spoken about on programme before. the footballer troy deeney is best known for his goals on the pitch but now he's aiming
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at a new target off it. troy wants to make it compulsory for schools to teach black and asian history and his campaign is gaining ground. he's made a documentary about it, which is on channel 4 tonight. take a look. we are from different parts but were both from england so how was your education? i still need educating. i wasn't too savvy. if you was to have seen more black role models, do you think that would have engaged you more if you'd had a different trajectory at school? would i have been better off seeing other black faces? 100%. i felt segregated because every time i learned about african culture, you learn about the negatives. so you kind of feel demonised. yeah. it would have been important for me to have seen more the inventors, creators, scientists. troyjoins us now from
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stratford—upon—avon. good morning to you. thanks so much for speaking to us. i know this is deeply personalfor you, for speaking to us. i know this is deeply personal for you, something you feel so strongly about. tell us then about when you were at school and what you were taught didn't really reflect what you wanted to hear? . really reflect what you wanted to hear? , ., ., ., ., ., hear? first of all, good morning, thank you — hear? first of all, good morning, thank you for— hear? first of all, good morning, thank you for giving _ hear? first of all, good morning, thank you for giving me - hear? first of all, good morning, thank you for giving me the - thank you for giving me the opportunity. what i would say for me is it was massively aboutjust trying to understand who i was. i'm english, born in this country, obviously heritage irish and jamaican. i was going to a state of trying to understand who i was and in that process and over the last few years i saw my kids go to the same process so i'm trying to understand how do we get kids to understand how do we get kids to understand who they are? and it shouldn't necessarily always be up to the parents because we give our kids to schools for seven or eight hours a day. so they get more interactive time with our children
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and we properly do. so it'sjust a case of how do we get schools more up—to—date so we like, for example, computing is move forward now. i've got a 12—year—old son who is currently doing tech and understanding how to code and that is where the world has moved to now, coding is part of schooling. yet we are still so far behind in our narrative of how black and asian people are represented in the school environment, curriculum. twas. people are represented in the school environment, curriculum. troy, when ou went environment, curriculum. troy, when you went back— environment, curriculum. troy, when you went back and _ environment, curriculum. troy, when you went back and looked _ environment, curriculum. troy, when you went back and looked at - environment, curriculum. troy, whenj you went back and looked at schools, were you surprised by how outdated it feels now?— it feels now? definitely. the bi est it feels now? definitely. the biggest problem _ it feels now? definitely. the biggest problem for - it feels now? definitely. the biggest problem for me - it feels now? definitely. the biggest problem for me i - it feels now? definitely. the i biggest problem for me i think it feels now? definitely. the - biggest problem for me i think is the teachers, they steal underwhelmed, they don't feel empowered to deliver. we did a survey to back that up and 94% of teachers don't feel like they have the empowerment to talk to kids and speak about difficult situations
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because we have to be honest, racism and history is a very difficult subject. if our teachers aren't empowered to do that, then how are we, as parents, supposed to give our children the confidence to go to school and speak about it? so it was difficult but i think this journey is going to hopefully open a wonderful conversation between all sorts of people from all different backgrounds and hopefully move this space a not more forward and into being a real black and white area, that beautiful grey area when we have to start understanding and show a level of empathy for each other. we are seeing some pictures of you in the classroom is talking to kids, people involved in setting education, and i'm interested in what you said about empowering teachers. i'm wondering how do you do that? what sort of things do you think could be done to help teachers be a bit more open minded or give a
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bit more depth on things they may be don't know about themselves. i think first of all, teachers _ don't know about themselves. i think first of all, teachers do _ don't know about themselves. i think first of all, teachers do want - don't know about themselves. i think first of all, teachers do want to - first of all, teachers do want to talk about it. we live in a world, as you guys know, if you say the wrong thing you can be cancelled and you can be thrown out and you can be demonised straightaway from a teaching point of view, talking about it, it's so polarising and you can't have an opinion and you can't get something wrong and you can't learn about it in a situation at the moment because everyone is trying to cancel each other so we have to have a bit of empathy. i think teachers do have a great understanding, but who i have teamed up with at the moment is a wonderful business called the black curriculum and they actively go out currently notjust in the uk but over europe and america, and teach and empower teachers on how to deliver and speak and have those awkward conversations with the right tone and, as we all
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know, tone and delivery of word is the hardest thing to do in any line of work. let's take a look at another clip from your documentary. i want to share this with everybody. here you are talking to the former footballer, micah richards, and the rapper big narstie. i'v e i've got four children, my oldest is 12 my youngest is two. first of all there no problems because they are rich kids, but they will still walk into a shop similar to us and get knocked out in a different way so how do we move that conversation forward? i honestly think that education is the way.- forward? i honestly think that education is the way. first, people have not education is the way. first, people have got to — education is the way. first, people have got to be _ education is the way. first, people have got to be willing _ education is the way. first, people have got to be willing to _ education is the way. first, people have got to be willing to listen. - have got to be willing to listen. these — have got to be willing to listen. these are — have got to be willing to listen. these are people's lives we are talking — these are people's lives we are talking about. this is what people don't _ talking about. this is what people don't understand. we are taught self-hate — don't understand. we are taught self—hate from the don't understand. we are taught self— hate from the start. try, don't understand. we are taught self-hate from the start. try, what does he mean _ self-hate from the start. try, what does he mean they _ self-hate from the start. try, what does he mean they are _ self-hate from the start. try, what does he mean they are saying - self-hate from the start. try, what does he mean they are saying we | self-hate from the start. try, what i does he mean they are saying we are taught self—hate from the start? what is that? so, any lesson regarding black people shall be say or slavery, asian people from a
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young age, is slavery, it's depicted in a way that we are less than, so what he's talking about their is when we were in school and we are one or two of the black kids, our generation now, now you are the only black kid in your class and you're watching roots and everyone in that class turns around and looks at you, is that you? is that your uncle? is that your dad? you are expected to understand that and it's really difficult to understand if you've never been in that situation, but what is trying to say is that you are taught that that is all you can become. that is the best you can see. unless you do music, because unless you do football because we can show you ian wright, athletics we can show you linford christie, other than that, you don't see anything that is about empowering, anything that is about empowering, anything about young black women in
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science for example. i have got two daughters and we don't see anything about women in the time period because women weren't really allowed to be, but there were still some fantastic women who did great things and we don't learn about that. shouldn'tjust be on parents to do that? i think the school should have at least more books, better books, so that kids can engage and open their mind and ifeel like so that kids can engage and open their mind and i feel like as adults and parents we always want our kids to be safe but in our approach to doing that we kind of dampen their imagination. if you've got children, you will appreciate your kids play with barbies or whatever it is they play with, and have you heard them with their accents and the way they make up these great imaginative stories? but as parents, because you want to be said, we say do this and do thou to be so, we say do this and do thou to be so, we say do this and do that we marginalise them up imaginations and i want to come away from that now and get into a space where we can say imagine if. imagine if you could be the best person you could be in the world. and we see a
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lot of negativity and it would be great if we could just get parents and schooling to a place where everyone is saying you can be the best version of yourself instead of being taught you are not better. it's a message i'm sure a lot of people will be keen to hear this morning. it means a lot. your campaign certainly seems to be gaining ground. we look forward to seeing the full documentary tonight. thanks forjoining us this morning. troy deeney — where's my history? is on channel 4 at ten o'clock tonight. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent. our headlines today. thousands more youngsters will end up in care unless there's a "radical reset" of the system. that's the warning from a landmark review of child protection in england. almost 700 fewer services a day. scotrail, the company running most trains in scotland, brings in a severely reduced timetable, over a driver shortage and pay dispute. £400 a month. that's the extra families are paying as energy, transport and childcare costs soar. will the government respond to calls for more support? i'll have the details. a dramatic comeback on an extraordinary final day, i'm at the home of the premier league
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champions manchester city. this day is manchester city's. premier league champions again. they lift the trophy after coming from behind to beat aston villa but a pitch invasion and an attack on the villa keeper sparks a club investigation. hello, i'm harry. welcome to my house. i love it here. i like to listen to music and read and hang out with my friends. harry styles as you've never seen him before, in his pyjamas no less, as he gets in the mood for reading a children's bedtime story. good morning from the rhs chelsea flower show. i am currently in the raf benevolent fund garden, commemorating the battle of britain with this statue of a young raf pilot waiting to return to his
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spitfire. it is mild this morning, fairly cloudy, and some of us will see some rain, possibly even here in london. the details later on in the programme. it's monday 23rd may. children's social care needs radical change to avoid tens of thousands more youngsters being taken away from theirfamilies. that's the warning following a major review into child protection services in england. the report says the current system is too heavily based on crisis intervention, and calls for a windfall tax on the profits of the biggest privately run children's homes. here's our social affairs editor, alison holt. ok, so let me know how it's been going since the panel. henrietta works with young people to help them pitch ideas and get their voices heard. and also it would be good to know, like, how you found working on the project as well. her own life was shaped by the crisis in the children's care system that today's report wants to change. after two difficult years, she was removed from her mother
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by social services. she was 14 and in the next month she was moved between five different homes. to me, being in care felt like a never—ending storm, just, like, every day not knowing where the support is going to be from, where am i even going to lay my head, where is the support for the families at the start when they are struggling, why does it need to be when they are taken away? and you can't put kids into dysfunction, when you have taken them out of dysfunction. it makes no sense. today's review said a radical reset is needed to shift the focus of kids social care away from crisis intervention. it wants more early help available in schools and communities, a new expert social worker role to strengthen child protection. the phasing out of what is described as wholly unsuitable young offenders institutions. a windfall tax on the profits of large children's homes companies, and to ensure change happens, an extra £2.6 billion funding for services over the next five years.
