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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 20, 2022 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm luxmy gopal and these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. a major setback for emmanuel macron after he loses his majority in parliamentary elections less than two months after winning his second term as france's president. ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky warns that russia is likely to intensify its attacks this week. train passengers in many parts of the uk prepare for the biggest railway strikes in 30 years — starting tomorrow. if there is a train, there is a train. if not, i will have to find some other way of getting to work. i support the rail strike because no one is listening to them, the transport minister has not been listening to them for decades. it is a huge inconvenience to people's lives.
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and in here at london's euston station, where people have already begun changing their plans because of this week's strikes. how will the week's industrial action in the uk affect you? are you a key worker struggling to find a way into work? perhaps you're a student taking exams and worried about gettng to school? we want to hear from you. you can get in touch with me on twitter, i'm at luxmy—g or you can use the hashtag bbc your questions. easyjet announces plans to cut more flights over the busy summer period in the uk just weeks after passengers were stranded following cancellations due to staff shortages. the uk's energy regulator ofgem announces new measures to protect customers if companies go bust. up close and personal — we have a special report from uganda on how a conservation effort to increase numbers of mountain gorillas has been a success.
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one of our closest relatives on earth. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. president macron of france has suffered a major political setback after his party failed to win a majority, in the country's parliamentary elections. his party, ensemble, is still the biggest in the national assembly, but it lost around 100 seats in yesterday's elections, which saw big gains by marine le pen's far—right party and a new left—wing alliance. the centrist ensemble coalition is now expected to win 216 seats, well short of the 289 needed to control the national assembly. the left—wing alliance headed by jean—luc melenchon is second on 131.
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marine le pen's far right national rally has 89 seats, with the mainstream right—wing les republicans, headed by christianjackob, back on 64. our paris correspondent lucy williamson reports. emmanuel macron�*s presidency just got tougher. his centrist coalition has lost a third of its seats. just look at the mood. translation: the situation is unprecedented. _ the national assembly has never seen a configuration of this type in the fifth republic. this situation constitutes a risk for our country, in view of the challenges that we have to face. this is now president macron�*s main opposition, a new alliance of green and left—wing parties dominated by far left mps, the initial estimates confirming their new status as the first opposition
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party of france. translation: it's the total defeat of the president's party, _ and there is no majority. we have achieved the political objective we gave ourselves, to bring down the man who with such arrogance twisted the arm of the whole country to get elected. but this was the big surprise of the night — marine le pen's far right national rally party jumped from a handful of seats to almost 90. plenty of opposition to the president from all sides. translation: we are going - to continue to bring french people together as part of the great popular movement unifying all patriots, from the right and the left. the parliamentary opposition to macron�*s centrist coalition is now much stronger than before, but it's also more fractured, with one block led by jean—luc melenchon on the far left of the chamber, and another by marine le pen on the far right. french politics is realigning around these three political groups.
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some voters say it's no bad thing if president macron is forced to negotiate with his opponents. others believe denying the government a majority only leads to stagnation. president macron is facing a new area of political opposition that some see as good for democracy and others as bad for france. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. joining me now to discuss this is noemie bisserbe, reporter at the wall street journal based in paris. thank you forjoining us. how can a president who was re—elected only a few months ago lose his majority? why did those voters though? where did they turn to? or is it that they just didn't turn out to vote this time? i just didn't turn out to vote this time? ~ , , just didn't turn out to vote this time? ~' , , , , , time? i think the biggest surprise for the selection _ time? i think the biggest surprise for the selection is _ time? i think the biggest surprise for the selection is the _ time? i think the biggest surprise i for the selection is the performance of the far right. i think that what
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happened is that in the presidential run—off, left—leaning voters went out to support emmanuel backfrom, to block the far right, to block marine le pen, but it seems that in this election, in districts where the far right faced a candidate front macron�*s party, left—leaning voters did not go and vote, and that allowed marine le pen's candidates to winds in far more districts than expected. to winds in far more districts than exected. �* , ., i. ~ expected. and why do you think it was so unexpected, _ expected. and why do you think it was so unexpected, this - expected. and why do you think it was so unexpected, this result. expected. and why do you think it was so unexpected, this result by| was so unexpected, this result by marine le pen, by the far right? is it simply that a couple of months ago, you know, she was almost britain off? is it something that we should have expected? i britain off? is it something that we should have expected?— should have expected? i think that the war in ukraine, _ should have expected? i think that the war in ukraine, and _ should have expected? i think that the war in ukraine, and its - the war in ukraine, and its consequences on the price of food and fuel have had an huge impact in france and french people are very worried about inflation right now.
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and those concerns, macron has not really been able to address them. so, if you months ago, he still benefited from the fact that he was perceived as the more convincing leader in time of war, despite the fact that prices had already started to rise. but today the biggest concern right now is inflation and he is still perceived as a president who is disconnected from people's lives and from the hardship, the everyday hardship of the middle and working class, and that is played against him. working class, and that is played against him-— working class, and that is played auainst him. �* ., ,, ~ ., against him. and do you think that the far right _ against him. and do you think that the far right has _ against him. and do you think that the far right has become _ against him. and do you think that the far right has become a - against him. and do you think that the far right has become a bit - against him. and do you think that| the far right has become a bit more palatable to french voters? because of course a couple of months ago, a few months ago, they turned out to block the far right from getting in, but that doesn't seem to have happened this time around? yes. but that doesn't seem to have happened this time around? yes, i cuess happened this time around? yes, i auess that happened this time around? yes, i guess that peeple _ happened this time around? yes, i guess that people don't _ happened this time around? yes, i guess that people don't see - happened this time around? yes, i guess that people don't see the i happened this time around? yes, i j guess that people don't see the far right as bad as it —— as they used
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to see it. the far right has worked hard to try to change, to soften its image, and that has worked to some extent, so even if many people may not support the far right, they are not, they don't feel all hail so, that candidates went many districts, —— and what now for emmanuel macron? how do you run a country when it is so politically fragmented and you have lost your majority? it is so politically fragmented and you have lost your majority? have lost your ma'ority? it is going to be ve have lost your majority? it is going to be very difficult _ have lost your majority? it is going to be very difficult but _ have lost your majority? it is going to be very difficult but he - have lost your majority? it is going to be very difficult but he will - to be very difficult but he will have to bargain with a left and the right to push through individual bills, and it is going to be difficult. and especially, he plans to raise the retirement age to 65 and that was really one of the main
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things that he would do during his second mandate, and at this point, ed really, it really seems complicated, it will be complicated for him to make that work.- for him to make that work. thanks very much — for him to make that work. thanks very much for— for him to make that work. thanks very much for your _ for him to make that work. thanks very much for your insight. - ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky warned that russia was likely to intensify its attacks this week, as kyiv awaits a historic decision from the european union on its membership application. it comes after a number of world leaders warned that the war in ukraine could last for years, with the head of nato saying the west must prepare to continue backing the country. earlier, i spoke to our correspondentjoe inwood who gave us the latest from kyiv. president zelensky didn't give details of exactly what escalation might look like. it could be that we are going to see an increase or restarting attacks on the north, on the northern territories, it could be that they intensify things coming from the east. or it could be that this is
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president zelensky trying to intensify pressure on the west to continue the heavy levels of support that they have been offering. so, this is a warning but without specifics from the president. and with the world leaders warning about the fact that this could last for years, i mean, it is almost a kind of dichotomy because on the one hand, you've got russia intensifying its attacks this week, what impact would it cause if that continues for years, potentially? it is interesting, you get from the president, he has two different audiences, he has his domestic audience to whom he always talks of the victory being assured, he was a very positive view across, and to the west, he puts a much more are not necessarily negative but a more cautious approach because he was to increase and continue the levels of support. i think probably the truth is somewhere in the middle, it is really difficult to predict exactly
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what is going to happen. we have seen the russians really pushing into the east, and i think that is where they could be an intensification. what the president has always said, the method she continuously puts across is that they need continued support, and you talked about the west, nato and borisjohnson saying this is going to last a long time. i think that will be music to the ears of president zelensky because what he needs is a guarantee that they will continue their support, continue the flow of weapons, even if we start to see fatigue amongst their populations. we are already seeing the consequences of this war spread to other economies, whether that is the high price of food affecting people in africa or the high price of fuel and other commodities affecting people in the west, and food as well, we should say. and i think there is a danger, there is a concern here that war weariness and fatigue in those populations means there is diminishing support for the high levels of support that the west is giving president zelensky and the
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ukrainians. and i think the fear is if there is a drop—off in support, they would really be struggling on the battlefield. eu foreign ministers are meeting in luxembourg to discuss how to ensure millions of tons of grain trapped in silos in ukraine can reach needy countries. russia is continuing to blockade ukrainian ports, but blames western sanctions on moscow for creating the global food crisis. earlier, the eu foreign policy chief, josep borrell, hit back at russia, accusing president putin of committing a war crime. economic actors have to know that these products from russia are out of the scope of our sanctions, so they can operate, they can buy, they can transport, they can insure. the problem comes from the russian blockade of the ukrainian grain. millions of tonnes of wheat is being blocked and millions of people will not be able to eat this wheat.
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so the war is going to have dramatic consequences for the world. we call to russia to doblockade the ports and let these products go. it's inconceivable. one cannot imagine... one cannot imagine that millions of tonnes of wheat remained blocked in ukraine when in the rest of the world people are suffering hunger. this is a real war crime. train services across england, scotland and wales will run on a severely reduced timetable from this evening, ahead of the biggest walkout on the railways in 30 years. strikes will take place on almost all major lines from tomorrow, with disruption expected all week. commuters in london will also face a strike tomorrow on the london underground. the rmt rail union has warned it will intensify industrial action if a deal over pay isn't reached, and says it will run its campaign for as long as it takes. here's our business reporter esyllt carr.
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it will be a week of huge disruption, and it starts tonight as services begin winding up ahead of the first of three days of industrial action. thousands of workers represented by the rmt union are striking overjob cuts, pay, and changes to working conditions. it will mean around one in five trains running on strike days with many services cut on the days in between, too. awful for people if they need to get to jobs and to work and to places. i support the rail strike because no one is listening to them, the transport minister has not been listening to them for decades. it's a huge inconvenience to people's lives, isn't it? you know, it is having a big impact on people. it's a pain for me because i am travelling down to london on tuesday but i'm going to fly now. i'd rather not, from an ecological point of view but it is what i have to do. i have to wait and see, and if there is a train, there a train, and if there is not, i have to find another way of getting to work. so far, talks between the union and network rail has been unsuccessful. both labour and the rmt have called on the government to step in. i think the campaign will intensify
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if we don't get a settlement. but we are determined and available to get a settlement at any time. but they must loosen the shackles of the employers so they can make a deal. we want to protect our members' jobs, we want to protect their conditions, and we need a pay rise. so, it is a fairly straightforward issue. grant shapps is putting a lot of hyperbole into it but we can settle this if he allows these companies to negotiate. however, the government insists it is for the employer to negotiate with the union, with the transport secretary grant shapps describing the rmt as determined to strike. after receiving government funding to keep services running during the pandemic, rail bosses say any pay rises must come with changes to make the railway more sustainable. we really require detail and acceptance that the reform can go ahead, and then that allows us to work on how we can get a settlement for our staff and make sure that way that we move the industry forward. there is room for compromise. we can work together,
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you know, this is resolvable. talks are continuing today, but the advice for passengers is to only travel if necessary on strike days. esyllt carr, bbc news. our correspondent celestina olulode is at euston station in central london for us. celestino, how are passengers feeling ahead of strike action starting tomorrow?— feeling ahead of strike action starting tomorrow? well, there is a real mix of — starting tomorrow? well, there is a real mix of opinions _ starting tomorrow? well, there is a real mix of opinions here. - starting tomorrow? well, there is a real mix of opinions here. just - starting tomorrow? well, there is a real mix of opinions here. just a - real mix of opinions here. just a few moments ago, i spoke to a man who said to me that, look, the rail workers deserve the pay rise, but so too do nhs workers. i also spoke to another woman who is on her way to glasgow, she is leaving today, instead of later on this week. she was really angry, she said to me that, look, at the end of the day, we really need to ensure that services are available. she has had to hack cancel all her work meetings this week as a result of this industrial action. this week as a result of this industrialaction. now, how this week as a result of this industrial action. now, how does it affect people across britain?
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tomorrow, thursday, and saturday, 20% of rail services will be available from 7:30am until 6:30pm in the evening. in terms of the overall picture across britain, there is connectivity to major cities, but in rural areas, no connectivity. now, in places as well in the south like penzance and bournemouth, there won't be any rail services. in the north, if you are in chester, blackpool, you will also be affected. over in wales, it is the south of the country that will have trains running but nowhere else. and then from here if you want to get to glasgow, if you want to get to edinburgh, there will be services, but areas like inverness and aberdeen, you can't get trains. now, we have been checking the services all throughout the morning. so far, no delays, but as you had a bit low earlier on, it is later on this afternoon that we will see that
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timetable, that reduced timetable beginning to come into effect. so, the overall message, as you heard earlier on from the rail service providers, is don't travel unless you have too. and i should say as well that this isn't a week that will just see well that this isn't a week that willjust see morning commuters affected, this week, we know that it is the glorious long—awaited glastonbury festival, there is an elton john rolling glastonbury festival, there is an eltonjohn rolling stones concert, people trying to get to nhs appointments, school children taking exams this week, so a lot of people affected by this disruption.- affected by this disruption. thank ou. i'm joined by nicola bunting who is trying to get from bath in the southwest of england to her son's graduation in st andrew's in eastern scotland during the disruption this week. i'v e i've been reading about the process
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so far, took us through what you have had to do. my so far, took us through what you have had to do.— so far, took us through what you have had to do. g ,., .,, ., ., have had to do. my son was meant to uraduate have had to do. my son was meant to graduate from _ have had to do. my son was meant to graduate from st _ have had to do. my son was meant to graduate from st andrews _ have had to do. my son was meant to graduate from st andrews in - have had to do. my son was meant to graduate from st andrews in 2020 i have had to do. my son was meant to| graduate from st andrews in 2020 and he missed his whole last term because of covid and the graduation was obviously cancelled. it was rescheduled for 2021, it was cancelled again. and so this year is the third time lucky. so, i wanted to make it a really special occasion so i booked us on the sleeper train from london to st andrews, and of course that was cancelled. but it wasn't clear straightaway that it wasn't clear straightaway that it was going to be cancelled because it was going to be cancelled because it was actually living on the wednesday so i thought maybe we would be lucky. we were on tenterhooks for a few days, checking the website. finally, it was cancelled. so i thought, ok, help, because this is a big deal, this is not the kind of thing that you can miss. i thought, will fly to edinburgh. that meant me going to london today, in fact, because my son is in london, and we are flying easyjet. so we booked
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easyjet from london on wednesday, and then easyjet, after that, they cancelled my return flight. so, then i had to rebook with easyjet and then try to get to gatwick airport from london has turned out to be quite complicated, we couldn't get an over, we couldn't get a mini cab, we have had to really scramble. and getting from edinburgh to st andrews, this shuttle was all booked up. so, it has been intensely stressful at what should be a really special time for both of us. i special time for both of us. i imagine it has also been a lot of expense as well, nicola? it imagine it has also been a lot of expense as well, nicola?- imagine it has also been a lot of expense as well, nicola? it has been i would expense as well, nicola? it has been i would only — expense as well, nicola? it has been i would only expensive _ expense as well, nicola? it has been i would only expensive because - expense as well, nicola? it has been i would only expensive because it - expense as well, nicola? it has been i would only expensive because it is. i would only expensive because it is two extra nights in london that i wasn't expecting, an extra night in scotland because we were going to get the overnight sleeper, flights, private taxis to gatwick, to st andrews, you know, and it is the kind of event that you are going to do what you have to do to make it happen and to make it work, but, you
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know, i think it is a very stressful situation for ourfamily know, i think it is a very stressful situation for our family but also i am sure many other families are situation for our family but also i am sure many otherfamilies are in the same situation, in terms of graduation this year and, you know, people also who had their graduation cancelled two years ago and last year. cancelled two years ago and last ear. . ., . cancelled two years ago and last ear, . ., ., ., ., cancelled two years ago and last ear. _, ., ., ., ., cancelled two years ago and last ear. ., ., ., ., ., cancelled two years ago and last ear. . . ., . ., year. nicola, i have to ask, do you have any symmetry _ year. nicola, i have to ask, do you have any symmetry for _ year. nicola, i have to ask, do you have any symmetry for the - year. nicola, i have to ask, do you have any symmetry for the rail - have any symmetry for the rail workers taken this action —— sympathy for the rail workers taken this action to protect theirjobs and for their web page? it is this action to protect their 'obs and for their web page? it is super selfish of them. _ and for their web page? it is super selfish of them. people _ and for their web page? it is super selfish of them. people need - and for their web page? it is super selfish of them. people need the l selfish of them. people need the rail to go about their essential business. i had seen on the news this morning that there are cancer patients that are going to miss their chemotherapy with horrible effects on their life expectancy and the quality—of—life. essential workers are played much less than rail workers, workers are played much less than railworkers, nhs workers are played much less than rail workers, nhs staff, workers are played much less than railworkers, nhs staff, care workers, nurses, doctors, and it seems they are holding the country to ransom, really. and they were
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supported during covid, so they have had some support already, and i think it is unconscionable, really. well, nicola, thank you, to make it clear, it is not the rail drivers who are striking, it is mainly the other railway staff. briefly, nicola, obviously, all of us watching are rooting for you to get there, how are you feeling about your prospects of getting there for your prospects of getting there for your son's graduation?— your son's graduation? fingers crossed, your son's graduation? fingers crossed. it _ your son's graduation? fingers crossed, it is _ your son's graduation? fingers crossed, it is planes, - your son's graduation? fingers crossed, it is planes, trains, i crossed, it is planes, trains, automobiles. i am leaving for london shortly and i really, really hope that we get to get there, he gets to graduate, and that we had that moment, that he has that moment. good luck, nicola, best of luck, and fingers crossed for you.— fingers crossed for you. thank you. thank you- — easyjet say they'll make further cuts to flights this summer. the airline claims it's to help manage problems like staff shortages at airports.
