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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 23, 2022 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news and i am rebecca jones. these are the latest headlines dr chris smith a 21—year—old russian soldier is jailed for life, after admitting killing an unarmed civilian in the early stages of the invasion in ukraine in the country's first war crimes trial. thousands of youngsters will end up in care, unless there is a radical reset of the system. that is the warning from a landmark review of child protection in england. it is crucial that when families _ protection in england. it is crucial that when families hit _ protection in england. it is crucial that when families hit crisis - protection in england. it is crucial that when families hit crisis and l that when families hit crisis and they have got difficulty, that there is a low stigma, really intensive help on offer. is a low stigma, really intensive help on offer-— is a low stigma, really intensive help on offer. people at high risk of developing _ help on offer. people at high risk of developing monkeypox - help on offer. people at high risk of developing monkeypox after i help on offer. people at high risk - of developing monkeypox after coming into contact with positive cases are urged to self—isolate for three weeks. that, as scotland confirms
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its first case of the virus. and in half an hour, we will be answering your concerns and questions on monkeypox with our health correspondent, james gallaher. 27—year—old health worker is arrested on suspicion of deliberately administering poison after a child died while being treated in hospital. major disruption from rail passengers in scotland, with an timetable from today after services have been cut by a third. and the chelsea flower show showcases wildlife, well—being and floral displays to mark the queen's platinumjubilee. hello and welcome to bbc news. at the first war crimes trial since the
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invasion of ukraine, a 21—year—old russian soldier has been jailed for life. sergeant vadim shishimarin had claimed he was only following orders when he shot dead a 62—year—old unarmed civilian. but the court in the ukrainian capital of kyiv found him guilty of murder. the un's government says the deafening thousands of war crimes since people started three months ago. our correspondence, joe inward, has the latest. this was a moment of great significance. the first russian soldier officially declared a war criminal. 21—year—old vadim shishimarin sentenced to life imprisonment for the murder of oleksandr shelipov. the russian tank commander admitted killing the 62—year—old, but said he was simply following orders. the ukrainian court disagreed and gave him life. but almost at the same time, another announcement was being made. here in the capital there will be
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real anger at the news that the defenders of azovstal, men who were considered national heroes for their defence of mariupol, are to be tried in what's being called an international tribunal in the dom domnetsk people's republic. the news was made by the leader of the breakaway region. we haven't got more details yet, but it could be he's referring to all of the fighters orjust the leadership. as legal battles were concluded, realfighting has continued to escalate. it is now focused in the donbas, what was the industrial heartland of the ukrainian economy. this oil refinery was struck by russian shelling as they continued their advance. towards the city of severodonetsk. the toll of the war has been terrible on ukraine, on its people and its economy. speaking at the world economic forum in davos there was a plea for help.
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translation: if we received 100% of our needs at once back in - february, tens of thousands of lives would have been saved. that is why we need all the weapons we are asking for, notjust what is being provided. that's why we need funding — at least 5 billion us dollars a month. and all the funds we need to rebuild our economy. meanwhile, russian armour continues to advance on the eastern stronghold, with all but one bridge to the city destroyed. while people talk of reconstruction in davos, on the ground the destruction continues. joe inwood, bbc news, kyiv. radical changes are needed to prevent tens of thousands more children ending up in care. that is according to a major report today. the review into council run services in england to say the current system is dysfunctional. it calls for more than £2.5 billion of investment over the next five years and a windfall
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tax on big, private children's homes. alison holt, our social affairs editor, has this report. so, let me know how it's been going since the panel. henrietta works with young people to help them pitch ideas and get their voices heard. and also it will be good to know how you found working on the project as well. her own life was shaped by the crisis in the children's care system that today's report wants to change. after two difficult years, she was removed from her mother by social services. she was ia. in the next months she was moved between five different homes. for me, being in care felt like a never ending storm. just, like, every day not knowing where the support is going to be from, where am i even going to lay my head. where is the support for the families right at the start when they're struggling? why does it need to be when they've been taken away? and you can't put kids into dysfunction when you've taken them out of dysfunction. it makes no sense. today's review says a radical reset is needed to shift the focus of children's social care away
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from crisis intervention. it wants more early help available in schools and communities, a new expert social worker role to strengthen child protection, the phasing out of what is described as "wholly offenders institutions," a windfall tax on the profits of large children's homes companies, and to ensure change happens, an extra £2.6 billion funding for services over the next five years. it's crucial that when families hit crisis and they've got difficulties that there is low stigma, really intensive help on offer. and the system we've got at the moment is very well resourced to assess and check what's going on with families, but pretty strapped in terms of the help that it's able to offer. that is where places like new beginnings in stockport come in. these parents have had either children taken into care or they've come close to it. here, they have found support, counselling and advice which has counselling and advice, which has turned their lives around. my little boy has been home with me
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a year and a half now, _ and i never, ever thought that would be possible again. - and anytime i need support, . i reach out to new beginnings. they're like family, - you know, they are family. they're the family that i never had. they've given me so much support and a lot of tools and strategies to work with, with my son who's got special needs. and again, they've given me the strength to push on. the government says it is piloting additionalfamily hubs providing early support. it also accepts more needs to be done to support family members, kinship carers, who take on a child who would otherwise go into care, and to find more foster carers. we know that family relationships, kinship care, is equally important. the system used to obsess about those relationships the system needs to obsess about those relationships because that's how you get great outcomes for the children that need the most help in our society.
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the government says it will consider other recommendations over the longer term. alison holt, bbc news. health officials say the first case of monkeypox has been confirmed in scotland. a total of 20 cases are known in england so far, with updated figures expected to be released soon. people who have come into direct contact with someone who has monkeypox are being asked to self—isolate for three weeks. we're joined now by dr chris smith, a consultant biologist and the host of the naked scientist pod cast. very good to have you with us, chris. how worried should we be about monkeypox?— worried should we be about monkeypox? worried should we be about monke 0x? . , . monkeypox? well, actually, i am reassured because _ monkeypox? well, actually, i am reassured because we _ monkeypox? well, actually, i am reassured because we know - monkeypox? well, actually, i am| reassured because we know about monkeypox? well, actually, i am - reassured because we know about it, we found it, we have found cases, we are following it, there is surveillance happening at all the right things are happening at the numbers are very, very low. it is not as though we have never seen this virus before. we actually discovered it 60 years ago and a name monkeypox is actually quite a misnomer because it is not actually
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a monkey virus, it is actually an infection of rats and other small rodents in certain parts of africa that occasionally jumps the rodents in certain parts of africa that occasionallyjumps the species barrier and gets into other bigger animals like monkeys, but also us. what is different this time is that unlike the handful of cases we have had in the past whereas it is coming to the country because travelled into the infected area, with the exception of one case in this instance that did have a travel history, there are cases that have no trouble history and this suggests there is community spread of the infection and that is why we have no trouble history and this suggests there is community spread of the infection and that is why we are being vigilant, there might be for some people a problem, and so it is better to find it and its habitat quickly while of people. so better to find it and its habitat quickly while of people. so how do ou catch quickly while of people. so how do you catch it? _ quickly while of people. so how do you catch it? well, _ quickly while of people. so how do you catch it? well, this _ quickly while of people. so how do you catch it? well, this is - quickly while of people. so how do you catch it? well, this is a - you catch it? well, this is a respiratory _ you catch it? well, this is a respiratory infection - you catch it? well, this is a respiratory infection and i you catch it? well, this is a | respiratory infection and via you catch it? well, this is a - respiratory infection and via close personal contact. so when you have got the infection, you are infected and symptomatic probably an infectious. you have the infection when your symptomatic. it is not
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like covid, where we know people were passing that on before they even knew they had it and had any symptoms. when you are actually symptomatic, that is when you are infectious. the markers of that our people tend to have a fever, they tend to have a flu—like illness, they feel a bit cold and chivalry, muscle aches and pains. also, you get a rash. the rash can vary, in some people more dramatic than others, but it is little blisters, almost like spots and pimples, and those are crammed with virus particles, so you can be briefed on ljy particles, so you can be briefed on by somebody or if you have contact with those blisters and what is on them and that gets onto your skin or elsewhere, then you can catch it by that route and one other possibility and we know this because the family of viruses to which this belongs attempts to spread this way, you leave behind an infectious legacy on your bedclothes and on your clothes, and so if someone handles bedlinen or something that has been in close contact with someone while they were infectious, there will be some viral residue on there that could pass the
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infection on as well, so really it is all about identifying cases and then taking steps to minimise contact with them when they are infectious, which will be for about a week or so, until their symptoms have subsided and then you will be ok. , ., , have subsided and then you will be ok. , ., y , as any kind of in treatment? in terms of the infection, we are dealing with the form of monkeypox that comes from west africa and this man has about a i% of severe disease rate, in other ways of the hunt 100 people who catch it about one about one in 100 will develop a disease that could be life—threatening. slowly the vast majority of people will be absolutely fine. they will have milder symptoms, but they can be quite intense, you do have a fever, muscle aches and pains and you do feel unwell. in terms of management, if we identify cases of people who have been in contact promptly, then we can give them prophylaxis and that takes the form of actually a smallpox vaccine, believe it or not. a smallpox
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vaccine is not a smallpox vaccine, it is a vaccine for another virus very similar to smallpox, but it also works 80% of the time for monkeypox, so use that vaccine is given quickly after contact it can given quickly after contact it can give the immune system a head start and protect people from the infection. there are also some antivirus drugs that can be used, although they are more experimental, they have a less good track record and in most cases because the disease is mild, it isjust a supportive treatment, where you look after people until they are making their own recovery, and that is normally sufficient. we their own recovery, and that is normally sufficient.— their own recovery, and that is normally sufficient. we are out of time unfortunately, _ normally sufficient. we are out of time unfortunately, but _ normally sufficient. we are out of time unfortunately, but yes - normally sufficient. we are out of time unfortunately, but yes or . normally sufficient. we are out of| time unfortunately, but yes or no, we are not facing another pandemic like? ., , , ., ., . like? no, this is not a pandemic situation- _ like? no, this is not a pandemic situation. 0k, _ like? no, this is not a pandemic situation. 0k, dr— like? no, this is not a pandemic situation. 0k, dr chris - like? no, this is not a pandemic situation. 0k, dr chris smith, . like? no, this is not a pandemic i situation. 0k, dr chris smith, that is reassuring _ situation. 0k, dr chris smith, that is reassuring to _ situation. 0k, dr chris smith, that is reassuring to know. _ situation. 0k, dr chris smith, that is reassuring to know. the - is reassuring to know. the consultant biologist and host of the naked scientist podcast, good to talk to you. and we be answering your questions on monkeypoxjust and we be answering your questions on monkeypox just after and we be answering your questions on monkeypoxjust after 2:30pm. 0ur health correspondence, james gallagher, will be answering your
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questions, so do get in touch, the details the screen. a health worker has been arrested on suspicion dr chris of administering poison with intent to endanger life after a child died at birmingham children's hospital. the 27—year—old woman was arrested on thursday and has been suspended from her role at the hospital. 0ur correspondent navtej johal is following developments at the hospital. what we know so far as the child was being treated here at birmingham children's hospital at the paediatric intensive care unit and died on thursday. later that evening a 27—year—old woman, a health worker here, was arrested at a property in the west midlands police and that was on suspicion of administering poison with intent to gain your life. she has since been released as investigations continue and forensic tests are examined. she has also been suspended by the nhs trust
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responsible for the hospital and that same trust has said it is supporting the infant's family at the same time and asked that privacy is being respected at this process. the hospital treats tens of thousands of children and young people every year, it is a leading centre for specialist paediatric care and there is no doubt this news will have shocked and saddened the people who work here. navtej johal reporting there. let's update you with the headlines on bbc news. a21—year—old russian soldier is jailed for life after admitting killing an unarmed civilian in the early stages of invasion in ukraine in the country's first war crimes trial. thousands more youngsters will end “p thousands more youngsters will end up in care unless there is a radical reset of the system. that is the warning from a landmark review of child protection in england. people at high risk of developing monkeypox after coming into contact with positive cases are urged to self—isolate for three
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weeks. that, as scotland confirms its first case of the virus. the prime minister, borisjohnson, says no option is off the table to help people deal with the rising cost of living. his words come as new data shows families with two children are facing costs which are at least £400 per month higher than they were last year. the labour leader, sir keir starmer, says a range of things need to be looked at and has accused the government of to and has accused the government of to and delaying over whether to introduce a windfall tax on oil and gas companies. our political correspondence, nick eardley, reports. of living squeeze, but there isn't an easy formula to deal with the cost of living squeeze, but the prime minister is under pressure to come up with answers. what more can and will the government do to help households struggling to make ends meet? no option is off the table, let's be clear about that. i'm not attracted
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intrinsically to new taxes. but of course this thing is going to go on, everybody can see the increase in energy prices. there's more we're going to do. but, again, you just have to wait a bit longer. new data from loughborough university suggests a typical family with two young children is paying an extra £400 a month for basic goods and services. we've actually seen mothers who are saying by friday they are left with £1 and they have no money and they are really, really struggling. the government has promised more help is on the way, but ministers are still working out exactly what it'll look like. some think it needs to be highly targeted, designed to help the most vulnerable households through the next few months. but ministers have said they won't bring back the increase in universal credit seen
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during the pandemic. they are, though, still weighing up the idea of a one—off emergency tax on big energy companies. conservative mps are having a public debate about it, a public debate about it. some tories are backing a windfall tax, some ministers are opposed. the treasury seems to be leaning towards the idea at the moment, but what is clear is exactly but what isn't clear is exactly where the money would go and it's unlikely to be enough to make a significant long—term difference. what's the government doing? it's dithering, delaying, last week they voted against a windfall tax, now they are saying they are looking at a windfall tax. they need to get a grip because every day they dither and delay, more people are struggling. the cost of living crisis is a real, pressing issue for many and politicians here are under pressure to do more to help. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. scotrail — which runs most train
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services in scotland — has introduced an emergency timetable, cutting its daily services by almost a third. it's due to a shortage of drivers and a pay dispute between the newly nationalised scotrail and the aslef union, as our scotland correspondent james shaw reports. this train has got four coaches. on this key route between scotland's biggest cities there are half as many services during rush hour as normal. every 30 minutes instead of every 15. and across the network passengers' routines are being bent out of shape by the changes. we have been told it will be very crowded, which is why we booked seats. it will be another 45 minutes and it was supposed to take half an hour. i had to get up 15 minutes earlier than normal because of the train| disputes, but it all went well. the train was cancelled and now i am really late.