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we need to build a care system where homes are available, filled with the sort of people who can build loving, long—term relationships, near to the schools and communities that these children already live in, that's the big scene —— change that we need in the care system. so empowering to know that your trauma doesn't define you. that is where places like new beginnings in stockport come in. these parents have had either children taken into care or they have come close to it. you know, we all understand that each day is different for everybody. here they have found support, counselling and advice which has turned their lives around. my little boy has been in with me a year and a half and i never, thought that would be possible again. and any time i need support, i reach out to new beginnings. they're like family, they are family, they are family that i never had. they have given me so much support the tools and strategies to work with, with my son who has got needs, special needs. and, again, they have given me
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strength to push on to not make the mistakes again. the government says it is piloting additionalfamily hubs providing early support. it also accepts more needs to be done to support family members, kinship carers, who take on a child who would otherwise go into care, and to find more foster carers. i think there is a real opportunity for us to get those children a loving, supportive home, and we know that family relationships and kinship care is equally important. the system needs to obsess about those relationships because that is how you get great outcomes for the children that need the most help in our society. the government says it will consider other recommendations over the longer term. alison holt, bbc news. a drastically reduced rail timetable has come
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a nurse at a children's hospital has been arrested on suspicion of administering poison with intent to endanger life after a young child died on thursday. the child was being treated in the intensive care department at birmingham children's hospital, which confirmed it has suspended a member of staff. the nurse, a 27—year—old woman, has been released pending further inquiries. of ukraine as the soviet union lost in their entire nine—year russia has lost as many soldiers in its three—month invasion of ukraine as the soviet union lost in their entire nine—year war in afghanistan. that's according to british military intelligence who say both tactical and strategic failings are to blame. it comes as russia continues its offensives in the east of the country with attempts to encircle the eastern city of severodonetsk. our correspondent in kyiv, joe inwood, has the latest. joe, russia seems to be faring
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badly, but how will this affect pu to's tactics? == badly, but how will this affect pu to's tactics?— to's tactics? -- putin's tactics? it's worth _ to's tactics? -- putin's tactics? it's worth pointing _ to's tactics? -- putin's tactics? it's worth pointing out - to's tactics? -- putin's tactics? it's worth pointing out that - to's tactics? -- putin's tactics? it's worth pointing out that a i to's tactics? -- putin's tactics? | it's worth pointing out that a lot of these mistakes which led to the incredible roster is that the russians have suffered happened towards the start of the war. this figure covers the whole three months of what russia calls its special military operation. since then they have changed tactics probably in some extents to response to those losses, but also to focus differently. before they tried to take this huge country of 45 million people from all sides and all angles, it was disjointed and chaotic and it led to huge losses of men and equipment. now they have refocused and coming towards the area called the donbas, which we have spoken about many times, this city of severodonetsk, they are trying to encircle it, trying the same tactics they applied in the city of mariupol, covering it from
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all sides, city of mariupol, covering it from allsides, encircle city of mariupol, covering it from all sides, encircle it and cut it off and pounded down with artillery. i think we are seeing a change in tactics, coming about because of a change in strategy, but also because of the realisations of the failures at the start of this campaign. thank ou ve at the start of this campaign. thank you very much. _ at the start of this campaign. thank you very much. joe. _ at the start of this campaign. thank you very much, joe, in _ at the start of this campaign. thank you very much, joe, in kyiv. - a drastically reduced rail timetable has come into force in scotland today. around 700 daily services, a third of the normal number, are being cut. our correspondent jamie mcivor is outside glasgow queen street station. jamie, this is likely to be significant disruption, isn't it? explain what is happening and why. absolutely, jon, significant disruption today and in the coming days. around a third of the services, 700 per day in the normal timetable, have been stopped for the foreseeable future. during the rush hour, it's pretty much as normal but i have been speaking to some people who had to set off from home half an
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hour earlier than usual to get to work on time, because there are fewer trains than normal. a particular problem is going to happen later on in the day. that's because the last train home will often be significantly earlier than usual. for example, the last train from glasgow to dundee will be at ten past seven at night, the last train from glasgow to stirling will be before 8pm. that's causing a particular concern for people in the night—time economy, cinemas, theatres and bars, just starting to get back to normal after the pandemic and they are worried that customers will stay away or wondering how their staff might be able to get home at night. at the root of all of this there is a shortage of drivers and a pay dispute. drivers are not happy about a 2.2% pay offer so they have been turning down over time so this still is not an official dispute industrial dispute so far.
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anyone at high risk of having caught monkeypox should isolate for 21 days. that's the latest official guidance from the uk health security agency. those who may be infected are asked to cancel travel plans, and avoid contact with immunosuppressed people, pregnant women, and children under 12. on friday there were 20 confirmed cases in the uk, but that number is expected to rise today. we seem to have ongoing transmissions so people have become infected from contact with that first case and, as we've heard, there's quite a lot of cases in countries around the world that haven't had this kind of transmission before, so the numbers are not great. we're not too alarmed and it's generally a mild disease. but we do need to try and understand what's changed, why we're seeing a different pattern. i sitting comfortably? it is story time! —— are you sitting comfortably? the cbeebies channel has a habit of bagging some of the world's biggest names to read its bedtime stories, from dolly parton to the actor tom hardy to the duchess of cambridge. well, they've done it again. harry styles is in the chair tonight
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and he's worn his pyjamas for the occasion. hello, i'm harry. welcome to my house. i love it here. i like to listen to music and read and hang out with my friends. tonight's bedtime story is about a house full of love and laughter. it's called, in every house, on every street and it's byjess hitchman with pictures by lili la baleine. he has got a lovely soothing voice to calm things down at the end of the day. to calm things down at the end of the da . ~ ., ., , . to calm things down at the end of theda .~ ., ., , . ., the day. well done, harry, nice to dress u -' the day. well done, harry, nice to dress up! it— the day. well done, harry, nice to dress up! it is— the day. well done, harry, nice to dress up! it is appropriate, - the day. well done, harry, nice to l dress up! it is appropriate, though. he is always flamboyant.— he is always flamboyant. everyone else is watching _ he is always flamboyant. everyone else is watching cbeebies - he is always flamboyant. everyone else is watching cbeebies in - he is always flamboyant. everyone else is watching cbeebies in their. else is watching cbeebies in their pyjamas. and you can watch harry styles' bedtime story tonight at 6.50 on cbeebies and bbc iplayer.