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it insists customers will be given advance notice of flight cancellations. gatwick and amsterdam are among the airports worst affected. earlier, i spoke to our correspondent matt graveling who gave us the latest on what passengers could expect. there is no good news, if you are getting away at the moment, whether you are on the rails or you're in the air, and of course this recent news from easyjet. it follows a number of cuts that not just easyjet but airlines have had to make cuts over the summer because of a lack of staff, following covid, lots of staff lost theirjobs and now passenger numbers have increased, people want to go back away on holiday and now restrictions have eased, they haven't got the staff in order to do that. now, easyjet specifically have been hit quite hard. last month, they had to apologise to customers for about 200 flights having to be cancelled because of it issues but this announcement today, again focusing more around the lack of staff that they have, and they have had to cut more staff, sorry, more flights over the summer months that are coming. we can tell you that easyjet had previously planned to run about 97% of pre—pandemic capacity overjuly, august and september.
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that has now been cut to 90%, so less planes going into the air. the company have called these measures proactive consolidation, in order to build additional resilience in the face of operational issues. this has been made slightly harder for easyjet because a couple of airports have basically said things are getting so bad that we will have to cap the number of flights that are leaving this airport throughout the summer — this includes gatwick and amsterdam. gatwick would normally have 900 flights each day injuly and august, they have now got that down to 825 injuly and 850 in august, so easyjet aren't able to get as many flights out of the airport so they say that is one reason for cutting them. however, they are also cutting them at other airports around their network. iwill tell you briefly, luxmy, that gatwick have told us that they are recruiting 400 new staff to try and get passengers onto their flights, through security quicker, so this is an issue
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that is being dealt with. by let's leave the final word with easyjet because that is what today's story is about. i have a note from their chief executive who basically said about these recent cuts — the ongoing challenging operating environment has unfortunately continued to have an impact which has resulted in these cancellations. coupled with airport caps, which we spoke about, we are taking pre—emptive actions to increase resilience, and giving advance notice to customers, and we expect the vast majority of these customers to be rebooked on alternative flights within 2a hours. and they say, we believe this is the right action for us to take. the uk's energy regulator, ofgem, has announced plans to better protect customers who pay their bills through direct debit, tightening the rules on suppliers in order to stop excess payments. earlier, i spoke to our personal finance correspondent kevin peachey for more on the new measures. it has been a source of frustration
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for many years for customers that they pay by direct debit, the same amount every month, generally, and if they don't use as much energy as they paid for, then what is called a credit balance builds up, and many customers say this is basicallyjust a free loan to their supplier because they hold onto it month after month after month. and even ofgem are saying today that some companies used it as an interest—free credit card. what the proposals from the regulator suggest is that there is going to be some changes that will mean those credit balances don't become too excessive, they don't build up quite so much. and what's important here is if a company goes bust, and of course we have seen in the uk, 30 companies, around 30 companies collapse in the last year or so, well, what happens is their customers are automatically transferred to a new supplier, and their credit balances,
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which remember, can be quite high, can be hundreds of pounds, also go as well, so they are protected, they are honoured. but it is everybody else who picks up the tab, it is not the failed company, at the moment, it is every bill payer because that tab is picked up by all bill payers across the board, everybody sees their bill go up by a little bit more. and so ofgem say that these companies need to be better capitalised, they need to have more money behind them, if you like, in order to make sure that it is not everybody that picks up the bill for these credit balances when they go bust. colombians have elected the country's first ever left—wing president, the former rebel fighter gustavo petro. mr petro said his victory marked the beginning of a new phase in their history, turning away from sectarianism and intolerance. our south america correspondent katy watson reports from the capital bogota. the atmosphere here in
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gustavo petro's h0 is electric. people here almost didn't believe it. it was a nailbiter until the very end. now this is a historic vote in so many ways, and that's often used as a real cliche, but it's really true. he is the first leftist president that colombia has ever had. francia marquez will be the first—ever black vice president colombia has ever had, and its testament to the changes that colombians wanted. rodolfo hernandez, his rival, the colombian trump as he was known, he has conceded defeat. but gustavo petro will have a job in his hand trying to win over the conservative elite that have for so long run this country. but i think what this vote shows is the ability for a country like colombia has suffered decades of civil conflict, that colombia can actually turn the page on its past and vote for a new future. here, the family of a 12—year—old
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boy who has brain damage will find we've got breaking news to bring you now. and barristers in the uk have voted to take industrial action darting a week today in protest to pay and conditions. —— starting today. they are refusing to accept returns, substitution of a new barrister when another one of them is unable to make a trial date, but now this is industrial action starting a week today. the criminal bar association said its members voted for the highest form of escalation. that is breaking news coming in in the past minute or so, that barristers in the uk are voting to take industrial action —— have voted to start taking industrial action, starting a week today. here, the family of a 12—year—old boy who has brain damage will find
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out today if they can appeal against a ruling that his life support treatment should stop. archie battersbee was found unconscious at his home in essex in april. his parents want his treatment to continue but doctors at the royal london hospital say he's medically dead. zoe conway has more. he's just so beautiful. he's so angelic. it's no different from at home. he just looks peaceful. he's asleep. for nine weeks, hollie dance has been keeping watch over her son. every night, she sleeps in archie's hospital room. every day she talks to him and she says... you really need to wake up now because we've got the biggest battle of our lives and it would be really great if you actually helped me — you know, wake up and do something. it was in early april that hollie found archie unconscious at home. she believes he was taking part in an online challenge that went terribly wrong. last week, a judge concluded archie is brain—stem dead, and his life support should not continue. but archie's parents want him
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to be given more time. hollie says she felt him squeeze her hand. he's in there. physically, for whatever reason — whether it's locked—in syndrome, whether he's he's paralysed, you know, and there's an injury that's not been sort of looked into — i don't know, but i feel he's in there. archie used to tell his mum that he wanted to be a world champion. he loved gymnastics and mixed martial arts fighting. archie. my name isjoe egan. each day, get well messages are played to him. from croydon's boxing club, we'd like to wish archie - a speedy recovery. hi, archie. the former wvu champion of the world here. but, man, listen, we're allthinking of you and praying for you. hope you get well soon. hi, archie, it's max whitlock here. one message is from olympic gold medallist max whitlock, who trains at the same gym as archie. you've got everybody| behind you right now, everybody supporting you.
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come on, archie! and what was your relationship with him like? amazing. he's literally like my little sidekick. i can't even go to tesco's without archie being with me and i'll be walking around... coming down the other aisle is archie with his own trolley, doing his own shopping, you know? and i'm like, "oh, arch, you're costing me a fortune!" he's like, "yeah, but i need to eat healthy and i'll give you it back when dad gives me my pocket money on thursday." later today hollie, and archie's father paul battersby, will return to court to seek permission to appeal against the judge's decision that treatment can be withdrawn. do you ever worry that you are prolonging the agony for yourself? no, i don't. i would be more worried if i gave up and spent the rest of my life thinking, "what if ijust held on that little bit longer?" i think that nobody — and i mean nobody — has archie's best interest at heart like a mother.
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throughout our interview, hollie did not break down or cry. she was remarkably composed. inside, i'm not. inside, i'm broken. but i've had to go in fight—and—flight. i've got no choice. i haven't got time to think about my feelings, my emotions at the minute because this is a fight for archie's life. i can deal and address my emotions after this battle. at the minute, i can't let my guard down for a split second. he's a 12—year—old boy — give him a chance! it's a brain injury. nine weeks is nothing. zoe conway, bbc news. more now on the rail strikes in england, scotland and wales, which are due to take place on almost all major lines tomorrow, and on thursday and saturday, with disruption expected all week. barry tweeted to say i had to bring
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forward a week's holiday to september because i rely on the trains to get to work. thank you for that message, barry. if you have any comments or share your thoughts on how you are affected by this, get in touch with us. earlier, our business correspondent, nina warhurst, was at liverpool lime street station and explained how the industrial action has got to this point. i was just grabbing a coffee and chatting to somebody in the queue. she's come over from canada for a week, her plan was to take the train around the uk and that won't be happening now. that's just one example of plans being heavily disrupted in the week ahead. how did we get here? well, the main rail union and rail providers haven't been able to come to a deal over pay and conditions and so from tomorrow, 40,000 workers will walk out. let's have a look at how it's set to affect you. so it will be from tomorrow and then more strikes on thursday and on saturday. 20% of services will be running
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and they'll only be running between 7:30am and 6:30pm. understandably, then the advice is on those days, please don't travel unless you absolutely have to. have a look here then, this is what the overall picture is like where the services are running. you'll see there's connectivity between the main cities, but head out to more rural areas and it will be impossible to hop on a train. so in england, in places like penzance and bournemouth in the south, you won't be able to take a train at all. up in the north west that includes places like blackpool and chester. north of the border then in scotland you'll see those lines are running from london up to the big cities of glasgow and edinburgh, but north of the central belt, aberdeen, inverness, the criticism there is that they're being completely cut off. and in wales it's only the south around cardiff where there'll be any services, one from cardiff to treherbert, merthyr tydfil and aberdare, and also that one to the severn tunnel. but that is it for wales. and it's notjust the strike days
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that will be affected. the wraparound days, monday, wednesday, friday, only expect 60% of services to run then so do check out whether your services are going ahead if you're travelling on those days and expect extra passengers. if you've already bought a ticket, then what are your rights? well, if your service is cancelled, you are entitled to a refund. although you will be able to travel on other services with other service providers if they are available. but that might not be happening for all ticket types wo worth getting in touch with your train provider if you've bought an advanced ticket. have to repeat, though, the advice this week is do not travel unless you absolutely have to. and it's notjust morning commuters that are affected, it's schoolchildren trying to get to exams, it's people trying to get to nhs appointments. there's a big eltonjohn, rolling stones gig in london this weekend. there's also glastonbury festival coming up, the england test match as well. so all of these, all of these events will be affected. lots more people getting in their cars so expect bottlenecks in the roads around those events. now, one of the areas
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in england that's been heavily affected is devon, there are no services there running to cornwall at all. john mcguire has been to the seaside town of torquay to see how people there are planning to cope. the grand hotel has graced the torquay seafront for 150 years. it has 130 rooms, sea views, swimming pools and pretty much its own railway station. platform 1 for the... normally an asset, but not this week. we're just hiring people that can do the job. as we're hiring chefs and food and beverage operators. here we go. over a devon cream tea, and we went for cream first, by the way, the hotel's owner, keith richardson, tells me it's an issue for guests and for some staff. i would think it's quite significant, with two aspects in mind, we have customers coming from up north and london to our hotel by train.
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and as you know, the train station is a stone's throw away from my front door. and the other innovation this last few months is that we have been training in staff from as far away as plymouth to make up for the lack of staff in torbay. it's an hour's drive to plymouth, so plainly for staff to come from there by train, they've got to get to the train station at the other end as well as the train journey. for those who let the train take the strain, plans will need to change, meaning hassle, stress and expense. and what if you commute to school and have a—levels this week? the rail strikes won't let me get to my exams, i'll have to get a hotel and i'll have to spend quite a lot of my summer budget on getting a hotel so that i can sit my exams. if i went to a friend's house, that would be the only other option. and i didn't want to do that because me and my parents decided that i wouldn't be able to... ..i wouldn't have a good night's sleep before my exams,
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and that's not a good thing. so which one should we go for? well, the biggest one. right. so i would go for... oh, it's huge. yeah. and even the best laid plans are being thwarted. kay darton's due for a hip replacement and wanted to see family before her operation. she booked a train journey from south devon to coventry, including help at each station but will now miss the trip and fears she'll lose the money she's spent. just a day that i'd chosen to go out and see my son and his family in coventry. and so i thought, well, with covid and everything and i'm due to have an operation next month i thought i'd go first for a treat and then i heard they're going on strike. and i thought, "oh no!" just today. and then i applied for a refund, non—refundable, and it's nearly £300, so i thought, "hmm, it's not my day." yes, so it's a big disappointment,
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£300 is quite a lot to lose. the rmt union says it's taking the action to protect pay conditions and jobs. whether for business or pleasure to work or to see friends and family, before the pandemic, rail travel was breaking new records as people chose the train. but in the week ahead, that choice will be severely limited. john maguire, bbc news, devon. well, the good news for kay and others like her is they will be entitled to a refund if their service is cancelled. but it's obviously a very anxious time for her and for many others. and frankly, at the moment, who's in a position to wait for that 300 quid to come back? well, there is frustration from some commuters who say, look, everybody�*s facing inflation of 9%, teachers, nurses, social workers, they're not getting pay rises above 3% at the moment. but others are saying, look, if the rails don't take a stand, if somebody doesn't take a stand,
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how long will public sector pay continue to be squeezed against the rate of inflation? the government at the moment is seeking to distance itself from this dispute, saying really it's between the main rail union and between railway employees. but the truth is they do have leverage when it comes to pay on the rail networks, they proved that over the pandemic. the big question is, though, can they give way on this strike when it looks like other public sector strikes are planned in the weeks and months ahead? but then looking to the disruption in the coming days, can they afford not to? iam i am sorry to bring you more travel updates, but we have had some breaking news from heathrow airport asking airlines to cancel. the breaking news is heathrow airport has said airlines have been asked to take 10% of their flights out of their schedules at terminals two and
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three after problems with baggage at the airport. the heathrow spokesperson could not confirm how many flights had been affected and said that some might have two consolidated flights. a private members bill calling for the introduction of statutory time off for those undergoing fertility treatment will be presented in the british parliament today. conservative mp nickie aiken decided to take—up the issue after being contacted by a constituent who says she was "forced out" of herjob while having ivf treatment. our reporter shelley phelps has more. you are pumped full of so many awful hormones. it's a huge, huge roller coaster. and each day was really difficult. so i'd end up taking presentations to the clinic to try and get the work done. you're injecting yourself more than once a day. sometimes you're having more than one blood test a day. and it was extremely difficult, coupled with the need to hide what was going on from your employer as though it was something to be ashamed of. anne, not her real name,
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says she was forced out of herjob in the city after a dispute with her employer over the time she needed to take off work for ivf treatment. she left the company and signed a non—disclosure agreement. i was asked the question, how much did i want a career and how much did i want a family? and that question was surprisingly easy to answer, but it was a question no woman should ever be asked. around 50,000 women have ivf each year, with many having multiple cycles. the success rate per embryo transfer varies from 32% for women under 35 to under 5% for women over 43. that's according to the uk's fertility regulator. currently, there's no statutory right to time off work for fertility treatment.
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so, there isn't any legal right to taking time off, whether paid or unpaid. for any fertility treatments in the workplace until there has been successful implementation of fertilised ova, for example, when we're looking at in—vitro fertilisation, ivf, which is one of the most common fertility treatments. a conservative mp is calling for more legal protection. the crux of my bill is to be able to give women the power and the confidence that if they are going to go through ivf treatment, that they will be supported by their employer and by society as a whole. here in london's harley street, there's several fertility clinics. the local mp says that queues of women form here early in the mornings as they try to get appointments without having to take time off from work. business community representatives, the british chambers of commerce, say many employers operate broad and flexible working practices to help people balance work and family commitments.