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this is what scotrail�*s reduced timetable looks like. more crowded trains because the services are less frequent and that means more stress and frustration for these commuters. scotrail says the reduction in services means there will be fewer cancellations, so more predictability for travellers, but evening services in particular have been cut drastically. we absolutely understand customers' frustration over the lack of evening and late services. this timetable has been a difficult trade—off between running trains for the maximum number of people travelling and trying to meet the needs of those customers as well. a ballot on industrial action being held by the train drivers union means there is also the possibility of even more severe disruption. but they say a pay offer of just over 2% is not acceptable. we are not looking for favours, we are looking for fairness, and i
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think at a time when the whole country is facing a cost of living crisis we should not be looking to run salaries down off anyone, we should be bringing the lowest paid up and driving forward to a high—paid, high skilled work here in scotland. work force here in scotland. it is not the only transport union considering industrial action. the rmt, representing rail workers across the uk, is also unhappy with the pay settlement it has been offered. rampant inflation is hitting many household budgets and the impact on pay negotiations in the railway industry and elsewhere is onlyjust starting to be felt. james shaw, bbc news, glasgow. black and asian women in maternity care wards are experiencing- care wards are experiencing racism. women are — care wards are experiencing racism. women are reporting _ care wards are experiencing racism. women are reporting feeling - care wards are experiencing racism. | women are reporting feeling unsafe, being denied pain relief and facing racial stereotyping about their pain
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tolerance. 0ur correspondent reports. i tolerance. our correspondent reorts. ~ , ~ , reports. i kept thinking is there something _ reports. i kept thinking is there something wrong _ reports. i kept thinking is there something wrong with - reports. i kept thinking is there something wrong with me? - reports. i kept thinking is there i something wrong with me? what reports. i kept thinking is there - something wrong with me? what if i don't actually make it out of here? this woman had a leader almost one year ago. this woman had a leader almost one yearago. she this woman had a leader almost one year ago. she says it was a traumatic neighbour. i year ago. she says it was a traumatic neighbour.- year ago. she says it was a traumatic neighbour. i felt shivery, m whole traumatic neighbour. i felt shivery, my whole body _ traumatic neighbour. i felt shivery, my whole body was _ traumatic neighbour. i felt shivery, my whole body was a _ traumatic neighbour. i felt shivery, my whole body was a queue. - traumatic neighbour. i felt shivery, my whole body was a queue. everyj my whole body was a queue. every time i told them that i don't feel good, they were like, oh, well, you look fine. it good, they were like, oh, well, you look fine. . , ., , , ., look fine. it was 24 hours before doctors realised _ look fine. it was 24 hours before doctors realised she _ look fine. it was 24 hours before doctors realised she was - look fine. it was 24 hours before | doctors realised she was seriously ill. she had sepsis. i doctors realised she was seriously ill. she had sepsis.— ill. she had sepsis. iwas 'ust, it was so frustrating * ill. she had sepsis. iwas 'ust, it was so frustrating that h ill. she had sepsis. iwasjust, it was so frustrating that you - ill. she had sepsis. iwasjust, it was so frustrating that you are l ill. she had sepsis. i wasjust, it i was so frustrating that you are just not listened to. it was a fight the whole way, it was constant writing and that is not what having a baby should be like, you shouldn't have to keep fighting. hiraii should be like, you shouldn't have to keep fighting-— should be like, you shouldn't have to keep fighting. hiral believes her race -la ed to keep fighting. hiral believes her race played a _ to keep fighting. hiral believes her race played a part _ to keep fighting. hiral believes her race played a part in _ to keep fighting. hiral believes her race played a part in her— to keep fighting. hiral believes her| race played a part in her treatment. so i noticed that with the racist stereotypes and the microaggression is, they would come in and they would be like, morning, princess! she meant princess alice... princess. they think indian or asian
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girls are little daddy's girls, mummy�*s girls, you'd get everything handed to them, can't handle pain. instead of taking me seriously, i think theyjust instead of taking me seriously, i think they just thought i was instead of taking me seriously, i think theyjust thought i was a big crybaby. pm think they 'ust thought i was a big c bab . �* , , think they 'ust thought i was a big c bab . �* , _ ., think they 'ust thought i was a big cbab. crybaby. an inquiry by a charity birthriuht crybaby. an inquiry by a charity birthright had _ crybaby. an inquiry by a charity birthright had similar— crybaby. an inquiry by a charity birthright had similar stories i crybaby. an inquiry by a charity birthright had similar stories to hiral�*s. black and asian women reported racial stereotyping at microaggression is an felt dismissed. tina felt ignored during her three pregnancies. with her youngest daughter, she had unexplained bleeding, but was told it was just an infection. it got worse and she ended up needing multiple blood transfusions. ii i multiple blood transfusions. ifi had not multiple blood transfusions. if i had not have been hospitalised, i don't _ had not have been hospitalised, i don't think— had not have been hospitalised, i don't think i would be sitting here i’ilht don't think i would be sitting here right now — don't think i would be sitting here right now. and i don't think my daughter— right now. and i don't think my daughter would be here either. another— daughter would be here either. another finding of the inquiry was black women being denied pain relief, based on racial stereotyping of tolerance. i relief, based on racial stereotyping of tolerance-— of tolerance. i never get anything, other than — of tolerance. i never get anything, other than gas _ of tolerance. i never get anything, other than gas and _ of tolerance. i never get anything, other than gas and air _ of tolerance. i never get anything, other than gas and air and - of tolerance. i never get anything, other than gas and air and even i of tolerance. i never get anything, i other than gas and air and even that i other than gas and air and even that i have _ other than gas and air and even that i have to _ other than gas and air and even that i have to beg for. everybody handles
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pain differently. i don't know where people _ pain differently. i don't know where people get this idea that we can handle — people get this idea that we can handle more than most people. all my experiences _ handle more than most people. all my experiences in my pregnancies have been _ experiences in my pregnancies have been... tainted by my race. the re ort been... tainted by my race. he report highlights been... tainted by my race. tie: report highlights the been... tainted by my race. iie: report highlights the need been... tainted by my race. iil report highlights the need for urgent action, including better education. urgent action, including better education-— urgent action, including better education. ~' , :, :, education. the key thing for me to come out of _ education. the key thing for me to come out of this _ education. the key thing for me to come out of this inquiry _ education. the key thing for me to come out of this inquiry as - education. the key thing for me to come out of this inquiry as a - education. the key thing for me to | come out of this inquiry as a health care professional— come out of this inquiry as a health care professional is _ come out of this inquiry as a health care professional is the _ come out of this inquiry as a health care professional is the gaps - come out of this inquiry as a health care professional is the gaps in- come out of this inquiry as a health care professional is the gaps in our| care professional is the gaps in our knowledge — care professional is the gaps in our knowledge and _ care professional is the gaps in our knowledge and the _ care professional is the gaps in our knowledge and the lack— care professional is the gaps in our knowledge and the lack of- knowledge and the lack of understanding _ knowledge and the lack of understanding when - knowledge and the lack of understanding when it- knowledge and the lack of. understanding when it comes knowledge and the lack of- understanding when it comes to knowledge and the lack of— understanding when it comes to how unconscious — understanding when it comes to how unconscious bias _ understanding when it comes to how unconscious bias is _ understanding when it comes to how unconscious bias is consistent- understanding when it comes to how unconscious bias is consistent in- unconscious bias is consistent in our care, — unconscious bias is consistent in our care, that— unconscious bias is consistent in our care, that we _ unconscious bias is consistent in our care, that we provide. - unconscious bias is consistent in our care, that we provide. at. unconscious bias is consistent in our care, that we provide. a new maternity _ our care, that we provide. a new maternity task — our care, that we provide. a new maternity task force _ our care, that we provide. a new maternity task force have - our care, that we provide. a new maternity task force have been l our care, that we provide. a new l maternity task force have been set up, which the department of health and social care said would address unacceptable disparities in care. tina hopes these disparities will end long before her girls need maternity care. i end long before her girls need maternity care.— maternity care. i have two daughters- _ maternity care. i have two daughters. i— maternity care. i have two daughters. i don't - maternity care. i have two daughters. i don't want i maternity care. i have two i daughters. i don't want them maternity care. i have two - daughters. i don't want them to
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maternity care. i have two _ daughters. i don't want them to have to daughters. idon't want them to have to go— daughters. i don't want them to have to go through what i have gone through — to go through what i have gone throu~h. �* �* , president biden has said the united states would intervene militarily to protect taiwan if it were attacked by china. mr biden's words contradict the us government's long declared policy on taiwan, and have drawn a rapid and angry rebuke from beijing. he made the comments at a news conference launching a new asia—pacific trade pact with japan, aimed at countering growing chinese influence. the parents of a young teacher took his own life was struggling with a gambling addiction have described the government's response as disappointing and inadequate. jack ritchie wasjust 24 disappointing and inadequate. jack ritchie was just 24 when he died five years ago. in march, a coroner ruled he had been failed by woefully inadequate warnings and treatments. the government has now promised a comprehensive review of gambling laws, butjack�*s parents, charles
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angeles, a more urgent action is needed. they have been speaking tomos morgan. jack needed. they have been speaking tomos morgan-— needed. they have been speaking tomos morgan. jack was... he was a real star. tomos morgan. jack was... he was a real star- he — tomos morgan. jack was... he was a real star. he was _ tomos morgan. jack was... he was a real star. he was very _ tomos morgan. jack was... he was a real star. he was very popular. - tomos morgan. jack was... he was a real star. he was very popular. he i real star. he was very popular. he was a very, very happy baby and he retained _ was a very, very happy baby and he retained that kind of cheeriness throughout his life, really. jack ritchie began _ throughout his life, really. i:c< ritchie began gambling with throughout his life, really. i:cc ritchie began gambling with his friends as a teenager at school. he quickly became hooked, so he self excluded himself from the local betting shop, along with the help of his parents, but then the addiction went online. he his parents, but then the addiction went online— went online. he didn't bet ridiculous _ went online. he didn't bet ridiculous amounts - went online. he didn't bet ridiculous amounts and i went online. he didn't bet i ridiculous amounts and again that went online. he didn't bet - ridiculous amounts and again that is one of the myths of gambling, is that jack always gambled pretty much within his means. shatter that jack always gambled pretty much within his means.— within his means. after seven years of bettin: , within his means. after seven years of betting. at _ within his means. after seven years of betting, atjust _ within his means. after seven years of betting, at just 24 _ within his means. after seven years of betting, at just 24 years - within his means. after seven years of betting, at just 24 years of i within his means. after seven years of betting, at just 24 years of age, l of betting, atjust 24 years of age, jack took his own life, blaming himself for his addiction. it was like a bomb _ himself for his addiction. it was like a bomb had _ himself for his addiction. it was like a bomb had gone _ himself for his addiction. it was like a bomb had gone off. i himself for his addiction. it was like a bomb had gone off. a i like a bomb had gone off. a five—year—old knows that smoking kills _ five—year—old knows that smoking kills who — five—year—old knows that smoking kills. who knows that gambling kills? _ kills. who knows that gambling
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kills? , , :, ., , kills. who knows that gambling kills? ,, :, ., , kills? the type of gambling 'ack was into with the — kills? the type of gambling 'ack was into with the most i kills? the type of gambling jack was into with the most addictive. i kills? the type of gambling jack was into with the most addictive. nearly| into with the most addictive. nearly half of all people playing online casino games and slots are addicted or at risk. and more than 400 suicides every year in england alone are due to this issue. earlier this year, a coroner ruled that the information about the dangers and associated treatments available were woefully inadequate to jack. senior coroner david added... last week his parents received a uk government response to the coroner's venture future death report. what is your response to what the uk government have said, following the coroner's report? to government have said, following the coroner's report?— coroner's report? to be honest, it was pretty — coroner's report? to be honest, it was pretty disappointing. - coroner's report? to be honest, it was pretty disappointing. why i coroner's report? to be honest, it was pretty disappointing. why is l was pretty disappointing. why is that? i was pretty disappointing. why is that? i think — was pretty disappointing. why is that? i think it _ was pretty disappointing. why is that? i think it is _ was pretty disappointing. why is that? i think it is inadequate, i was pretty disappointing. why is that? i think it is inadequate, in | that? i think it is inadequate, in that? i think it is inadequate, in that it doesn't _ that? i think it is inadequate, in that it doesn't feel _ that? i think it is inadequate, in that it doesn't feel as _ that? i think it is inadequate, in that it doesn't feel as if - that? i think it is inadequate, in that it doesn't feel as if it i that? i think it is inadequate, in that it doesn't feel as if it has i that it doesn't feel as if it has recognised the real scale of the problem. recognised the real scale of the roblem. :, recognised the real scale of the roblem. . , , ., ., problem. later this year, a white -a er is problem. later this year, a white paper is due _ problem. later this year, a white
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paper is due to — problem. later this year, a white paper is due to be _ problem. later this year, a white paper is due to be published i problem. later this year, a white paper is due to be published on | problem. later this year, a white i paper is due to be published on this issue and his parents are looking for affordability checks of as little as £100 or so for those losing money online to be a part of it. but above all, they are fighting to make sure this does not happen to any otherfamily. i to make sure this does not happen to any other family-— any other family. i can't see us to see the changes _ any other family. i can't see us to see the changes that _ any other family. i can't see us to see the changes that need i any other family. i can't see us to see the changes that need to i any other family. i can't see us to i see the changes that need to happen, to be honest. we are in our 60s and this is— to be honest. we are in our 60s and this is worse — to be honest. we are in our 60s and this is worse than smoking.- this is worse than smoking. tomos moruan, this is worse than smoking. tomos morgan. bbc _ this is worse than smoking. tomos morgan, bbc news. _ this is worse than smoking. tomos morgan, bbc news. almost i this is worse than smoking. tomosl morgan, bbc news. almost 10,000 people... almost 10,000 people in wales have been offered a covid boosterjab despite not being eligible for one. the welsh health minister said the mistake was made after the criteria for who would be offered a jab was broadened, leading to some people being accidentally included in the new group. the incorrect offers for a booster will be honoured, the welsh government confirmed. harry styles will be the latest in a line of stars bringing bedtime stories to children. he's taking the opportunity to tell a story for cbeebies —
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following in the footsteps of dolly parton and the duchess of cambridge. and he'll be reading his story in pyjamas. very much dressed, here is susan powell with the weather. hello. it is a bit of an overused phrase in weather, we have got a mixed bag, but that really is the best way to describe the weather thatis the best way to describe the weather that is coming for the uk through the week ahead. we will see numerous areas of low pressure trying to approach from the atlantic, kicking up approach from the atlantic, kicking up the wins and as they do so ushering in some rain. we have seen this area of low pressure pushing up from the south through monday, weather fronts digging down from the north, basically we can anticipate seeing a bit of rainjust north, basically we can anticipate seeing a bit of rain just about anywhere through the latter part of monday. but particularly across eastern areas of england. further north and west, it should begin to become drier as we go into the small hours of tuesday. a relatively mild night, a little cooler to the north—west of the uk, with
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temperatures down in single figures. tuesday daytime we have low—pressure swelling away in the north sea, breezy down the north sea coasts, further showers running into coastal regions, but also developing widely inland as the day plays out. there will be some sunny spells between the showers, but quite a cool north—westerly breeze and temperatures never quite recovering to the house we saw through the week where they were in the high teens to low 20s, perhaps 17 or 18 degrees at best. wednesday another area of low pressure to talk about, this time coming in from the atlantic, tightening isobars, which means wind will kick up, so tuesday will be a breezy day, wednesday will go for windy, showers working their way across the uk and wind is getting rather gusty at times, i think we could see them gusting 35—40 mph quite widely across the uk, but actually in many areas they will be some decent spells of sunshine through the day on wednesday. but it will feel cool in the breeze, and especially if you are caught in any
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showers, again our highs possibly 17 or 18 at best. towards the end of the week, things to try to settle down, anotherfriend the week, things to try to settle down, another friend sneaks through on thursday, meaning brains for the northern half of the uk, but by friday high pressure is going to try to build in from the south, so that should actually mean we see more in the way of dry weather from friday onwards and also i think we will see our temperatures recovering a little. but at the moment it looks like we may well sit on the eastern side of the area of high pressure with a northerly breeze, so no sign of a heatwave on the wayjust yet.
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hello. this is bbc news. i'm rebecca jones and these are the headlines. a 21—year—old russian soldier is jailed for life after admitting killing an unarmed civilian in the early stages of the invasion in ukraine in the country's first war crimes trial.
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thousands more youngsters will end up in care unless there's a "radical reset" of the system — that's the warning from a landmark review of child protection in england. people at high risk of developing monkeypox after coming into contact with positive cases are urged to self—isolate for three weeks. that, as scotland confirms its first case of the virus. a 27—year—old health worker is arrested on suspicion of deliberately adminstering poison after a child died while being treated in hospital. major disruption for rail passengers in scotland, with an emergency timetable from today after services have been cut by a third. and...the chelsea flower show showcases wildlife, wellbeing and floral displays to mark the queen's platinum jubilee. sport now and for a full round up,
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from the bbc sport centre. as manchester city get ready for their title parade later this afternoon, we've heard from the new we've heard from the new manchester united manager, erik ten haag, for the first time. he's been outlining his plans for the club and says he's looking forward to taking on city and liverpool. united finished 35 points off the top of the table in 6th this season. i have a good feeling with the people around, from the meetings, from the players and i'm about to get the plan going, the process, to be consistent in our plan with good people around with the bright connections, the bright commitment. 0ur connections, the bright commitment. our plan is huge. and we will roll
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this out to the staff and players and you will save. ten haag will have steve mcclaren alongside him in the dugout next season in an assistant coaching role. mcclaren worked under sir alex ferguson at old trafford between 1999 and 2001. mitchell van der gaag will also join the coaching staff from ajax crystal palace manager patrick vieira will face no action from police after an altercation with a fan at goodison park on thursday. everton won 3—2 to secure their premier league survival, and that led to thousands of fans invading the pitch at full—time, with vieira appearing to aim a kick at a fan after being taunted by him. but after both vieira and the fan were contacted, merseyside police said 'the opportunity to make a formal complaint was declined'. the football association say they will be investigating after a pitch invasion at manchester city yesterday, in which the aston villa goalkeeper robin 0lsen was assaulted.
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city have apologised to villa for the incident at fulltime, following their victory that clinched the prmier league title. greater manchester police have charged two men over separate incidents of crowd disorder but say that 'enquiries into the reported assault of a player on the etihad pitch are ongoing'. manchester city footballer benjamin mendy has entered not guilty pleas to nine charges of sexual offences against six women. mendy denied all the charges, which include seven of rape, the offences are alleged to have taken place at his home between october and april. mendy denied all the charges, which include seven of rape, at chester crown court. west ham's kurt zouma and his brother yoan , who plays for dagenham and redbridge, will appear in court tomorrow charged with a number of offences under the animal welfare act. the hammers defender was filmed on social media in february kicking and mistreating his pet cats. the two men are due to appear at thames magistrates�* court for a first hearing tomorrow morning. the animals are still being cared for by the rspca who raised the investigation.
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there are a few british players in action at the french open today, british number1 cameron norrie is on court right now, but harriet dart is out beaten in straight sets by italy's martina trevisan in the first round. naomi 0saka was also beaten, the former world number one and two time grand slam champion lost in straight sets to the 2019 semi—finallist amanda anisimova, the american who also beat her at the australian open. afterwards 0saka said she might skip the grass court season, now that wimbledon has been stripped of ranking points, because of its ban on russian and belarussian players. no problems for the world number one though. iga swiatek eased past the ukrainian lesia tsurenko in straight sets in under an hour. swiatek has won her past five tournaments and that was her 29th win in a row that's all the sport for now.
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we will be back in the next hour with another update. see you then. now on bbc news, your questions answered. welcome to your questions answered. as we are hearing monkeypox is been detected in three more countries. scientists say they are still unsure what's causing the 0utbreak so, this edition of the programme we are going back to basics and asking some key questions about the virus and with me to answer those questions are our health correspondence. lets get back to basics with the first question. what is monkeypox and how do you catch it? 50 what is monkeypox and how do you catch it? ~ , what is monkeypox and how do you catch it? ~ , catch it? so monkeypox is a virus and normally _ catch it? so monkeypox is a virus and normally infects _ catch it? so monkeypox is a virus
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and normally infects rodents i catch it? so monkeypox is a virus and normally infects rodents in i and normally infects rodents in central africa. someone will come into contact with one of those creatures in the virus willjump into them and what happens is is that your skin forms a rash which blisters and in this can pass the virus from one person to another. that's the main way.— virus from one person to another. that's the main way. what about the symptoms? — that's the main way. what about the symptoms? that _ that's the main way. what about the symptoms? that rash _ that's the main way. what about the symptoms? that rash is _ that's the main way. what about the symptoms? that rash is the - that's the main way. what about the symptoms? that rash is the main, i symptoms? that rash is the main, distinctive symptom. but there are a whole host of other ones including fever, muscle pain, headache. so you feel groggy if you get monkeypox but it is the rash that will really mark it is the rash that will really mark it out as something that is distinctive.— it out as something that is distinctive. and dare i say it marked out _ distinctive. and dare i say it marked out coronavirus i distinctive. and dare i say it marked out coronavirus as i distinctive. and dare i say it i marked out coronavirus as well, because you can feel breathless and feverish when you have that, can't you? feverish when you have that, can't ou? :, :, :, , :, feverish when you have that, can't ou? :, :, :, :, ., feverish when you have that, can't you? coronavirus and monkeypox are comletel you? coronavirus and monkeypox are completely different _ you? coronavirus and monkeypox are completely different and _ you? coronavirus and monkeypox are completely different and spreading i completely different and spreading completely different and spreading completely different and spreading completely different ways. while there are some symptoms that overlap, both can give you a
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headache for example, the core characteristics of each, coronavirus affects your lungs whereas the rash you get from monkeypox, you would never confuse the two.— never confuse the two. gloria wants to know, should _ never confuse the two. gloria wants to know, should the _ never confuse the two. gloria wants to know, should the government i to know, should the government implement measures to stop people leaving and entering the country? i don't think that's even remotely on the cards. the question is, the idea is that you want to stop more cases coming into the country, that's the idea there, but what ones do you exclude? because it currently spreading in europe so you would need to stop travel to european countries. this has quite a long incubation period. so if i had monkeypox you may not show symptoms for a couple of weeks so it's difficult to the correct order control measures to stop that. it's better to find who people come into contact and make sure they don't
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spread it to anyone else. so basically. — spread it to anyone else. so basically, self—isolate for three weeks? basically, self-isolate for three weeks? : basically, self-isolate for three weeks? ., :, basically, self-isolate for three weeks? : . :, ., basically, self-isolate for three weeks? : ., :, :, weeks? also vaccination. you can get rinu weeks? also vaccination. you can get ring vaccination, _ weeks? also vaccination. you can get ring vaccination, these _ weeks? also vaccination. you can get ring vaccination, these are _ weeks? also vaccination. you can get ring vaccination, these are people i ring vaccination, these are people in a ring who had contact with someone with monkeypox so you can put a ring around the infected persons of the can't spread it so there are other ways you would want to go about containing it. lets there are other ways you would want to go about containing it.— to go about containing it. lets come onto the questions _ to go about containing it. lets come onto the questions about _ onto the questions about vaccinations because there are two questions around that. is there a vaccination you can have that prevents you from getting it. interesting thing about this is that if we were to rewind time and go to the efforts to eradicate smallpox from the face of the planet, which we did successfully using the smallpox vaccine, because smallpox and monkeypox vaccines are not the same but they look quite similar as far as the same but they look quite similar as faras the immune same but they look quite similar as far as the immune system is concerned, you can use the smallpox vaccine to protect people against
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monkeypox so that's what essentially happening. 50. monkeypox so that's what essentially ha eninu. . , monkeypox so that's what essentially haueninu. . , , :, ., happening. so, that is beforehand. what if you've _ happening. so, that is beforehand. what if you've got _ happening. so, that is beforehand. what if you've got monkeypox? i happening. so, that is beforehand. | what if you've got monkeypox? can you still be vaccinated? yes. what if you've got monkeypox? can you still be vaccinated?— you still be vaccinated? yes. you want to vaccinate _ you still be vaccinated? yes. you want to vaccinate someone i want to vaccinate someone quite soon after someone has been diagnosed with it or after they showed symptoms. with it or after they showed symptoms-— with it or after they showed symptoms. with it or after they showed s mtoms. : :, , :, , :, symptoms. another question is how can it be treated? _ symptoms. another question is how can it be treated? beyond _ symptoms. another question is how can it be treated? beyond this i can it be treated? beyond this vaccine, is there anything else that can be done? could you but anything on these saws to stop them from itching? on these saws to stop them from itchin: ? . on these saws to stop them from itchin: ? , :, :, , itching? the first thing to note is, almost universally, _ itching? the first thing to note is, almost universally, this _ itching? the first thing to note is, almost universally, this infectionl almost universally, this infection will clear up on its own without any medical involvement. it's a mild disease, largely mild. there are some particular risk groups which we can mention but for most it's going to be completely mild. if you needed
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more intensive therapy, there are drugs available that have been developed that are approved therapies for monkeypox. you mentioned — therapies for monkeypox. you mentioned risk _ therapies for monkeypox. you mentioned risk groups. one question has been asked, why is the lg t b plus community being singled out? it's challenging for the health board who are trying to stop the spread of monkeypox and how it raises awareness at the same time not stigmatising people. if you look at the data, look at who is getting it then it tends to be young men who are gay, bisexual or are men who have sex with other men. how do you balance not stigmatising that group of people while at the same time making sure the message next to the people who need to hear it most so thatis people who need to hear it most so that is why that group is being mentioned a lot in relation to monkeypox but that's not a
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prejudicial thing. that's not then saying this group is to blame but at the moment, those are the people who need to be most aware. there the moment, those are the people who need to be most aware.— need to be most aware. there are two sides of that — need to be most aware. there are two sides of that argument, _ sides of that argument, stigmatisation of this group but also a section of society being lulled into the full sense is guilty that they might not be vulnerable? anybody, any age, any sexuality can get monkeypox. what about children? do they suffer more with this disease because there are reports of a child in intensive care with monkeypox prez—mac monkeypox is generally mild but it tends to be a little bit worse in young children, in pregnant women so those of the groups you want to keep the virus out of but even in those cases it will largely be mild but the risks are a little higher in those groups.