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have your milk first! yes, and a little bedtime biscuit! and have your milk first! yes, and a little bedtime biscuit!— little bedtime biscuit! and a cookie. that _ little bedtime biscuit! and a cookie. that will _ little bedtime biscuit! and a cookie. that will be - little bedtime biscuit! and a cookie. that will be me. - little bedtime biscuit! and a cookie. that will be me. in | little bedtime biscuit! and a - cookie. that will be me. in your pyjamas? _ cookie. that will be me. in your pyjamas? yes. _ cookie. that will be me. in your pyjamas? yes. of— cookie. that will be me. in your pyjamas? yes, of course! - cookie. that will be me. in your pyjamas? yes, of course! not. cookie. that will be me. in your - pyjamas? yes, of course! not quite those, they — pyjamas? yes, of course! not quite those. they are _ pyjamas? yes, of course! not quite those, they are very _ pyjamas? yes, of course! not quite those, they are very stylish. - pyjamas? yes, of course! not quite those, they are very stylish. yes, i those, they are very stylish. yes, lovelypale _ those, they are very stylish. yes, lovelypale conduct. _ those, they are very stylish. yes, lovelypale conduct. -- _ those, they are very stylish. yes, lovelypale conduct. -- lovely - those, they are very stylish. yes, lovelypale conduct. —— lovely polka dots. we are all smiling with you this morning, carol, it is spring you look wonderful! bless you, good morning, everyone! i'm in the raf benevolent fund garden, commemorating the 80th anniversary of the battle of britain 2020, delayed for two years because of covid. this stunning statue is of a young raf pilot looking to the sky at what is happening about him. it comprises 223 laser cut stainless steel 3d scans of george, who is the
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son of the designer, john everest. and it is pretty spectacular. and the curved seat i am sitting on allows visitors to sit here and look up allows visitors to sit here and look up at the pilot, and ponder what he was seeing and what he must be thinking. it is a lovely start to the day here, at the chelsea flower show, pleasantly mild. the focus as we go through this week is a bit more unsettled. we are looking at cooler conditions, it's also going to be wet at times, but in between there will be some sunshine. temperature is nothing like yesterday, it was 24 degrees in london yesterday, today at best it was 24 degrees in london yesterday, today at best it will see 18 degrees. what is happening today is two weather fronts, one sinking south and one moving north, both bringing some rain. we start with some rain across northern scotland, also coming in across the south—east of england. a lot of cloud to start with producing some showers and if anything, the showers will develop further through the afternoon and some of those could be heavy and
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thundery. temperatures ranging from 12 in the north to 18 in the south. increasingly turning breezy as we go through the course of the afternoon as well. that breeze will continue overnight as the band of rain meet across south—east scotland and north—east england. co—defendant clear skies, and a fairly mild night. so into tomorrow, tomorrow we start off with the rain across north—east england and that east scotland. that will clear behind it will be more sunshine than today, and we are looking at a day of sunshine and showers, some heavy and thundery with temperatures very similar to what we are looking at today. again up to 19 degrees. on wednesday more rain on the cards, coming in from the west, pushing east, and it will weaken. what a pleasure it is to be back here at the rhs chelsea flower show, amongst all of these flowers. the perfume is all of these flowers. the perfume is a stunning and the bees are fairly prolific as well.—
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prolific as well. stay safe, carol! don't aet prolific as well. stay safe, carol! don't get stung! _ the parents of a young teacher who took his own life while struggling with a gambling addiction have described the government's response as "disappointing" and "inadequate". jack ritchie was just 24 when he died five years ago. in march, a coroner ruled he'd been failed by "woefully inadequate" warnings and treatments. the government has now promised a comprehensive review of gambling laws but jack's parents charles and liz say more urgent action is needed. tomos morgan reports. jack richie began gambling with his friends as a teenager at school. he quickly became hooked, so he self—excluded himself from the local betting shop, along with the help of his parents. but then the addiction went online. after seven years of betting, atjust 24 years of age, jack took his own life, blaming himself for his addiction. the type of gambling jack was into was the most addictive. nearly half of all people playing
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online casino games and slots are addicted or at risk. and more than 400 suicides every year in england alone are due to this issue. earlier this year, a coroner ruled that the information about the dangers and associated treatments available were woefully inadequate to jack, and senior coroner david urpeth added thatjack did not understand that being addicted to gambling was not his fault. jack's parents liz and charles ritchie join us now. thank ritchiejoin us now. you so much for coming in. to talk thank you so much for coming in. to talk aboutjack. wejust thank you so much for coming in. to talk about jack. we just saw that report there, tell us a little bit more aboutjack report there, tell us a little bit more about jack and what type of boy he was. ., . ., more about jack and what type of boy he was. . , ., ~ he was. oh, he was great fun. and ureat he was. oh, he was great fun. and great friend. _ he was. oh, he was great fun. and great friend, all— he was. oh, he was great fun. and great friend, all his _ he was. oh, he was great fun. and great friend, all his friends - he was. oh, he was great fun. and great friend, all his friends talk - great friend, all his friends talk about how much they loved him. he was a big guy, he was six foot
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three, and they'll talk about his big hugs. and he was friends with so many different groups in sheffield, he was the kind of person who you would want to have around because he made things more fun. i would want to have around because he made things more fun.— made things more fun. i wonder if bein: the made things more fun. i wonder if being the guy _ made things more fun. i wonder if being the guy that _ made things more fun. i wonder if being the guy that everybody - made things more fun. i wonder if| being the guy that everybody relies on... ., �* . a being the guy that everybody relies on- - -_ a big _ being the guy that everybody relies on- - -_ a big chap - on... that's true. a big chap physically — on... that's true. a big chap physically and _ on... that's true. a big chap physically and a _ on... that's true. a big chap physically and a big - on... that's true. a big chap i physically and a big character, i wonder whether that made it more difficult for him to seek help. i think what made it difficult for him to seek help was the messaging that happens, that the coroner rightly saw, and rightly pointed out. and that the government didn't seem to be listening to, frankly. the message is that everything is an individual�*s fault, that stopping the harm is down to the individual. and that it's not part of the system. unfortunately what the government seems to be saying, and what they have said to us, is that the current system that kills jack is going to go on. but
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the current system that kills jack is going to go on-_ is going to go on. but also, jack did reach out _ is going to go on. but also, jack did reach out for— is going to go on. but also, jack did reach out for help _ is going to go on. but also, jack did reach out for help and i is going to go on. but also, jack did reach out for help and seek| did reach out for help and seek help _ did reach out for help and seek help he — did reach out for help and seek help. he saw medical professionals, they didn't _ help. he saw medical professionals, they didn't know the dangers of gambling either. it's notjust jack, the whole — gambling either. it's notjust jack, the whole system is flawed. the oint is, the whole system is flawed. the point is. if _ the whole system is flawed. the point is. if you _ the whole system is flawed. iie: point is, if you have the whole system is flawed. tie: point is, if you have a system that has voluntary funding by the very companies that cause the harm, which they can put their money where they want and move it wherever they want the messaging gets too close to home. and what's close to home is the link between the products and the link between the products and the health harm. like cigarettes, like tobacco, they will do anything to stop that link. in the best way to stop that link. in the best way to do that is to say, it's individuals who are addicted and they have to do something. so individuals who are addicted and they have to do something. 50 in individuals who are addicted and they have to do something. so in a sense what — they have to do something. so in a sense what they _ they have to do something. so in a sense what they are _ they have to do something. so in a sense what they are doing - they have to do something. so in a sense what they are doing is i they have to do something. so in a sense what they are doing is that l sense what they are doing is that the addict is being asked to take complete responsibility? exactly. and that surely _ complete responsibility? exactly. and that surely cannot _ complete responsibility? exactly. and that surely cannot work. i complete responsibility? exactly. and that surely cannot work. no, j complete responsibility? exactly. i and that surely cannot work. no, it really misses _ and that surely cannot work. no, it really misses the _ and that surely cannot work. no, it really misses the whole _ and that surely cannot work. no, it really misses the whole thing i and that surely cannot work. no, it really misses the whole thing around addiction _ really misses the whole thing around addiction. and at says, you have some _ addiction. and at says, you have some incredibly addictive products,
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as addictive as heroin, and what we are expecting is that people will somehow know that. when jack started gambling, _ somehow know that. when jack started gambling, i_ somehow know that. when jack started gambling, i thought it was a bit of fun because that was the only message _ fun because that was the only message that there was about gambling. the thing about the impact on mental— gambling. the thing about the impact on mental health, nothing around suicide _ on mental health, nothing around suicide bite and that is what gambling with lives have had to do. and the _ gambling with lives have had to do. and the current charity, gamble aware, they can say what they want and waffle on about being independent, and i'm sure they will say so at some point, you may well have a comment from them. but the reality is, if the industry and the companies can move theirfunding if the message gets too close to home, then they cannot afford to really be clear about the products. and the real cause of the damage. 50 clear about the products. and the real cause of the damage. so what do ou need real cause of the damage. so what do you need to — real cause of the damage. so what do you need to happen. _ real cause of the damage. so what do you need to happen, what— real cause of the damage. so what do you need to happen, what do - real cause of the damage. so what do you need to happen, what do you i you need to happen, what do you want? we you need to happen, what do you want? ~ ~' ., , ., , .,