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anne gave birth to a daughter and says she's speaking out in the hope of making things better for her future. shelley phelps, bbc news. leaders from around the commonwealth are in rwanda this week for discussions about the future of their countries. it comes as a number of caribbean countries consider becoming a republic. it happened in barbados last year, and jamaica could be next. adina campbell has more. jamaica's north coast, a picture postcard of expansive shorelines and mountainous views. but beyond the dreamy landscape, there's the more serious business of politics and the country's future. ocho rios captures the beauty of this caribbean island and is a tourism hotspot. when it comes to the question ofjamaica becoming a republic, people here are split and are quick to tell us how they truly feel. remove the queen. it's not going to be better.
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when the queen was there, when i was young, jamaica was better. yeah? so i don't see no way to remove the queen. none at all. we need to move on now. it's 60 years of independence, so we need to move on. no, i don't want one. it really doesn't - make any difference. it does not. because what is the queen has done? the queen has done nothing for us since independence. i so it is here not there whether we j are a republic or because nothing| is going to change. the prime ministers are not doing nothing, the queen not doing nothing. so we don't know who to turn to more than god. the jamaican prime minister is determined to take his country in a new direction, drifting away from the british monarchy could take years. but he told me, now is the time. in our 60th year we have reached the point where we have to give
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very serious consideration to the form of our nation. the role of the royal family in caribbean countries is a divisive, often sore subject. when the duke and duchess of cambridge visited jamaica earlier this year, there were protests and repeated calls for slavery reparations. and some politicians feel there's too much distance between the jamaican people and the royal family. jamaica certainly wants to be a republic. and...it�*s not clear that we still need to be a part of the realm. ordinaryjamaicans can't even get a visa to go to the united kingdom. but we still... in parliament, we pray for the health of the queen, and she is the head of state. butjamaicans can't go and visit their head of state. what also really matters is the country's future on the next generation. keep that coming back here. at an academy in kingston run
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by former international cricket star nikita miller, the royal family doesn't seem relevant any more. not much to say about them. i don't know. i know that jamaica used to be under slave by the queen. - do you care about the british royalfamily? mm... not really. not really, not really. i wouldn't mind seeing what being a republic would bring us as a country. i mean, so i'm sure during that period when that conversation started, it would educate us as to why it is important to be a republic and the benefits and the pros and cons. jamaica celebrates 60 years of independence later this summer. but with the foundation set for parting away from the queen, even more independence could be on the horizon. adina campbell, bbc news, injamaica.
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monday is world refugee day — an annual event organised by the united nations that draws attention to the plight of refugees all across the globe. but refugees are not always welcome and their arrival can cause tension. in south africa — one group is using martial arts to help. tim allman reports. at this dojo injohannesburg, they are pursuing harmony through the controlled use of violence. this is judo for peace, teaching children that wherever they come from, the merits of discipline and self—control and cooperation. friendship and respect, they are taught on the mat. these are things children learn day by day by participating in activities and working together, they learn to live together as well. find working together, they learn to live together as well.— together as well. and that hasn't alwa s together as well. and that hasn't always been _ together as well. and that hasn't always been too _ together as well. and that hasn't always been too easy. _ together as well. and that hasn't always been too easy. this - together as well. and that hasn't always been too easy. this was l always been too easy. this was johannesburg in 2019. shops, mostly
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owned by nigerians looted and ransacked, part of a wave of xenophobic attacks that shocked the nation. back at the dojo, the judo instructor says the emphasis here is on unity rather than division. translation: for on unity rather than division. translation:— on unity rather than division. translation: ., , , ., translation: for me, everybody that lives here is my — translation: for me, everybody that lives here is my family. _ translation: for me, everybody that lives here is my family. i _ translation: for me, everybody that lives here is my family. i am _ lives here is my family. i am congolese, black and african. we are all african and it is important to help the children because it helps everybody. help the children because it helps eve bod . , , ., help the children because it helps eve bod. , ., everybody. this is a poor and sometimes — everybody. this is a poor and sometimes violent _ everybody. this is a poor and l sometimes violent community. everybody. this is a poor and - sometimes violent community. a everybody. this is a poor and _ sometimes violent community. a tough place to grow up for many of these youngsters. but, with the right throws and holds, there is hope for the future. it's been more than 40 years since sir david attenborough met the mountain gorillas of rwanda — they were, at the time, on the brink of extinction. despite the odds, their numbers have increased, thanks to a huge conservation effort. our climate editor, justin rowlatt, has been to uganda to visit them.
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the morning mist rises from bwindi impenetrable forest in uganda. one of the last two places on earth where mountain gorillas still survive. so we're just hacking our way through the forest because obviously the gorillas go wherever they want. there are no paths up here. have you seen something, luke? oh, there's one down there! there's a gorilla! gentle groaning. there are baby gorillas in the trees and also juvenile gorillas on the ground. it's incredible to be so close to one of our closest relatives on earth. rumbling.
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and that, i think, was a gorilla fart! wow! the population is healthy and growing steadily. it is a dramatic turnaround. when sir david attenborough made his famous visit to a mountain gorilla family back in the 1970s, it was, in his words, tinged with sadness because he feared he might be seeing the last of their kind. poachers preyed on the mountain gorilla population and the civil wars in rwanda and the democratic republic of congo made conservation in those countries very difficult. this park in uganda, the bwindi impenetrable forest, was made a national park in 1991.
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next, says the warden in charge, they needed to get local people onside. the communities are critical in conserving the gorillas because, you know, these communities live next to the park. and so we feel that they should be part of the conservation and they should get benefits from conservation. key among those benefits have been the revenues from this, from tourism. and tourism also supports a thriving economy. tourism really does help wild animals if it's done right. when i first started out, there were only about five lodges. now there's as many as 70. the lodges have created jobs, the ngos have created jobs, so there's lots of employment that has happened. you know, they can sell crafts,
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they can sell accommodation, meals. and so all of that makes a big difference. some of the tourist income and money from gorilla charities helped create alternative income for these men. they used to make their living poaching animals from the park. some were offered jobs as rangers. others were offered land and training to grow crops. now we are called the ambassadors of the park because we are helping a lot the conservation of the park. we monitor and give reports monthly. conservation charities say carefully managed ecotourism can really help protect biodiversity. and protect the gorillas' habitat, and you protect so much else. but tourism alone is not enough. look how abruptly the tree cover ends here in uganda.
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the parks are big, but as the gorilla population grows... we're definitely seeing that gorilla families are more crowded. they're bumping into each other more, which unfortunately is often associated with aggression. we're seeing higher rates of infanticide so infants can oftentimes be killed when these families come together. bigger parks cost more money. the un wants countries to set aside a third of their land and sea area for conservation. the developing world wants $100 billion a year to help fund that. we've been told by scientists, we only have this century. and we only have one planet. there's no planet b. mountain gorillas show we can save species from the brink of extinction. the question now is whether the world is ready to commit the money and resources to make it happen on a much bigger scale.
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justin rowlatt, bbc news, bwindi impenetrable forest. you are watching bbc news. hello again. for many of us today, it's going to be sunny and warm. now we're starting off with some clouds as we head into the afternoon across parts of, for example, the channel islands and also across the northwest scotland where we've got weather fronts. but in between we've got this ridge of high pressure, so things fairly settled. the prone areas for cloud today are across the channel islands, but that should melt through the day also across parts of eastern england house at times that cloud coming in from the north sea and thicker cloud from the weather front, bringing some rain into the outer hebrides later on. here, temperatures 12 to 14 degrees — our top temperature likely to be 21 or 22 degrees. pollen levels, though, today are high or very high, almost across the board, except for across the northwest where we're looking at low or moderate.
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now through this evening and overnight, that band of rain will be heavy for a time across northern scotland but as it sinks southwards and eastwards, it is going to weaken and ahead of it, a lot of clear skies. temperatures tonight similar to last night, but not quite as low across parts of the southern uplands and the highlands were some of us saw temperatures as low as to four degrees. so as we head into tomorrow, then here's our weather front. it tends to fade in situ. we could still see the odd shower from the weather front across the channel islands. but again, we do have this ridge of high pressure still very much upon us. so translated, here's the weather front across southern scotland and into northern england could produce the odd bit of rain across, for example, cumbria, the north york moors. that will be the exception rather than the rule. and we could see the odd shower develop in clearer skies across scotland through the afternoon. but where we've got the lion's share of the sunshine in england and wales is where we'll see the highest temperatures. northern ireland too,
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you've got a lot of dry weather around and we're looking at highs for you of 18 degrees. into wednesday, then we do have still a weather front across the north producing some spots of rain in the northern isles, a bit more cloud around on wednesday, but nonetheless, it should melt away in the latter part of the day, leaving us with a sunny evening and temperatures up to about 28 or 29 degrees in the southeast, 12 to 15 in the northwest. as we head on into thursday, we've got a weather front in the northwest of scotland that's going to produce some rain here, a bit more cloud in northern ireland. so it be cooler for you. but again, we're looking at some sunshine, the south and still warm before it turns unsettled.
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this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling and these are the latest headlines at 11. train passengers prepare for the biggest railway strikes in 30 years, starting tomorrow. if there is a train, there is a train. if not, i will have to find some other way of getting to work. i support the rail strike because no one is listening to them, the transport minister has not been listening to them for decades. it is a huge inconvenience to people's lives. a report into grooming and child sexual exploitation in oldham between 2011 and 2014 has found there were serious failings in the handling of some cases by the council and police. a major setback for emmanuel macron after he loses his majority in parliamentary elections less than two months after winning his second term as france's president. heathrow airport calls on airlines to cancel 10% of their flights today after problems with baggage at
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two of its terminals. it comes after easyjet announced plans to cut more flights over summer. up close and personal — we have a special report from uganda on how a conservation effort to increase numbers of mountain gorillas has been a success. we are close to one of our closest relatives on earth. low rumble. and that was, i think, a gorilla fart. wow. and in sport, england's matt fitzpatrick wins the us open after clinching his first major trophy, sealing a sensational victory in boston.
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good morning and welcome to bbc news. train services across england, scotland and wales will run on a severely reduced timetable from this evening, ahead of the biggest walkout on the railways in 30 years. strikes will take place on almost all major lines from tomorrow, with disruption expected all week. commuters in london will also face a strike tomorrow on the london underground. the rmt rail union has warned it will intensify industrial action if a deal over pay isn't reached, and says it will run its campaign for as long as it takes. here's our business reporter esyllt carr. it will be a week of huge disruption, and it starts tonight as services begin winding up ahead of the first of three days of industrial action. thousands of workers represented by the rmt union are striking overjob cuts, pay, and changes to working conditions. it will mean around one in five trains running on strike days with many services cut on the days in between, too. awful for people if they need to get
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to jobs and to work and to places. i support the rail strike because no one is listening to them, the transport minister has not been listening to them for decades. it's a huge inconvenience to people's lives, isn't it? you know, it is having a big impact on people. it's a pain for me because i am travelling down to london on tuesday but i'm going to fly now. i'd rather not, from an ecological point of view but it is what i have to do. i have to wait and see, and if there is a train, there a train, and if there is not, i have to find another way of getting to work. so far, talks between the union and network rail has been unsuccessful. both labour and the rmt have called on the government to step in. i think the campaign will intensify if we don't get a settlement. but we are determined and available to get a settlement at any time. but they must loosen the shackles of the employers so they can make a deal. we want to protect our members' jobs, we want to protect their conditions, and we need a pay rise. so, it is a fairly straightforward issue. grant shapps is putting a lot of hyperbole into it but we can
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settle this if he allows these companies to negotiate. however, the government insists it is for the employer to negotiate with the union, with the transport secretary grant shapps describing the rmt as determined to strike. after receiving government funding to keep services running during the pandemic, rail bosses say any pay rises must come with changes to make the railway more sustainable. we really require detail and acceptance that the reform can go ahead, and then that allows us to work on how we can get a settlement for our staff and make sure that way that we move the industry forward. there is room for compromise. we can work together. you know, this is resolvable. talks are continuing today, but the advice for passengers is to only travel if necessary on strike days. esyllt carr, bbc news. joining me now is our political correspondent iain watson. so, correspondent iain watson. ian, last—minute talks way, so, ian, last—minute talks are under way, is it thought there is realistically much prospect of
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success? it realistically much prospect of success? ., , �* ,, success? it doesn't sound like it, joanna, certainly _ success? it doesn't sound like it, joanna, certainly not _ success? it doesn't sound like it, joanna, certainly not listening i success? it doesn't sound like it, joanna, certainly not listening to| joanna, certainly not listening to government minister this morning, simon clark on the bbc said of because he hoped very good outcome but equally he was warning us that industrial action is likely and that he wouldn't send out a signal of false hope, and i think, well, one way of highlighting this problem is as a disagreement over who should be talking to whom, never mind the substance of what should potentially be agreed. the rmt rail union said it wanted to talk to the transport secretary grant shapps and rishi sunak and the government say, no, you must only talk to the train operating companies and to network rail, the legal the employers in this dispute, and simon clark made it very clear that even if the government were to talk to the unions directly, he accused them of not acting in good faith. the negotiations are conducted quite properly between the legal employers and the train unions.