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an overriding question, should we be worried about catching it? for an overriding question, should we be worried about catching it?— worried about catching it? for most of us, no. worried about catching it? for most of us. no- we _ worried about catching it? for most of us, no. we will— worried about catching it? for most of us, no. we will be _ worried about catching it? for most of us, no. we will be fine. - worried about catching it? for most of us, no. we will be fine. the i of us, no. we will be fine. the worry here is that this is a virus that has been very predictable for the past 50 years and is now doing something out of the ordinary. we've not seen outbreaks like this where the virus is living in animals and spreading out. it is doing something different and scientists want to understand what it is doing differently and, until they know, this is where the scientific concern is. but this is not alarming and this is not coronavirus two. 50 this is not coronavirus two. so there is no evidence of mutation. the virus tends not to mutate and is
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fairly stable. the virus tends not to mutate and is fairly stable-— fairly stable. that must be quite reassuring? _ fairly stable. that must be quite reassuring? if _ fairly stable. that must be quite reassuring? if we _ fairly stable. that must be quite reassuring? if we have - fairly stable. that must be quite reassuring? if we have a i fairly stable. that must be quite reassuring? if we have a look. fairly stable. that must be quite reassuring? if we have a look at| reassuring? if we have a look at what is going on, there are three explanations for this. one of them could be, has the virus itself change and is that why it's behaving differently and if we look at the genetic analysis, interrogating its dna, what's different about this vibrant, if it's showing nothing different then that's where you start to look for some of the other explanations as to what might be going on. explanations as to what might be auoin on. g :. . explanations as to what might be auoin on. g :. , :, explanations as to what might be auoin on. g :. . :, . explanations as to what might be atoin on. . ., , :, ., going on. james, good to have you with us. thank _ going on. james, good to have you with us. thank you _ going on. james, good to have you with us. thank you from _ going on. james, good to have you with us. thank you from your- with us. thank you from your questions answered. this is bbc news and i am rebecca jones. these are the latest headlines. 21—year—old russian soldier is jailed for life, after admitting killing an unarmed civilian in the early stages of the invasion in ukraine in the country's first war crimes trial. thousands of youngsters will end up in care, unless there is a radical reset of the system. that is the warning
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from a landmark review of child protection in england. people at high risk of developing monkeypox after coming into contact with positive cases are urged to self—isolate for three weeks. that, as scotland confirms its first case of the virus. ukraine's government says there've been thousands of war crimes committed since the start of the war three months ago. people have been fleeing violence, human rights and persecution including elite mat to other countries including ethiopian. school is close to dame on the share after a boy lost a finger on what
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his mother says was a racially motivated incident. the community says it's helping the police and council to investigate. the 11—year—olds's mother said he injured himself while running away from belize. this is a secondary campus which is close today. the alleged incident happened on tuesday and raheem's mum, chantelle, said he was being attacked by a group of kids, on the floor, being kicked. as he tried to run away from them, he got his finger caught on offence and it was so badly injured that after six hours of surgery it had to be amputated. she has said that since her son has been at this school since september he has been subject to racist abuse and bullying because he is small for his age. this is
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angered many, many people including quality campaigners. angered many, many people including quality campaigners-— quality campaigners. shocked. seriously outraged. _ quality campaigners. shocked. seriously outraged. very i quality campaigners. shocked. l seriously outraged. very angry. quality campaigners. shocked. i seriously outraged. very angry. and disappointed that, yet again, another black child has been devastated, has had his life severely impacted both physically and psychologically, mentally by racism. . and psychologically, mentally by racism. , , :, , , and psychologically, mentally by racism. , , , ., racism. this story first came to li . ht on racism. this story first came to light on friday _ racism. this story first came to light on friday and, _ racism. this story first came to light on friday and, since i racism. this story first came to j light on friday and, since then, it's had a massive response. people so shocked at the details of this story. they wanted to show support for the child's, also celebrities, sportsmen, the boxer anthonyjoshua sportsmen, the boxer anthony joshua has sportsmen, the boxer anthonyjoshua has sent his best wishes. fundraising campaign has been set up in that reach nearly £100,000.
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initially, that was just to get treatment for a prosthetic finger and the last time i spoke to chantelle, she said relatively, he was doing 0k chantelle, she said relatively, he was doing ok but has the pain is starting to wear off and struggling to understand —— he is struggling to understand what is happening. she tried to have gentle conversations around the situation. the police say they've been in and out of school. this no peoples here today as the investor —— investigation continues. the unit was set up 73 years ago to patrol the waterways of essex. this is effectively a police beat on water, patrolling the second longest coastline in the country,
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covering 562 miles of waterways. this has a top speed of 56 knots, that's equivalent to 64 mph, and it can be used in any weather conditions. only a handful of police forces in the country have a special marine unit. are you going far? it emerges they're just on a day trip. the marine unit has the power to check not only small boats but also large ships. they have no intelligence to say this cruise ship in the thames estuary is carrying anyone illegally, but as part of a europe—wide operation they are checking security on as many vessels as possible. we look for any signs of modern—day slavery, see if they've got any information they might be able to pass us about where they've come from and any concerns they've had on the way over there, suspicious activity. the ladder is lowered, they are given permission to go on board. this ship's voyage with 1000 passengers on board includes the seychelles and iceland. it plans to dock in the thames
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estuary for the night. do you have any issues at the ports when you are on the continent with people trying to get on? they put some fences all around. the check takes only minutes. thank you. they disembark. the cruise ship's journey isn't disrupted. we talked about dock security while they were in france and on the continent, just to see whether there'd been any risk to people getting aboard that shouldn't be. they not only board commercial boats but constantly look for illegal activity, even on these, the maunsell forts, built to deter german forces and defend our coastline. we have just spotted this vessel coming into the thames estuary, and we can see it has come from portsmouth, the main shipping channel. it's ok. thank you. they want to check it didn't take anyone i up. don't be frightened. any issuesl or problems? nothing in the channel, any concerns? it's all legal. this patrol, assigned to keep our coastline safe, may not have found marine crime,
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migrants or missing people today, but they never know what criminals or weather conditions they might have to face. there are hopes the queen may visit the chelsea flower show which has returned this year to its traditional spring slot, with floral tributes to honour her platinum jublilee year. 0therfeatures include a mini scotland and a garden for children. welcome to the chelsea flower show. we are in central london but you wouldn't think in this garden because it's so peaceful. this is recreating the habitat of the beaver, so, there's lots of water. plants native to the uk and it is just gorgeous. ifeel so plants native to the uk and it is just gorgeous. i feel so lucky to be here. i can see the buttercups, grasses and the water feature actually moves down to replicate how actually moves down to replicate how a beaver would make its way through the water system. there is a hot
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right at the top which is —— hut. we're going to speak to rebecca who is cheap executive of wild britain. —— chief executive. has is cheap executive of wild britain. -- chief executive.— -- chief executive. as ecosystem engineers. _ -- chief executive. as ecosystem engineers, beavers _ -- chief executive. as ecosystem engineers, beavers create i -- chief executive. as ecosystem - engineers, beavers create complexity and dynamism which allow other species to thrive within it. for example, the beaver dam there creates these wetlands and streams coming through. there is a vole —— water vole lawn and spaces for other species to boost adversity. essen species to boost adversity. even
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animals native _ species to boost adversity. even animals native to _ species to boost adversity. even animals native to chelsea - species to boost adversity. even animals native to chelsea have been enjoying it. iseem animals native to chelsea have been enjoying it. i seem a blackbird having a bath, butterflies here. you can see with — having a bath, butterflies here. 7m. can see with this damn how beavers function in cleaning our water. the water coming out is crystal—clear. we've got fish spawning so we've salmon and trout. normally, they need gravel, normally the silt is too rich for their eggs but different paste waters produced different paste waters produced different habitats.— different habitats. people don't realise that _ different habitats. people don't realise that you _ different habitats. people don't realise that you have _ different habitats. people don't realise that you have nothing i different habitats. people don't| realise that you have nothing to work with so you have to build something like this from scratch? yes. that's right. it was flat grass in chelsea hospital grounds and you slowly see an empire being built. the trees in the first plants that
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come on and it's fascinating to see what shape and form chelsea's going to stop taking and we are really excited. ifelt like i was part of to stop taking and we are really excited. i felt like i was part of a really good year this year. there is a very forest —like feel down there. we have really hit the wild side here and the trees, we are showing trees that would have been felled by the beavers and then regenerated. that gives smaller birds places, kingfishers, bases to thrive. there's a lot of things. we really trying to show a flourishing series of habitats with the beavers activating landscapes. you of habitats with the beavers activating landscapes. of habitats with the beavers activatin: landscaes. ., ., ., activating landscapes. you would not think you're — activating landscapes. you would not think you're in _ activating landscapes. you would not think you're in london _ activating landscapes. you would not think you're in london with _ activating landscapes. you would not think you're in london with the - think you're in london with the soundtrack piped in. the sounds of the country. soundtrack piped in. the sounds of the country-— soundtrack piped in. the sounds of the count . . ~ ., .,
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the country. yeah. we did want that. we wanted to... _ the country. yeah. we did want that. we wanted to... drop _ the country. yeah. we did want that. we wanted to... drop people - the country. yeah. we did want that. we wanted to... drop people into - the country. yeah. we did want that. we wanted to... drop people into a l we wanted to... drop people into a feeling of nature, thejoy, the playfulness and they're kind of, i don't know, the fascination, the learning. all those things you find when you go out into nature. what learning. all those things you find when you go out into nature. what is the reaction — when you go out into nature. what is the reaction been? _ when you go out into nature. what is the reaction been? i _ when you go out into nature. what is the reaction been? i see _ when you go out into nature. what is the reaction been? i see lots- when you go out into nature. what is the reaction been? i see lots of- the reaction been? i see lots of people taking photos? it’s the reaction been? i see lots of people taking photos? it's been amazinu. people taking photos? it's been amazing- we — people taking photos? it's been amazing. we are _ people taking photos? it's been amazing. we are thrilled. - people taking photos? it's been amazing. we are thrilled. i - people taking photos? it's been| amazing. we are thrilled. i think there is something quite rich in the learning about nature for everyone and we have certainly had that on this journey for making this and i think, yeah, ithink this journey for making this and i think, yeah, i think everyone is loving it, which is great. it is gorgeous- — loving it, which is great. it is gorgeous- all— loving it, which is great. it is gorgeous. all the _ loving it, which is great. it is gorgeous. all the gardeners tomorrow are going to find out how they do the prizes that are going to be handing out and i have a feeling this is going to do very, very well. now it's time for a look at the weather with susan powell. hello. it is a bit of an overused phrase in weather, "we have
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got a mixed bag," but that really is the best way to describe the weather that is coming for the uk through the week ahead. we will see numerous areas of low pressure trying to approach from the atlantic, kicking up the winds as they do so and ushering in some rain. we have seen this area of low pressure pushing up from the south through monday, weather fronts digging down from the north. basically we can anticipate seeing a bit of rain just about anywhere through the latter part of monday, but particularly across eastern areas of england. further north and west, it should begin to become drier as we go into the small hours of tuesday. a relatively mild night, a little cooler to the north—west of the uk, with temperatures down in single figures. tuesday daytime we have low—pressure swirling away in the north sea, breezy down the north sea coasts, further showers running into coastal regions, but also developing more widely inland as the day plays out. there will be some sunny spells between the showers, but quite a cool north—westerly breeze and temperatures never quite recovering to the highs we saw through the weekend,
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where they were in the high teens to low 20s, perhaps 17 or 18 degrees at best. wednesday another area of low pressure to talk about, this time coming in from the atlantic, tightening isobars, which means the wind will kick up, so tuesday will be a breezy day, wednesday we'll go for windy, showers working their way across the uk and winds getting rather gusty at times — i think we could see them gusting 35—40 mph quite widely across the uk — but actually in many areas there will be some decent spells of sunshine through the day on wednesday. but it will feel cool in the breeze, and especially if you are caught in any showers, again our highs possibly i7 or 18 at best. towards the end of the week, things do try to settle down, another front snakes through on thursday, that'll mean some rain for the northern half of the uk, but by friday and looking towards next weekend high pressure is going to try to build in from the south, so that should actually mean we see more in the way of dry weather from friday onwards, and also i think we will see our temperatures
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recovering a little. but at the moment it looks like we may well sit on the eastern side of the area of high pressure with a northerly breeze, so no sign of a heatwave on the wayjust yet.
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this is bbc news, i'm rebecca jones and these are the latest headlines... thousands more youngsters will end up in care unless there's a "radical reset" of the system — that's the warning from a landmark review of child protection in england. it is crucial that when families hit crisis and they have got difficulties, that there is no stigma, really intensive help on offer. a 21—year—old russian soldier is jailed for life after admitting killing an unarmed civilian in the early stages of the invasion in ukraine in the country's first war crimes trial. people at high risk of developing monkeypox after coming into contact a 27—year—old health worker is arrested on suspicion of deliberately adminstering poison after a child died while being treated in hospital. people at high risk of developing monkeypox after coming into contact
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with positive cases are urged to self—isolate for three weeks. that, as scotland confirms its first case of the virus. major disruption for rail passengers in scotland, with an emergency timetable from today after services have been cut by a third. and... the chelsea flower show showcases wildlife, wellbeing and floral displays to mark the queen's platinum jubilee. hello and welcome to bbc news. radical changes are needed to prevent tens of thousands more children ending up in care, according to a major report today. the review into council—run children's services in england says the current
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system is "dysfunctional." it says earlier support is needed before families reach crisis point. the report says 100,000 children could be in care by 2032, if things don't change. that is 20,000 more than the current figure, which is already a record high. the landmark review makes more than 80 recommendations with its leader, former teacherjosh mcallister, saying it system needs a radical reset. to do that he is calling for £2.6 billion to be invested over the next five years and a windfall tax on big private children's homes. alison holt, our social affairs editor, has this report. so, let me know how it's been going since the panel. henrietta works with young people to help them pitch ideas and get their voices heard. and also it will be good to know how you found working on the project as well. her own life was shaped by the crisis in the children's care system that today's report wants to change. after two difficult years, she was removed from her mother by social services.
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she was 1a. in the next months she was moved between five different homes. for me, being in care felt like a never ending storm. just like every day not knowing where the support is going to be from, where am i even going to lay my head. where is the support for the families right at the start when they're struggling? why does it need to be when they've been taken away? and you can't put kids into dysfunction when you've taken them out of dysfunction. it makes no sense. today's review says a radical reset is needed to shift the focus of children's social care away from crisis intervention. it wants more early help available in schools and communities, a new expert social worker role to strengthen child protection, the phasing out of what is described as wholly unsuitable young offenders institutions, a windfall tax on the profits of large children's homes companies, and to ensure change happens, an extra £2.6 billion funding for services over the next five years.
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it's crucial that when families hit crisis and they've got difficulties that there is low stigma, really intensive help on offer. and the system we've got at the moment is very well resourced to assess and check what's going on with families, but pretty strapped in terms of the help that it's able to offer. that is where places like new beginnings in stockport come in. these parents have had either children taken into care or they've come close to it. here, they have found support, counselling and advice which has turned their lives around. my little boy has been home with me a year and a half now, _ and i never, ever thought that would be possible again. - and anytime i need support, . i reach out to new beginnings. they're like family, - you know, they are family. they're the family that i never had. they've given me so much support and a lot of tools and strategies to work with, with my son who's got special needs. and again, they've given me the strength to push on. the government says it is piloting
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additionalfamily hubs providing early support. it also accepts more needs to be done to support family members, kinship carers, who take on a child who would otherwise go into care, and to find more foster carers. we know that family relationships, kinship care, is equally important. the system needs to obsess about those relationships because that's how you get great outcomes for the children that need the most help in our society. the government says it will consider other recommendations over the longer term. alison holt, bbc news. joining me now is geraldine nosowska. she's chair of the british association of social workers, the professional association for social work in the uk. very good to have you with us, welcome to bbc news. first of all, i wonder do you welcome this report
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and its recommendations? i absolutely welcome the attention on the need for change in the system and social workers, it really feels every day, they feel it every day if they are not able to provide families and children and young people the absolute best support. we want to be able to say to people that we did everything possible to keep families together and help children fright, so we welcome the recommendations that will enable us to do that. ~ , ., ., to do that. why, then, are more children not _ to do that. why, then, are more children not being _ to do that. why, then, are more children not being kept - to do that. why, then, are more children not being kept with - to do that. why, then, are more | children not being kept with their families at the moment? i children not being kept with their families at the moment?- children not being kept with their families at the moment? i think we are in a really _ families at the moment? i think we are in a really difficult _ families at the moment? i think we are in a really difficult time, - are in a really difficult time, actually. we have had ten years of cuts, particularly to all those support services and universal services and to the safety net that quite a lot of families with quite a threadbare way of living and you see that stress in families, social workers when they go out very often they are now meeting with families, children and young people who would previously have come into a crisis situation, and so, i think,
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previously have come into a crisis situation, and so, ithink, as previously have come into a crisis situation, and so, i think, as well as addressing the changes that are neededin as addressing the changes that are needed in children's social care, we do have to think about wrapping that safety net around families again. how broken is the child's social care system in england at the moment, in your view? care system in england at the moment, in yourview? it care system in england at the moment, in your view?- care system in england at the moment, in your view? it has a lot of heart and _ moment, in your view? it has a lot of heart and it _ moment, in your view? it has a lot of heart and it has _ moment, in your view? it has a lot of heart and it has a _ moment, in your view? it has a lot of heart and it has a lot _ moment, in your view? it has a lot of heart and it has a lot of - moment, in your view? it has a lot of heart and it has a lot of things l of heart and it has a lot of things going for it. it has had ten years of disinvestment and it has just come through a pandemic and we are going into a cost of living crisis, so this is absolutely the right time to be looking at how to improve things and we really welcome the government's commitment to be putting back some of those things that are really needed. let's see that are really needed. let's see that family support and community social work and let's make sure that people come into crisis get timely help, as quickly as they can, so that we can get them out of that again. that we can get them out of that aaain. �* , ., , that we can get them out of that aaain. �* , . , ., again. but tell us a little bit more about what _ again. but tell us a little bit more about what is _ again. but tell us a little bit more about what is needed _ again. but tell us a little bit more about what is needed and - again. but tell us a little bit more about what is needed and is - again. but tell us a little bit more about what is needed and is this | about what is needed and is this just bad about what is needed and is this just had more investment? about what is needed and is this just bad more investment? investment is a bi art just bad more investment? investment is a big part of — just bad more investment? investment is a big part of it. _ just bad more investment? investment is a big part of it, but _ just bad more investment? investment is a big part of it, but there _ just bad more investment? investment is a big part of it, but there is - is a big part of it, but there is always an element which is about using that money really wisely. i think what we have seen is that child protection is kind of like the
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canary in the mine, the litmus test for whether things are working. when we are seeing a lot of people coming into child protection services and children coming into care, it means that further back in the system there are things that are not working and we need to address those. that is about putting back in the multi—agency help, making sure there is really good timely support for families there is really good timely support forfamilies and also there is really good timely support for families and also addressing some of the things that cause stress on families, which is poverty, poor housing and inequality across our country. housing and inequality across our count . ., ., housing and inequality across our count . ., , ., country. can you give me a sense of an example. — country. can you give me a sense of an example, perhaps, _ country. can you give me a sense of an example, perhaps, of— country. can you give me a sense of an example, perhaps, of how - country. can you give me a sense of an example, perhaps, of how the i an example, perhaps, of how the system actually works, when perhaps a child is reported to you and social workers get involved for the first time? what is the process? we rel first time? what is the process? , rely really heavily on people coming forward and saying when there is a concern with a family. and we have good communities and neighbourhoods and families who do that. or we might hearfrom and families who do that. or we might hear from school. a social worker would make contact and go out and try to get to the bottom of what is going on and what they want to be
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able to do is put in place things to help that family really thrived. it may be there are worries with money, worries with health, it may be there are problems with housing, it may be that there is just a real breakdown of relationships within the family. sometimes as well we know there is actual harm and intent to harm, so it is getting to the bottom of that and really pulling together with other agencies, with education, police, health and particularly with community and family and voluntary support. that is what we need to wrap around families and that is what really makes a difference. the re ort is what really makes a difference. the report is calling for {2.6 billion report is calling for £2.6 billion in extra funding over the next five years. what will happen if that money is not forthcoming, in your view? which is, let's be honest, probably quite likely that it won't be. ~ ., ., , ., , probably quite likely that it won't be. ., ., , ., be. well, that money goes some way to -auttin be. well, that money goes some way to putting back— be. well, that money goes some way to putting back in _ be. well, that money goes some way to putting back in what _ be. well, that money goes some way to putting back in what is _ be. well, that money goes some way to putting back in what is needed. . to putting back in what is needed. what we don't want to see is it being used in a piecemeal way or just for structure change orjust for just for structure change or just for a just for structure change orjust for a rebranding of things.