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want? we think there has to be a statutory levy _ want? we think there has to be a statutory levy which _ want? we think there has to be a statutory levy which is _ want? we think there has to be a| statutory levy which is absolutely, absolutely fundamental... just exlain absolutely fundamental... just explain what — absolutely fundamental... just explain what that _ absolutely fundamental... just explain what that means, a statutory levy? explain what that means, a statutory le ? �* . ., explain what that means, a statutory le ? �* , . , explain what that means, a statutory le ? �* , ., , ., explain what that means, a statutory levy? it's a levy on the profits of the gambling — levy? it's a levy on the profits of the gambling companies - levy? it's a levy on the profits of the gambling companies which i levy? it's a levy on the profits of| the gambling companies which is mandated by the government. it means they cannot suddenly withdraw it, they cannot suddenly withdraw it, the government says, this has got to happen. and then the government can direct it into the state organisations that are used to delivering treatment and education and information. how ludicrous is it that people going into our schools has voluntary funding from the industry that causes the harm? would we have this from tobacco now? we probably used to but we don't any more. . ~' probably used to but we don't any more. . ~ , ., probably used to but we don't any more. , ~ i. ., more. this it feel like you are fiuuhtin more. this it feel like you are fighting the — more. this it feel like you are fighting the kind _ more. this it feel like you are fighting the kind of _ more. this it feel like you are fighting the kind of campaign | more. this it feel like you are i fighting the kind of campaign which decades ago was being fought against cigarettes? decades ago was being fought against ciuarettes? ~ ,,., , decades ago was being fought against cigarettes?_ it _ decades ago was being fought against cigarettes?_ it feels i cigarettes? absolutely. it feels like the gambling _
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cigarettes? absolutely. it feels like the gambling industry i cigarettes? absolutely. it feels like the gambling industry is i like the gambling industry is playing _ like the gambling industry is playing the tobacco industry playbook, they influence research and messaging. this smoking industry at the _ and messaging. this smoking industry at the start— and messaging. this smoking industry at the start played that smoking was -ood at the start played that smoking was good for— at the start played that smoking was good for your health. the gambling industry— good for your health. the gambling industry is — good for your health. the gambling industry is still portraying this as a bit _ industry is still portraying this as a bit of— industry is still portraying this as a bit of fun— industry is still portraying this as a bit of fun and there is no research _ a bit of fun and there is no research funded by them which says otherwise — research funded by them which says otherwise. the research funded by them which says otherwise. �* ., ., otherwise. the belgian government said it was the _ otherwise. the belgian government said it was the new _ otherwise. the belgian government said it was the new smoking - otherwise. the belgian government said it was the new smoking last i said it was the new smoking last week, and introduced most —— more stringent laws, when will our government do that? stringent laws, when will our rovernment do that? �* . government do that? belgium have bad aaamin government do that? belgium have bad gaming advertising _ government do that? belgium have bad gaming advertising -- _ government do that? belgium have bad gaming advertising -- they _ government do that? belgium have bad gaming advertising -- they have - gaming advertising —— they have banned — gaming advertising —— they have banned gambling advertising. the indust banned gambling advertising. tie: industry representatives say, 30 million people enjoy a bet every year and the overwhelming majority do it safely. they are committed to spending £100 million on the treatment of problem gambling, they
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say they have already done more with messages and they strongly support the government gambling review. saying that most people gamble safely is a chilly a recipe for increasing suicide.- safely is a chilly a recipe for increasing suicide. safely is a chilly a recipe for increasin: suicide. ., ., . , increasing suicide. how? -- a chilly a reci e. increasing suicide. how? -- a chilly a recipe- it — increasing suicide. how? -- a chilly a recipe. it pretends _ increasing suicide. how? -- a chilly a recipe. it pretends that _ increasing suicide. how? -- a chilly a recipe. it pretends that all - a recipe. it pretends that all gambling — a recipe. it pretends that all gambling is _ a recipe. it pretends that all gambling is the _ a recipe. it pretends that all gambling is the safe -- i a recipe. it pretends that all i gambling is the safe -- pretends gambling is the safe —— pretends that the all gambling is safe. brute that the all gambling is safe. we are not talking about major changes around _ are not talking about major changes around the — are not talking about major changes around the national lottery or horse racing _ around the national lottery or horse racing or— around the national lottery or horse racing or whatever, it is the highly addictive — racing or whatever, it is the highly addictive electronic online casino games — addictive electronic online casino games. those are the products which have addiction at risk rate of nearly— have addiction at risk rate of nearly 50%. that is where the regulation needs to happen. so those products— regulation needs to happen. so those products need to be made safer. you will remember member that back into the -- _ will remember member that back into the -- you _ will remember member that back into the —— you will remember in 2019 stakes— the —— you will remember in 2019 stakes on— the —— you will remember in 2019 stakes on fixed terms were reduced
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to £2 _ stakes on fixed terms were reduced to 5? that— stakes on fixed terms were reduced to £2. that is the first time government said not about all gambling but some doubt too dangerous to be on our high street on their— dangerous to be on our high street on their current form. that needs to happen— on their current form. that needs to happen with — on their current form. that needs to happen with online products as well. how frustrated are you that that has not happened already?— not happened already? people will die. it not happened already? people will die- it feels _ not happened already? people will die. it feels like _ not happened already? people will die. it feels like the _ not happened already? people will die. it feels like the government i die. it feels like the government will not grasp — die. it feels like the government will not grasp the _ die. it feels like the government will not grasp the scale - die. it feels like the government will not grasp the scale of- die. it feels like the government will not grasp the scale of the i will not grasp the scale of the problem _ will not grasp the scale of the problem are we worry that they will tinker— problem are we worry that they will tinker around the edges so there will be _ tinker around the edges so there will be something about advertising, they will— will be something about advertising, they will ban shirt front advertising they will not do anything about the more wider advertising at football grounds. they— advertising at football grounds. they will— advertising at football grounds. they will introduce affordability checks — they will introduce affordability checks but they will do it at a level — checks but they will do it at a level which isjust not not high enough — level which isjust not not high enough to be preventative. if you have _ enough to be preventative. if you have an _ enough to be preventative. if you have an affordability check at £500, losses _ have an affordability check at £500, losses per— have an affordability check at £500, losses per month, jack would not have _ losses per month, jack would not have been— losses per month, jack would not have been picked up through that until he _ have been picked up through that until he had a deep and serious addiction — until he had a deep and serious addiction. you have got to set things— addiction. you have got to set things at— addiction. you have got to set things at a level which will be preventative. it things at a level which will be preventative.— things at a level which will be reventative. , , , preventative. it pretends it is safe doinu preventative. it pretends it is safe doing this- — preventative. it pretends it is safe doing this. that's _ preventative. it pretends it is safe doing this. that's what _ preventative. it pretends it is safe doing this. that's what jack i doing this. that's what jack
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thought. jack pointed to the bookies with his friends at the age of 17 and he thought it was as advertised, and he thought it was as advertised, a bit of safe fibre. he didn't know his life is at risk. on that last day when he died, he did wake up at the boarding athink, this evening i will be dead. —— he did not wake up in the morning. he had no idea what he was doing would kill him. we have to tell people. i do he was doing would kill him. we have to tell people-— to tell people. i do our lives are utterly committed _ to tell people. i do our lives are utterly committed to this, as i to tell people. i do our lives are utterly committed to this, as is | to tell people. i do our lives are. utterly committed to this, as is a full—time job for you? utterly committed to this, as is a full-time job for you?— full-time 'ob for you? yes, and other full-time job for you? yes, and other families. _ full-time job for you? yes, and other families. we _ full-time job for you? yes, and other families. we have - full-time job for you? yes, and other families. we have many i full-time job for you? yes, and i other families. we have many people otherfamilies. we have many people who refer to us. that other families. we have many people who refer to us.— who refer to us. that was a shock when jack — who refer to us. that was a shock when jack first — who refer to us. that was a shock when jack first died, _ who refer to us. that was a shock when jack first died, gambling i whenjack first died, gambling suicides— whenjack first died, gambling suicides were not an issue, you didn't— suicides were not an issue, you didn't read _ suicides were not an issue, you didn't read about them. what we discovered within weeks, really, of jack dyer, — discovered within weeks, really, of jack dyer, whichjust how many discovered within weeks, really, of jack dyer, which just how many other families— jack dyer, which just how many other families had — jack dyer, which just how many other families had been affected —— of jack dying. — families had been affected —— of jack dying. and how many ordinary young _ jack dying. and how many ordinary young people were taking their lives _ young people were taking their lives. the thing about it is, they
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were _ lives. the thing about it is, they were just — lives. the thing about it is, they were just ordinary, normal, lives. the thing about it is, they werejust ordinary, normal, happy people _ werejust ordinary, normal, happy people. gambling was the single problem — people. gambling was the single problem. it wasn't mental health issues, _ problem. it wasn't mental health issues, it— problem. it wasn't mental health issues, it wasn't masses of debt, it was what _ issues, it wasn't masses of debt, it was what gambling does to your mental— was what gambling does to your mental health.— was what gambling does to your mental health. ., ,, , ., . ., mental health. thank you so much for cominu in mental health. thank you so much for coming in and — mental health. thank you so much for coming in and talking _ mental health. thank you so much for coming in and talking about _ mental health. thank you so much for coming in and talking about jack i mental health. thank you so much for coming in and talking about jack but i coming in and talking aboutjack but also about what you have learned that what you are campaigning for. government is carrying out the review and have said in a statement and say they are apprehending africa undertaking the most comprehensive review of gambling laws for 15 years to make sure they are fit for the digital age. we will keep across that of the programme. if you have been affected by any of the issues raised in this conversation, you can find help and advice at bbc.co.uk/actionline. 26 minutes past eight. morning live follows breakfast on bbc one this morning. kym and gethin can tell us what they have in store.