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what i would say as well is that it is not as though i think the leadership of the rmt are there to be spoken to in good faith. mick lynch, the general secretary, has said he won't negotiate, quote unquote, with a tory government, so i think that gives you just about the measure of the likelihood of him sitting quote unquote, with a tory government, so i think that gives you just about the measure of the likelihood of him sitting down for a sensible conversation. quite apart from the legalities of this, i think we have to recognise that we do need negotiating partners to work with in good faith. listening to that, we should all be making alternative travel arrangements for tomorrow. interestingly, labour are saying there is time to sort it out, they are urging the government to get around the table with the employers and with the trade unions and the shadow transport secretary louise haigh said whether labour were in government, they would be bringing people together. any strike is a representation of a failure, of the talks breaking down, so we are on the side of both
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the public and these rail workers that want a resolution, that once the industrial dispute brought to an end, that can avoid this disruption and ultimately build a railway network that is fit for the 215t century. i think what is interesting is whether this rail dispute could in fact be the tip of industrial action. certainly the government would appear to think so because later this week, government sources tell me that they will be introducing legislation which would allow employers to bring in agency staff to cover the role of striking workers during disputes. that is something that was banned for almost 40 years, in fact from the conservative government in the early 19705, conservative government in the early 1970s, and they are going to give the employer is the flexible it he did do so, and what is nmi is not so much the strike with the rmt but it is likely the other unions will joining in due course, and potentially with the increased cost of living increases, more demands
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for more pay right across—the—board, we know the biggest teachers union in england is considering industrial action and unison is considering industrial action so i think from the point of view of the government, they are trying to put into play something that might mitigate that when it comes. i think also if they assume there may be great amid demands for pay, then perhaps there is less incentive to try to settle this rail strike sooner rather than later. let's talk about some of the wider issues facing the rail industry. sara nelson is head of communications at the independent watchdog for transport users, transport focus. welcome, thank you very much for joining us. what impact do you think this strike will have on rail users? it is going to be massive, widespread disruption, and we know that of course some people, like me, i am lucky enough to work from home sometimes, but people who keep the lights on, they still have to get to
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work, office workers, shop workers, people who are really doing these essential workers —— services still have to travel. we know they will be one in five services running but the important thing will be for people to check if they do have to travel and keep checking to make sure they have been no changes, even while you are out and about. you have been no changes, even while you are out and about.— are out and about. you are right to oint out are out and about. you are right to point out the _ are out and about. you are right to point out the fact _ are out and about. you are right to point out the fact that _ are out and about. you are right to point out the fact that essential. point out the fact that essential workers simply have to go to their place of work to do the vitaljobs in our society. in terms of how much the picture has changed, home culture and how adaptable that makes other commuters, is this going to be different from previous strikes? it different from previous strikes? it could very well be. as an independent watchdog, what we do is we talk to people, thousands of people every week, anyway, looking at their experiences of travel, we will be doing that this week, we will be doing that this week, we will be doing that this week, we will be talking to those who still have to travel and those who have had to cancel their plans or work from home to get a picture of how
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people's decision—making has changed and what level —— lessons can be learnt if there is any future disruption.— learnt if there is any future disruption. learnt if there is any future disrution. . ., , ., learnt if there is any future disrution. ., , ., disruption. what is the sort of make u . disruption. what is the sort of make u- of rail disruption. what is the sort of make up of rail users _ disruption. what is the sort of make up of rail users now? _ disruption. what is the sort of make up of rail users now? because - up of rail users now? because obviously things shifted dramatically after the pandemic. we know dramatically after the pandemic. - know that the pattern of how people travel has changed, how we live has changed, how we work has changed. this was an ongoing trend anywhere in the pandemic really sped that up, so there is a widescale —— widescale reform going on anyway aside from this industrial dispute, and we know it's a good opportunity to look at how these happens —— patterns have changed and matched the new services to the new demand. find changed and matched the new services to the new demand.— changed and matched the new services to the new demand. and so where does that take you. — to the new demand. and so where does that take you. in _ to the new demand. and so where does that take you, in terms _ to the new demand. and so where does that take you, in terms of— to the new demand. and so where does that take you, in terms of your - to the new demand. and so where does that take you, in terms of your view - that take you, in terms of your view of modernising and everything else which is all part of the makes of this dispute?— this dispute? there is a huge opportunity _ this dispute? there is a huge opportunity to _ this dispute? there is a huge opportunity to be _ this dispute? there is a huge opportunity to be seized - this dispute? there is a huge opportunity to be seized to l this dispute? there is a huge - opportunity to be seized to match services to how people want to live and work. passengers don't really
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care how things are being worked out in the background and who is talking to who, all they want to know is how theyjourneys impacted, how am i going to get to work today? am i going to get to work today? am i going to get to work today? am i going to make it back to pick up the kids today? and as long as they know there is a service there that they can rely on, they will have confidence in the railway. what would you _ confidence in the railway. what would you say _ confidence in the railway. what would you say to _ confidence in the railway. what would you say to those - confidence in the railway. what would you say to those negotiating ahead of the strike? fiur would you say to those negotiating ahead of the strike?— would you say to those negotiating ahead of the strike? our message is clear, ahead of the strike? our message is clear. please — ahead of the strike? our message is clear. please get — ahead of the strike? our message is clear, please get back _ ahead of the strike? our message is clear, please get back around - ahead of the strike? our message is clear, please get back around the i clear, please get back around the table and please sort this out, on behalf of passengers. and table and please sort this out, on behalf of passengers.— table and please sort this out, on behalf of passengers. and when you sa about behalf of passengers. and when you say about the _ behalf of passengers. and when you say about the importance _ behalf of passengers. and when you say about the importance of - say about the importance of reliability and obviously that is absolutely fundamental for people, if that trust is broken, i mean, when is the sort of point at which trust is broken and what is the potential impact of that? we saw several years _ potential impact of that? we saw several years ago _ potential impact of that? we saw several years ago when _ potential impact of that? we saw several years ago when a - potential impact of that? we saw l several years ago when a timetable change went wrong and lots of services got cancel that short notice, we have seen it with other disruption to service that people do
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lose confidence. however, as soon as they start to travel again and they are enticed back and i have good journeys, it does build back trust. so, get back services running as soon as you can, pick make sure information is god, that is good, make sure you provide information and if you decide not to travel, can you get money back, can you get compensation on your season tickets? the answer to that is people may be able to get refunds, it is not guaranteed. able to get refunds, it is not guaranteed-— able to get refunds, it is not - guaranteed._ thank you guaranteed. that is right. thank you for “oininr guaranteed. that is right. thank you forjoining us- _ guaranteed. that is right. thank you forjoining us. do _ guaranteed. that is right. thank you forjoining us. do let— guaranteed. that is right. thank you forjoining us. do let me _ guaranteed. that is right. thank you forjoining us. do let me know- guaranteed. that is right. thank you forjoining us. do let me know yourl forjoining us. do let me know your thoughts on this. easyjet say they'll make further cuts to flights this summer. the airline claims it's to help manage problems like staff shortages at airports. it insists customers will be given advance notice of flight cancellations. meanwhile, heathrow has asked airlines flying from two of its terminals to cut 10% of flights today, following problems processing baggage.
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let's get more from our correspondent, matt graveling. disruption, some of it longer term, some of it immediate, tell us festival about easyjet?- some of it immediate, tell us festival about easyjet? your last ruess festival about easyjet? your last guess they're — festival about easyjet? your last guess they're talking _ festival about easyjet? your last guess they're talking about - festival about easyjet? your last - guess they're talking about problems on the rails, you are trying to get away this summer, it won't be easy, this isn't anything new, we have been hearing about this for the last few months. really, it is a problem started during the pandemic, so many airports start lost theirjob and now all of a sudden restrictions have eased and everybody understand me what you are back on holiday but they aren't the staff, whether that is on the plains are on the ground to get people through security to make that happen. it has been problematic for all airlines, easyjet had not escaped, it is better to say. last month, easyjet had to apologise to customers for grounding 200 flights because of it problems and today they have come out and said they will have to scale back for the next few months. they
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were hoping to run at a reduced capacity on three pandemic levels, at about 97%, they have now said thatis at about 97%, they have now said that is more likely to be around 90% of they have called this proactive consolidation. i have a note here from their chief executive which reads, the ongoing challenging operating environment has unfortunately continue to have impact which has resulted in cancellations. this is coupled with airport caps, and they say they are taking pre—emptive action to take resilience but they are giving customers notice and they expect the vast majority to be rebooked on alternative flights with at least 24—hour was noticed. they say, we believe this is the right action for us to be taking.— believe this is the right action for us to be taking. when they say there will be advance _ us to be taking. when they say there will be advance notice, _ us to be taking. when they say there will be advance notice, when - us to be taking. when they say there will be advance notice, when should| will be advance notice, when should passengers know? this is covering a window all the way up to september. the idea for easyjet is they are trying, as they say here, proactive consolidation, so they are trying to reduce the number of flights so they
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do have a window, this isn't about cancelling flights last minute, they say they will be notifying the customers on the flights that are cancelled ahead of time when they get to that on their schedule, hopefully with no —— more notice than not because people have hotels booked at the other end and they will be letting people know. they say the vast majority will be booked on alternative flights. and say the vast majority will be booked on alternative flights. and heathrow sa in: on alternative flights. and heathrow saying today — on alternative flights. and heathrow saying today they _ on alternative flights. and heathrow saying today they want _ on alternative flights. and heathrow saying today they want airlines - on alternative flights. and heathrow saying today they want airlines to i saying today they want airlines to cancel 10% of flights today because of the build—up of baggage. with this sort of drive that the government has said, airlines have to cancel in advance, which is what we are told about there with easyjet, it is an reminder that still they can be problems on the day which lead to unforeseen cancellations.— day which lead to unforeseen cancellations. .. , ., cancellations. there can be, and airorts cancellations. there can be, and airports and _ cancellations. there can be, and airports and airlines _ cancellations. there can be, and airports and airlines have - cancellations. there can be, and airports and airlines have been l cancellations. there can be, and i airports and airlines have been hit by a problems with staffing. i mentioned easyjet talked about airport caps there, and basically, airport caps there, and basically, airport caps there, and basically, airport caps is because things like airports like gatwick and amsterdam have said during the peak summer, we cannot do as many flights as we
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normally can do, they would normally have 900 flights a day injuly and august, and they have taken that back to 825 injuly per day and 850 in august. this is one reason why easyjet haven't been able to get as many flights in the air, but to pick up many flights in the air, but to pick up on what you said about heathrow, we heard from them in the last couple of hours and they were telling their airlines yesterday, we need you to reduce your flight capacity by 10% from today because we can't handle the baggage at the moment. i don't know whether that is a staffing issue are a technical issue with conveyor belts but that issue with conveyor belts but that is what they said, 10% felt their airlines from today. the headlines on bbc news... train passengers prepare for the biggest railway strikes in 30 years, starting tomorrow. heathrow airport calls on airlines to cancel 10% of their flights today after problems with baggage at two of its terminals. it comes after easyjet announced plans to cut more flights over summer. a major setback for emmanuel macron after he loses
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his majority in parliamentary elections less than two months after winning his second term as france's president. president macron of france has suffered a major political setback after his party failed to win a majority in the country's parliamentary elections. his party, ensemble, is still the biggest in the national assembly but it lost around 100 seats in yesterday's elections, which saw big gains by marine le pen's far—right party and a new left—wing alliance. our paris correspondent, lucy williamson, has the details. emmanuel macron's presidency just got tougher. his centrist coalition has lost a third of its seats. just look at the mood. translation: the situation is unprecedented. _ the national assembly has never seen a configuration of this type in the fifth republic.
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this situation constitutes a risk for our country, in view of the challenges that we have to face. this is now president macron's main opposition, a new alliance of green and left—wing parties dominated by far left mps, the initial estimates confirming their new status as the first opposition party of france. translation: it's the total defeat of the president's party, _ and there is no majority. we have achieved the political objective we gave ourselves, to bring down the man who with such arrogance twisted the arm of the whole country to get elected. but this was the big surprise of the night — marine le pen's far right national rally party jumped from a handful of seats to almost 90. plenty of opposition to the president from all sides. translation: we are going -
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to continue to bring french people together as part of the great popular movement unifying all patriots, from the right and the left. the parliamentary opposition to macron's centrist coalition is now much stronger than before, but it's also more fractured, with one block led by jean—luc melenchon on the far left of the chamber, and another by marine le pen on the far right. french politics is realigning around these three political groups. some voters say it's no bad thing if president macron is forced to negotiate with his opponents. others believe denying the government a majority only leads to stagnation. president macron is facing a new area of political opposition that some see as good for democracy and others as bad for france. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. emiliano grossman is associate professor of politics from the paris institute
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of political studies, or sciences po, as it's commonly referred to. welcome, thanks for joining welcome, thanks forjoining us. how do you see this? some commentators are saying that france is effectively going to be ungovernable.- effectively going to be ungovernable. effectively going to be uncovernable. ~ , ., ungovernable. well, it is not completely _ unprecedented in 1988, it. so it is not the other thing is it is clearly a set back the relative lack of ambition in the campaign, the relative absence of debate, programme, really, that didn't manage to mobilise voters in what will it mean in terms of this programme? he
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will it mean in terms of this programme?— will it mean in terms of this programme? will it mean in terms of this rouramme? , . . , , programme? he is a centrist. he is presumably — programme? he is a centrist. he is presumably going _ programme? he is a centrist. he is presumably going to _ programme? he is a centrist. he is presumably going to have - programme? he is a centrist. he is presumably going to have to - programme? he is a centrist. he is presumably going to have to align l presumably going to have to align with the republicans to try to get things done? will that mean that his government inevitably has to move further to the right? mei]! government inevitably has to move further to the right?— further to the right? well his government _ further to the right? well his government has _ further to the right? well his government has moved - further to the right? well his government has moved to i further to the right? well his. government has moved to the further to the right? well his i government has moved to the right further to the right? well his - government has moved to the right of the last five years. when you look at voters of his party, at the beginning in 2017, there was a large majority of centre—left voters, most of those left him over the length and he more and more appeals to centre—right voters. those that are still in the conservative party, are those that were most reluctant to coalesce with him, and so there will be some resistance. it is also simply because this is not in their dna of the fifth republic to do this kind of crosscutting coalition, we are not denmark or netherlands, we are not denmark or netherlands, we are more like the uk from that point of view, that will clearly a big obstacle to good governing, knowing
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also that he could possibly call for new elections but not before a year from now, right? so that would be an alternative. right now, the big challenge will be to get everybody on board and to manage to create the right conditions for cooperation which again it is not in the dna of the fifth republic but somehow they will have to invent this new form of more co—operative governing. it will have to invent this new form of more co-operative governing. it does indicate that — more co-operative governing. it does indicate that he _ more co-operative governing. it does indicate that he has _ more co-operative governing. it does indicate that he has not _ more co-operative governing. it does indicate that he has not shifted i indicate that he has not shifted since the presidential elections, only two months ago when he won, but there was that strong showing by marie le pen and jean—luc melenchon around the issues of the cost of living. how much does he now need to consider those lessons and potentially change his agenda going forward? his potentially change his agenda going forward? , ., ., , potentially change his agenda going forward? , ., ., ., , forward? his government has already announced a — forward? his government has already announced a law _ forward? his government has already announced a law on _ forward? his government has already announced a law on purchasing i forward? his government has already l announced a law on purchasing power, we don't know exact what would be in it but it is very clear he will be forced to pay a lot of attention to that. i think on the other hand
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there was also the environment on there was also the environment on the agenda which the pressure is clearly weaker on that, providing that the showing of the left coalition was clearly below their own expectations, i think. the big surprise really is the 90 seats for the far right, and they are much more present on those purchasing power issues so it will clearly be expected to take action fairly soon. and how do you see jute lop expected to take action fairly soon. and how do you seejute lop —— jean—luc melenchon's strategy are bringing together that coalition on the left? so often on the politics, and issue has fragmented politicians, he has kind of done a textbook to bringing together to punch above his weight, effectively. let me stating a bit sceptical about that because in order to create a
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parliamentary group, you need 25 states, right? so, as a matter of fact, most of the components could create separate groups, and i think that this is very likely to happen so lsd, which isjean—luc melenchon's party, they must have something like 75 seats but you have the greens, the socialists, and the communist, and they might be tempted not to show as much unity as they have during the campaign. so, i am not entirely certain that there will be a coherent new group, that is the name of the coalition, showing unity throughout the whole mandate. fragmentation will be very, very that the show and i'm not entirely sure that anybody will be able to structure debates very simply. i think a lot of learning will be going on here to find a new modus operandi that allows for lawmaking
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in a highly divided and highly fragmented assembly. in a highly divided and highly fraamented assembl . . ,, , fragmented assembly. thank you very much for joining us. barristers have voted to take industrial action in england and wales in protest at pay and conditions. the criminal bar association says its membership has voted for the highest form of escalation, starting a week today. our home and legal correspondent dominic casciani is with me. tell us more about the action and then we will get into the issues. like what is going on with the trains and possibly the teachers, this also comes down to pay in pocket. what we are talking about here is the defence barristers. most barristers are defenders as well as prosecutors. many defendants are legally aided, that means they are basically too poor to afford their own representation in court so the government steps in, basically pays through that through the legal aid system. lots of other countries have
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identical systems because it seems it is important to justice. identical systems because it seems it is important tojustice. over identical systems because it seems it is important to justice. over the last decade or so, legal aid rates have been kept basically artificially low, that is what criminal barristers say, and they have got to a point now where they simply cannot make a living. i know criminal barristers who at the early part of their career were earning per how less than the minimum wage. there has been attempted get the government to shift on this and an independent review for ministers told the government it needs to put 15% extra cash in legal aid as a starting point. the government has been accused of criminal barristers of sort of agree to that but then dragging its feet. and they need to stem the flow of barristers out of the profession into other parts of law. the government has refused to put any extra cash in. the barristers took part in a limited form of action last year and they are now going basically for what amounts to strike action, closing
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down the courts on days which will escalate through the summer. is it escalate through the summer. is it obvious there _ escalate through the summer. is it obvious there is _ escalate through the summer. is it obvious there is going to be any way through? they want more money for legal aid but how likely is that? it legal aid but how likely is that? it is very difficult to see a way through theirs. there are no meetings of mind between dominic raab, and the criminal bar association representing two and a half thousand so criminal barristers. the real issue in this is also how the judiciary are going to react and how they will actually, whether they will go back to government and say you need to do something about this because fundamentally this impacts every single court room. come next monday, when most trials will start on the monday, up and down the land, crown courts will have juries arriving to be sworn in to hear a new trial, in practice, those new trials will not be starting because a judge cannot start a trial without having defence barristers in court to represent the people in the dock at the back of
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the courts. those trials will be put back. if those trials are put back, they are at the back of a very long queue, there is an enormous backlog which means the wheels ofjustice will get slower and slower. if you are talking about sexual offences, which had some of the worst delays, some victims of sexual offences are waiting for up to four years from offence to completion of their case, so you can see what is at stake here. i think what lots of criminal barristers are hoping, because they have the sympathy ofjudges, they are hoping the judiciary will start to put pressure on the government and say, you have got to do more here because otherwise we won't have greater delays, we will also have a greater delays, we will also have a greater loss of barristers in the system. we have not had a reaction from the government yet so we're not sure whether this is enough to make move but there. it is difficult to know how many cases will be impacted because it shifts week on week. take
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the old bailey, you might have five or six new trial starting every week at the old bailey, these trials going on for 23 weeks, that doesn't sound like a lot but if you multiply it out across the scores of crown courts across england and wales, you can start to see how the backlogs can start to see how the backlogs can add up. at the moment, we have a backlog of 58,000 cases in the system so it will probably take a few months to come through. the critical thing is you —— the immediate lead to justice. you could have a murder trial where a witness or a victim, the family of a victim have been waiting a long time for justice to happen. or somebody, a defendant who believe they are going to have their day in court to clear themselves, those cases are going to be put back. themselves, those cases are going to be put back-— a report has found children in oldham were failed by the agencies meant to protect them from sexual abuse. the independent inquiry — which examined the way child sexual
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exploitation was tackled between 2011 and 2014 — found procedures were not properly followed. investigators said there were structural flaws in greater manchester police — and the council's systems which were meant to safeguard children. the review found no evidence of a cover—up. speaking at a press conference this morning — the independent reviewers set out the report's findings. we have found that throughout this period, the specialist services tackling child sexual exploitation provided by oldham council and greater manchester police were strategically, ahead of those available in many other local authorities at the time. however, these did not always translate at an operational level into the effective safeguarding of children experiencing sexual exploitation. our own review of a sample of children has exposed significant failings in the protection provided by the statutory authorities to those children. we understand that
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oldham council and greater manchester police have agreed to review the management of these cases to consider whether any further action can now be taken in respect of the men who exploited these children. we've been provided with no evidence to support the allegations circling on social media suggesting that senior managers or councillors sought to cover up either the existence of child sexual exploitation in oldham or the complexity involved in tackling the perpetrators. hello. this is bbc news. i'mjoanna gosling, and these are the headlines. train passengers prepare for the biggest railway strikes in 30 years — starting tomorrow. a report into grooming and child sexual exploitation in oldham between 2011 and 2014 has found there were serious failings in the handling of some cases by the council and police. a major setback for emmanuel macron
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after he loses his majority in parliamentary elections less than two months after winning his second term as france's president. heathrow airport calls on airlines to cancel 10% of their flights today after problems with baggage at two of its terminals. it comes after easyjet announced plans to cut more flights over summer. up close and personal — we have a special report from uganda on how a conservation effort to increase numbers of mountain gorillas has been a success. and in sport — england's matt fitzpatrick wins the us open after clinching his first major trophy, sealing a sensational victory in boston. sport now and a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good morning.