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ultimately, the test for social workers is can social workers, experienced social workers spend more time with families and access to help those families need? so that will be the test for us.— will be the test for us. geraldine nosowska from _ will be the test for us. geraldine nosowska from the _ will be the test for us. geraldine nosowska from the british - nosowska from the british association of social workers, really good to talk to you, thanks for your time. really good to talk to you, thanks for your time-— a russian soldier has been given life in prison for the murder of a 62—year—old ukrainian man. vadim shishimarin is the first person to stand trial for war crimes since the start of russia's invasion. it comes as president zelensky asked the world economic forum for more help to support ukraine. 0ur correspondent, joe inwood, has the latest. this was a moment of great significance. the first russian soldier officially declared a war criminal. 21—year—old vadim shishimarin sentenced to life imprisonment for the murder of oleksandr shelipov. the russian tank commander admitted killing the
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had admitted killing the 62—year—old, but said he was simply following orders. a ukrainian court disagreed and gave him life. but almost at the same time, another announcement was being made. here in the capital there will be real anger at the news that the defenders of azovstal, men who were considered national heroes for their defence of mariupol, are to be tried in what's being called an international tribunal in the donetsk people's republic. the news was made by the leader of the breakaway region. we haven't got more details yet, but it could be he's referring to all of the fighters orjust the leadership. as legal battles were concluded, realfighting has continued to escalate. it is now focused in the donbas, what was the industrial heartland of the ukrainian economy. this oil refinery outside luhansk was struck by russian shelling as they continued their advance towards the city of severodonetsk.
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the toll of the war has been terrible on ukraine, on its people and its economy. speaking at the world economic forum in davos there was a translation: if we had received 100% of our - needs at once back in february, tens of thousands of lives would have been saved. that is why we need all the weapons we are asking for, notjust what is being provided. that's why we need funding — at least 5 billion us dollars a month. and all the funds we need to rebuild our economy. meanwhile, russian armour continues to advance on the eastern stronghold, with all but one bridge to the city destroyed. stronghold of severodonetsk, with all but one bridge to the city destroyed. while people talk of reconstruction in davos, on the ground the destruction continues. joe inwood, bbc news, kyiv. 0ur kyiv correspondent, james waterhouse, was in the courtroom today and described how busy it was. it was the fullest one i have ever seen.
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i could physically get about two metres in. there were tiers of camera looming over the dock where vadim shishimarin stood, in a familiar pose of bowing his head as thejudge recalled, recounted the key moments of that earlier invasion. now, shishimarin's country, russia, denies deliberately targeting civilians, but it was that 21—year—old in the dock alone who was facing the ukrainian criminal process. he has now been found guilty and oleksandr shelipov will not be the only ukrainian, he has not been the only ukrainian who has been deliberately targeted in this war. it is a significant legal precedent as ukraine continues to try and gather evidence and hold the individual russian soldiers or officers to account, as this war goes on. moscow says it is disappointed that it couldn't defend vadim shishimarin's interests and will look at other avenues, but in kyiv a very significant moment.
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that was james waterhouse in kyiv. two lines of news coming out of russia that i wanted to bring you. starbucks says it will completely exit russia, it is leaving russia, closing 130 cafe is. that of course comes after mcdonald's has now grossed sold off its outlets in the country. —— it has sold off its outlets. meanwhile, we are hearing news that a russian diplomat in geneva has left his job news that a russian diplomat in geneva has left hisjob in protest at the russian war with ukraine. boris is a counsellor at the united nations mission in geneva and he has been speaking to the russian editor, steve rosenberg. he said he was leaving because he strongly disagreed and disapproved of what his government is doing and didn't want to be associated with it any longer and we will bring you more on that interview as soon as it comes into us here in london. health officials say the first case
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of monkeypox has been confirmed in scotland. a total of 20 cases are known in england so far, with updated figures expected to be released soon. people who've come into direct contact with someone who has monkeypox are being asked to self—isolate for three weeks. dr rosamund lewis, the head of the smallpox secretariat at the world health organization, said they are working closely with african nations, which are more used to dealing with this virus. we do have ongoing working relationships with the ministry's of health and the laboratories in the african region. we have several countries we work with very closely because they have been reporting monkeypox over the last few years. these include nigeria, the democratic republic of the congo, the centrica african republic of cameroon, these are places where we have seen cases now, so we are working closely with these countries to help respond and try to ascertain why this virus is now coming,
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becoming more frequently reported because it is well known to be, as you said, a zoonotic disease, so it is primarily in the animal kingdom, in forested areas. now we are seeing it more in urban areas and this week we are seeing it for the first time around the world. idr we are seeing it for the first time around the world.— we are seeing it for the first time around the world. dr rosamund lewis there from the — around the world. dr rosamund lewis there from the world _ around the world. dr rosamund lewis there from the world health - there from the world health organization. earlier dr rosamund lewis earlier i spoke to dr chris smith, a consultant virologist & host of the naked scientist podcast. i asked him how worried we should be in the uk about the number of cases of monkeypox identified so far. well, actually, i'm reassured because we know about it. we found cases. we are following it. surveillance is happening. all the right things are happening and the numbers are very, very low and this is not as though it never seen this virus before. we actually discovered it 50 or 60 years ago and the name monkeypox is kind of a misnomer because it's not actually a monkey virus. it's actually an infection of rats and other small rodents in certain parts of africa who occasionallyjumps the species
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barrier and get into bigger animals, like monkeys but also us. what is different this time is that, unlike the handful of cases we've had in the past where it's coming to the country because someone has travelled to the infected area, with the exception of one case in this instance, there are cases that have no travel history and this suggests there is community spread of this infection and that's why we are being vigilant because it does have a low risk that there might be some people, a problem, so it's better to find it and stamp it out quickly while it's just a handful of people. so, how do you catch it? well, this is a respiratory infection and via close personal contact, so, when you've got the infection, you are infected, symptomatic and infectious. you have the infection when you are symptomatic. it's not like coronavirus
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where we know people were passing it on before they even knew they had it. didn't have any symptoms. when you actually are symptomatic, that's when you are infectious. the markers of that tend to mean you have a fever, flu—like illness. they feel cold, shivery, muscle aches and pains also, you get a rash and that can vary, in some people more dramatic than others. but it's little blisters, almost like spots or pimples. and those are crammed with virus particles, so you could be breathed on by somebody or if you have contact with those blisters and what's in them and if that gets into your skin then you can catch that via that route, another possibility because the virus is a part of the family that tends to spread in this way, you leave behind an infectious legacy on your bedclothes and on your clothes, so if someone handles bed linen or clothing of someone who's been in close contact with someone while they were infectious, there will be viral residue on there that could pass infection on there. so it's about identifying cases, then taking
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steps to minimising contact while there infectious which takes about a week or so until the symptoms subside and then they are ok. 0k, ok, but how poorly will you be? is there any kind of treatment? in terms of the intensity of the infection, we are dealing with the form of monkeypox that comes from west africa and this one has about a 1% of severe disease rate, in other words of the 100 people who catch it about one in every 100 will develop disease that could be life threatening. the vast majority of people will be absolutely fine, they will have milder symptoms, but they can be quite intense, you do have a fever, muscle aches and pains and you do feel unwell. in terms of management, if we identify cases who have been in contact promptly, we can give them prophylaxis and that takes the form of actually a smallpox vaccine, believe it or not. the smallpox vaccine is not a smallpox vaccine, it is a vaccine for another virus there is similar to smallpox, but it also works 80%
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of the time against monkeypox, so we use that vaccine and if given quickly after contact it can give the immune system a head start and protect people from getting an infection. there are also some antivirus drugs that can be used, although they are more experimental, they have a good track record and in most cases because the disease is mild it isjust most cases because the disease is mild it is just supportive treatment, where you look after people until they are making their own recovery, is normally sufficient.— own recovery, is normally sufficient. . ., , sufficient. that was doctor chris smith. a health worker has been arrested on suspicion of administering poison with intent to endanger life after a child died at birmingham children's hospital. the 27—year—old woman was arrested on thursday and has been suspended from her role at the hospital. our correspondent, navteonhal, is following developments at the hospital. what we know so far is that the child was being treated here at birmingham children's hospital at the paediatric intensive care unit and died on thursday. later that evening a 27—year—old woman, a health worker here,
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was arrested at a property in the west midlands by police and that was on suspicion of administering poison with intent to endanger life. she has since been released as investigations continue and forensic tests are examined. she has also been suspended by the nhs trust responsible for the hospital and that same trust has said that it is supporting the infant's family at this distressing time and has asked that privacy is respected during this process. this hospital treats tens of thousands of children and young people every year, it is a leading centre for specialist paediatric care, and there is no doubt this news will have shocked and saddened the people who work here. scotrail — which runs most train services in scotland — has introduced an emergency timetable, cutting its daily services by almost a third. it's due to a shortage of drivers and a pay dispute between the newly nationalised scotrail and the aslef union, as our scotland
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correspondent james shaw, reports. this train is formed of four coaches. on this key route between scotland's biggest cities there are half as many services during rush hour as normal. every 30 minutes instead of every 15. and across the network, passengers' routines are being bent out of shape by the changes. we have been told it will be very crowded, which is why we booked seats. it took me an hour and 45 minutes and it was supposed to take half an hour. i had to get up 15 minutes earlier than normal because of the train| disputes, but it all went well. the train was cancelled and now i am really late. this is what scotrail�*s reduced timetable looks like. more crowded trains because the services are less frequent and that means more stress and frustration for these commuters. scotrail says the reduction in
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services means there will be fewer cancellations, so more predictability for travellers, but evening services in particular have been cut drastically. we absolutely understand customers' frustration over the lack of evening and late services. this timetable has been a difficult trade—off between running trains for the maximum number of people travelling and trying to meet the needs of those customers as well. a ballot on industrial action being held by the train drivers union means there is also the possibility of even more severe disruption. but they say a pay offer of just over 2% is not acceptable. we are not looking for favours, we are looking for fairness, and i think at a time when the whole country is facing a cost of living crisis we should not be looking to run salaries down off anyone, we should be bringing the lowest paid up and driving forward to a high—paid, high skilled work force here in scotland.
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aslef is not the only transport union considering industrial action. the rmt, representing rail workers across the uk, is also unhappy with the pay settlement it has been offered. rampant inflation is hitting many household budgets and the impact on pay negotiations in the railway industry and elsewhere is onlyjust starting to be felt. james shaw, bbc news, glasgow. black and asian women in maternity care wards are experiencing racial discrimination, according to a year—long investigation. women reported feeling unsafe, being denied pain relief, and facing racial stereotyping about their pain tolerance. our correspondent, diveeya talwar, reports. i kept thinking, is there something wrong with me? what if i actually don't make it out of here? hiral had leela almost a year ago. she says it was a traumatic labour.
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ifelt shivery, my whole body was achey. every time i told the midwives that i don't feel good, they were like, well, you look fine. it was 2a hours before doctors realised hiral was seriously ill. she had sepsis. it was so frustrating that you're not listened to. it was a fight the whole way, it was constant fighting. and...that�*s not what having a baby should be like. you shouldn't have to keep fighting. hiral believes her race played a part in her treatment. i noticed with the racial stereotypes and the microaggressions, they'd come in and they'd be like, "morning, princess." she meant princess as, "uh, princess." they think indian girls, asian girls are like little daddy's girls, mummy�*s girls, get everything handed to them, they can't handle pain. instead of taking me seriously i think they just thought i was a big crybaby. an inquiry by the charity birthrights had similar stories to hiral�*s. black and asian women reported experiencing racial stereotyping and microaggressions
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and felt dismissed. tinu felt ignored during her three pregnancies. with her youngest daughter, she had unexplained bleeding, but was told it was just an infection. it got worse, and she ended up needing multiple blood transfusions. if i had not have been hospitalised, i don't think i would be sitting here right now and i don't think my daughter would be here either. anotherfinding of the inquiry was black women being denied pain relief based on racial stereotyping of tolerance. i never get anything, other than gas and air, and even that i have to beg for. everybody handles pain differently. i don't know where people get this idea that we can handle more than most people. all my experiences in my pregnancies have been tainted by my race.
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the report highlights the need for urgent action, including better education. the key thing for me to come out of this inquiry is a health care of this inquiry as a health care professional is the gaps in our knowledge and the lack of understanding when it comes to how unconscious bias is consistent in our care that we provide. a new maternity task force has been set up, which the department of health and social care said would address unacceptable disparities in care. tinu hopes these disparities will end long before her girls need maternity care. i have two daughters. i don't want them to have to go through what i've gone through. divya talwar, bbc news. president biden has said the united states would intervene militarily to protect taiwan if it were attacked by china. mr biden's words contradict the us government's long
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declared policy on taiwan, and have drawn a rapid and angry rebuke from beijing. he made the comments at a news conference launching a new asia—pacific trade pact with japan, aimed at countering growing chinese influence. almost 10,000 people in wales have been offered a covid boosterjab, despite not being eligible for one. the welsh health minister said the mistake was made after the criteria for who would be offered a jab was broadened, leading to some people being accidentally included in the new group. the incorrect offers for a booster will be honoured, the welsh government confirmed. harry styles will be the latest in a line of stars bringing bedtime stories to children. he's taking the opportunity to tell a story for cbeebies — following in the footsteps of dolly parton and the duchess of cambridge. and he'll be reading his story in pyjamas. now it's time for a look
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at the weather with susan powell. hello. we are delving into the good old mixed bag of weather again this week, certainly looking cooler than it was through the weekend and in the days ahead often breezy and there are going to be some showers for you tojudge as there are going to be some showers for you to judge as well. monday's picture, what a mess! this area of low pressure pushing up from the south, weatherfronts moving down from the north, the chance of rain? well, just about anywhere as we finish monday, but he had the more persistent rain will tend to drift eastwards through the small hours of tuesday. quite wet across central and eastern england, becoming drier elsewhere, but cooler than in the nightjust gone. temperatures in the south looking like they still might stay in double figures. rain around first thing on tuesday, which i think will clear and it will brighten, but then as the day plays out we will see showers developing, the odd one heavier, the chance of a
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downpour and a bit like todayjust about anywhere. still on the cooler side as well, top temperatures 17 or 18 degrees. hello. this is bbc news. i'm rebecca jones and these are the headlines. thousands more youngsters will end up in care unless there's a "radical reset" of the system — that's the warning from a landmark review of child
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protection in england. a 21—year—old russian soldier is jailed for life after admitting killing an unarmed civilian in the early stages of the invasion in ukraine in the country's first war crimes trial. a 27—year—old health worker is arrested on suspicion of deliberately adminstering poison after a child died while being treated in hospital. people at high risk of developing monkeypox after coming into contact with positive cases are urged to self—isolate for three weeks. that, as scotland confirms its first case of the virus. major disruption for rail passengers in scotland — with an emergency timetable from today after services have been cut by a third. and the chelsea flower show showcases wildlife, wellbeing and floral displays to mark the queen's platinum jubilee.
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news justin and newsjustin and the news justin and the formative conservative mp imran khan has been jailed at southwark crown court for sexually assaulting a 15—year—old boy into thousand and eight. mr khan was thrown out of the conservative party after a jury delivered its verdict in southwark crown court in april. he has stood down as an mp but is appealing against his conviction. a by—election will be held in his constituency of wakefield next month. sport and a full round up. as manchester city get ready for their title parade later this afternoon, we've heard from the new manchester united manager for the first time. erik ten haag has been outlining his plans for the club and says he's looking forward
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to taking on city and liverpool. united finished 35 points off the top of the table in 6th this season. i have a good feeling with the people around, from the meetings, from the players and i'm about to get the plan going, to get it into process, to cooperate, to be consistent in our plan with good people with the right connections, the right commitment. our plan is huge. and we will roll this out to the staff and players and you will see. the football association say they will be investigating after a pitch invasion at manchester city yesterday,
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in which the aston villa goalkeeper robin olsen was assaulted. city have apologised to villa for the incident at full—time, following their victory that clinched the prmier league title. greater manchester police have charged two men over separate incidents of crowd disorder but say that ' enquiries into the reported assault of a player on the etihad pitch are ongoing'. manchester city benjamin mendy has entered not guilty pleas to nine charges of sexual offences against six women. the offences are alleged to have taken place at his home between october 2018 and august 2021. the 27—year—old is due to face trial on july 25th. the french defender last played for city on the first day of last season in august but was suspended by the club after being charged. west ham's kurt zouma and his brother yoan, who plays for dagenham and redbridge, will appear in court tomorrow charged with a number of offences under the animal welfare act. the hammers�* defender was filmed on social media in february kicking and mistreating his pet cats. the two men are due to appear at thames magistrates�* court for a first hearing tomorrow morning. the animals are still being cared for by the rspca who raised the investigation.