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good morning. and actually gambling is something we are going to be talking about as well today. it may be the end of the premier league season in england but for some gamblers the game never stops. we've been to speak to those suffering the true cost of the link between betting advertising and sport. we didn't know that gambling could kill, but we know now. i also on the show, up to 40% of us will suffer from the condition that can leave you numb, in pain, and struggling to walk. loads of you got in touch after our back pain clinic wanting to know how to manage sciatica. dr xand has the answers. yes, it's a debilitating condition that can cause severe _ pain and limit mobility, _ but there are some simple exercises you can do to improve symptoms and get you back on your feet. i and he has got a demo for you today and everything! also, we know yourfinances are a top priority right now. as the energy crisis deepens and the headlines get more confusing, our financial expert iona bain is here to help. i'll be explaining what ofgem's
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latest price cap plan means- for your bills and where to get i support if you're struggling to pay. and, he's a masterchef: the professionals winner, has worked in michelin starred restaurants and even cooked at the oscars. but today dan lee will be showing us how to make a cheap and easy monday night stir fry from instant noodles and your sunday roast leftovers. can't wait for dinner tonight. plus nikita kuzmin is here for his strictly fitness debut today. wonderful to have him, he is ready to go as you can see! see you at 9:15. those noodles are some gorgeous. yes, a cheat day on a monday! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm tolu adeoye. new figures on the number of monkeypox cases are expected today with most of the 20 cases
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so far confirmed in london. some sexual health doctors have expressed concerns about how the virus could impact services. the government says it provides billions of pounds of funding through public health grants. there's been a lot of inquiries but perhaps not overwhelmingly so and i think at the moment we are managing. i think the difficulty is that sexual health services have been so squeezed over the last decade or so. we've seen huge cuts in funding. we've seen reductions in staff and we don't have an awful lot of capacity or resilience for dealing with new issues. a new report suggests that black and asian women in the uk are being harmed by racial discrimination in maternity care. a year—long inquiry by the charity, birthrights, found mothers reported feeling unsafe, were denied pain relief, and faced stereotyping. the department of health said a task force had been set up to address factors linked to disparities in the quality of maternity care.
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final preparations are under way for the opening of the elizabeth line tomorrow morning. three and half years late, billions of pounds over—budget, the line stretching from reading in the west to shenfield in the east will serve up to 200 million passengers a year. the first train will run at 6.30am. well, let's take a look at the tube situation this morning. all lines running well. we will of course have the elizabeth line joining the table tomorrow. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. we've got a rather unsettled week of weather ahead. yesterday we got 24 celsius and plenty of sunshine. today there's not quite so much sun. it's quite an unsettled picture. you can see various fronts moving through so first thing maybe a little bit of brightness. you might see a little bit of blue sky but fairly quickly the cloud will increase. coming up from the south we've got a heavy band of rain largely affecting the south—east but we could get showers everywhere. a breezy day too. temperatures reaching 18 celsius. so quite a bit cooler
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than yesterday. now overnight we're still going to see some showers blowing through. it stays breezy. it stays cloudy overnight. the minimum temperature dropping down to nine celsius so another cloudy start tomorrow. but the cloud tomorrow a little more willing to break up. we will however see further showers. now with the sun we'll see the heat of the daytime and more frequent showers through the course of tomorrow. you might even get the odd rumble of thunder. temperatures tomorrow very similar at around 18 celsius. now, as we head further through the week for wednesday, a largely cloudy start, some brighter spells in the afternoon. more sunshine for thursday and gradually the temperature getting a little bit warmer as we head towards the weekend. well, there's not long to go now until the queen's platinum jubilee. we'd love to know how you will be celebrating and we might even bring our cameras. if you're doing something special, get in touch by emailing us. i'll be back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour.
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plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back tojon and sally. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent. having recovered from that weekend of sport which was exhausting? so stressful. exhilarating, painful, but delightful for some? john has been trying to put it all together for us this morning and he's at the etihad stadium where they have got sore heads with big smiles, right? yes, and a few tears as well. it's worth pointing out, good morning to both. good morning, everybody. those tears came not only from their fans the pep guardiola after that final whistle as the premier league title confirmed and you wonder where those tears of relief? it must be exhausting carrying the weight and expectation not only of the health club on your shoulders but all the fans, as well and city were expected to deliver the title and yesterday,
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they very nearly didn't when you consider of course that they had to win yesterday, they had to beat aston villa to make sure of the title. yet they were 2—0 down with just 15 minutes of that match remaining. they turned it around, though, in five incredible minutes with three goals as they came back to win 3—2 and certainly manchester city, when it comes the final to day of the season, they know how to deliver drama, don't they? just as they did when sergio aguero scored that goal to win the first premiership title in 2012. they did it again perhaps not such a late drama this time, it was an extraordinary day all round, though. the only real sour note was that pitch invasion which followed the match yesterday. we saw the aston villa goalkeeper attacked at one point. the club and pep guardiola have apologised and an investigation is under way by greater manchester police. contrasting emotions of course of the other end of the table with burnley confirmed as the final team to be relegated from the premier league, ending their
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six—year stay in the flight. ben croucher can now tell us more. this day is manchester city's. premier league champions again. well, that's the simple version. they did it in a very manchester city way. ten years on from their first premier league, and you know who, it was deja vu. 2—0 down against aston villa, title on the line, city did their final day thing again. ilkay gundogan and then rodri threaded a new story into city's modern premier league tapestry. all it needed now was the finishing touch. de bruyne cross, gundogan scores! you cannot imagine the joy of our tears, was today, it was incredible relief, satisfaction. i want to shout for the whole organisation, for man city. there were tears of a different kind at anfield as liverpool's late win over wolves was too little, too late. they will still have the champions
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league to play for next weekend. this, though, was a day for highs and lows, the ups and downs. leeds started sunday staring at relegation. they finished it up on cloud nine. 0h, brilliant! leeds are safe! that's a bit burly were not. defeat by newcastle ends their six—year stay in the top flight. just devastated, really. all the season, we have just not been good enough, frankly. too many mistakes and not enough goals and that's going to result in you being down lower down the table. higher up, tottenham seized fourth spot and champions league football with a 5—0 win at norwich. son heung—min's brace means he shares the golden boot with mo salah. manchester united stumbled into sixth after losing at crystal palace. they will play in the europa league under new boss erik ten hag. and amongst city's celebrations, more unsavoury conduct in the pitch invasion. the club say they will investigate after and amongst city's
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celebrations, more unsavoury aston villa's robin olsen was attacked. what the hell is going through fans minds when they have just won the title, and we saw it in the forest sheffield united game, we saw it in the everton v palace game, we have seen it again today. it has to stop. yeah, we have seen one culprit, we have seen one jailed. but the premier league and the fa, they need to protect. that's the players place of work. they have got to do more. once the fans had dispersed, city were able to savour the latest addition to their trophy cabinet. and as the sun sets on another memorable premier league season, the blue moon has risen again. ben croucher, bbc news. in the last hour, greater manchester police have confirmed that two fans have been charged following that pitch invasion here yesterday although this doesn't relate to the attack on the goalkeeper. they say inquiries into that assault are still ongoing with officers now working with both clubs. this was
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the fifth pitch invasion across the leagues in the last week. there was drama at the us pga championship. england's matt fitzpatrick and tommy fleetwood both just fell short of winning golf�*s us pga championship finishing two shots behind the winnerjustin thomas. the american won the second major of his career after producing a stunning final round. thomas trailed by seven shots at the start of the day, but produced a 3—under par round of 67 to move joint top of the leaderboard and then beat fellow american will zalatoris on a third hole play—off. a huge day at the french open ahead today as well. novak djokovic in action, rafi nadal in the top two in the men's and women's games. as far as the british players are concerned, they will be in action later on. they will hope to avoid an upset of course which happen certainly at roland garros yesterday.