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i imagine matt fitzpatrick will be waking up in massachusetts this morning wondering was it all a dream. the englishman put his name in the history brooks at brookline — with the biggest victory of his career at the us open, nine years after winning the amateur event at the same venue. he described the moment as out of this world. joe lynskey reports oh, so proud of you! on the boston greens, the sound came from sheffield. for matthew fitzpatrick, this was a moment for his family and history for british golf. americans dominate the us open. now he's just the third englishman to win it in 90 years — and so many tried to stop him. fitzpatrick played on the last day with will zalatoris — south yorkshire against san francisco — and between them it was so close. the two were neck—and—neck through the back nine. to stay in touch, fitzpatrick found the spectacular.
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at 27, he hadn't won a major before, but here he was in the sand at the last hole with a shot the greats would be proud of. that's one of the best shots i've ever seen. zalatoris would need this putt to force a play—off. for him, it was heartbreak. but for fitzpatrick, to do it here meant so much — on this same course, he won the us amateur atjust 18. back then, he had to stay with a boston family. this week, the same one have housed his mum and dad. nine years on with two trophies, this place feels like home. it's what you grow up dreaming of. it's something i've worked so hard for, for such a long time. and, you know, there was a big monkey on my back trying to win over here and everyone — all they ever talked about was that and, you know, to do it as a major for my first win, there's nothing better. fitzpatrick wraps his clubs
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in a sheffield united badge. now he's won where so few brits have before. and us open silver is heading to the steel city. joe lynskey, bbc news. england head coach eddiejones has named a 36—player squad for the tour of australia next month. it features 12 players from the weekend's premiership final between leicester tigers and saracens, including a return for billy vunipola. and the remarkable revival of danny care's england career continues. the 35—year—old harlequins scrum—half won the last of his 84 caps in 2018, but featured for england against the barbarians at twickenham yesterday. he's named alongside eight uncapped players for the three—test tour. chelsea chairman bruce buck is to step down from his role after 19 years at the club. with new co—owner todd boehly set to take over. buck, who's 76, has been chairman since roman abramovich became owner in 2003, but will continue to support the club as a "senior adviser".
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during his tenure, the chelsea men's team claimed 18 major honours and the women's team won 12. swimming's world governing body fina has voted to stop transgender athletes from competing in women's elite races. it means transgender atheltes will have to have tranistioned by the age of 12 to be eligible for women's events, following a vote yesterday by fina's members. the lgbt advocacy group �*athlete ally�* called the new policy "discriminatory, harmful, unscientific". we are faced with some very complex challenges. i believe that we will have a solution that will protect the competitive fairness of our competition. but it sends a clear
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message to every single athlete, you are all welcome. and wimbledon qualfying is underway... also, britain's heather watson just getting underway at eastbourne as well. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. the energy regulator — ofgem — has announced plans to better protect customers who pay their bills through direct debit, tightening the rules on suppliers in order to stop excess payments. let's talk to consumer rights expert, martyn james. thanks forjoining us. this is when people are effectively overpaying on direct debit and a big balance builds up and sometimes you are not even aware of it because you are not alerted to it. how will things change? alerted to it. how will things chance? ., �* , alerted to it. how will things chance? . �* , , alerted to it. how will things chance? . �*, , , change? that's right. this is something _ change? that's right. this is something we _ change? that's right. this is something we all— change? that's right. this is something we all kind i change? that's right. this is something we all kind of i change? that's right. this is i something we all kind of been change? that's right. this is - something we all kind of been aware of but not really had addressed until now and the reason why offjam
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making the proposals is that when the extraordinary 28 businesses went under in september last year became apparent there was a big problem with missing credit balances. many people, myself as well assumed that those balances were in effect protected and ring fenced but that money went with the companies and that has reminded ofgem that they need to protect it on this matters because in quite strong wording for the regulator they refer to energy practices as retaining those credit balances is almost acting like an interest free corporate credit card because of course we build up credit balances over the summer when we don't use as much energy and the industry has effectively used that as a bank account. 50 industry has effectively used that as a bank account.— industry has effectively used that as a bank account. so those balances that not as a bank account. so those balances that got built — as a bank account. so those balances that got built up _ as a bank account. so those balances that got built up and _ as a bank account. so those balances that got built up and were _ as a bank account. so those balances that got built up and were lost i as a bank account. so those balances that got built up and were lost in i that got built up and were lost in the system when the companies went down, is there any way for consumers to get those back? the down, is there any way for consumers to get those back?— to get those back? the good news is the regulator — to get those back? the good news is the regulator schemes _ to get those back? the good news is the regulator schemes protect i to get those back? the good news is the regulator schemes protect that l the regulator schemes protect that money so it won't be lost but what
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has actually happened is when a new energy provider takes over, they in effect have to subsidise that lost money and of course that always gets passed back onto us. ofgem estimate about £94 per person along with the additional costs of moving everyone over when things went wrong, so it's clear that the energy industry needs a considerable amount of rebuilding to build confidence in it and as we face an energy crisis it even more apparent that it looking ahead to the future that there is still concern about how people will be able to afford the money if credit balances are clamped down on. icredit balances are clamped down on. credit balances are clamped down on. credit balances were — balances are clamped down on. credit balances were almost _ balances are clamped down on. credit balances were almost luxury - balances are clamped down on. credit balances were almost luxury when energy prices were low and it's hard to see many people building up a credit balance now when direct debits go up to keep pace with the rising cost of energy. i’ee debits go up to keep pace with the rising cost of energy.— rising cost of energy. i've been contacted _ rising cost of energy. i've been contacted by — rising cost of energy. i've been contacted by a _ rising cost of energy. i've been contacted by a number - rising cost of energy. i've been contacted by a number of i rising cost of energy. i've been i contacted by a number of people this morning who are worried that they wanted to use their credit balances
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and we've had proposals of these huge energy bills and we need to be more creative in terms of what is proposed. and to allow consumers to save money through the summer period and tide them over through the winter because there's no getting away from the fact that even with the £400 rebate we will get in october, we are still looking at thousands of pounds to help people save and make it as soon as possible not just after the consultation. explain how you think it would work in an ideal world and how that difference from what will happen. the energy market is unique in that we build up debts over the winter and then in the summer we almost ended with a credit, so it's incredibly hard to know how much money you need to put to one side of your energy bills. and it's clear
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the energy market were too reliant on estimates and need to rely on smart metres and actually doing metre readers. so people know realistically how much they will pay in a year and how much money they need to put to one side and the new proposal state that new direct debits should be controlled so people can't take excessive balances but we need to make sure people have enough money to pay in the winter or simply move the pricing down the road so we need more oversight on how businesses retain this money and maybe even look at ways on how people can earn interest on credit balances like a savings account in the run—up to winter. a private members bill asking for the introduction of statutory time off for those undergoing fertility treatment will be presented in parliament later. conservative mp nickie aiken took up the issue after being contacted by a constituent who says she was "forced out" of herjob while having ivf treatment. our reporter shelley phelps has more. you are pumped full
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of so many awful hormones. it's a huge, huge roller coaster. and each day was really difficult. so i'd end up taking presentations to the clinic to try and get the work done. you're injecting yourself more than once a day. sometimes you're having more than one blood test a day. and it was extremely difficult, coupled with the need to hide what was going on from your employer as though it was something to be ashamed of. anne, not her real name, says she was forced out of herjob in the city after a dispute with her employer over the time she needed to take off work for ivf treatment. she left the company and signed a non—disclosure agreement. i was asked the question, how much did i want a career and how much did i want a family? and that question was surprisingly easy to answer, but it was a question no woman
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should ever be asked. around 50,000 women have ivf each year, with many having multiple cycles. the success rate per embryo transfer varies from 32% for women under 35 to under 5% for women over 43. that's according to the uk's fertility regulator. currently, there's no statutory right to time off work for fertility treatment. so, there isn't any legal right to taking time off, whether paid or unpaid. for any fertility treatments in the workplace until there has been successful implementation of fertilised ova, for example, when we're looking at in—vitro fertilisation, ivf, which is one of the most common fertility treatments. a conservative mp is calling for more legal protection. the crux of my bill is to be able to give women the power and the confidence that
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if they are going to go through ivf treatment, that they will be supported by their employer and by society as a whole. here in london's harley street, there's several fertility clinics. the local mp says that queues of women form here early in the mornings as they try to get appointments without having to take time off from work. business community representatives, the british chambers of commerce, say many employers operate broad and flexible working practices to help people balance work and family commitments. anne gave birth to a daughter and says she's speaking out in the hope of making things better for her future. shelley phelps, bbc news. i'm joined now by the mp bringing this bill to the houses of parliament whom you saw in that report, nickie aiken.
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this bill will hopefully provide that confidence for women that they have the right to take off time and paid to do so rather than taking it as holiday sick leave. some companies are very good with this. when you talk about the women you have come across who keep it quiet like we heard from anna and she had the conversation and ended up losing herjob, but the women you come across, is it a fear that they have thatis
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across, is it a fear that they have that is well—founded or do you think if there was more openness, companies might respond better than people fear? i companies might respond better than --eole fear? .,, ., , , people fear? i hope that this bill starts the conversation. - people fear? i hope that this bill starts the conversation. i've i people fear? i hope that this billj starts the conversation. i've met brilliant companies that do support women and men, and remember that there are partners involved in this and it's important to start that conversation, society and there is a misunderstanding sometimes, and i have this belief that ivf is a lifestyle choice, and it's not. it's a medical treatment and we need to consider it as a medical issue that women have to go through if they want to start a family, and also as a country we have to appreciate that we have a falling birth rate and an increasing issue with infertility so we need to support people who are going through ivf whether at work or in their life in general. and
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going through ivf whether at work or in their life in general.— in their life in general. and it im acts in their life in general. and it impacts on — in their life in general. and it impacts on every _ in their life in general. and it impacts on every aspect i in their life in general. and it impacts on every aspect on i in their life in general. and it i impacts on every aspect on some of his life. financially, physically and also mentally.— his life. financially, physically and also mentally. his life. financially, physically and also mentall . , ~' ., ., and also mentally. identity know how involved it is — and also mentally. identity know how involved it is an _ and also mentally. identity know how involved it is an issue _ and also mentally. identity know how involved it is an issue do _ and also mentally. identity know how involved it is an issue do it _ involved it is an issue do it yourself or you know someone in you heard about the injections you have in the blood tests and scans, it is so involved and it's also important to remember that 40% of fertility issues are because of the male partner but it is the woman who has to have the treatment so she is often putting her career on the line so it is right we support women through this process and i hope that this bill will be successful. tell us more about _ this bill will be successful. tell us more about what _ this bill will be successful. tell us more about what the process will be and how it is looking. i am be and how it is looking. i am tablin: be and how it is looking. i am tabling the — be and how it is looking. i am tabling the bill _ be and how it is looking. i am tabling the bill this _ be and how it is looking. i —n tabling the bill this afternoon in parliament and then it will have its second reading hopefully in september but i'm also having
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conversations with ministers who i know are sympathetic to supporting women in the workplace, so i'm confident that this campaign, and i've beenjoined by amazing organisations up and down the country, this is a real issue for many women and we need to support them through this very tough time, which ivf can be. 50 them through this very tough time, which ivf can be.— them through this very tough time, which ivf can be. so how quickly, if it all aoes which ivf can be. so how quickly, if it all goes through, _ which ivf can be. so how quickly, if it all goes through, can _ which ivf can be. so how quickly, if it all goes through, can the - which ivf can be. so how quickly, if it all goes through, can the law i it all goes through, can the law change? it all goes through, can the law chance? , it all goes through, can the law chance? a, , , , , a, change? private members bills are difficult to get _ change? private members bills are difficult to get through _ change? private members bills are difficult to get through parliament| difficult to get through parliament but it is about half the reason i'm doing it to start that conversation for employees to have with their employers and we can start that conversation is country and women don't have to keep it secret if they are going through ivf, that they can be supported, and i would like to see companies have fertility policies within the hr system and that would be a huge move forward if
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it was done voluntarily rather than going through a law that companies ensured that women and men going through this treatment are supported and can have time off work. what and can have time off work. what would you — and can have time off work. what would you say _ and can have time off work. what would you say if— and can have time off work. what would you say if there _ and can have time off work. what would you say if there is - and can have time off work. what would you say if there is somebody sitting watching this, going through this, who is afraid if they speak openly, you want them to, but what protection is that if somebody speaks up and their employer has this sort of conversation that an experience? it this sort of conversation that an exoerience?_ this sort of conversation that an experience? this sort of conversation that an exerience? , ., ., , ., ., experience? it is against the law to sack a woman _ experience? it is against the law to sack a woman if _ experience? it is against the law to sack a woman if she _ experience? it is against the law to sack a woman if she is _ experience? it is against the law to sack a woman if she is pregnant, . experience? it is against the law to l sack a woman if she is pregnant, and we need to make sure that there are stronger employment laws so if we are going through ivf, but until the embryo is implanted, they do not have many employment rights and that is what my bill is about, ensuring... is what my bill is about, ensuring. . .— is what my bill is about, ensurinu... ,, ., , ,, , ensuring... should somebody speak up toda but ensuring... should somebody speak up today but they — ensuring... should somebody speak up today but they put _ ensuring... should somebody speak up today but they put themselves - ensuring... should somebody speak up today but they put themselves in - ensuring... should somebody speak up today but they put themselves in a - today but they put themselves in a vulnerable position.—
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vulnerable position. many women don't want to _ vulnerable position. many women don't want to tell _ vulnerable position. many women don't want to tell anybody - vulnerable position. many women don't want to tell anybody or - vulnerable position. many women| don't want to tell anybody or even their own close friends or families they are going through ivf because they are going through ivf because they are going through ivf because they are built up wrongly that if you go through ivf that you are a failure and nothing could be further from the truth. we are seeing infertility issues increasing over recent years and we need to support women and we do need to have help and nf get pregnant, but we want to help those couples whether it is straight or gay, people trying on their own or in a couple to have the right employment rights so they can do it out in the open and they have to tell their manager but they get the time off work and they have to take as holiday and that is what the bill will do. ., ~ , ., take as holiday and that is what the bill will do. ., ~ i. ., ., bill will do. thank you for 'oining us.
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ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky has warned that russia is likely to intensify its attacks this week, as kyiv awaits a historic decision from the european union on its membership application. it comes after a number of world leaders warned that the war could last for years, with the head of nato saying the west must prepare to continue backing the country. our correspondentjoe inwood gave us the latest from kyiv. the president has two different audiences, his domestic audience to whom he always talks of there being a victory assured and puts a positive view are crossed, and to the west, he puts a much more not necessarily negative but more cautious approach because he wants to increase and continue the levels of sport. i think probably the truth is somewhere in the middle. it really is difficult to predict exactly what will happen and we've seen the russians are really pushing into the east and that is where there could be an intensification. what the president has always said, the message she continuously puts across, is that they need continued
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support. it's been more than a0 years since sir david attenborough met the mountain gorillas of rwanda — they were, at the time, on the brink of extinction. despite the odds, their numbers have increased, thanks to a huge conservation effort. our climate editor, justin rowlatt, has been to uganda to visit them. the morning mist rises from bwindi impenetrable forest in uganda. one of the last two places on earth where mountain gorillas still survive. so we're just hacking our way through the forest because obviously the gorillas go wherever they want. there are no paths up here. have you seen something, luke? 0h, there's one down there! there's a gorilla! gentle groaning.