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arsenal defender kieran tierney has been left out of scotland's squad for the world cup play—off semi—final with ukraine on the 1stjune. he hasn't recovered fully from knee surgery last month. his last match was for scotland in 2—all friendly draw against austria at the end of march. everton's nathan patterson has been included despite being out for the same period of time with an ankle problem if scotland with an ankle problem. if scotland get past ukraine at hampden they will face wales in cardiff on 5thjune for a place at the world cup in qatar. you can get full details of the squad on the bbc sport website. all five british players at the french open are in action today. the british number1 cameron norrie is on court right now against manuel guinard, but harriet dart is out beaten in straight sets by italy's martina trevisan in the first
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round. naomi osaka was also beaten, the former world number one and two time grand slam champion lost in straight sets to the 2019 semi—finallist amanda anisimova — the american who also the american who also beat her at the australian open. afterwards osaka said she might skip the grass court season now that wimbledon has been stripped of ranking points, because of its ban on russian and belarussian players. no problems for the world number one though. iga swiatek eased past the ukrainian lesia tsurenko in straight sets in under an hour. swiatek has won her past five tournaments and that was her 29th win in a row. that's all the sport for now. will be back with more sport in the next hour. . ., .,
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thanks, rebecca. we've been hearing about how much prices are going up all around us. we know it's the lowest income families that are being hardest hit. we have some research from the university of loughborough. they looked a year ago at what people would have considered acceptable standard of living and apply that to today. so, first of all, a family with two young children as paying at least £400 more per month. that'sjust to afford about minimum. unsurprisingly household energy is the biggest contributor to that. that is setting families back by nearly £130 per month. it's notjust energy, transport, social activities and childcare have gone up significantly in that's leading to difficult decisions for people like stacey. stacey is a single mother from
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leicester with two children and she told us she decided to take treats and the big days out out of her budget. and the big days out out of her bud . et. , and the big days out out of her budaet. , .. and the big days out out of her budaet. , ~' �* ., and the big days out out of her budaet. , ~ ~ ., ., , budget. things like alton towers, we can't do that — budget. things like alton towers, we can't do that any _ budget. things like alton towers, we can't do that any more _ budget. things like alton towers, we can't do that any more and _ budget. things like alton towers, we can't do that any more and they - budget. things like alton towers, we can't do that any more and they are l can't do that any more and they are noticing the difference as well. their friends from school can go but we can't afford it. it's really affecting me at the minute, mentally and physically, as well. i love doing stuff with my kids. i love going out on days off to make them happy but i can't fulfil that and it makes it me feel like a little bit less than a mum. i have to cut down so i campaign for stuff. food has gone up as well. it's gone up to £90 per week so that's a noticeable difference. i'm having to shop less. we are trying to eat healthily but health foods gone up by more than thejunk food health foods gone up by more than the junk food now. health foods gone up by more than thejunk food now. it’s health foods gone up by more than the junk food now.—
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the junk food now. it's difficult to hear that an _ the junk food now. it's difficult to hear that an stacey's _ the junk food now. it's difficult to hear that an stacey's plight - the junk food now. it's difficult to hear that an stacey's plight is - the junk food now. it's difficult to hear that an stacey's plight is not unusual. we hearing from so many otherfamilies unusual. we hearing from so many other families at usual. if you are on a low wage a bigger proportion on your income goes on food and energy and as we've been hearing the cost of living is going up. the inflation figure for april shows that it's at 9%. but the research today say that the most vulnerable in society, it's more like 13%. when it comes specifically to food, the consumer group which? have found groceries gone up by more than 20% including the basics such as butter, milk and they also found there were fewer offers available for items such as vegetables and fresh fruit. clearly, lots people are finding themselves struggling, some of them for the very first time and we asked the money advice trust what to do if you're worried. hat money advice trust what to do if you're worried.— money advice trust what to do if ou're worried. ., , ., . ., , you're worried. not everyone claims all of the benefits _ you're worried. not everyone claims all of the benefits they _ you're worried. not everyone claims all of the benefits they are - all of the benefits they are entitled to and, as your situation
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changes, — entitled to and, as your situation changes, and your situation in regards — changes, and your situation in regards to— changes, and your situation in regards to what you entitled to can change _ regards to what you entitled to can change as— regards to what you entitled to can change as well so if you haven't looked — change as well so if you haven't looked at — change as well so if you haven't looked at that in quite some time then it's — looked at that in quite some time then it's worth looking at that again — then it's worth looking at that again. there's lots of grants and different— again. there's lots of grants and different types of support people can access and it's worth it considering talking to national debt line or— considering talking to national debt line or debt charities and they can help you — line or debt charities and they can help you understand what else it is you might — help you understand what else it is you might be able to access in your situation _ you might be able to access in your situation. that's the income side. on the _ situation. that's the income side. on the spending side, the advice we will he _ on the spending side, the advice we will be familiar with is looking away— will be familiar with is looking away is — will be familiar with is looking away is that you can cut your budget _ away is that you can cut your budget. that's very difficult for lots of— budget. that's very difficult for lots of people at the moment, particularly people who are already managing quite a tight budget. they also told us what _ managing quite a tight budget. he also told us what not managing quite a tight budget. tia: also told us what not to managing quite a tight budget. “iierg also told us what not to do, managing quite a tight budget. i“ieg also told us what not to do, in particular, don't ignore the problem or cancel direct debits because that could make things worse.
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the head of the international monetary fund has warned that the global economy is facing a series of "calamities". it comes as the world economic forum in switzerland begins —— in switzerland begins with hundreds of top business leaders and bankers meeting heads of government. our economics editor faisal islam is there and met with yuliia svyrydenko, first deputy prime minister of ukraine, and asked her what tasks she was focusing on for the rebuilding of ukraine. we need to reconstruct some railway stations, social infrastructure. of course, different factories were destroyed in general. should russia pay for that? of course. that's why they have frozen assets and we need to find a clear procedure, how to get these frozen assets. the west seized assets? _ get these frozen assets. the west seized assets? the _ get these frozen assets. the west seized assets? the foreign - get these frozen assets. the west. seized assets? the foreign reserves? you think you should take them and given to ukraine? igale you think you should take them and given to ukraine?— given to ukraine? we should take them and give —
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given to ukraine? we should take them and give this _ given to ukraine? we should take them and give this fund, - given to ukraine? we should take them and give this fund, this - given to ukraine? we should take i them and give this fund, this money for reconstruction of ukraine. it makes no sense to find another source. wejust makes no sense to find another source. we just need to find a clear procedure, how to get this fund and how to direct this fund for reconstruction.— how to direct this fund for reconstruction. , reconstruction. so, yachts, football clubs, reconstruction. so, yachts, football clubs. take — reconstruction. so, yachts, football clubs, take the _ reconstruction. so, yachts, football clubs, take the money, _ reconstruction. so, yachts, football clubs, take the money, pay - reconstruction. so, yachts, football clubs, take the money, pay for - reconstruction. so, yachts, football clubs, take the money, pay for the | clubs, take the money, pay for the rebuilding of people's homes? otherwise what's the sense of raising their assets. yachts, apartments, what sense? if ukraine are not able to receive this. igulhat are not able to receive this. what do ou are not able to receive this. what do you say _ are not able to receive this. what do you say to _ are not able to receive this. what do you say to those _ are not able to receive this. what do you say to those who - are not able to receive this. what do you say to those who say - are not able to receive this. what do you say to those who say that that... when we face massive inflation, rising energy, gas prices, food prices, hunger, they are wondering just how far should we go on this path? make its payment
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for the war —— its go on this path? make its payment for the war "— for the war -- its payment for the war. so for the war -- its payment for the war- so you _ for the war -- its payment for the war. so you have _ for the war -- its payment for the war. so you have all— for the war -- its payment for the war. so you have all of _ for the war -- its payment for the war. so you have all of this - for the war -- its payment for the war. so you have all of this food | war. so you have all of this food badly needed — war. so you have all of this food badly needed in _ war. so you have all of this food badly needed in the _ war. so you have all of this food badly needed in the world - war. so you have all of this food badly needed in the world stopl war. so you have all of this food | badly needed in the world stop in the ports. can't really... it would take years to get it on the road. what do you need from the west to help get these on plates around the world? igale help get these on plates around the world? ~ . ,, , ., . ., help get these on plates around the world? ~ , ., . ., ., world? we need the assistance of our international— world? we need the assistance of our international partners _ world? we need the assistance of our international partners to _ world? we need the assistance of our international partners to secure, - international partners to secure, our experts at the seaports, from the transport bureau to find a way to build a corridor or a solution, the opportunity for safe passage for ukrainian vessels. saie the opportunity for safe passage for ukrainian vessels.— ukrainian vessels. safe passage? yes, safe passage. _
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ukrainian vessels. safe passage? yes, safe passage. that's - ukrainian vessels. safe passage? yes, safe passage. that's our - yes, safe passage. that's our economics — yes, safe passage. that's our economics editor. _ yes, safe passage. that's our economics editor. as - yes, safe passage. that's our economics editor. as we - yes, safe passage. that's our i economics editor. as we brought yes, safe passage. that's our - economics editor. as we brought you news on the last few minutes we've learned that the former tory mp imran khan has beenjailed at southwark crown court for sexually assaulting a 15—year—old boy in 2008. letsjoin our assaulting a 15—year—old boy in 2008. lets join our correspondent james reynolds who is outside the crown court right now. james, can you bring us up—to—date? the you bring us up-to-date? the sentencing — you bring us up—to—date? the sentencing hearing lasted with a break _ sentencing hearing lasted with a break of — sentencing hearing lasted with a break of about an hour and a half and mr_ break of about an hour and a half and mriust— break of about an hour and a half and mrjust parker told imran khan that "l— and mrjust parker told imran khan that "i do— and mrjust parker told imran khan that "i do not except you have any remorse _ that "i do not except you have any remorse for — that "i do not except you have any remorse for your offending and i sentence — remorse for your offending and i sentence you for 18 months half of it sentence you for18 months half of it will_ sentence you for 18 months half of it will he _ sentence you for 18 months half of it will be served in prison and the second _ it will be served in prison and the second will— it will be served in prison and the second will be on licence." it began with a _ second will be on licence." it began with a victim — second will be on licence." it began with a victim impact statement by the victim — with a victim impact statement by the victim who remains anonymous. the victim _ the victim who remains anonymous. the victim says this is a lasting impact — the victim says this is a lasting impact on _ the victim says this is a lasting impact on his life, being touched with no— impact on his life, being touched with no warning freaks me out, he
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said _ with no warning freaks me out, he said he _ with no warning freaks me out, he said. he said it was that man and he said. he said it was that man and he said i've _ said. he said it was that man and he said i've had — said. he said it was that man and he said i've had my own assault pantomimes back to me and i have issues _ pantomimes back to me and i have issues with— pantomimes back to me and i have issues with everyday tasks, suicidal thoughts _ issues with everyday tasks, suicidal thoughts. i'm now attending counselling. khan said he would appeal~ — counselling. khan said he would appeal. his own barrister has said he will— appeal. his own barrister has said he will never work in public life or politics _ he will never work in public life or politics again. his he will never work in public life or politics again-— politics again. his reputation is utterly destroyed. _ politics again. his reputation is utterly destroyed. james, - politics again. his reputation is utterly destroyed. james, it's i politics again. his reputation is - utterly destroyed. james, it's worth reminding us the evidence the jury heard because they heard how mr khan had forced the teen to drink gin and tonic and watch pornography. can you remind us of the background of this kate? , , ., .., remind us of the background of this kate? , , ., _, ., kate? this is what the court heard in aril kate? this is what the court heard in april here- _ kate? this is what the court heard in april here. they _ kate? this is what the court heard in april here. they heard - kate? this is what the court heard in april here. they heard he - kate? this is what the court heard in april here. they heard he was l in april here. they heard he was forced _ in april here. they heard he was forced to— in april here. they heard he was forced to drink gin, watch pornography before being assaulted.
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the victim _ pornography before being assaulted. the victim said he was left scared, vulnerable — the victim said he was left scared, vulnerable numb, shocked and supplied — vulnerable numb, shocked and supplied. he had his feet and leg touched — supplied. he had his feet and leg touched coming near his private area as he _ touched coming near his private area as he tried _ touched coming near his private area as he tried to go into his bunk bed following — as he tried to go into his bunk bed following a — as he tried to go into his bunk bed following a party. the headlines on bbc news... thousands more youngsters will end up in care unless there's a "radical reset" of the system — that's the warning from a landmark review of child protection in england. a 21—year—old russian soldier is jailed for life after admitting killing an unarmed civilian in the early stages of the invasion in ukraine in the country's first war crimes trial. people at high risk of developing monkeypox after coming into contact with positive cases are urged to self—isolate for three weeks. that, as scotland confirms its first case of the virus.
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the essex police marine unit has been taking part in a europe—wide operation, boarding ships looking for illegal activity, or migrants on board. the unit was set up 73 years ago to patrol the coastline and waterways of essex. our reporter debbie tubbyjoined them. this is effectively a police beat on water, patrolling the second longest coastline in the country, covering 562 miles of waterways. this has a top speed of 56 knots, that's equivalent to 64 mph, and it can be used in any weather conditions. only a handful of police forces in the country have a special marine unit. are you going far? it emerges they're just on a day trip. the marine unit has the power to check not only small boats but also large ships.
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they have no intelligence to say this cruise ship in the thames estuary is carrying anyone illegally, but as part of a europe—wide operation they are checking security on as many vessels as possible. we look for any signs of modern—day slavery, see if they've got any information they might be able to pass us about where they've come from and any concerns they've had on the way over there, any suspicious activity. the ladder is lowered, they are given permission to go on board. this ship's voyage with 1000 passengers on board includes the seychelles and iceland. it plans to dock in the thames estuary for the night. do you have any issues at the ports when you are on the continent with people trying to get on? when you are on the continent they put some fences all around. when you are on the continent the check takes only minutes. when you are on the continent thank you. when you are on the continent they disembark. when you are on the continent the cruise ship's journey isn't disrupted. we talked about dock security while they were in france and on the continent, just to see whether there'd been any risk to people getting aboard that shouldn't be. they not only board commercial boats but constantly look for illegal activity, even on these, the maunsell forts, built to deter german forces and defend our coastline. we have just spotted this vessel coming into the thames estuary, and we can see it has come from
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portsmouth, the main shipping channel. it's ok. thank you. they want to check it didn't take anyone | up. don't be frightened. any issues| or problems? nothing in the channel, any concerns? it's all legal. this patrol, assigned to keep our coastline safe, may not have found marine crime, migrants or missing people today, but they never know what criminals or weather conditions they might have to face. there are hopes the queen may visit the chelsea flower show which has returned this year to its traditional spring slot, with floral tributes to honour her platinum jublilee year. 0therfeatures include a garden for children. our reporter charlotte gallagher is there.
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0h, oh, it's been absolutely gorgeous and you _ oh, it's been absolutely gorgeous and you mentioned that there is a special— and you mentioned that there is a special garden for children and this is it _ special garden for children and this is it i'm _ special garden for children and this is it. i'm standing in it. it's the older— is it. i'm standing in it. it's the older hay— is it. i'm standing in it. it's the older hay hospital for children. so many— older hay hospital for children. so many features, nooks and crannies. all the _ many features, nooks and crannies. all the planting is with them in mind _ all the planting is with them in mind say— all the planting is with them in mind say things they can eat and smell~ _ mind say things they can eat and smell. there are so many gorgeous gardens— smell. there are so many gorgeous gardens here and my colleague helena wilkinson— gardens here and my colleague helena wilkinson has been taking a look at some _ wilkinson has been taking a look at some of— wilkinson has been taking a look at some of them. this is the official tribute to the queen's platinum jubilee, here at the chelsea flower show. 70 terracotta pots, one for each year of her reign, filled with lily of the valley, her favourite flower. we have got one tonne of steel, as a frame, in the lovely platinum purple, and then it supports 70 terracotta pots, made by whichford pottery in warwickshire, where i am from and they are each planted with lily of the valley and within the centre we have a silhouette, again, of her majesty, using gorgeous rosemary for remembrance and an assortment
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of british trees. every garden here has been planned to perfection, ready for its royal visitors later on. this is a garden which has been made for children. it will be relocated to alder hey children's hospital in liverpool, which betty, who is four, will be able to enjoy. i think it is that opportunity to explore and to have those connections in the world that you do not get when you are stuck in hospital. has betty done any foraging here this morning? she has. she has been on the picnic blanket, picking some mint and having - a little smell of all the different herbs that are in _ the picnic blanket. for the first time ever at the chelsea flower show, judges will find a winner amongst the balcony and container gardens. jane porter is a chelsea first—timer. she has created a slice of scotland using repurposed whiskey casks, which are filled with heather and thistle. i really feel like it gives
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an impression of scotland and also that people can see these sort of ubiquitous planters that you see everywhere and just think, you can do a little bit more with them, with a bit of imagination. before the garden is open to the public tomorrow, some well—known faces have been enjoying the displays. roses are falling out of the sky and i have got apples forming, pears forming, figs forming, walnuts, i've got everything, actually — lemons on my lemon trees dropping off, which i pick every night for a gin and tonic. this year's show will be particularly special, as they celebrate the queen's 70 years on the throne. helena wilkinson, bbc news, at the chelsea flower show. and the sun has finally come out again _ and the sun has finally come out again. really, there is nowhere else better— again. really, there is nowhere else better to _ again. really, there is nowhere else better to be. so many beautiful things— better to be. so many beautiful things here to see, as you saw my colleague — things here to see, as you saw my colleague helena explained. i'm delighted to be joined by one of the
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designers, howard miller. congratulations. the reaction to this is— congratulations. the reaction to this is an — congratulations. the reaction to this is an incredible?— congratulations. the reaction to this is an incredible? we've had so much positive _ this is an incredible? we've had so much positive feedback. _ this is an incredible? we've had so much positive feedback. this - much positive feedback. this morning, we had children in the garden for the first time and it just worked exactly how we thought it would. they come in through the secret hedge, an opening in a hedge and it has this path that leads you round and they were running round enjoying themselves, picking the strawberries. i won't tell you that was! ~ , ., , , , ., was! when you design this did you think, was! when you design this did you think. when _ was! when you design this did you think. when i— was! when you design this did you think, when i was _ was! when you design this did you think, when i was a _ was! when you design this did you think, when i was a boy, - was! when you design this did you think, when i was a boy, what - was! when you design this did you think, when i was a boy, what did| was! when you design this did you | think, when i was a boy, what did i like? _ think, when i was a boy, what did i like? me— think, when i was a boy, what did i like? g . ., think, when i was a boy, what did i like? 3 . ., ., think, when i was a boy, what did i like? g . ., ., ., , , like? my grandad had a nursery when i was small- — like? my grandad had a nursery when i was small. he _ like? my grandad had a nursery when i was small. he had _ like? my grandad had a nursery when i was small. he had dwarf _ like? my grandad had a nursery when i was small. he had dwarf conifers i i was small. he had dwarf conifers and i remember walking round that the same height as these trees and it was a magical experience. so, i wanted to bring the feeling of a world within a world within this
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garden and, yeah, the hospital has this mantra, the child at the centre, so whether that's clinical or whatever food aid to the hospital and we wanted to put that into this garden and make the child at the centre so this is set at a child's eye view, made smaller to be suitable for them. we've made a set of foraging tools especially lightweight so they can pull branches down towards them to pick things and so on. fine branches down towards them to pick things and so on.— things and so on. one of the nicest thins is things and so on. one of the nicest things is that _ things and so on. one of the nicest things is that this _ things and so on. one of the nicest things is that this is _ things and so on. one of the nicest things is that this is not _ things and so on. one of the nicest things is that this is not going - things and so on. one of the nicest things is that this is not going to i things is that this is not going to be ripped — things is that this is not going to be ripped up but is going to be taken — be ripped up but is going to be taken to— be ripped up but is going to be taken to the hospital so children being _ taken to the hospital so children being treated there can enjoy it? that's_ being treated there can enjoy it? that's right. it won't evenjust be that's right. it won't even just be for the children. when you think of children's hospitals you think of sick children who are bed ridden and really poorly but it's their whole families that are going through it. so, i think children's siblings,
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their parents and grandparents, we hope it won'tjust give back we hope it will make children who feel poorly developed back in their life but a grandparent could take the sibling away and give them back a little bit of normality in their life. , ' little bit of normality in their life. , , , ., life. this different 'ellies and -ickled life. this different 'ellies and pickled things _ life. this different jellies and pickled things back - life. this different jellies and pickled things back there, i life. this different jellies and i pickled things back there, have life. this different jellies and - pickled things back there, have the children— pickled things back there, have the children been interested in that? yes _ children been interested in that? yes all— children been interested in that? yes. all the labels have been written by my family so it's a family affair. for susie, it's been project for her during lockdown. there's a little bit of everything. we've got damson jam, garlic salt,
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wild garlic salt, even candied dandelion heads for children to enjoy. dandelion heads for children to en'o . ., , ., dandelion heads for children to en'o . . i. dandelion heads for children to en'o . . ., enjoy. have you en'oyed that? i haven't. enjoy. have you en'oyed that? i haven-t. nah enjoy. have you en'oyed that? i haven't. but it's _ enjoy. have you enjoyed that? i haven't. but it's the _ enjoy. have you enjoyed that? i haven't. but it's the perfect - enjoy. have you enjoyed that? i | haven't. but it's the perfect slice of british— haven't. but it's the perfect slice of british countryside in london and now it's _ of british countryside in london and now it's going to the centre of liverpool~ _ now it's going to the centre of liverpool. lots of nervous gardeners now because we are expecting a royal visit so _ now because we are expecting a royal visit so the _ now because we are expecting a royal visit so the final preparations being — visit so the final preparations being made for the royal visitors coming — being made for the royal visitors coming here. being made for the royal visitors coming here-— being made for the royal visitors cominu here. ., ., . , ., coming here. charlotte, many thanks for that update _ coming here. charlotte, many thanks for that update on _ coming here. charlotte, many thanks for that update on chelsea. _ coming here. charlotte, many thanks for that update on chelsea. we'll- coming here. charlotte, many thanks for that update on chelsea. we'll be. for that update on chelsea. we'll be back with you a little later. let's catch up with your wedding use. he is susan powell. here is susan powell. hello. it is a bit of an overused phrase in weather, "we have got a mixed bag," but that really is the best way to describe the weather that is coming for the uk through the week ahead. we will see numerous areas of low pressure trying to approach from the atlantic,
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kicking up the winds as they do so and ushering in some rain. we have seen this area of low pressure pushing up from the south through monday, weather fronts digging down from the north. basically we can anticipate seeing a bit of rain just about anywhere through the latter part of monday, but particularly across eastern areas of england. further north and west, it should begin to become drier as we go into the small hours of tuesday. a relatively mild night, a little cooler to the north—west of the uk, with temperatures down in single figures. tuesday daytime we have low—pressure swirling away in the north sea, breezy down the north sea coasts, further showers running into coastal regions, but also developing more widely inland as the day plays out. there will be some sunny spells between the showers, but quite a cool north—westerly breeze and temperatures never quite recovering to the highs we saw through the weekend, where they were in the high teens to low 20s, perhaps 17 or 18 degrees at best. wednesday another area of low pressure to talk about, this time coming in from the atlantic, tightening isobars, which means the wind will kick up, so tuesday will be a breezy day, wednesday we'll go for windy,
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showers working their way across the uk and winds getting rather gusty at times — i think we could see them gusting 35—40 mph quite widely across the uk — but actually in many areas there will be some decent spells of sunshine through the day on wednesday. but it will feel cool in the breeze, and especially if you are caught in any showers, again our highs possibly 17 or 18 at best. towards the end of the week, things do try to settle down, another front snakes through on thursday, that'll mean some rain for the northern half of the uk, but by friday and looking towards next weekend high pressure is going to try to build in from the south, so that should actually mean we see more in the way of dry weather from friday onwards, and also i think we will see our temperatures recovering a little. but at the moment it looks like we may well sit on the eastern side of the area of high pressure with a northerly breeze, so no sign of a heatwave on the wayjust yet.