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something which the women's number six seed 0ns jabeur was unable to do. the tunisian was knocked out by madga linette losing by two sets to one. the pole will face harriet dart next, if the briton wins today. how well emma rad a kanu fair as she makes herfinal how well emma rad a kanu fair as she makes her final preparations for his senior debut tournament? emma raducanu is also in action this afternoon as she prepares to make her french open debut. the us open champion will face czech qualifier linda noskova in the opening round. britain's heather watson, dan evans and cameron norrie are all also on court throughout the day. and of course, we look ahead and prepare for wimbledon. the manchester city fans will be looking ahead to the trophy presentation, an open top bus tour will be out on the streets of central manchester later, getting under way about 6pm. you wonder if we will see more tears potentially from their fans late and perhaps one or two more from pep guardiola? it has been a thrilling premier league title race once again. liverpooland premier league title race once again. liverpool and manchester city pushing each other so closely once again. you sort of take it as the norm, don't you, with liverpool vying for four trophies this season, man city winning their fourth title
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in five seasons. this isn't the norm and it goes to show they've been the two standout sides once again in english football. it's been so hard to split them once again. cheers, cracking season. it's been absolutely brilliant. thanks very much indeed. no wonder pep guardiola is tired and emotional. exhausted. there will be other tiers on the other side of manchester this morning. yes, true. we've been speaking a lot about the rising cost of living in recent weeks, but sometimes you just want to know the bottom line. now some new research has calculated just how much family budgets are going up by and it's a lot. nina has the details. yes, on the one hand it's shocking but then people will realise, yes, that sounds so familiar and inflation was 9% for the month of april. we know poorerfamilies who are hit the hardest and this really quantifies the numbers for us. good morning. they've been worked out by looking at the cost a year ago of what is considered a minimum acceptable standard of living. so
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the basics, comparing those basics to today. a family with two children are paying at least £390 pounds more each month. just to afford the bare minimum. a single parent with two kids is facing extra costs of more than £360. unsurprisingly, household energy is draining the most cash. that's setting families back by nearly £130 a month. transport, social activities and childcare have also gone up quite significantly. that's leading to difficult decisions for people like stacey who's had to remove things days out from the budget. sings like alton towers taking my nine—year—old to alton towers, we can't do that any more. they are noticing the difference when their friends at school can go to places like that and i just said afford friends at school can go to places like that and ijust said afford it. and it's really, really affecting me at the minute. mentally, physically as well. i love doing stuff for my kids. i love going out on my days
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off and making sure they are happy but i can't fulfil that. itjust makes me feel like less of a mum. i just don't know what i've got to do or what i got to cut down on to pay for stuff. or what i got to cut down on to pay forstuff. food or what i got to cut down on to pay for stuff. food has gone up, as well. my average food bill used to be 50p a week and is now £90 a week now. so that's a noticeable difference for me. i'm having to kind of shop less, we are trying to eat healthy as well but the healthy food has gone more expensive than thejunk food has gone more expensive than the junk food now.— the junk food now. stacey situation miaht the junk food now. stacey situation might sound _ the junk food now. stacey situation might sound familiar. _ if you're on a low wage a bigger proportion of your income goes on food and energy. inflation was 9% in april, but for the most vulnerable in society it's more like 13%. when it comes to food , which? has found hundreds of grocery prices have gone up by more than 20%. that includes many of the basics; things like butter and milk. the consumer group also found there were fewer offers available, on vegetables and fresh fruit. this weekend the boss of gas
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and electric supplier e.0n said one in eight of their customers are already struggling to pay their bills, and joined calls for more government support. could one way offering support come from the so called "windfall tax" on energy businesses? it's something the government had initally dismissed, but this morning implied it could a possibility. the chancellor has been clear we can't rule anything out. and i think that must be the right position to adopt. philosophically, idon't that must be the right position to adopt. philosophically, i don't want to be raising taxes but nor obviously can we ignore the fact that there is a very challenging situation in terms of the cost of energy at the moment. it will likely worsen ahead of next winter and the government is going to need to take action to address that and so, it is in that context that the chancellor and his team will be looking at all the options open to us and i think people will expect that to be the case at this point. lots
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people will expect that to be the case at this point.— people will expect that to be the case at this point. lots of people wondering _ case at this point. lots of people wondering when, _ case at this point. lots of people wondering when, though, - case at this point. lots of people wondering when, though, those| wondering when, though, those changes will come in. the minister didn't rule out changes to universal credit either. there are no easy answers here — particularly as the future of energy prices remains unpredictable. thank you for your messages. just three here to read out. this is all from mary. she said just a reminder of how the prices are hitting pensioners, people like myself who are on their own on state pensions, we don't get any more supportive. we've worked all of our lives and we can't get any help. debbie similarly says please can you stop talking about families and pensioners. i'm struggling, a single person, 53 years old, struggling to pay my mortgage. i work for the nhs, i'm an army veteran of 22 years, but i'm an army veteran of 22 years, but i can't cope at the moment with these pressures. so these are people, you know, it's what we've been hearing recently, people in full—time employment who built up a pension are really struggling to by. phyllis says she can out of care and learned to live in bedsit on her own and how to cook cheap food. she suggested using porridge to fill you
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“p suggested using porridge to fill you up in the morning at a cheap option for breakfast. these are the realities of the decisions people are making. the world economic forum in davos has opened and the imf has already said the global economy is facing a series of calamities. and i think that goes to show it's not just happening here. these pressures in supply are global, every government is weighing up how much they can support people while managing the debt they are already in because of support schemes over covid. it's a very difficult time and affecting everybody. thank you. it's coming up to a 8:45. the chelsea flower show makes a return to its traditional spring slot this week after two years of disruption caused by the pandemic. it was in the autumn, wasn't it, last year and wasn't as big as normal. this year's displays includes a garden which honours one of the show�*s biggest and most longstanding supporters, the queen. i thought you were going to say carol! yes, she is our queen. daniela relph has been for a look around. months of graft. it's in studios and gardens well away from chelsea
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that the flower show is designed and prepared. simon lycett is making the royal horticultural society's officialjubilee tribute to their patron, the queen. a familiar image in a heavy steel framework. it will be filled with flowers and plants the queen loves. in 2021, her majesty revealed to the rhs that her favourite flower is lily of the valley. that combined with knowing that she adores native trees, things like hornbeams and oaks and beeches and birches, those were the ingredients i wanted to encapsulate, but it also needed to be hefty, significant, enough of a statement to stand out within the great pavilion amongst all those amazing world class gold medal gardens. so no pressure! on site at the flower show looking more like a building site in recent days. but examine things more closely and you see the meticulous work going on to create these
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prizewinning pieces of horticulture. and this year, the smaller gardens really do get a look in. for the first time ever, judges will be finding a winner from amongst the balcony and container gardens. and this is one of the container gardens. jane porter has created a mini scotland. whisky casks reversioned. slate to recreate the harbour walls of the western isles. heather and thistles among the plants. i think that's what people are relating to now because people with really small spaces have started gardening. you know that whatever you do, it has to be the absolute best it can be. it's tonnes and tonnes of pressure, but that's also very exciting and motivating. all right. so you have to stoop when you're on your way in here. a garden with a younger viewpoint. it's a child—sized hole. this is for children. so it's got to be fun. it's exactly size for them. designed for alder hey children's hospital in liverpool, where it will eventually be
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relocated, emphasising the link between alder hey and the local community. we've designed i a garden for children. this isn't a stuffy space. where bankers can come and entertain their clients. this is a place for children to have fun and we want people _ to take that away from it. but the big draw here will be the chance to go foraging. not everything in the garden is edible because that would be like a sweet shop. it's more like an easter egg hunt. try a bit of that. can i swallow? yeah, yeah, i'm not going to poison you. that's mint. yeah, that is water mint. water mint. and children are a big feature here, too. the new blue peter garden, where you'll be encouraged to get your hands dirty. it's an invitation to children to learn about soil, get down in the soil, feel it, smell it, and in the end, love it. after the covid interruption and postponements, the chelsea flower show has returned to the comfort of may with its