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there are baby gorillas in the trees and also juvenile gorillas on the ground. it's incredible to be so close to one of our closest relatives on earth. rumbling. and that, i think, was a gorilla fart! wow! the population is healthy and growing steadily. it is a dramatic turnaround. when sir david attenborough made his famous visit to a mountain gorilla family back in the 1970s, it was, in his words, tinged with sadness because he feared he might be seeing the last of their kind.
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poachers preyed on the mountain gorilla population and the civil wars in rwanda and the democratic republic of congo made conservation in those countries very difficult. this park in uganda, the bwindi impenetrable forest, was made a national park in 1991. next, says the warden in charge, they needed to get local people onside. the communities are critical in conserving the gorillas because, you know, these communities live next to the park. and so we feel that they should be part of the conservation and they should get benefits from conservation. key among those benefits have been the revenues from this, from tourism. and tourism also supports a thriving economy.
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tourism really does help wild animals if it's done right. when i first started out, there were only about five lodges. now there's as many as 70. the lodges have created jobs, the ngos have created jobs, so there's lots of employment that has happened. you know, they can sell crafts, they can sell accommodation, meals. and so all of that makes a big difference. some of the tourist income and money from gorilla charities helped create alternative income for these men. they used to make their living poaching animals from the park. some were offered jobs as rangers. others were offered [and and training to grow crops. now we are called the ambassadors of the park because we are helping a lot the conservation of the park. we monitor and give reports monthly.
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conservation charities say carefully managed ecotourism can really help protect biodiversity. and protect the gorillas' habitat, and you protect so much else. but tourism alone is not enough. look how abruptly the tree cover ends here in uganda. the parks are big, but as the gorilla population grows. we're definitely seeing that gorilla families are more crowded. they're bumping into each other more, which unfortunately is often associated with aggression. we're seeing higher rates of infanticide so infants can oftentimes be killed when these families come together. bigger parks cost more money. the un wants countries to set aside a third of their land and sea area for conservation. the developing world wants $100 billion a year to help fund that. we've been told by scientists, we only have this century. and we only have one planet. there's no planet b.
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mountain gorillas show we can save species from the brink of extinction. the question now is whether the world is ready to commit the money and resources to make it happen on a much bigger scale. justin rowlatt, bbc news, bwindi impenetrable forest. and if you want to see more on that story, you can watch "mountain gorillas: a conservation success" — this saturday and sunday at 18:45, and on the bbc iplayer. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol hello, again. the weather this week is going to be mostly dry, it will be sunny and it will be warm, but increasingly turning humid through the week. now, you can see today we've got a lot of sunshine, some fair weather cloud bubbling up in some eastern areas coming in on the breeze from the north say,
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and we also have a weather front moving in across the north—west which later will produce some rain, so your temperatures are 12 to iii, but widely temperatures in the low 20s. now, through this evening and overnight, there will be some heavy rain in that weather front for a time across north—west scotland but it pushes further southwards and eastwards and it tends to weaken, and ahead of it it will be dry with clearer skies. so, not as cold across parts of the southern uplands and the highlands as it was this morning. tomorrow, then, we start off with the cloud and some spots of rain moving in across cumbria, north york moors. later, as it brightens up in eastern scotland, we could see the odd shower, and again ahead of it, for the bulk of england and wales, it is going to be dry, sunny, and warm.
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this is bbc news. i'mjoanna gosling — the headlines at midday train passengers prepare for the biggest railway strikes in 30 years, starting tomorrow. if there is a train, there is a train. if not, i will have to find some other way of getting to work. i support the rail strike because no one is listening to them, the transport minister has not been listening to them for decades. it is a huge inconvenience to people's lives. thousands of passengers have had their flights cancelled today after problems with baggage at two terminals at heathrow airport. it comes after easyjet announced plans to cut more flights over summer. a report into grooming and child sexual exploitation in oldham between 2011 and 2014 has found there were serious failings in the handling of some cases by the council and police. the parents of i2—year—old archie battersbee return to court to try and keep him alive
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despite doctors insisting he is brain dead. up close and personal — we have a special report from uganda on how a conservation effort to increase numbers of mountain gorillas has been a success. and in sport, england's matt fitzpatrick wins the us open after clinching his first major trophy, sealing a sensational victory in boston. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. train services across england, scotland and wales will run on a severely reduced timetable from this evening, ahead of the biggest walkout on the railways in 30 years. strikes will take place on almost all major lines from tomorrow, with disruption expected all week. commuters in london will also
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face a strike tomorrow on the london underground. the rmt rail union has warned it will intensify industrial action if a deal over pay isn't reached, and says it will run its campaign for as long as it takes. here's our business reporter esyllt carr. it will be a week of huge disruption, and it starts tonight as services begin winding up ahead of the first of three days of industrial action. thousands of workers represented by the rmt union are striking overjob cuts, pay, and changes to working conditions. it will mean around one in five trains running on strike days with many services cut on the days in between, too. awful for people if they need to get to jobs and to work and to places. i support the rail strike because no one is listening to them, the transport minister has not been listening to them for decades. it's a huge inconvenience to people's lives, isn't it? you know, it is having a big impact on people. it's a pain for me because i am travelling down to london on tuesday but i'm going to fly now. i'd rather not, from
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an ecological point of view but it is what i have to do. i have to wait and see, and if there is a train, there a train, and if there is not, i have to find another way of getting to work. so far, talks between the union and network rail has been unsuccessful. both labour and the rmt have called on the government to step in. i think the campaign will intensify if we don't get a settlement. but we are determined and available to get a settlement at any time. but they must loosen the shackles of the employers so they can make a deal. we want to protect our members' jobs, we want to protect their conditions, and we need a pay rise. so, it is a fairly straightforward issue. grant shapps is putting a lot of hyperbole into it but we can settle this if he allows these companies to negotiate. however, the government insists it is for the employer to negotiate with the union, with the transport secretary grant shapps describing the rmt as determined to strike. after receiving government funding to keep services running during the pandemic, rail bosses say any pay rises must come with changes to make the railway more sustainable. we really require detail
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and acceptance that the reform can go ahead, and then that allows us to work on how we can get a settlement for our staff and make sure that way that we move the industry forward. there is room for compromise. we can work together. you know, this is resolvable. talks are continuing today, but the advice for passengers is to only travel if necessary on strike days. esyllt carr, bbc news. i'm joined by anna—jane hunter, a rail operations consultant. she a rail operations consultant. has led teams at netv and she has led teams at network rail and is a consultant at railway management consultancy. thank you very much forjoining us. what impact do you think the strikes will have? , , ., ., , ., , have? this is going to be really disruptive _ have? this is going to be really disruptive and _ have? this is going to be really disruptive and not _ have? this is going to be really disruptive and notjust - have? this is going to be really disruptive and notjust on - have? this is going to be really disruptive and notjust on the l have? this is going to be really i disruptive and notjust on the days that are actually containing the strike action but for all of this week so it is disappointing and it will be disruptive passengers. iudhen will be disruptive passengers. when ou look at will be disruptive passengers. when you look at how _ will be disruptive passengers. when you look at how the _
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will be disruptive passengers. when you look at how the railways - will be disruptive passengers. when you look at how the railways are handling it and through the prism of yourjob and your expertise, what is yourjob and your expertise, what is your view? it yourjob and your expertise, what is our view? , . , yourjob and your expertise, what is our view? , ., , ., yourjob and your expertise, what is ourview? , . , ., ., your view? it is really hard to re are your view? it is really hard to prepare for — your view? it is really hard to prepare for strike _ your view? it is really hard to prepare for strike action, - your view? it is really hard to prepare for strike action, an l your view? it is really hard to - prepare for strike action, an awful lot of work goes on behind—the—scenes and my colleagues across the industry will have been putting in the hours to prepare for this to try and minimise the impact. there is a lot that goes on behind—the—scenes so for instance keeping critical freight running will have taken a lot of additional effort by the rail history management team and that will be going on throughout this week and won't necessarily be seen. we going on throughout this week and won't necessarily be seen.- won't necessarily be seen. we are where we are. _ won't necessarily be seen. we are where we are, what _ won't necessarily be seen. we are where we are, what is _ won't necessarily be seen. we are where we are, what is your - won't necessarily be seen. we are where we are, what is your view l won't necessarily be seen. we are| where we are, what is your view of that? $5 where we are, what is your view of that? �* , where we are, what is your view of that? ~ , ,._ where we are, what is your view of that? �* , ._ , where we are, what is your view of that? , ._ that? as i say, it is really disappointing _ that? as i say, it is really disappointing that - that? as i say, it is really disappointing that we - that? as i say, it is really. disappointing that we have that? as i say, it is really - disappointing that we have ended that? as i say, it is really _ disappointing that we have ended up here. but i can see how we have. their talks are not producing an outcome that either side are happy with, and these discussions had to cover a whole host of issues for a number of different groups of staff and it is worth remembering that, that the rmt represents a really broad church of employees, this is notjust
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broad church of employees, this is not just a broad church of employees, this is notjust a one—shot broad church of employees, this is not just a one—shot solution that needs to be found, there is a lot of discussion that needs to be had about modernisation, that reform of terms and conditions, from very different groups of staff, this is notjust different groups of staff, this is not just about a percentage different groups of staff, this is notjust about a percentage pay rise. �* , ., .., notjust about a percentage pay rise. �* , ., ., notjust about a percentage pay rise. �* ., , rise. and you indicate that people will look at _ rise. and you indicate that people will look at a _ rise. and you indicate that people will look at a modernisation - rise. and you indicate that people i will look at a modernisation through a different prism depending on where they are in the picture, and so it meansjob losses for they are in the picture, and so it means job losses for some. for rail users, what does it mean, as far as you are concerned? i users, what does it mean, as far as you are concerned?— you are concerned? i think the railway in _ you are concerned? i think the railway in the _ you are concerned? i think the railway in the uk _ you are concerned? i think the railway in the uk is _ you are concerned? i think the railway in the uk is a - you are concerned? i think the| railway in the uk is a cherished asset, it is much like the nhs and people have a sense of nostalgia about it, they value it, but it does need to be self—sustaining and the reality is that over the last few years, the passenger railwayjust isn't bringing in much as much money as it used to and i give the funding gap, so there are questions that need to be asked about how to make it sustainable financially, how the railway has a part to play in reducing the carbon output of the nation and also, fair pay for people
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doing the days work. these will have to be balanced and that is what is going to be at the art of the discussions that are ongoing. —— at the heart of the discussions. imitten the heart of the discussions. when ou look the heart of the discussions. when you look at — the heart of the discussions. when you look at the _ the heart of the discussions. when you look at the picture _ the heart of the discussions. when you look at the picture you - the heart of the discussions. when you look at the picture you paint their away —— where the railway service is and the diminishing returns and you think, you know, it should be absolute heart of our transport, obviously, shouldn't it? because it has the environment impact, but we are where we are, how have things come to this, in your view? why isn't it a very different picture? view? why isn't it a very different icture? ., ., ~ , view? why isn't it a very different icture? , ., , picture? look, it is really complicated _ picture? look, it is really complicated and - picture? look, it is really| complicated and complex. picture? look, it is really - complicated and complex. we are dealing with what is in many places of victorian asset which requires a lot of funding to mother neither physically. the railway is very people intensive so we talk about big numbers when we are talking about strikes, 40,000 people, because the railway employs a lot of people. that is a lot of different
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people. that is a lot of different people that need to be, you know, kept on board with a modernisation agenda. these are not easy things to solve, and a pay deal doesn'tjust affect one grade of staff, there are many involved in this. all of this is really complex but people do value the railway and i think passengers do value the railway, and we saw during the pandemic that people, even non—rail users valued the railways's ability to keep things moving. i mentioned rail —— freight before and that was crucial in the pandemic. everybody is feeling the bite of the cost of living crisis and i think there is a level of sympathy for people asking for a pay rise as well.— for a pay rise as well. thank you very much. _ for a pay rise as well. thank you very much. and _ for a pay rise as well. thank you very much, and jane _ for a pay rise as well. thank you very much, and jane hunter. - easyjet say they'll make further cuts to flights this summer. the airline claims it's to help manage problems like staff shortages at airports. it insists customers will be given advance notice of flight cancellations. meanwhile, heathrow has asked airlines flying from two of its terminals to cut 10% of flights today, following problems processing baggage. earlier, i spoke
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to our correspondent — matt graveling — who gave us the latest on the disruption. this isn't anything new, we have been hearing about this for the last few months. really, it is a problem started during the pandemic, so many airports staff lost theirjob and now all of a sudden restrictions have eased and everybody understand me wants to go back on holiday but they aren't the staff, whether that is on the plains are on the ground to get people through security to make that happen. it has been problematic for all airlines, easyjet had not escaped, it is better to say. last month, easyjet had to apologise to customers for grounding 200 flights because of it problems and today they have come out and said they will have to scale back for the next few months. they were hoping to run at a reduced capacity on pre—pandemic levels, at about 97%, they have now said that is more likely to be around 90% of they have called this proactive consolidation.