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this is bbc news, i'm rebecca jones and these are the latest headlines... nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe tells the bbc she was forced by iran to sign a false confession before being allowed to leave — while a uk official stood by. all the false confessions that we have been exposed to, they have no value. they are just propaganda for the iranian regime to show how scary they are. a former conservative mp has been jailed for 18 months, following his conviction for sexually assaulting a 15—year—old boy. thousands more youngsters will end up in care unless there's a "radical reset" of the system — that's the warning from a landmark review of child protection in england. it is crucial that when families hit crisis and they have got difficulties, that there is no
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stigma, really intensive help on offer. a 21—year—old russian soldier is jailed for life after admitting killing an unarmed civilian in the early stages of the invasion in ukraine in the country's first war crimes trial. a 27—year—old health worker is arrested on suspicion of deliberately adminstering poison after a child died while being treated in hospital. and...the chelsea flower show showcases wildlife, wellbeing and floral displays to mark the queen's platinum jubilee. hello and welcome to bbc news.
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nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe has told the bbc that iran forced her to sign a last—minute confession before allowing her to return to the uk. she was imprisoned by the country for six years after being accused of being a spy. mrs zaghari—ratcliffe says a uk official was with her when she was forced to sign the declaration. she was talking to the bbc in an exclusive interview for women's hour, with emma barnett. woman's hour, with emma barnett. so when you knew, you found out you were going to be released, i mean, i don't know, did you believe it? no. i did not believe it, not until i got off the plane. right. i was taken by the revolutionary guards to the airport. i did not see my parents. instead, i was made to sign a forced confession, at the airport, in the presence of the british government, where i was... can we just pause on that? so before you left iran... before i left iran, at the airport. you had to sign it? otherwise you wouldn't have been able to... they told me that i would not be able to get on the plane and i know that that was a last—minute game
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because i knew they were — they told me that they have been given the money, so what is the point of me signing a piece of paper which is incorrect, it is a false confession? to all the things they had been accusing you of? exactly, and also, the british government not questioning it, why i have to do it... so a british official was with you when you signed that? she was with me, yes. but also, the whole thing was filmed. the whole thing of me signing the forced confession was filmed. they enjoy showing how scary they are and the desperation of people. yes. so it is a tool of power? it is a tool, and i am sure they will show that some day. of you signing it? of me signing it. even though i was under duress and ijust want to put it here... on the record ? on the record, that all the false confessions that we have been exposed to, they have no value. they arejust propaganda for the iranian
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regime to show how scary they are and they can do whatever they want to do. but it must have been something you felt that you just did not want to do, having fought and protested and known your innocence? it is dehumanising, in my opinion. yes. if you force someone to sign something that, first of all, i have finished my sentence, but also i haven't done it. well, that is the biggest point. why would i sign something i have been trying very, very hard for the past six years to say, "i have not done it"? we did ask the foreign office for a statement about the confession and there was nothing said specifically in response about it, but what was said was that "iran put nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe" — this was from a spokesperson — "through a horrendous ordeal right up to the moment she left the country. "throughout that time, the uk government was working tirelessly to end her unfair detention, but it was always in iran's gift to release nazanin and to allow her to return to the family."
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and nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe talks to emma barnett is on bbc one tonight at 8pm. an extended version of the interview will be available on bbc sounds tonight at 8.30pm and on bbc radio 4's woman's hour tomorrow at 10am. radical changes are needed to prevent tens of thousands more children ending up in care, according to a major report today. the review into council—run children's services in england says the current system is "dysfunctional." it calls for more than £2.5 billion of investment over the next five years, and a windfall tax on big private children's homes. alison holt, our social affairs editor, has this report. so, let me know how it's been going since the panel. henrietta works with young people to help them pitch ideas and get their voices heard. and also it will be good to know how you found working on the project as well. her own life was shaped
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by the crisis in the children's care we are going to live that story there because i want to take you straight to the house of commons now, where the children's minister, will quince, is making a statement on this independent review of children's social care, let's listen in. children's _ social care, let's listen in. children's social _ social care, let's listen in. children's social care - social care, let's listen in. children's social care in march 2021, which is published today. this was commissioned to take a look at the children's social care system and understand how we must transform it to better support the most vulnerable children and families. i want to extend my heartfelt thanks to josh mcallister and want to extend my heartfelt thanks tojosh mcallister and his team for this comprehensive review, as well as of course to the children, the experts on the experience board, the care leavers and families and carers who shared their experiences of the current system and aspirations for the future one. the review is bold and broad, calling for a reset of the system, so it acts decisively in response to abuse, provides more
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help to families in crisis and ensures those in care have lifelong, loving relationships and homes. i very much look forward to working with the sector, those with first—hand experience and with colleagues on all sides of this house to inform an ambitious and detailed government and detailed strategy to be published before the end of 2022. to get us there, i have three main priorities. the first is to improve the child protection system, so it keeps children safe from harm as effectively as possible. the second is to support families to care for their children, so that they can have safe, loving and happy childhoods, which set them up and happy childhoods, which set them up forfulfilling and happy childhoods, which set them up for fulfilling lives. and happy childhoods, which set them up forfulfilling lives. in and happy childhoods, which set them up for fulfilling lives. in the third is to ensure there are the right placements for children in the right placements for children in the right places, so that those who cannot stay with their parents go up in safe, stable and loving homes. to enable me to respond effectively and
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without delay, i will establish a national implementation board of people of experience of leading transformational change to challenge the system to achieve the full extent of our ambitions for children. the board will also consist of people with their own experience of the care system, to remind us of the promise of delivery and the cost of delay. mr speaker, i want to be straight. too many vulnerable children have been let down by the system. we cannot level “p down by the system. we cannot level up if we cannot make progress on children's social care reform, but we are striving to change this and our work to improve the life chances of children is already well under way. this very much aligns, mr speaker, with the key themes of the review and the cma report. on the 2nd of april we backed the supporting families programme with £695 million, which will mean 300,000 of the most vulnerable families will be supported to be lightly safe and loving homes their children need to thrive. we welcome the review of this programme is an excellent model of family
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intervention. today, mr speaker, with the review is our road map, we are going further. we will work with the sector to develop a national children's social care framework, which will set a clear direction for the system and point everyone to the best available evidence for how to support children and families and we will set out more detail on this later this year. mr speaker, will set out more detail on this laterthis year. mr speaker, i will set out more detail on this later this year. mr speaker, i want to pay tribute to every single social worker striving to offer life changing support to children and families day in, day out. providing more default decisive child protection relies on the knowledge and skills of the social workers, which is why i support the principle of the review�*s proposed early career framework. of the review�*s proposed early careerframework. we of the review�*s proposed early career framework. we will set out robust plans to refocus the support social workers receive early on, with a particular pro focus on child protection, given the challenging nature of this work. we will also take action to drive forward the review�*s three data at digital priority areas, inc showing local government and partners are in the driving seat. following the
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recommendation for a data and technology task force, we will introduce a new digital and data solutions fund to help local authorities improve delivery for local families through technology. more detail will follow later this year on joining more detail will follow later this year onjoining up data from more detail will follow later this year on joining up data from across the public sector, so that we can increase transparency, both between safeguarding partners and the wider public. mr speaker, recognising the urgency of action in placements efficiency, we will prioritise working with local authorities to recruit more foster carers. this will recruit pathfinder recruitment campaigns that build towards a national programme to help ensure children have access to the right placements at the right time. as the review recommends, we will focus on providing more support through the application process to improve the conversion rate from expressions of interest to approved foster carers. delivering change for vulnerable children is my absolute priority and, as suggested by the review, i will return to this house on the anniversary of its publication to
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update colleagues on progress made. mr speaker, the statement also provides an opportunity to welcome the recommendations set out in the competition and markets authority report into the children's social care market, which is published in march. as an initial response, i've asked my department to conduct thorough research into the children's homework. engaging with the sector and expert to improve oversight of the market. sadly, we know that too many children are still not being protected from harm quickly enough. this is unacceptable. on thursday the child safeguarding practice review panel will set out lessons learnt from the heartbreaking deaths of arthur hughes and hobson and the secretary of state will come to this house to outline the government's initial response to these tragic cases. mr speaker, for too long children's social care has not received refocus it so desperately needs and deserves. i am determined to work with colleagues across this house and with local authorities across
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our country to deliver a once in a generation reform, so that the system provides high—quality help at the right time with tangible outcomes. for every child who needs our protection, we must reform the system. for every family who needs our help and support, we must reform the system. for every child and young person in care who deserves a safe, stable and loving home, we must reform the system. this is a moral imperative and we must all rise to the challenge. i commend the statement to the house.— statement to the house. shadow minister! thank _ statement to the house. shadow minister! thank you, _ statement to the house. shadow minister! thank you, mr - statement to the house. shadow| minister! thank you, mr speaker. statement to the house. shadow. minister! thank you, mr speaker. i think the minister _ minister! thank you, mr speaker. i think the minister for _ minister! thank you, mr speaker. i think the minister for advance - minister! thank you, mr speaker. i | think the minister for advance sight of his statement today. labour welcomes the report of the independent review of children's social care and i would like to add my thanks tojosh social care and i would like to add my thanks to josh mcallister and social care and i would like to add my thanks tojosh mcallister and his team for their hard work and commitment. i also want to pay tribute to the social workers, support workers, foster carers, children's home staff, youth workers and everyone else who strives day in and everyone else who strives day in
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and day out to provide safety, support and stability to children who are in need or his own families are unable to care for them. their work is vital. it makes a huge difference and it often goes unrecognised. at the top of my mind today are the group of care leavers i hosted in parliament earlier this year. they were articulate, thoughtful and kind. all had been through experiences no child should have to endure and they all deserved far better than the current system had been able to deliver. mr speaker, i welcome the review�*s conclusion that a total reset of children's social care is needed. this conclusion is a terrible indictment of the extent to which this government has been failing children for more than a decade. 12 years, during which we have seen the number of children living in poverty rise to 11.3 million stock that is a key causal factor underpinning the government's failure of children. the unbearable pressure on families, which increases the risk of abuse
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and neglect. the number of un—looked after children increased continually up after children increased continually up by a quarter since 2010. the number of section 47 inquiries when a local authority has cause to suspect a child is in need up by 78% since 2011. half of all children services departments rated inadequate or requiring improvement. they and turnover rates for children social worker is increasing, outcomes for care experience children and young people worsening, and in the meantime the ten biggest providers, private providers of children's homes and private foster care placements making a jaw—dropping £300 million in profits last year. we welcome the review�*s clear statement that by providing care for children, it should not be based on profit. it shouldn't. the law recognises childhood is lasting till the age of 18 and it is shocking the government has continued to allow children to be placed in unregistered children's homes and other completely
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unsuitable accommodation. we welcome the review�*s conclusion that the use of unregistered placements for 16 and 17—year—olds must stop, and stop now. at the heart of the government's failure is the erosion of early health and family support. this is demonstrated no more starkly and badly 1300 sure start centres which have closed since 2010. we welcome the review�*s focus on restoring early help to families, so that many more children can be supported to remain and thrive with their own family. and we welcome the focus in the review on supporting kinship carers and am seeking to ensure that every looked after child can lifelong links with the extended family members. while the minister has re—announced a series of policies today, there is nothing here that will deliver the transformation in children social care that the review demands. successive piecemeal announcements are yet further indication of what the review describes as a lack of national direction about the purpose of children's social care. the minister does not seem to have
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grasped the depth of change that the review requires at scale across the whole country. so i asked the minister, will the minister commit to a firm date for publication of a comprehensive response to the review and a detailed information plan? does he expect that there will be a need for legislation? and how does this square with the queen's speech, voted on last week, from which children social care was completely absent? i will the announcement of early help investment in a handful of different places today ensure that early help services are available in every single area of the country, so that every family who needs help can be supported? what representations is the minister making to the treasury in response to the review? will be minister commit, as the review demands, to an end in profiteering in children social care? how will the minister ensure that the voices and experiences of children are always at the heart of children's social care? and how will the minister
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guarantee that the workforce, who are the backbone of children social care, are fully engaged and involved as reforms are implemented? finally, mr speaker, how will the minister ensure that as reforms are implemented, the framework of accountability for decisions made by the state about the care of children is strengthened? this review sets out the urgent need for the government to put children first and stop poverty, mental illness, substance misuse, domestic abuse, sexual abuse and other adverse childhood experiences from becoming the defining experience of a child's whole life, so that every child can thrive? labourwill whole life, so that every child can thrive? labour will always put children first. we did so in government and we will do so again. this review represents an opportunity to deliver total reset thatis opportunity to deliver total reset that is needed in children social care. it is an opportunity that must not be missed and we will hold the government to account every single day on the framework of support and the outcomes for our most vulnerable children. mr the outcomes for our most vulnerable children. ~ ,,, ., ~ , , children. mr speaker, firstly let me thank the honourable _
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children. mr speaker, firstly let me thank the honourable lady, - children. mr speaker, firstly let me thank the honourable lady, there l children. mr speaker, firstly let me i thank the honourable lady, there are lots of— thank the honourable lady, there are lots of questions in there and i genuinely— lots of questions in there and i genuinely mean it when i say i want to take _ genuinely mean it when i say i want to take as— genuinely mean it when i say i want to take as much as i can a cross—party approach to tackling this issue — cross—party approach to tackling this issue and delivering the review _ this issue and delivering the review i_ this issue and delivering the review. i do thank the honourable lady for— review. i do thank the honourable lady for her— review. i do thank the honourable lady for her largely constructive comments and i thank her for her tone _ comments and i thank her for her tone in— comments and i thank her for her tone in which she refers to the review— tone in which she refers to the review itself. we all want to see the review — review itself. we all want to see the review acted upon to bring about the review acted upon to bring about the change _ the review acted upon to bring about the change we all want to see and whilst _ the change we all want to see and whilst i _ the change we all want to see and whilst i completely understand why the honourable lady wants to talk about _ the honourable lady wants to talk about the — the honourable lady wants to talk about the past, we have got to be honest _ about the past, we have got to be honest with ourselves, mr speaker, that despite years of real terms increases — that despite years of real terms increases in funding, too many young people _ increases in funding, too many young people and _ increases in funding, too many young people and children have been felled and let— people and children have been felled and let down and are still being felt let— and let down and are still being felt let down by the system, subsystem reform is decades overdue. i hope _ subsystem reform is decades overdue. i hope the _ subsystem reform is decades overdue. i hope the honourable lady will understand why i want to focus on the future — understand why i want to focus on the future and the review itself and how we _ the future and the review itself and how we will look to implement it stop the — how we will look to implement it stop the honourable lady rightly pushes — stop the honourable lady rightly pushes me on implementation, that is absolutely— pushes me on implementation, that is absolutely key and the secretary of state and _ absolutely key and the secretary of state and i are determined that this will not _ state and i are determined that this will notjust be state and i are determined that this will not just be another report that sits there — will not just be another report that sits there gathering dust on a shelf in whitehall. it can't, this is far
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too important and that is the gladly why and _ too important and that is the gladly why and establishing an implementation report with the sector— implementation report with the sector expert to drive the change we want and _ sector expert to drive the change we want and need to see. in response to the lady— want and need to see. in response to the lady was — want and need to see. in response to the lady was my question, and in the mentation— the lady was my question, and in the mentation plan is to be delivered by the end _ mentation plan is to be delivered by the end of— mentation plan is to be delivered by the end of this year. finally, let me say— the end of this year. finally, let me say this. the honourable lady should _ me say this. the honourable lady should not— me say this. the honourable lady should not in any way doubt my personal— should not in any way doubt my personal determination to implementing many of the review's recommendations. colleagues looking at my instagram feed, mr speaker, many— at my instagram feed, mr speaker, many colleagues often say that i have _ many colleagues often say that i have the — many colleagues often say that i have the bestjob in government and to some _ have the bestjob in government and to some extent they may be right. what _ to some extent they may be right. what they— to some extent they may be right. what they don't see it every weekend i read _ what they don't see it every weekend i read a _ what they don't see it every weekend i read a serious incident notification report, which details all children who have been killed, abused, _ all children who have been killed, abused, neglected or taken their own lives over— abused, neglected or taken their own lives over the course of the previous _ lives over the course of the previous week. it is a harrowing read, _ previous week. it is a harrowing read. and — previous week. it is a harrowing read, and whilst i know that no legislation, no process, no procedure on the review, however good. _ procedure on the review, however good, can— procedure on the review, however good, can prevent evil, nor can i