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spring flowers in full bloom. the aim is to create a show that is innovative, celebratory and thoughtful. daniela relph, bbc news, at the chelsea flower show. we are trying to go back to normal aren't we? it we are trying to go back to normal aren't we? . aren't we? it feels right, the comfort of— aren't we? it feels right, the comfort of may _ aren't we? it feels right, the comfort of may as _ aren't we? it feels right, the comfort of may as daniela i aren't we? it feels right, the i comfort of may as daniela called it. carol is back at chelsea in the sunshine. there is certainly sunny smiles there this morning. carol, hello. . ., , . smiles there this morning. carol, hello. . ., , , hello. there certainly is, john. yes, hello. there certainly is, john. yes. good _ hello. there certainly is, john. yes, good morning, _ hello. there certainly is, john. j yes, good morning, everyone. hello. there certainly is, john. i yes, good morning, everyone. i'm once again at one of the show gardens, there are 13 here. this one is called a rewilding briton landscape and it is showcasing the beauty and diversity that returns when we allow nature to flourish. now there is a copse of hawthorn, hazel and field maple is here and you can also see just below me here
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this lovely little dam. it represents the beavers having built this dam with a large pool behind it and actually, it does show the role of beavers in the ecosystem. and once again, the sound of water, it's just so calming. it's beautiful. and a kaleidoscope of colours once more. now it's mild here this morning in london, but still quite cloudy and the sun is trying to come out. the weather for this week is looking more unsettled than it was last week. so it's going to be cooler, there will also be rain at times, it will be breezy at times, equally there will also be some sunshine. today what's happening is no pressure is in charge of our weather and we have a weather front across the north west of scotland, producing some rain, and another one coming up across the south—east of england. also producing some rain. in between, a lot of cloud and a few showers. so we focus on the south—east first of all. that rain will push further north through the date, through east anglia, possibly
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clipping here in london as well, so we might see some rain at chelsea later. meanwhile, the rain in scotland moves a little bit further south but the showers will develop more widely and some of them will be heavy and sundry. their breeze picking up in the south with temperature ranging from 12 in the north, 18 in the south eastern corner. through this evening and overnight, the weather front in scotland pushes south bringing rain into the south—east of scotland. and also the weather front in the south—east of england pushes north bringing its rain into the north—east of england. quite a bit of cloud, some clear spells, and breezy, so it's not going to be a cold night. in fact it will be quite a mild one. so we start tomorrow with the rain across south—east scotland and north—east england and that clears away into the north sea. then tomorrow, once again, a day of sunshine and showers. some of the showers will be heavy and sundry that they will be more sunshine around tomorrow than we are looking at today and once again, quite breezy as well. temperature is very similar to today. we are looking at the low to the high teens. then, as
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we head into friday, for many it will start on a dry node, a weather front coming into the west bringing some rain. the heaviest of which will be western scotland and asked that rain pushes eastwards, it will start to turn more patchy in nature and then as it clears away once again, we are back in that dizzy regime of sunshine and showers with temperatures again up to the high teens. if you're looking for something more settled in the forecast you have to wait until friday and into the weekend when high—pressure once again he exerts its influence across our shores. sally and john. carol, before we let you go i have to tell you we have had so many lovely comments from viewers at home, people watching, saying congratulations on yourjust announced this morning engagement. they are all so happy for you as we all are. they are all so happy for you as we allare. can they are all so happy for you as we all are. can we please have a tiny look at your ring? filth. all are. can we please have a tiny look at your ring?— all are. can we please have a tiny look at your ring? oh, thank you, everybody- _
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look at your ring? oh, thank you, everybody- we — look at your ring? oh, thank you, everybody. we are _ look at your ring? oh, thank you, everybody. we are absolutely i everybody. we are absolutely thrilled. i'm still in a daze. i can't believe it actually happened because it certainly wasn't expecting. it's lovely. thank you. that's beautiful, carol. there's lots of people... that's beautiful, carol. there's lots of people. . ._ that's beautiful, carol. there's lots of people... you are making me blush! you — lots of people... you are making me blush! you blush _ lots of people. .. you are making me blush! you blush all— lots of people... you are making me blush! you blush all you _ lots of people... you are making me blush! you blush all you like - blush! you blush all you like because you _ blush! you blush all you like because you deserve - blush! you blush all you like because you deserve to i blush! you blush all you like i because you deserve to blush. tell us as much as you want to about how it happened. was it formal? one knee thing? it happened. was it formal? one knee thin ? . it happened. was it formal? one knee thin ? , ., , it happened. was it formal? one knee thin ? . ., . ~ it happened. was it formal? one knee thin ? , i, , i ., it happened. was it formal? one knee thin? , i,, i i, i, thing? yes, it was. we went out for a icnic thing? yes, it was. we went out for a picnic and — thing? yes, it was. we went out for a picnic and l _ thing? yes, it was. we went out for a picnic and i had _ thing? yes, it was. we went out for a picnic and i had absently - thing? yes, it was. we went out for a picnic and i had absently no i thing? yes, it was. we went out for a picnic and i had absently no idea. | a picnic and i had absently no idea. the weather was glorious, we were sitting chatting and then my other half was a wee bit nervous for some reason which i didn't know and he was fumbling in his pocket and out came a ring and i thought he was joking, actually. i didn't believe him to start with. but it was lovely. it was quite romantic. film. lovely. it was quite romantic. oh, that's lovely. it was quite romantic. 0h, that'siust — lovely. it was quite romantic. 0h, that'sjust gorgeous, isn't it? that's just gorgeous, isn't it? you're making me really embarrassed now. �* , you're making me really embarrassed now. , now. don't be embarrassed. i don't want to worry _ now. don't be embarrassed. i don't want to worry you _ now. don't be embarrassed. i don't want to worry you but _ now. don't be embarrassed. i don't want to worry you but you - now. don't be embarrassed. i don't want to worry you but you did - now. don't be embarrassed. i don't want to worry you but you did it - now. don't be embarrassed. i don't want to worry you but you did it in l want to worry you but you did it in your own time, but matt has already
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said he wants to be a page boy. nina is coming up with your table plan. but no pressure.— is coming up with your table plan. but no pressure. brilliant. goodness knows when — but no pressure. brilliant. goodness knows when it _ but no pressure. brilliant. goodness knows when it will _ but no pressure. brilliant. goodness knows when it will happen. - but no pressure. brilliant. goodness knows when it will happen. maybe . knows when it will happen. maybe soon, maybe years.— knows when it will happen. maybe soon, maybe years. that's basically sa inc ou soon, maybe years. that's basically saying you are _ soon, maybe years. that's basically saying you are not _ soon, maybe years. that's basically saying you are not invited. - soon, maybe years. that's basically saying you are not invited. she - soon, maybe years. that's basically saying you are not invited. she has| saying you are not invited. she has got the flowers sorted anyway. carol, have a lovely day. congratulations to carol. the best news ever- _ congratulations to carol. the best news ever. thank _ congratulations to carol. the best news ever. thank you, _ congratulations to carol. the best news ever. thank you, thank - congratulations to carol. the best news ever. thank you, thank you | congratulations to carol. the best - news ever. thank you, thank you very much. i news ever. thank you, thank you very much. ~ ., ., , , much. i think we had embarrassed her there. much. i think we had embarrassed her there- that's — much. i think we had embarrassed her there. that's what _ much. i think we had embarrassed her there. that's what we _ much. i think we had embarrassed her there. that's what we are _ much. i think we had embarrassed her there. that's what we are here - much. i think we had embarrassed her there. that's what we are here to - much. i think we had embarrassed her there. that's what we are here to do l there. that's what we are here to do every morning. it is 853. they're the life blood of the music industry — small, grass—roots venues where up—and—coming artists can cut their teeth and build a fan base. in the last two decades, however, more than third of them have closed down, often because of the high rents charged by commercial landlords. today the music venue trust is launching a new scheme to stop the rot and it's all about music—lovers clubbing together to own a stake
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in the buildings. abi smitton went to one of them to find out more. all schools, the music schools. what more do you want, like? people travel hundreds of miles to come here to see gigs. llt'sjust a beautiful, beautiful, | really beautiful, beautiful vibe. it's so laid back and relaxed and you can't do anything. but just enjoy it. it's the spine—tingling, foot—tapping sound of live music. jazz night at the ferret in preston. you can't beat a really good audience reaction. it makes you play better. and obviously as a musician, you enjoy it more. you know, it's fantastic. live music, come and see some live music. that's the thing. that's what we're all about. the ferret is a staple