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i have a note here from their chief executive which reads, the ongoing challenging operating environment has unfortunately continued to have impact which has resulted in cancellations. this is coupled with airport caps, and they say they are taking pre—emptive action to take resilience but they are giving customers notice and they expect the vast majority to be rebooked on alternative flights with at least 24—hour was noticed. they say, we believe this is the right action for us to be taking. when they say there will be advance notice, when should passengers know? this is covering a window all the way up to september. the idea for easyjet is they are trying, as they say here, proactive consolidation, so they are trying to reduce the number of flights so they do have a window, this isn't about cancelling flights last minute, they say they will be notifying the customers on the flights that are cancelled ahead of time when they get to that on their schedule, hopefully with more notice than not because people have hotels booked at the other end and they will be
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letting people know. they say the vast majority will be booked on alternative flights. and heathrow saying today they want airlines to cancel 10% of flights today because of the build—up of baggage. with this sort of drive that the government has said, airlines have to cancel in advance, which is what we are told about there with easyjet, it is an reminder that still they can be problems on the day which lead to unforeseen cancellations. there can be, and airports and airlines have been hit by problem with staffing. i mentioned easyjet talked about airport caps there, and basically, airport caps is because things like airports like gatwick and amsterdam have said during the peak summer, we cannot do as many flights as we normally can do, they would normally have 900 flights a day injuly and august, and they have taken that back to 825 injuly per day and 850 in august. so, they are saying they haven't got the staff to do it. this is one reason why easyjet
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haven't been able to get as many flights in the air, but to pick up on what you said about heathrow, we heard from them in the last couple of hours and they were telling their airlines yesterday, we need you to reduce your flight capacity by 10% from today because we can't handle the baggage at the moment. i don't know whether that is a staffing issue are a technical issue with conveyor belts but that is what they said, 10% felt their airlines from today. speaking at a press conference this morning, the independent reviewers set out the report's findings. a review into historic child safeguarding practices in oldham has found there were 'serious failings' in the handling of some cases of grooming and sexual exploitation. the report was commissioned after allegations circulated on social media that oldham council was covering up what it knew about asian grooming gangs in the town. the independent inquiry found procedures were not properly followed between 2011 and 2014. investigators said there were structural flaws in greater manchester police — and the council's systems which were meant to safeguard children. the review found no evidence of a cover—up.( we have found that throughout this period, the specialist services
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tackling child sexual exploitation provided by oldham council and greater manchester police were strategically ahead of those available in many other local authorities at the time. however, these did not always translate at an operational level into the effective safeguarding of children experiencing sexual exploitation. our own review of a sample of children has exposed significant failings in the protection provided by the statutory authorities to those children. we understand that oldham council and greater manchester police have agreed to review the management of these cases to consider whether any further action can now be taken in respect of the men who exploited these children. we've been provided with no evidence to support the allegations circulated on social media suggesting that senior managers
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or councillors sought to cover up either the existence of child sexual exploitation in oldham or the complexity involved in tackling the perpetrators. the headlines on bbc news... train passengers prepare for the biggest railway strikes in 30 years,starting tomorrow. thousands of passengers have had their flights cancelled today after problems with baggage at two terminals at heathrow airport. it comes after easyjet announced plans to cut more flights over summer. a report into grooming and child sexual exploitation in oldham between 2011 and 2014 has found there were serious failings in the handling of some cases by the council and police. sport, let's get a full roundup
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from the bbc sport centre. sheffield's matt fitzpatrick has put his name in the history brooks — with the biggest victory of his career at the us open. he played what he called one of the best shots of his life on the 18th from the bunker, to somehow reach the green. that forced his playing partner will zalatoris to make this putt to force a play—off, but he missed. fitzpatrick winning the title by one shot. it is what you grow up dreaming of, it is something i have worked so hard for for such a long time. there is a big monkey on my back trying to win over here and everyone all they'll talked about was that and to do it as a major for they'll talked about was that and to do it as a majorfor my they'll talked about was that and to do it as a major for my first win, there is nothing better. 0ur sports correspondant nesta mcgregor is at hallamshire golf club in sheffield where fitzpatrick played as an amateur. it is where it all began, fits
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tactics seem to be making a bit of a name for himself ashton home for himself. �* , ., ., himself. and it is not bad weather. this is hallamshire _ himself. and it is not bad weather. this is hallamshire golf _ himself. and it is not bad weather. this is hallamshire golf in - this is hallamshire golf in sheffield, max fitzpatrick born and raised in sheffield and there is a very course where he practised and perfected those skills that as we saw last night took him right to the top of the very game. that might be his adopted home but this is deaf in his adopted home but this is deaf in his home home and those images of his home home and those images of his families rushing him had been played in a clubhouse all morning. —— this is definitely his home home. his achievement, you know, and 27, the us open, his first major, only the us open, his first major, only the third englishman to win golf�*s second oldest element as well, quite an achievement. of course, he won it as an amateur in 2013 but still take nothing away as you mention, holding his nerve, neck to neck with wells a
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a tourist, all the way and busily bringing the title home. the first non-american — bringing the title home. the first non-american to _ bringing the title home. the first non-american to win _ bringing the title home. the first non-american to win both - bringing the title home. the first non-american to win both titles | bringing the title home. the first - non-american to win both titles from non—american to win both titles from 2013 and now here in 2022 at the us open. i'm interested to know what the reaction has been like behind you there this morning at hallamshire. fits you there this morning at hallamshire.— you there this morning at hallamshire. �* , ., hallamshire. as i mentioned, there miaht be hallamshire. as i mentioned, there might be rrot _ hallamshire. as i mentioned, there might be not many _ hallamshire. as i mentioned, there might be not many people - hallamshire. as i mentioned, there might be not many people behind l hallamshire. as i mentioned, there l might be not many people behind me that all morning, people have been coming here. this is a special year for hallamshire golf club because they celebrate 125 years and we are having some special events on this week and this win will be the cherry on top of all of that. people who know him, and there are many, he has also donated an old golf bag, plenty of selfies being taken next to that but people that know him say one major went might be enough, as you can imagine this is going to be some homecoming when he is back in the uk for the scottish open at the start
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ofjuly. england head coach eddiejones has named a 36—player squad for the tour of australia next month. it features 12 players from the weekend's premiership final between leicester tigers and saracens, including a return for billy vunipola. and the remarkable revival of danny care's england career continues. the 35—year—old harlequins scrum—half won the last of his 84 caps in 2018, but featured for england against the barbarians at twickenham yesterday. he's named alongside eight uncapped players for the three—test tour. danny has always been a really good player but the game is changing, you know, and it keeps going back and full. we saw the final on saturday, it was 96 kicks, which is over 2000 running —— but then you watch super rugby final and you watch the other games, there is this ability to have
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really quick ruck ball, and the really quick ruck ball, and the really good attacking teams are able then to make sure the defence doesn't recover, and there is no one better in the bay —— in the game at the moment and any county do that. and wimbledon qualfying is underway this morning... the main event of course starts next week. and lots of brits in action at eatbourne today too — heather watson in action at the moment... you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. president macron of france has suffered a major political setback, after his party failed to win a majority, in the country's parliamentary elections. his party, "ensemble", is still the biggest in the national assembly, but it lost around 100 seats in yesterday's elections, which saw big gains by marine le pen�*s far—right party and a new left—wing alliance. 0ur paris correspondent, lucy williamson, has the details. emmanuel macron�*s presidency
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just got tougher. his centrist coalition has lost a third of its seats. just look at the mood. translation: the situation is unprecedented. _ the national assembly has never seen a configuration of this type in the fifth republic. this situation constitutes a risk for our country, in view of the challenges that we have to face. this is now president macron�*s main opposition, a new alliance of green and left—wing parties dominated by far left mps, the initial estimates confirming their new status as the first opposition party of france. translation: it's the total defeat of the president's party, _ and there is no majority. we have achieved the political objective we gave ourselves, to bring down the man who with such arrogance twisted the arm of the whole country to get elected. but this was the big surprise of the night —
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marine le pen�*s far right national rally party jumped from a handful of seats to almost 90. plenty of opposition to the president from all sides. translation: we are going - to continue to bring french people together as part of the great popular movement unifying all patriots, from the right and the left. the parliamentary opposition to macron�*s centrist coalition is now much stronger than before, but it's also more fractured, with one block led by jean—luc melenchon on the far left of the chamber, and another by marine le pen on the far right. french politics is realigning around these three political groups. some voters say it's no bad thing if president macron is forced to negotiate with his opponents. others believe denying the government a majority only leads to stagnation. president macron is facing a new area of political opposition
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that some see as good for democracy and others as bad for france. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. the energy regulator — ofgem — has announced plans to better protect customers who pay their bills through direct debit, tightening the rules on suppliers in order to stop excess payments. our personal finance correspondent kevin peachey explains the new measures. it has been a source of frustration for many years for customers that they pay by direct debit the same amount every month, generally, and if they don't use as much energy as they paid for, then what is called a credit balance builds up, and many customers say this is basicallyjust a free loan to their supplier because they hold onto it month after month after month. and even ofgem are saying today that some companies used it as an interest—free credit card. what the proposals from
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the regulator suggest is that there is going to be some changes that will mean those credit balances don't become too excessive, they don't build up quite so much. and what's important here is if a company goes bust, and of course we have seen in the uk, 30 companies, around 30 companies collapse in the last year or so, well, what happens is their customers are automatically transferred to a new supplier, and their credit balances, which remember, can be quite high, can be hundreds of pounds, also go as well, so they are protected, they are honoured. but it is everybody else who picks up the tab, it is not the failed company, at the moment, it is every bill payer because that tab is picked up by all bill payers across the board, everybody sees their bill go up by a little bit more. and so ofgem say that these companies need to be better capitalised, they need to have more money behind them, if you like, in order to make sure that it is not
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everybody that picks up the bill for these credit balances when they go bust. ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky has warned that russia is likely to intensify its attacks this week, as kyiv awaits a historic decision from the european union on its membership application. it comes after a number of world leaders warned that the war could last for years, with the head of nato saying the west must prepare to continue backing the country. our correspondentjoe inwood gave us the latest from kyiv. it is interesting, you get from the president, he has two different audiences, he has his domestic audience to whom he always talks to about the victory being assured, he was a very positive view across, and to the west, he puts a much more not necessarily negative but a more cautious approach because he wants to increase and continue the levels of support. i think probably the truth
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is somewhere in the middle, it is really difficult to predict exactly what is going to happen. we have seen the russians really pushing into the east, and i think that is where there could be an intensification. what the president has always said, the message he continuously puts across is that they need continued support, and you talked about the family of a 12—year—old boy who has brain damage will find out today if they can appeal against a ruling that his life support treatment should stop. archie battersbee was found unconscious at his home in essex in april. his parents want his treatment to continue but doctors at the royal london hospital say he's medically dead. zoe conway has more. he's just so beautiful. he's so angelic. it's no different from at home. he just looks peaceful. he's asleep. for nine weeks, hollie dance has been keeping watch over her son. every night, she sleeps in archie's hospital room. every day she talks to him and she says... you really need to wake up now because we've got the biggest battle of our lives and it would be really great if you actually helped me — you know, wake up and do something.
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it was in early april that hollie found archie unconscious at home. she believes he was taking part in an online challenge that went terribly wrong. last week, a judge concluded archie is brain—stem dead, and his life support should not continue. but archie's parents want him to be given more time. hollie says she felt him squeeze her hand. he's in there. physically, for whatever reason — whether it's locked—in syndrome, whether he's he's paralysed, you know, and there's an injury that's not been sort of looked into — i don't know, but i feel he's in there. archie used to tell his mum that he wanted to be a world champion. he loved gymnastics and mixed martial arts fighting. archie. my name isjoe egan. each day, get well messages are played to him. from croydon's boxing club, we'd like to wish archie -
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a speedy recovery. all: come on, archie! hi, archie. the former wvu champion of the world here. but, man, listen, we're allthinking of you and praying for you. hope you get well soon. hi, archie, it's max whitlock here. one message is from olympic gold medallist max whitlock, who trains at the same gym as archie. you've got everybody| behind you right now, everybody supporting you. all: come on, archie! and what was your relationship with him like? amazing. he's literally like my little sidekick. i can't even go to tesco's without archie being with me and i'll be walking around... coming down the other aisle is archie with his own trolley, doing his own shopping, you know? and i'm like, "oh, arch, you're costing me a fortune!" he's like, "yeah, but i need to eat healthy and i'll give you it back when dad gives me my pocket money on thursday." later today, hollie and archie's father, paul battersby, will return to court to seek permission to appeal against the judge's decision that treatment can be withdrawn. do you ever worry that you are
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prolonging the agony for yourself? no, i don't. i would be more worried if i gave up and spent the rest of my life thinking, "what if ijust held on that little bit longer?" i think that nobody — and i mean nobody — has archie's best interest at heart like a mother. throughout our interview, hollie did not break down or cry. she was remarkably composed. inside, i'm not. inside, i'm broken. but i've had to go in fight—and—flight. i've got no choice. i haven't got time to think about my feelings, my emotions at the minute because this is a fight for archie's life. i can deal and address my emotions after this battle. at the minute, i can't let my guard down for a split second. he's a 12—year—old boy — give him a chance! it's a brain injury. nine weeks is nothing. zoe conway, bbc news.
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it is going to be heating up once again over the next few days in the sunshine. aha, again over the next few days in the sunshine. �* ., , ., again over the next few days in the sunshine. ., , ., ., sunshine. a lovely day today for much of us- _ sunshine. a lovely day today for much of us. this _ sunshine. a lovely day today for much of us. this is _ sunshine. a lovely day today for much of us. this is the - sunshine. a lovely day today for much of us. this is the earlier. much of us. this is the earlier satellite picture. there is some cloud on the far north—west that is going to have more of an impact as we head into night but head of that in the sunshine, temperatures are a very pleasant 2223 degrees across southern parts of england and wales and across eastern areas of scotland. lots of sunshine, high pollen levels through the rest of the day. overnight, the cloud will come down into scotland and northern ireland bringing some rain for a while but it stays dry and clear across england and wales so temperatures will dip away 27 or 8 degrees, a bit for scotland and northern ireland. there won't be enough a lot of rain left tomorrow in scotland and northern ireland, a few showers but equally simply says of sunshine, some plaid will push
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into the far north of england, the rest of englert and wales enjoying another sunny day, so long sunshine and continue to heat up, 25 degrees in the midlands. nearer 17 or 18 in scotland and northern ireland. hello. this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling and these are the headlines. train passengers prepare for the biggest railway strikes in 30 years
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— starting tomorrow. thousands of passengers have had their flights cancelled today after problems with baggage at two terminals at heathrow airport. it comes after easyjet announced plans to cut more flights over summer. a report into grooming and child sexual exploitation in oldham between 2011 and 2014 has found there were serious failings in the handling of some cases by the council and police. the parents of 12—year—old archie battersbee return to court to try and keep him alive despite doctors insisting he is brain dead. up close and personal. we have a special report from uganda on how a conservation effort to increase numbers of mountain gorillas has been a success. and in sport — england's matt fitzpatrick wins the us open after clinching his first major trophy, sealing a sensational victory in boston. 60 people have died in lightning strikes and landslides
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triggered by severe monsoon storms in india and bangladesh. millions of people have been stranded while emergency workers have struggled to reach those affected. the flooding is expected to get worse over the next few days. akmal shareef is country director of islamic relief bangladesh. thank of islamic relief bangladesh. you forjoining us. w the thank you forjoining us. what is the situation now? the thank you forjoining us. what is the situation now?— thank you forjoining us. what is the situation now? the situation on the situation now? the situation on the round the situation now? the situation on the ground remains _ the situation now? the situation on the ground remains difficult - the situation now? the situation on the ground remains difficult and - the ground remains difficult and from today the water had started receding, especially in one city, but in the most hit district in the coverage area, the speed is slow when it comes to receding the water, so overall, if you look into how people are still struggling to get
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proper support and they have a shortage of food, is doing its best but in many places we have not been able to reach our team, the islamic relief teams on the ground and trying to support families in rescue efforts and we are trying to support them with dry food, that's what we're doing at the moment but the challenge remains in the coming days how to support them in rotation and shelter has been damaged in many parts and on top of that they ensure that people for the next three months that there will be food security which is critical. in terms of how much _ security which is critical. in terms of how much your _ security which is critical. in terms of how much your own _ security which is critical. in terms of how much your own team's - of how much your own team's operations has been impacted and how difficult it is to operate, how difficult it is to operate, how difficult has it been? it difficult it is to operate, how difficult has it been?- difficult it is to operate, how difficult has it been? it has been difficult has it been? it has been difficult because _ difficult has it been? it has been difficult because we've - difficult has it been? it has been difficult because we've also - difficult has it been? it has been| difficult because we've also been hit by the flood and one of our
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offices is completely under the water and has been for 72 hours and we had to rescue our staff from there so it represents a huge challenge and transport issues have been a huge challenge and is difficult and we've somehow been able to manage it, so access remains critical at the moment and especially in one area. have you dealt with _ especially in one area. have you dealt with anything _ especially in one area. have you dealt with anything on _ especially in one area. have you dealt with anything on this - especially in one area. have you dealt with anything on this scale before? to dealt with anything on this scale before? ., , ., , .,, dealt with anything on this scale before? ., , ., , ;;:: before? to be honest in the last 30 or 40 years. _ before? to be honest in the last 30 or 40 years, bangladesh _ before? to be honest in the last 30 or 40 years, bangladesh has - before? to be honest in the last 30 or 40 years, bangladesh has not i before? to be honest in the last 30 i or 40 years, bangladesh has not seen this level of flood and we also have to understand that this is the second flood in two months' time that the region has experienced, so the first flood which came in may was a real surprise for many and whatever the crops people had, they lost and suddenly within a month when they were starting to to regather their life, suddenly the flood has hit them, so the situation is really very bad, especially for
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the marginalised communities. you mention the — the marginalised communities. you mention the issue of food security and millions of people are affected ljy and millions of people are affected by this. and millions of people are affected b this. , ., , and millions of people are affected b this. , . , ., �* ., by this. they are. they don't have an hinu by this. they are. they don't have anything in _ by this. they are. they don't have anything in terms _ by this. they are. they don't have anything in terms of _ by this. they are. they don't have anything in terms of crops - by this. they are. they don't have anything in terms of crops and - anything in terms of crops and that's the first thing in the second thing we have to understand is there is a huge issue of inflation and i think bangladesh is grappling with that and rising food prices has been an issue for many, many months and on top of that, people are coming out from where they lost this lively —— livelihoods and coronavirus times, so people are trying to come back and then we were hit by the two successive floods and that makes life extremely difficult. so successive floods and that makes life extremely difficult.— successive floods and that makes life extremely difficult. so what do ou need? life extremely difficult. so what do you need? in _ life extremely difficult. so what do you need? in terms _ life extremely difficult. so what do you need? in terms of _ life extremely difficult. so what do you need? in terms of needs,, - life extremely difficult. so what do | you need? in terms of needs,, one life extremely difficult. so what do i you need? in terms of needs,, one of the short term _ you need? in terms of needs,, one of the short term supports _ you need? in terms of needs,, one of the short term supports for _ you need? in terms of needs,, one of the short term supports for the - you need? in terms of needs,, one of the short term supports for the next i the short term supports for the next seven days when we have to provide
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the dry rations, and then long term, as we said, people need to have food security for three to six months and we have to build houses because many of these people have lost their habitats and repairing the houses will be critical and there is another issue because predominantly in an agricultural community people need fodderfor their in an agricultural community people need fodder for their cattle, whatever they have left, so those challenges remain.— challenges remain. thank you for 'oinin: challenges remain. thank you for joining us- _ colombians have elected the country's first ever left—wing president, the former rebel fighter gustavo petro. mr petro said his victory marked the beginning of a new phase in their history, turning away from sectarianism and intolerance. the bbc�*s south america correspondent katy watson reports from the capital bogota.