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promise — good, can prevent evil, nor can i promise there won't be that cases like arthur— promise there won't be that cases like arthur or star or victoria or daniel— like arthur or star or victoria or daniel or— like arthur or star or victoria or daniel or peter, with this most excellent — daniel or peter, with this most excellent review, and i mean it, it really— excellent review, and i mean it, it really is _ excellent review, and i mean it, it really is an— excellent review, and i mean it, it really is an excellent review, i believe — really is an excellent review, i believe we have a plan, a road map, and opportunity. an opportunity that we must _ and opportunity. an opportunity that we must and will grasp to ensure these _ we must and will grasp to ensure these cases are as rare as they are tragic _ these cases are as rare as they are traaic. ., , , . these cases are as rare as they are traaic. . , , . _, tragic. charity select committee, robert. tragic. charity select committee, robert- we _ tragic. charity select committee, robert. we are _ tragic. charity select committee, robert. we are going _ tragic. charity select committee, robert. we are going to - tragic. charity select committee, robert. we are going to leave i tragic. charity select committee, | robert. we are going to leave the house of commons _ robert. we are going to leave the house of commons there. - robert. we are going to leave the house of commons there. i - robert. we are going to leave the house of commons there. i just i robert. we are going to leave the i house of commons there. i just want to put this into a little bit of context for you. so there has been a major independent review today into children's social care services in england. the review concluded that the current system is the dysfunctional. it calls for billions of pounds more investment and also a windfall tax on big private children's homes. so you were there watching will quince, who is the children's minister, responding in effect to the publication of that
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report today i do will have heard him say that too many vulnerable children have been let down by the system, and him making a series of pledges about the government's priorities. then we heard helen hayes, who is the shadow education minister, responding with her points. and one of the points she made was, the ten biggest private providers of social care for children made £300 million in profit last year. and that is a point i would like to pick up with our next guest, who is peter sandiford, ceo of independent children's homes association, which is a body that represents care providers. very good to have you with us and thanks for waiting patiently while we were listened to that statement in the house of commons. i want to pick up this point that the review says some private providers are charging excessive pricing. do you, first of all, except that finding? that was
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auoted all, except that finding? that was quoted from _ all, except that finding? that was quoted from the _ all, except that finding? that was quoted from the cma _ all, except that finding? that was quoted from the cma report i all, except that finding? that was quoted from the cma report and l all, except that finding? that was l quoted from the cma report and in fact it was an inaccurate report. the cma did not say that. they... just to interrupt, _ the cma did not say that. they... just to interrupt, the _ the cma did not say that. they... just to interrupt, the cma - the cma did not say that. they... just to interrupt, the cma is i the cma did not say that. they... just to interrupt, the cma is the l just to interrupt, the cma is the competition and markets authority, correct? ~ ., , , , , competition and markets authority, correct? ,_ ,_ correct? apologies, yes it is, yes. carry on- — correct? apologies, yes it is, yes. carry on- what — correct? apologies, yes it is, yes. carry on. what were _ correct? apologies, yes it is, yes. carry on. what were they - correct? apologies, yes it is, yes. carry on. what were they were i carry on. what were they were identifying _ carry on. what were they were identifying was _ carry on. what were they were identifying was that _ carry on. what were they were identifying was that there i carry on. what were they were identifying was that there was | carry on. what were they were i identifying was that there was a... a cost, the higher cost from those larger providers, they were taking a profit from it. they were not saying the fees they charge to hire, and in fact they are not. and one of the things that the report failed to identify is that actually the cost of provision in local authorities pauls' own position has been independently recognised as being significantly higher, by around about 20%. that was a failure to
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recognise and what we see in those larger providers is an economy of scale, which enables the profits. i think what is far more important for us to recognise is that the quality of provision. the quality of provision in children's homes, whatever the sector, be it private, voluntary or the public sector, the local authority's own position, is generally of a high standard. it needs to be100% and that is our commitment to work towards that, but it isn't that the larger providers or the private providers provide a lower quality. the quality is good across the board. yes, there are instances certainly where it could be better. , , ., ., be better. yes, i understand that. the competition _ be better. yes, i understand that. the competition markets - be better. yes, i understand that. | the competition markets authority report you referred to did say some companies' profit margins were 26% and as we heard in the commons there, the shadow education
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minister, helen hayes, saying the ten biggest providers were making £300 million in profits last year. i take your point that that is not a reflection on the quality of care that they are providing, but i suppose i am asking you what is a reasonable profit margin? i am not in a position to set that at all. i i in a position to set that at all. i am particularly interested in the quality of provision and the... ability to actually meet the needs of the children. and yes, at the moment the sufficiency of placements is a major issue. and what we have seen and what is highlighted in the report is that there needs to be more early intervention. the reason the early intervention hasn't been there isn't something that is driven by practice, it has been driven by cuts in spending on that local authority provision. and that is something that has come from the
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government down, if you like, rather than something that is caused by the actual providers themselves. the reason i am _ actual providers themselves. the reason i am asking you about these profits is because you will know in the report byjosh mcallister, there is a proposal for a windfall tax on the main 15 providers because essentially, they have done rather well out its market failure. in your view, is that windfall tax proposal fair? i view, is that windfall tax proposal fair? ., �* ~' , fair? i don't think it is achievable. _ fair? i don't think it is achievable. whether l fair? i don't think it is| achievable. whether it fair? i don't think it is i achievable. whether it is fair? i don't think it is - achievable. whether it is fair or not, i think the actual reality of it and the way those different companies are structured, they are not like the utilities, where the windfall tax has been talked about for the last few weeks. they are very different structures and to actually put into place, i don't think is durable, whether it is right or wrong to do it, isn't it again something i would want to go into because again, i am talking about the quality and the
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sufficiency of placement. it is interesting that the review, right at the beginning, was told it had to be cost neutral and it is almost like in the last few weeks there has been a discovery of a new way of funding those kind of interventions that are needed. i think it is for the government to actually look look at how it funds the quality of care it provides as the core parent for children in care.— children in care. peter sandiford from the independent _ children in care. peter sandiford from the independent children's homes association. it is a complicated issue, we are really gratefulfor complicated issue, we are really grateful for your complicated issue, we are really gratefulfor your time, thank you. grateful for your time, thank you. thank gratefulfor your time, thank you. thank you. another story to bring you now. researchers have created gene—edited tomatoes that can boost levels of vitamin d — which the uk population is deficient in. this development coincides with the introduction of a bill in parliament in two days' time, which would allow the commercial growing of gene—edited crops in england — which does not occur because of rules set by the eu.
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here's our science correspondent, pallab ghosh: these tomatoes could have great health benefits. they have been developed in the lab to be rich in the sunshine vitamin, d, which ordinary tomatoes don't have. it is vital for the development of strong bones and muscles and one in six people in the uk don't get enough of it. ~ ., people in the uk don't get enough of it. ~ . ., ., ., it. with human, half an hour in the sunshine every _ it. with human, half an hour in the sunshine every day _ it. with human, half an hour in the sunshine every day is _ it. with human, half an hour in the sunshine every day is enough i it. with human, half an hour in the sunshine every day is enough to i it. with human, half an hour in the i sunshine every day is enough to make enough vitamin d for you, but a lot of people don't have much time outside, so the tomatoes themselves can provide another source of vitamin d. e can provide another source of vitamin d-_ can provide another source of vitamin d. ., ., ., , ., , vitamin d. e tomatoes are being roduced vitamin d. e tomatoes are being produced using _ vitamin d. e tomatoes are being produced using an _ vitamin d. e tomatoes are being produced using an advanced i produced using an advanced scientific technique known as genetic editing. it usually involves sniffing out a small portion of the plant's dna. the older technique of genetic modification involves putting genetic material in. sometimes genes from a completely different species. a wide range of foods are produced using both
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methods and other countries. not in europe. you can't get these high—tech foods in the shops. that is because europe effectively banned genetically modified crops 25 years ago, over concerns about their safety. when gene editing emerged eight years ago, that wasn't allowed either. the uk government has now looked at the science and decided that the newer technology is completely safe. this firm in hertfordshire has been developing new varieties of wheat and barley, using traditional breeding methods for decades. they are planning to use gene editing because they believe it will keep food on our shelves at affordable prices. igufheh shelves at affordable prices. when we are developing _ shelves at affordable prices. when we are developing new— shelves at affordable prices. hisi;e:si we are developing new varieties like these you see in the packages here, that takes around 12 years, typically. with precision breeding techniques, we can significantly shorten that timescale and bring you varieties to the market much faster. —— bring new varieties. ih
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varieties to the market much faster. -- bring new varieties.— -- bring new varieties. in 1999, worried protesters _ -- bring new varieties. in 1999, worried protesters trampled i -- bring new varieties. in 1999, | worried protesters trampled gm crops. since then, scientific reviews have shown the technology to be safe. and some have now changed their minds. be safe. and some have now changed their minds-— their minds. these crops have been in the ground _ their minds. these crops have been in the ground now _ their minds. these crops have been in the ground now for _ their minds. these crops have been in the ground now for a _ their minds. these crops have been in the ground now for a quarter- their minds. these crops have been in the ground now for a quarter of. their minds. these crops have been in the ground now for a quarter of a j in the ground now for a quarter of a century _ in the ground now for a quarter of a century we — in the ground now for a quarter of a century. we know they are safe and we also _ century. we know they are safe and we also know it is a technology which — we also know it is a technology which can — we also know it is a technology which can be very useful for increasing the sustainability of agriculture, to reduce pesticides, to help _ agriculture, to reduce pesticides, to help crops adapt to climate change. — to help crops adapt to climate change, defeating growing populations, stuff like that. but a lane populations, stuff like that. but a large population _ populations, stuff like that. but a large population of— populations, stuff like that. but a large population of the _ populations, stuff like that. but a large population of the -- - populations, stuff like that. but a large population of the -- a i populations, stuff like that. em — large population of the —— a large proportion of the population have their doubts still, especially as their doubts still, especially as the new gm crops won't be labelled. they worry that the new technology will not be fully transparent. pallab ghosh, bbc news. joining us is liz o'neill, environmental campaigner and director at gm freeze, which campaigns for a responsible, fair and sustainable food system. welcome to bbc news, good to have the weather was. it won in six people in the uk are deficient in vitamins d, this sounds like a good
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idea, doesn't it? it vitamins d, this sounds like a good idea, doesn't it?— idea, doesn't it? it does when they tell it like that, — idea, doesn't it? it does when they tell it like that, but _ idea, doesn't it? it does when they tell it like that, but there - idea, doesn't it? it does when they tell it like that, but there is - idea, doesn't it? it does when they tell it like that, but there is no i tell it like that, but there is no shortage of vitamin d rich foods on our supermarket shelves, there is a huge array of excellent sources of dietary vitamin d, but people aren't eating them, so the problem is either poverty or the way the food system operates and adding in, you know, one obscure, no doubt highly pressed tomatoes onto the shelves are not going to change that. what we need is not gm catch up. igufhat are not going to change that. what we need is not gm catch up. what do ou mean we need is not gm catch up. what do you mean by — we need is not gm catch up. what do you mean by gm _ we need is not gm catch up. what do you mean by gm catch _ we need is not gm catch up. what do you mean by gm catch up? _ we need is not gm catch up. what do you mean by gm catch up? well, i we need is not gm catch up. what do you mean by gm catch up? well, you know, we you mean by gm catch up? well, you know. we had — you mean by gm catch up? well, you know, we had gm _ you mean by gm catch up? well, you know, we had gm tomatoes - you mean by gm catch up? well, you know, we had gm tomatoes before, l you mean by gm catch up? well, you i know, we had gm tomatoes before, the first gm plant that was ever developed was a tomato and it is used to make tomato paste, it was not sold as tomatoes and it is highly likely that that is what would happen here. tomatoes are really popular with researchers because there is a huge market for processing. this is largely about highly processed foods and also about finding an outlet for patents involved technology. what we haven't
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heard about it all in the report there is the fact that these new gene editing techniques are gmo is, just like old gm mose, g and those with better pr, but they are patented just the same, so that means the people that develop in them have a very significant vested financial interest in having them be a success and be taken taken up by the corporate food industry. so there is a lot at play here that isn't really about nutrition. sorry to interrupt. _ isn't really about nutrition. sorry to interrupt, just _ isn't really about nutrition. sorry to interrupt, just because - isn't really about nutrition. sorry to interrupt, just because you i isn't really about nutrition. sorry to interrupt, just because you are using in some ways the phrase gene editing and gene modification interchangeably and, as our reporter made clear in the report, there is a difference, isn't there? with gene editing you are essentially taking out a section of dna, whereas with gene modification you're essentially putting genes in? that gene modification you're essentially putting genes in?— putting genes in? that is the narrative that _ putting genes in? that is the narrative that is _ putting genes in? that is the narrative that is being - putting genes in? that is the i narrative that is being portrayed very, very heavily across the media, but i'm afraid it is just not true. genetic modification was never defined as adding injeans, it is
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about changing the dna in the lab in ways that don't happen in nature and thatis ways that don't happen in nature and that is exactly what is happening with this. that, there are genes genetic material added in as part of the genetic editing process. there is there no attempt to remove it, but let's talk about what gene editing is. they insert a genetic bitter material taken from a bacterium and they use it to injure the dna of an organism, they cause an injury and cause damage and then try to control the way that the cell repair that damage. that is a very complex process stop they describe thatis complex process stop they describe that is just a little snip or a little tweak, it is deliberately obscuring the truth, deliberate oversimplification and this is happening in order to try to persuade people who do not want this in their food. persuade people who do not want this in theirfood. to persuade people who do not want this in their food. to just accept it. but what about the argument that it will help with food poverty, in other words, will help with food poverty, in otherwords, it will help with food poverty, in other words, it will help increase
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supply, other words, it will help increase supply, it will help crops become more disease resistant and it will use less pesticides? there are advantages to this command there? there are hypothetical advantages and they are the same hypothetical advantages that we heard a lot about 20, 25 years advantages that we heard a lot about 20,25 years ago when advantages that we heard a lot about 20, 25 years ago when the first generation of gm came along, the same empty promises were made then and unfortunately they have not come to fruition. we have not seen that development and i have huge doubts about whether we would now, but even if we did, the regulation wouldn't allow that. gmo gmos is not banned, it is regulated, and what that means someone has to check the gm developers' homework and unfortunately these tomatoes are being grown in the open air under new rules that mean we haven't been subjected to any independent safety checks whatsoever. that is a real worry. you know, what i don't
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understand with people cheerleading for this, understand with people cheerleading forthis, is understand with people cheerleading for this, is what if what they think they have is so fantastic, why are they have is so fantastic, why are they so afraid of somebody else checking their homework? why aren't they happy to submit to sensible safeguards for public protection? i'm sorry, liz o'neill, we are out of time. a really good to talk to you, liz o'neill from gm freeze. sport and a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. are going to start with the french open. all five british players at the french open are in action today cameron norrie and dan evans are both two sets up and we found out that cameron has won his match.— won his match. lien coming into roland garros. _
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won his match. lien coming into roland garros. dan _ won his match. lien coming into roland garros. dan evans, i won his match. lien coming into roland garros. dan evans, he i won his match. lien coming into roland garros. dan evans, he is} won his match. lien coming into i roland garros. dan evans, he is to set up although the british number three was knocked out today. naomi osaka was also beaten, the former world number one and two time grand slam champion lost in straight sets to the 2019 semi—finallist amanda anisimova, the american who also beat her at the australian open. afterwards osaka said she might skip the grass court season now that wimbledon has been stripped of ranking points, because of its ban on russian and belarussian players. it's kind of, like, i don't want to say pointless, no pun intended but like, i... i'm the type of player who gets motivated by seeing my ranking going up and stuff like that so i'm going to kind of see how like the decisions turn up because i
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think there's going to be a bit of back—and—forth about the whole point situations and then i guess i can make my decisions. no problems for the world number one though. iga swiatek eased past the ukrainian lesia tsurenko in straight sets in under an hour. swiatek has won her past five tournaments and that was her 29th win in a row manchester city's title parade starts in the next hour and a half, interesting timing that we also heard from the new manchester united manager for the first time today. erik ten haag has been outlining his plans for the club and says he's looking forward to taking on city and trying to break their domination. united finished 35 points off the top of the table in 6th this season. i have a good feeling with the people around, get the plan done, to get it into process,
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to cooperate, to be consistent in our plan, with good people around with the right connections, the right commitment. we will achieve the success we want to. our plan is huge. and we will roll this out to the staff and players and you will see. west ham's kurt zouma and his brother yoan, who plays for dagenham and redbridge, will appear in court tomorrow charged with a number of offences under the animal welfare act. the hammers defender was filmed on social media in february kicking and mistreating his pet cats. the two men are due to appear at thames magistrates�* court for a first hearing tomorrow morning. the animals are still being cared for by the rspca who raised the investigation. arsenal defender kieran tierney has been left out of scotland's squad for the world cup play—off semi—final with ukraine on the 1stjune. he hasn't recovered fully from knee surgery last month.
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his last match was for scotland in 2—all friendly draw against austria at the end of march. everton�*s nathan patterson has been included despite being out for the same period of time with an ankle problem. if scotland beat ukraine then they'll face wales in cardiff on 5th ofjune for a place at the world cup in qatar. you can get full details of the squad on the bbc sport website. i will be back in the next hour. hopefully, will go to the manchester city parade. former tory mp imran ahmad khan has been jailed for 18 months at southwark crown court for sexually assaulting a is—year—old boy in 2008. mr khan was thrown out of the conservative party after a jury delivered its verdict at southwark crown court in april. he has stood down as an mp but is appealing against his conviction. a by—election will be held in wakefield next month
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earlier, i spoke with our correspondent james reynolds, who is outside the crown court in southwark thejudge sentenced the judge sentenced the former mp to 18 months, the first half to be spent in prison and a second on licence. the hearing began with a victim impact statement. the victim said, because i... he describes imran khan as that man. he said he finds it hard to focus on everyday tasks, and is now attending counselling. imran khan who said he will peel against the verdict sat impassively holding a walking stick. his own barrister said he never work
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in politics or public life again. his reputation is destroyed. james, it's worth you reminding us of the evidence the jury heard, as just remind to the background of this case. , . , remind to the background of this case. , ., , ., remind to the background of this case. , ., ., u, remind to the background of this case. , ., ., _, ., case. this was what the court heard in aril at case. this was what the court heard in april at this _ case. this was what the court heard in april at this particular— case. this was what the court heard in april at this particular crown - in april at this particular crown court. they heard that he forced a 15—year—old to drink gin, took him upstairs and asked him to watch pornography before assaulting him. the victim said they were left feeling scared, vulnerable, numb, shocked and surprised. khan who was then 3k years old touched the victim's legs near his private area in a bunk bed as he was at a party.