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of the grassroots music scene. # angels fly, fly, fly... before the slick polished lights and action of the arena tour, ed sheeran played here in 2011. despite its rich history, there are concerns for its future. earlier this year, the landlord put the building up for sale. we've come through the pandemic and we're still putting on gigs. then there's been the cost of living crisis, so people are a bit more reluctant to go out and spend money on gigs. but the biggest worry now is that the property is in the hands of a private landlord and they've put the property up for sale. it just shows that you can fight through the pandemic and you can get through all sorts of problems, but the landlord could take this away at any point by selling the building. it's thought nearly all grassroots music venues are owned by commercial landlords. 35% of them have had to close over the past 20 years. a new scheme from the charity the music venues trust is hoping to protect the future of nine
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grassroots venues, including the ferret. they want to raise enough money to buy the sites. we're really, really chuffed to be one of the first venues to be to be involved in this. it's come at exactly the right time with our building going up for sale in the last couple of months. it's thought it'll cost around £3.5 million. the trust is offering fans the chance to purchase shares, meaning they'll own a little part of a venue that means so much to them. it's really, really, really important to come and have live music, especially since lockdown ended. one of the things that's kept me going is coming to live gigs, seeing music and just chatting with people and even like this can sound really weird, but random people, you have gig buddies, you'll sit and chat to someone for the entire night watching music and you can't get that without music or comedy or people just trying to get out there on stage. the stage is set. it's hoped the new scheme will strike the right chord
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with certain music fans. yes, absolutely. i buy shares in it and i don't know whether you know, but ed sheeran played here a while back. and if ed's listening, would you buy some shares as well? i know you've got a few quid. abi smitton, bbc news. at the ferret in preston. megan paterson in glasgow at one of the venues that's going to be helped by the scheme. good morning, megan. good morning, es, this is good morning, megan. good morning, yes. this is the — good morning, megan. good morning, yes, this is the glad _ good morning, megan. good morning, yes, this is the glad cafe _ good morning, megan. good morning, yes, this is the glad cafe on _ yes, this is the glad cafe on glasgow south side and for the last ten years it has been helping new musicians get onto the stage and make a start on the scene. it also runs community workshops and is connected to a thrift shop. it's one of the nine venues to selected to take part in this new scheme. here to tell us a wee bit more is marked from the trust. mark, this is a
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really ambitious project. why is it necessary for the trust to become the owner of these buildings? we are t in: to the owner of these buildings? we are trying to create _ the owner of these buildings? we are trying to create a _ the owner of these buildings? we are trying to create a national— the owner of these buildings? we are trying to create a national trust - the owner of these buildings? we are trying to create a national trust of. trying to create a national trust of music— trying to create a national trust of music venues where the music community and local communities actually— community and local communities actually own the creative space, the cultural _ actually own the creative space, the cultural space that surround them feel a _ cultural space that surround them feel a sense of ownership because they are _ feel a sense of ownership because they are actually the owners. you know, _ they are actually the owners. you know. it's — they are actually the owners. you know. it's a — they are actually the owners. you know, it's a really exciting opportunity where everybody can become — opportunity where everybody can become part owner of this network of venues _ become part owner of this network of venues we _ become part owner of this network of venues. we want to do this first lot first and _ venues. we want to do this first lot first and then want to make it much bigger— first and then want to make it much bigger and — first and then want to make it much bigger and get everybody in the country— bigger and get everybody in the country involved where they have a real sense — country involved where they have a real sense of ownership of the music community— real sense of ownership of the music community around them. how drastic is the situation _ community around them. how drastic is the situation and _ community around them. how drastic is the situation and wires _ community around them. how drastic is the situation and wires are - community around them. how drastic is the situation and wires are so - is the situation and wires are so crucial to do it now to these venues?— crucial to do it now to these venues? , , , , , , venues? ownership is the big issue at the end of— venues? ownership is the big issue at the end of it. _ venues? ownership is the big issue at the end of it. whatever - venues? ownership is the big issue at the end of it. whatever else - venues? ownership is the big issue at the end of it. whatever else we | at the end of it. whatever else we are dealing — at the end of it. whatever else we are dealing with, noise, complaints, licensing, _ are dealing with, noise, complaints, licensing, we've got to get the ownership right because if people ownership right because if people own their— ownership right because if people own their own communities and spaces in the _ own their own communities and spaces in the communities, they have got the choice — in the communities, they have got the choice of what happens there so it's really— the choice of what happens there so it's really important people can visit music venue properties dot—com i’llht visit music venue properties dot—com right now— visit music venue properties dot—com right now and become the owner of a
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music— right now and become the owner of a music venue — right now and become the owner of a music venue. you right now and become the owner of a music venue-— music venue. you can own a little bit of your— music venue. you can own a little bit of your favourite _ music venue. you can own a little bit of your favourite place. - music venue. you can own a little bit of your favourite place. you i bit of your favourite place. you -la in bit of your favourite place. you play in these — bit of your favourite place. you play in these places _ bit of your favourite place. tj’f7l. play in these places so why bit of your favourite place. rim play in these places so why are they so special? play in these places so why are they so secial? , ., ,, , play in these places so why are they so special?— so special? grassroots venues are vital when — so special? grassroots venues are vital when you're _ so special? grassroots venues are vital when you're crafting - so special? grassroots venues are vital when you're crafting and - vital when you're crafting and coming — vital when you're crafting and coming uu _ vital when you're crafting and coming up. when— vital when you're crafting and coming up. when you're - vital when you're crafting and - coming up. when you're bringing out new music _ coming up. when you're bringing out new music. , coming up. when you're bringing out new music._ you - coming up. when you're bringing out new music._ you need - coming up. when you're bringing out new music._ you need to l new music. very good. you need to ush it to new music. very good. you need to push it to people- _ new music. very good. you need to push it to people. the _ new music. very good. you need to push it to people. the way - new music. very good. you need to push it to people. the way you - new music. very good. you need to push it to people. the way you do l new music. very good. you need to j push it to people. the way you do it is to come _ push it to people. the way you do it is to come through _ push it to people. the way you do it is to come through these _ push it to people. the way you do it is to come through these venues. . is to come through these venues. what _ is to come through these venues. what the — is to come through these venues. what the trust _ is to come through these venues. what the trust is _ is to come through these venues. what the trust is doing _ is to come through these venues. what the trust is doing is- what the trust is doing is tremendous— what the trust is doing is tremendous because - what the trust is doing is tremendous because not| what the trust is doing is- tremendous because not only are what the trust is doing is— tremendous because not only are they saving _ tremendous because not only are they saving the _ tremendous because not only are they saving the history— tremendous because not only are they saving the history of _ tremendous because not only are they saving the history of these _ tremendous because not only are they saving the history of these venues, i saving the history of these venues, but saving — saving the history of these venues, but saving it — saving the history of these venues, but saving it for _ saving the history of these venues, but saving it for the _ saving the history of these venues, but saving it for the future, - saving the history of these venues, but saving it for the future, for - but saving it for the future, for the artists _ but saving it for the future, for the artists-— but saving it for the future, for the artists. ., . , the artists. fantastic, so helping --eole the artists. fantastic, so helping people like _ the artists. fantastic, so helping people like those _ the artists. fantastic, so helping people like those who _ the artists. fantastic, so helping people like those who are - the artists. fantastic, so helping people like those who are going | the artists. fantastic, so helping l people like those who are going to come up and try to get on the stage as well. this is one of nine venues selected for the pilot festival and as you heard from mark, hopefully more will be taken under ownership too. ~ . . .. more will be taken under ownership too. ~ ., ., ,, i. more will be taken under ownership too. ~ ., ., ,, . you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8.59.
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this is bbc news. i'm ben thompson and these are the latest headlines. thousands more youngsters will end up in care unless there's a "radical reset" of the system — that's the warning from a landmark review of child protection in england. a 27—year—old health worker is arrested on suspicion of administering poison with intent to endanger life — after an infant died at birmingham children's hospital. people at high risk of developing monkeypox after coming into contact with positive cases are being urged to self—isolate for three weeks. almost 700 trains a day are axed in scotland because of driver shortages and a pay dispute. black and asian women are being harmed by racial discrimination in maternity care, according to an investigation
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by the charity birthrights.

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