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itv news has showed a the prime minister standing with a table of wine bottles. this was taken in 2020 at a leaving party for the director of communications, lee kane. at political correspondence joins us now. political correspondence 'oins us now. , , ., ., , political correspondence 'oins us now. , ,._, , _ now. these photographs released by itv news, now. these photographs released by itv news. they _ now. these photographs released by itv news, they are _ now. these photographs released by itv news, they are of— now. these photographs released by itv news, they are of one _ now. these photographs released by itv news, they are of one of - now. these photographs released by itv news, they are of one of those l itv news, they are of one of those events _ itv news, they are of one of those events being investigated by sue gray and — events being investigated by sue gray and the met police in november 2020 _ gray and the met police in november 2020 it_ gray and the met police in november 2020. it appears to be a leaving do. we think_ 2020. it appears to be a leaving do. we think it's — 2020. it appears to be a leaving do. we think it's a leaving do other senior— we think it's a leaving do other senior downing street aide and it shows_ senior downing street aide and it shows the — senior downing street aide and it shows the prime minister raising a glass— shows the prime minister raising a glass with — shows the prime minister raising a glass with several others in the room — glass with several others in the room this _ glass with several others in the room. this is not the event the prime — room. this is not the event the prime minister was fined for, that was with— prime minister was fined for, that was with the cabinet, several months earlier_ was with the cabinet, several months eartier for— was with the cabinet, several months earlier for his birthday but it's some — earlier for his birthday but it's some of— earlier for his birthday but it's some of the photographic evidence we've _ some of the photographic evidence we've seen release. downing street
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has said _ we've seen release. downing street has said that the police have access to all_ has said that the police have access to all information for this investigation. sue gray will publish that report in the coming days, at which _ that report in the coming days, at which point, the prime minister will address— which point, the prime minister will address parliament in full. a source we have _ address parliament in full. a source we have been speaking to suggest the existence _ we have been speaking to suggest the existence of the red box in that photo _ existence of the red box in that photo perhaps supports the idea that the prime _ photo perhaps supports the idea that the prime minister was at home in his house — the prime minister was at home in his house and had passed through to say goodbye to the well loved aide. labour_ say goodbye to the well loved aide. labour said he had been repeatedly breaking _ labour said he had been repeatedly breaking the law. questions are being _ breaking the law. questions are being asked about what he told parliament about what he happened during _ parliament about what he happened during those days but we must stress that this _ during those days but we must stress that this is _ during those days but we must stress that this is not the event for which he was _ that this is not the event for which he was fined. that this is not the event for which he was fined-— that this is not the event for which he was fined. helen, this comes as we await sue _ he was fined. helen, this comes as
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we await sue gray's _ he was fined. helen, this comes as we await sue gray's reports - he was fined. helen, this comes as we await sue gray's reports and - we await sue gray's reports and there have been a lot of reports in there have been a lot of reports in the media that that report will include a number of photographs. this might then perhaps be a leak from that report? i don't know. what think? ~ ., ., ., ., , from that report? i don't know. what think? ., ., ., ., , , think? will have to wait and see but ou are think? will have to wait and see but you are right. _ think? will have to wait and see but you are right. it _ think? will have to wait and see but you are right, it would _ think? will have to wait and see but you are right, it would be _ think? will have to wait and see but you are right, it would be unusual. you are right, it would be unusual for a report of this kind to release photographs as a part of that. apparently 510 photos were looked at tjy apparently 510 photos were looked at by the met police. we know they are around and at least some of them may find their way into the report by sue gray when it's published, possibly in the coming days. and sue gray when it's published, possibly in the coming days. and the pm still faces — possibly in the coming days. and the pm still faces scrutiny _ possibly in the coming days. and the pm still faces scrutiny by _ possibly in the coming days. and the pm still faces scrutiny by the - possibly in the coming days. and the pm still faces scrutiny by the house. pm still faces scrutiny by the house of commons privilege committee where he is in contempt of parliament, so it's notjust sue gray we are waiting for?— it's notjust sue gray we are waitin: for? ., , ., ., waiting for? no, you are right. there are _ waiting for? no, you are right. there are elements _ waiting for? no, you are right. there are elements to - waiting for? no, you are right. there are elements to this. i waiting for? no, you are right. - there are elements to this. whereas sue gray in the met police were looking into rule breaking, if you
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like, these events, there's the other element to this which is what the prime minister has said in parliament about these events and whether that has amounted to misleading parliament, deliberately. that's what the standards committee will look into after mps voted for that investigations. so notjust what happened at what the prime minister said about it.— minister said about it. helen, returning _ minister said about it. helen, returning to _ minister said about it. helen, returning to sue _ minister said about it. helen, returning to sue gray, - minister said about it. helen, returning to sue gray, are - minister said about it. helen, returning to sue gray, are we minister said about it. helen, - returning to sue gray, are we any clearer? we've been waiting a long time for this report. any idea when we will be able to read it? long—awaited, you are right. so the suggestion has been that it would be this week. of course, parliament goes into recess from thursday and the suggestion is that we would get this report while parliament was sitting so the thinking is that it's going to come in the next two days. and, helen, ithink
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going to come in the next two days. and, helen, i think it's worth reminding viewers who justjoined us about the four photographs that have been released by itv news. just tell us again what they show. this been released by itv news. just tell us again what they show.— been released by itv news. just tell us again what they show. as you have said, four photographs _ us again what they show. as you have said, four photographs taken - us again what they show. as you have said, four photographs taken in - said, four photographs taken in november 2020 showing the prime minister raising a glass inside downing street with what appears to be some other people with crisps and drink on the table. and the prime minister's red box in front of him there. these four photographs released by itv and they appear to show this gathering in november 2020. ., �* , show this gathering in november 2020. ., �*, ., 2020. that's a political correspondence - 2020. that's a political correspondence at - 2020. that's a political - correspondence at westminster. 2020. that's a political _ correspondence at westminster. thank you very much for that update. let's talk to adam now to —— human rights lawyer. what should we make of these
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photographs? it lawyer. what should we make of these photographs?— photographs? it looks like the prime minister is participating _ photographs? it looks like the prime minister is participating in _ photographs? it looks like the prime minister is participating in an - minister is participating in an illegal— minister is participating in an illegal ring on the 13th of november, 2020. that was during the november_ november, 2020. that was during the november lockdown so the rules were strict _ november lockdown so the rules were strict you _ november lockdown so the rules were strict. you were not allowed to meet up strict. you were not allowed to meet up or— strict. you were not allowed to meet up or gather— strict. you were not allowed to meet up or gather indoors unless the gathering — up or gather indoors unless the gathering was reasonably necessary for work _ gathering was reasonably necessary for work and if he participated in a gathering — for work and if he participated in a gathering that was reasonably necessary for work then you get a fixed _ necessary for work then you get a fixed penalty. we know he didn't get one of— fixed penalty. we know he didn't get one of these this gathering. i think it's correct — one of these this gathering. i think it's correct to say that some of the other— it's correct to say that some of the other people did. some people did -et other people did. some people did get a _ other people did. some people did get a fixed penalty notice so the question— get a fixed penalty notice so the question is why he seems to have got away with— question is why he seems to have got away with it? this question is why he seems to have got away with it?— away with it? this would be one of those gathering — away with it? this would be one of those gathering that _ away with it? this would be one of those gathering that would - away with it? this would be one of those gathering that would incur i away with it? this would be one of those gathering that would incur a | those gathering that would incur a fixed penalty notice, is that right?
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sign that we know for sure that the met police gave fixed penalty notices for an event that took place on november the 13th 2020. i don't know whether that's the one in the prime minister is flat or the leaving do for lee kane. but it stands that — leaving do for lee kane. but it stands that people _ leaving do for lee kane. but it stands that people got - leaving do for lee kane. but it stands that people got fixed . leaving do for lee kane. but it stands that people got fixed penalty notices _ stands that people got fixed penalty notices for this day. the photo with lots of _ notices for this day. the photo with lots of alcohol on the table, people having _ lots of alcohol on the table, people having a _ lots of alcohol on the table, people having a leaving party seems obviously to be an illegal gathering so i don't _ obviously to be an illegal gathering so i don't understand, as i said last week, _ so i don't understand, as i said last week, why the prime minister has not _ last week, why the prime minister has not top i don't even think he was sent— has not top i don't even think he was sent a — has not top i don't even think he was sent a questionnaire for this gathering — was sent a questionnaire for this anatherin. ~ , ., , gathering. might there be any mitiauatin gathering. might there be any mitigating situations - gathering. might there be any mitigating situations for - gathering. might there be any mitigating situations for this | mitigating situations for this gathering?— mitigating situations for this anatherin? ., ., ., , mitigating situations for this anatherin? ., ., ., gathering? no. the regulations say, is not that people _
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gathering? no. the regulations say, is not that people can't _ gathering? no. the regulations say, is not that people can't attend - gathering? no. the regulations say, is not that people can't attend a - is not that people can't attend a gathering — is not that people can't attend a gathering with a particular reason but the _ gathering with a particular reason but the gathering itself needs to have an — but the gathering itself needs to have an exception. the regulations say, if— have an exception. the regulations say, if a _ have an exception. the regulations say, if a gathering is not reasonably necessary for work and anyone _ reasonably necessary for work and anyone who in it is committing an offence _ anyone who in it is committing an offence so — offence so i don't see why someone could _ offence so i don't see why someone could participate in an illegal gathering legally and indeed, for the prime minister, this is his staff, — the prime minister, this is his staff, has— the prime minister, this is his staff, he's the boss, ithink the prime minister, this is his staff, he's the boss, i think it applies— staff, he's the boss, i think it applies more strongly. how could the boss participating a gathering with staff if— boss participating a gathering with staff if the staff have been deemed to have _ staff if the staff have been deemed to have acted illegally? i can't fathom — to have acted illegally? i can't fathom how that could be the case. we must _ fathom how that could be the case. we must leave it there but adam, very good to hear thoughts. many thanks. let's update you the headlights now. —— headlines now. borisjohnson has been shown in a photo lifting a
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glass at a gathering during coronavirus lockdown. nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe tells the bbc she was forced by iran to sign a false confession before being allowed to leave, while a uk official stood by. a former conservative mp has been jailed for 18 months following his conviction for sexually assaulting a 15—year—old boy. there are hopes the queen may visit the chelsea flower show which has returned this year to its traditional spring slot, with floral tributes to honour her platinum jublilee year. 0therfeatures include a mini scotland and a garden for children. our reporter charlotte gallagher is there. we canjoin we can join her life. we canjoin her life. hello, charlotte. we canjoin her life. hello, charlotte-— we canjoin her life. hello, charlotte. ., , �* , , ., charlotte. hello. yes. it's been an absolutely — charlotte. hello. yes. it's been an absolutely gorgeous _ charlotte. hello. yes. it's been an absolutely gorgeous day _ charlotte. hello. yes. it's been an absolutely gorgeous day chelsea. | charlotte. hello. yes. it's been an i absolutely gorgeous day chelsea. for the first _ absolutely gorgeous day chelsea. for the first time in three years, back to its— the first time in three years, back to its traditional slot in spring.
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so, to its traditional slot in spring. so. lots — to its traditional slot in spring. so. lots of— to its traditional slot in spring. so, lots of lovely spring flowers, gorgeous— so, lots of lovely spring flowers, gorgeous colours all around. we are at one _ gorgeous colours all around. we are at one of— gorgeous colours all around. we are at one of the show gardens now. this is the _ at one of the show gardens now. this is the rnli _ at one of the show gardens now. this is the rnli garden, lots of purples, pinks _ is the rnli garden, lots of purples, pinks and _ is the rnli garden, lots of purples, pinks and creams. and it smells wonderful~ _ pinks and creams. and it smells wonderful. this is chris, the designer— wonderful. this is chris, the designer and mark, the chief executive of the rnli. this isn't your— executive of the rnli. this isn't your typical stereotypical seaside garden — your typical stereotypical seaside garden. it�*s your typical stereotypical seaside carden. v . your typical stereotypical seaside carden. �*, ., garden. it's great you spotted it because we _ garden. it's great you spotted it because we wanted _ garden. it's great you spotted it because we wanted to - garden. it's great you spotted it because we wanted to go - garden. it's great you spotted it because we wanted to go down | garden. it's great you spotted it | because we wanted to go down a slightly more thoughtful path. we wanted to engage the history of our organisation but also to think of a more contemporary organisation, and rnli who are technologically advanced, the best trainers in the world and the admiration across the world. and so much of that is really threaded through the scheme here. but also, that subdued plant palette
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you are referring to. we were inspired by the nature of the cruise, the fact that these are ordinary people so we've selected plants that are generally ordinary garden plants but we have composed within a context that allows them to excel. so, this kind of a metaphor there. the way that plants are arranged, the way the garden reflects the crews. and you think that calm palette is exactly what would represent a member of the rnli crew. they are very calm, composed in that challenging environment so to have a steady, calm hand across the garden is exactly what we are after. painting, effectively the crew, in that plant palette. have any cream _ crew, in that plant palette. have any cream on — crew, in that plant palette. have any cream on the _ crew, in that plant palette. have
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any cream on the scene - crew, in that plant palette. have any cream on the scene it - crew, in that plant palette. have any cream on the scene it today? yes. they have an they were also part of the design process. for me, it was important not to impose a design. it was very much about talking with crew members, volunteers and members from head office so as many people as we could to understand the history of the organisation, where they are today and where they see themselves going and where they see themselves going and their relevance. what motivates them? how they emotionally deal with them? how they emotionally deal with the challenge of the rescues in an organisation like that. so they've been instrumental in the formation of the plans and the feedback is great. we went supported head. one of the crews who helped us shape the ideas, you know, they were in tears once they saw the design come to life. ~., ~' , once they saw the design come to life. a ~' , ,. once they saw the design come to life. ~., ~ , y., ., life. mark, why did you want the rnli to do _ life. mark, why did you want the rnli to do a _ life. mark, why did you want the rnli to do a garden? _ life. mark, why did you want the rnli to do a garden? thank - life. mark, why did you want the rnli to do a garden? thank you| life. mark, why did you want the - rnli to do a garden? thank you chris for helinu rnli to do a garden? thank you chris for helping us — rnli to do a garden? thank you chris for helping us with _ rnli to do a garden? thank you chris for helping us with this _ rnli to do a garden? thank you chris for helping us with this show. - rnli to do a garden? thank you chris for helping us with this show. this . for helping us with this show. this
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has not _ for helping us with this show. this has not come from life—saving funds. we really _ has not come from life—saving funds. we really wanted this to showcase the depth — we really wanted this to showcase the depth of importance of our organisation right around the coasts of the _ organisation right around the coasts of the uk _ organisation right around the coasts of the uk and ireland and its a lovely— of the uk and ireland and its a lovely way to thank volunteers for the commitment and effort they put into their— the commitment and effort they put into their work and chris has described _ into their work and chris has described that very well. what was our described that very well. what was your reaction _ described that very well. what was your reaction when _ described that very well. what was your reaction when you _ described that very well. what was your reaction when you saw - described that very well. what was your reaction when you saw it? - described that very well. what was your reaction when you saw it? i i your reaction when you saw it? i love a slightly understated, very natural —looking garden and my wife will laugh— natural —looking garden and my wife will laugh when she he's this as she knows _ will laugh when she he's this as she knows i _ will laugh when she he's this as she knows i haven't cut the grass but it's got _ knows i haven't cut the grass but it's got a — knows i haven't cut the grass but it's got a wonderfully natural feel to draw— it's got a wonderfully natural feel to draw you in. we it's got a wonderfully natural feel to draw you im— to draw you in. we are expecting ro al to draw you in. we are expecting royal visitors _ to draw you in. we are expecting royal visitors later _ to draw you in. we are expecting royal visitors later and _ to draw you in. we are expecting royal visitors later and lots - to draw you in. we are expecting royal visitors later and lots of. royal visitors later and lots of garden designers and people like yourselves are putting in the final touches. they will be judged tomorrow and you'll get your medal and find out, how you feeling? isluice and find out, how you feeling? wee bo said and find out, how you feeling? wee boy said that _ and find out, how you feeling? wee boy said that the _ and find out, how you feeling? as boy said that the most important thing is to reflect the charity and to have a garden —— we have always
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said. we want to represent the volunteers when thousands of chelsea visitors come through. a garden that allowed those volunteers to explain why our organisation is so important and why they do what they do. they can extract those and embark on a conversation and engage with the public who are notjust admiring the garden but then beginning to understand the relevance of the rnli and as far asjudgment understand the relevance of the rnli and as far as judgment is concerned, the most importantjudges will come out here and the viewing public who come. —— are the viewing public who come. —— are the viewing public who come here. we come. -- are the viewing public who come here-— come here. we are expecting the ro al come here. we are expecting the royal visitors _ come here. we are expecting the royal visitors to _ come here. we are expecting the royal visitors to arrive. _ come here. we are expecting the royal visitors to arrive. we - come here. we are expecting the royal visitors to arrive. we aren't| royal visitors to arrive. we aren't sure who they will be but hopes are high that the queen will be coming because it's one of her favourite events to attend. charlotte, lovely to hear from you events to attend. charlotte, lovely to hearfrom you again. i want to bring you some news just into us
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about monkeypox that the number of confirmed cases in england has risen to 56. it was 20. it's risen to 56. that's according to the uk health agency. this being one confirmed case in scotland and you may also remember that experts are suggesting anyone who comes into contact with anyone who comes into contact with anyone who comes into contact with anyone who has monkeypox should self—isolate a home for 21 days. just to repeat, the number of confirmed cases has risen to 56. now, almost 10,000 people in wales have been offered coronavirus boosterjab despite not being eligible for one. the mistake was made after the criterion was broadened leading to some people to be accidentally included in the new group. the correct offers will be honoured. the welsh government has
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confirmed. harry styles will be the latest in a line of stars bringing bedtime stories to children. he will bedtime stories to children. he will be reading for cbeebies following the footsteps of the duchess of cambridge and dolly parton. he will be reading the story in pyjamas. let's catch up with all the weather news now and we have susan here. i have to ask you, i'm lucky enough to be going to chelsea flower show tomorrow, what's it looking like? it looks better than today. there's been some cloud and rain towards the east. , , ., , , east. this is cambridgeshire tomorrow _ east. this is cambridgeshire tomorrow. things _ east. this is cambridgeshire tomorrow. things are - east. this is cambridgeshire tomorrow. things are trying | east. this is cambridgeshire i tomorrow. things are trying to brighten here but tomorrow, we shouldn't have that big lump of wet weather but they will be some showers around so take your umbrella with you. that brightness could lead you into a false sense of security because we've got more showers coming on from the west and throughout this week, actually, i
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think it's a brolly in the bag job because the pressure is really going to be setting the time. there's a gap in the cloud going across cambridgeshire but this cloud here, further west, cambridgeshire but this cloud here, furtherwest, is cambridgeshire but this cloud here, further west, is another big old lump of showers which are quite punchy affairs, pushing their way across england. elsewhere, it does become dry in the coming hours. clearing skies across northern england, northern ireland and scotland. quite cool in some of the rural spots. scotland. quite cool in some of the ruralspots. single figures scotland. quite cool in some of the rural spots. single figures and further south lows of 10—11 c. the weekend, clouds around first thing but heavier initial showers but here again is where the trick comes in where you get that lovely sunshine, heading out the house without your coat and brolly and showers will develop the afternoon. look out for some sharper showers through the
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latter part of the day. the north—westerly breeze quite cool. temperatures not quite as warm as they were and that breeze will have a fresh appeal to it. tuesday and wednesday, blink and you'll miss it. original high pressure but not for long, wednesday, low—pressure rolling in with a windy day on wednesday, quite a few showers pushing into western spaces of the uk. they'll drift eastward although quite a few persistent and northern scotland. the wind biggest story for wednesday, gushing. the wind will really make it feel on the fresher side. at the end of the week, it doesn't like things will shift to a quieterfooting. thursday, with got an area of low pressure running through to the north so there will be some further rain but by friday high pressure starts to build up from the south and i think we will see some dryer and hopefully
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slightly warmer conditions to come by the time we get to the weekend. so, in some spots, temperatures getting up to the figures we saw on the weekend.
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this is bbc news. iam ben i am ben brown. our latest headlines... new photos have emerged showing borisjohnson raising a glass at an event in downing street in november 2020, during the second coronavirus lockdown. nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe tells the bbc she was forced by iran to sign a false confession before being allowed to leave, while a uk official stood by. all the false confessions that we have been exposed to, they have no value. they arejust propaganda for the iranian regime to show how scary they are. thousands more youngsters will end up in care unless there's a "radical reset" of the system — that's the warning from a landmark review of child protection in england. a 21—year—old russian
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soldier is jailed for life. it's after he admitted killing an unarmed civilian in ukraine

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