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the atmosphere here in gustavo petro's h0 is electric. people here almost didn't believe it. it was a nailbiter until the very end. now this is a historic vote in so many ways, and that's often used as a real cliche, but it's really true. he is the first leftist president that colombia has ever had. francia marquez will be the first—ever black vice president colombia has ever had, and its testament to the changes that colombians wanted. rodolfo hernandez, his rival, the colombian trump as he was known, he has conceded defeat. but gustavo petro will have a job on his hands trying to win over the conservative elite that have for so long run this country. but i think what this vote shows is the ability for a country like colombia that has suffered decades of civil conflict, that colombia can actually turn the page on its past and vote for a new future. social media sites are recommending content promoting
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violence and knives for sale to accounts registered to 13—year—olds, according to an investigation by bbc panorama. our specialist social media reporter marianna spring has been looking into the role social media played in the murder of 13—year—old olly stephens, who was stabbed by two other teenagers after an online dispute. marianna joins me now in the studio. what have you learned while you have been investigating this?— been investigating this? ollie's arents been investigating this? ollie's parents reach _ been investigating this? ollie's parents reach out _ been investigating this? ollie's parents reach out to _ been investigating this? ollie's parents reach out to me - been investigating this? ollie's i parents reach out to me because been investigating this? ollie's - parents reach out to me because they did not know about the world of hate and violence that he had been exposed to through his phone until after he had been murdered. he was killed injanuary of last after he had been murdered. he was killed in january of last year after he had been murdered. he was killed injanuary of last year and killed in january of last year and went to the field opposite his house and he said to meet a friend in 15 minutes later he had been stabbed by two other young teenagers who were 13 and 14 at the time and they had recruited a girl on line who had lured him there who was a similar age. and after this happened the police set about investigating, how did we get here and how did this
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occur, and they look through the phones of those involved and that was when they came across some shocking evidence, voice notes that showed hateful language being used, cyber bullying, videos of knives, images and we have a clip from the dc! who led the case explaining how dci who led the case explaining how much digital evidence there was. this was an unusual case from our perspective — this was an unusual case from our perspective and we were taken aback lry perspective and we were taken aback by the _ perspective and we were taken aback by the amount of digital evidence. it was _ by the amount of digital evidence. it was probably from my experience as a senior— it was probably from my experience as a senior investigating officer an unprecedented investigation in that respect _ unprecedented investigation in that respect. given what we know about the young _ respect. given what we know about the young people involved in the case of— the young people involved in the case of olly that if we are finding this kind — case of olly that if we are finding this kind of material on their devices _ this kind of material on their devices then it struck me that this is probably— devices then it struck me that this is probably the tip of a very large iceberg — is probably the tip of a very large iceberg. we is probably the tip of a very large iceberu. ~ , ., ,., , ., iceberg. we set about investigating what 13-year-olds _ iceberg. we set about investigating what 13-year-olds are _ iceberg. we set about investigating what 13-year-olds are seeing, - iceberg. we set about investigating what 13-year-olds are seeing, if. what13—year—olds are seeing, if this is the tip of the iceberg and only scratches the surface so we set “p only scratches the surface so we set up a fake account across five different social media sites and we
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consulted one of olly�*s friends and other young teenagers account so we could follow the right kinds of stuff. the account liked everything from sport and gaming to drill music and anti—knife crime content and we ran it over the course of two weeks, liking and following what was suggested to us and that was when we found that instagram, youtube and facebook had promoted content such as people showing off knives, knives for sale and also videos glorifying violence and depicting violence this 13—year—old's account and what was perhaps the most shocking part was perhaps the most shocking part was that when i went to speak to a group of friends about this and say this is what we've seen from our experiment, they also, i get stuff like this all the time and i'm really used to seeing knives and this type of content. stuart and amanda, a quick temper�*s mum and dad want answers so they met the former facebook whistle—blower to speak to her about their fears and understand more about algorithms, the content that pushes this sort of stuff. we
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believe other parents need to know what we _ believe other parents need to know what we have been through. they are open and _ what we have been through. they are open and exposed to so much that is so bad, _ open and exposed to so much that is so bad, and — open and exposed to so much that is so bad, and you have no idea it is happening — so bad, and you have no idea it is happening under your roof. no so bad, and you have no idea it is happening under your roof. no one at facebook or— happening under your roof. no one at facebook or instagram _ happening under your roof. no one at facebook or instagram or _ happening under your roof. no one at facebook or instagram or any - happening under your roof. no one at facebook or instagram or any of - happening under your roof. no one at facebook or instagram or any of the l facebook or instagram or any of the social— facebook or instagram or any of the social media — facebook or instagram or any of the social media companies _ facebook or instagram or any of the social media companies says - facebook or instagram or any of the social media companies says i- facebook or instagram or any of the social media companies says i don't| social media companies says i don't want to— social media companies says i don't want to expose _ social media companies says i don't want to expose children _ social media companies says i don't want to expose children to - social media companies says i don't| want to expose children to violence, but what _ want to expose children to violence, but what did — want to expose children to violence, but what did happen _ want to expose children to violence, but what did happen is _ want to expose children to violence, but what did happen is that - want to expose children to violence, but what did happen is that these i but what did happen is that these products— but what did happen is that these products are _ but what did happen is that these products are designed _ but what did happen is that these products are designed as - but what did happen is that these products are designed as the i but what did happen is that these| products are designed as the sum but what did happen is that these i products are designed as the sum of lots of— products are designed as the sum of lots of little — products are designed as the sum of lots of little choices _ products are designed as the sum of lots of little choices and _ products are designed as the sum of lots of little choices and each - products are designed as the sum of lots of little choices and each time l lots of little choices and each time the goal— lots of little choices and each time the goal is — lots of little choices and each time the goal is to— lots of little choices and each time the goal is to get— lots of little choices and each time the goal is to get you _ lots of little choices and each time the goal is to get you to _ lots of little choices and each time the goal is to get you to spend i lots of little choices and each time . the goal is to get you to spend more time looking — the goal is to get you to spend more time looking at— the goal is to get you to spend more time looking at more _ the goal is to get you to spend more time looking at more ads— the goal is to get you to spend more time looking at more ads are - the goal is to get you to spend more time looking at more ads are more i time looking at more ads are more revenue _ time looking at more ads are more revenue each— time looking at more ads are more revenue each of— time looking at more ads are more revenue. each of us _ time looking at more ads are more revenue. each of us only _ time looking at more ads are more revenue. each of us only gets i time looking at more ads are more revenue. each of us only gets thisi revenue. each of us only gets this little _ revenue. each of us only gets this little tiny— revenue. each of us only gets this little tiny peephole _ revenue. each of us only gets this little tiny peephole to _ revenue. each of us only gets this little tiny peephole to view- revenue. each of us only gets this little tiny peephole to view sociali little tiny peephole to view social media _ little tiny peephole to view social media where _ little tiny peephole to view social media where we _ little tiny peephole to view social media where we see _ little tiny peephole to view social media where we see our- little tiny peephole to view social media where we see our own- media where we see our own experience _ media where we see our own experience we _ media where we see our own experience. we don't - media where we see our own experience. we don't see i media where we see our own. experience. we don't see what media where we see our own- experience. we don't see what a ts-year-old _ experience. we don't see what a 13—year—old sees. _ experience. we don't see what a 13—year—old sees. for— experience. we don't see what a 13-year-old sees.— 13-year-old sees. for stuart and amanda this _ 13-year-old sees. for stuart and amanda this is _ 13-year-old sees. for stuart and amanda this is about _ 13-year-old sees. for stuart and amanda this is about protecting | amanda this is about protecting other children like olly unlike stewart explained, they want parents to know what is going on on children's phones and how they can better protect them and the sites
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they went into the investigation they went into the investigation they got back to us and they expressed their sympathies to olly�*s family and mehta told us that they do not allow content that threatens or coordinates violence and they have a well established process to support police investigations and youtube says it has strict existing policies to make sure the platform is not used to incite violence and tiktok says there is never the job done to protect users and it will develop policies to help teens online and snapchat says they specifically prevent bullying, harassment in any illegal activity and provide reporting tools on their site. but for stuart and amanda this is the beginning of a campaign for them to make sure that this never happens to any other trial.- happens to any other trial. thank ou, and happens to any other trial. thank you. and your — happens to any other trial. thank you, and your panorama - happens to any other trial. thank you, and your panorama is i happens to any other trial. thank you, and your panorama is on i you, and your panorama is on tonight. you, and your panorama is on toniaht. �* , you, and your panorama is on toniaht. fl ., . you, and your panorama is on toniuht. �*, ., ., x, you, and your panorama is on toniaht. v ., . .m ., you, and your panorama is on toniaht. �*, ., ., j~, ., “ a bbc poll has found that more than a third of teenagers use social media sites as their main source of news.
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tiktok was the most common social media platform for sourcing news, followed by youtube and facebook. but in terms of trust in providing information on current affairs — parents came top, far ahead of social media influencers and politicians. brazilian police say they're looking for five more people believed to be involved in the murder of british journalist dom phillips and indigenous expert bruno pereira. three suspects have already been arrested in connection with the killing in the amazon. the pair were investigating the involvement of criminal gangs in illegalfishing and mining when they went missing. a private members bill asking for the introduction of statutory time off for those undergoing fertility treatment will be presented in parliament later. conservative mp nickie aiken took up the issue after being contacted by a constituent who says she was "forced out" of herjob while having ivf treatment. our reporter shelley phelps has more. you are pumped full of so many awful hormones. it's a huge, huge roller coaster. and each day was really difficult. so i'd end up taking presentations
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to the clinic to try and get the work done. you're injecting yourself more than once a day. sometimes you're having more than one blood test a day. and it was extremely difficult, coupled with the need to hide what was going on from your employer as though it was something to be ashamed of. anne, not her real name, says she was forced out of herjob in the city after a dispute with her employer over the time she needed to take off work for ivf treatment. she left the company and signed a non—disclosure agreement. i was asked the question, how much did i want a career and how much did i want a family? and that question was surprisingly easy to answer, but it was a question no woman should ever be asked. around 50,000 women have ivf
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each year, with many having multiple cycles. the success rate per embryo transfer varies from 32% for women under 35 to under 5% for women over 43. that's according to the uk's fertility regulator. currently, there's no statutory right to time off work for fertility treatment. so, there isn't any legal right to taking time off, whether paid or unpaid. for any fertility treatments in the workplace until there has been successful implementation of fertilised ova, for example, when we're looking at in—vitro fertilisation, ivf, which is one of the most common fertility treatments. a conservative mp is calling for more legal protection. the crux of my bill is to be able to give women the power and the confidence that if they are going to go through ivf treatment, that they will be supported by their employer and by society as a whole.
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here in london's harley street, there's several fertility clinics. the local mp says that queues of women form here early in the mornings as they try to get appointments without having to take time off from work. business community representatives, the british chambers of commerce, say many employers operate broad and flexible working practices to help people balance work and family commitments. anne gave birth to a daughter and says she's speaking out in the hope of making things better for her future. shelley phelps, bbc news. some news to bring you about minor surgery that borisjohnson had this morning. downing street said he had a very minor routine operation related to his sinuses under general anaesthetic at a hospital in london this morning. the prime minister's official spokesperson said he went to hospital about 6am and the operation was carried out first
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thing this morning and he was back in downing street shortly after 10am. he is resting at home and is planning to chair tomorrow morning's cabinet meeting. asked who was in charge of the nuclear accounts, the spokesperson said the deputy premised and the cabinet secretary were aware of the procedure and advance and that borisjohnson was underfor a relatively advance and that borisjohnson was under for a relatively brief time. also some breaking news about some british nationals who we are hearing have been released from detention in afghanistan. there is a new statement that has been put out from the foreign and developed office which says that we welcome and appreciate the release by the current administration of afghanistan of five british nationals who were detained in afghanistan and the british nationals have no role in the uk government's working afghanistan and travelled there against the uk government's travel advice and this was a mistake. on behalf of the families of the british nationals we express our apologies for any breach of afghan culture, customs and laws
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and offer assurances of their future conduct on the uk come regrets this episode. leaders from around the commonwealth are in rwanda this week for discussions about the future of their countries. it comes as a number of caribbean countries consider becoming a republic. it happened in barbados last year, and jamaica could be next. adina campbell has more. jamaica's north coast, a picture postcard of expansive shorelines and mountainous views. but beyond the dreamy landscape, there's the more serious business of politics and the country's future. ocho rios captures the beauty of this caribbean island and is a tourism hotspot. when it comes to the question ofjamaica becoming a republic, people here are split and are quick to tell us how they truly feel. remove the queen. it's not going to be better. when the queen was there, when i was young, jamaica was better. yeah? so i don't see no way
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to remove the queen. none at all. we need to move on now. it's 60 years of independence, so we need to move on. no, i don't want one. it really doesn't i make any difference. it does not. because what is the queen has done? the queen has done nothing for us since independence. i so it is here not there whether we j are a republic or because nothing| is going to change. the prime ministers are not doing nothing, the queen not doing nothing. so we don't know who to turn to more than god. the jamaican prime minister is determined to take his country in a new direction, drifting away from the british monarchy could take years. but he told me, now is the time. in our 60th year we have reached the point where we have to give very serious consideration to the form of our nation. the role of the royal family in caribbean countries is a divisive, often sore subject.
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when the duke and duchess of cambridge visited jamaica earlier this year, there were protests and repeated calls for slavery reparations. and some politicians feel there's too much distance between the jamaican people and the royal family. jamaica certainly wants to be a republic. and...it�*s not clear that we still need to be a part of the realm. ordinaryjamaicans can't even get a visa to go to the united kingdom. but we still... in parliament, we pray for the health of the queen, and she is the head of state. butjamaicans can't go and visit their head of state. what also really matters is the country's future on the next generation. keep that coming back here. at an academy in kingston run by former international cricket star nikita miller, the royal family doesn't seem relevant any more. not much to say about them.
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i don't know. i know that jamaica used to be under slave by the queen. i do you care about the british royalfamily? mm... not really. not really, not really. i wouldn't mind seeing what being a republic would bring us as a country. i mean, so i'm sure during that period when that conversation started, it would educate us as to why it is important to be a republic and the benefits and the pros and cons. jamaica celebrates 60 years of independence later this summer. but with the foundation set for parting away from the queen, even more independence could be on the horizon. adina campbell, bbc news, injamaica. (it's been more than 40 years since sir david attenborough met the mountain gorillas of rwanda — they were, at the time, on the brink of extinction.
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despite the odds, their numbers have increased, thanks to a huge conservation effort. our climate editor, justin rowlatt, has been to uganda to visit them. the morning mist rises from bwindi impenetrable forest in uganda. one of the last two places on earth where mountain gorillas still survive. so we're just hacking our way through the forest because obviously the gorillas go wherever they want. there are no paths up here. have you seen something, luke? oh, there's one down there! there's a gorilla! gentle groaning. there are baby gorillas in the trees and also juvenile gorillas on the ground.
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it's incredible to be so close to one of our closest relatives on earth. rumbling. and that, i think, was a gorilla fart! wow! the population is healthy and growing steadily. it is a dramatic turnaround. when sir david attenborough made his famous visit to a mountain gorilla family back in the 1970s, it was, in his words, tinged with sadness because he feared he might be seeing the last of their kind. poachers preyed on the mountain gorilla population and the civil wars in rwanda and the democratic republic of congo made conservation
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in those countries very difficult. this park in uganda, the bwindi impenetrable forest, was made a national park in 1991. next, says the warden in charge, they needed to get local people onside. the communities are critical in conserving the gorillas because, you know, these communities live next to the park. and so we feel that they should be part of the conservation and they should get benefits from conservation. key among those benefits have been the revenues from this, from tourism. and tourism also supports a thriving economy. tourism really does help wild animals if it's done right. when i first started out, there were only about five lodges. now there's as many as 70. the lodges have created jobs,
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the ngos have created jobs, so there's lots of employment that has happened. you know, they can sell crafts, they can sell accommodation, meals. and so all of that makes a big difference. some of the tourist income and money from gorilla charities helped create alternative income for these men. they used to make their living poaching animals from the park. some were offered jobs as rangers. others were offered [and and training to grow crops. now we are called the ambassadors of the park because we are helping a lot the conservation of the park. we monitor and give reports monthly. conservation charities say carefully managed ecotourism can really help protect biodiversity. and protect the gorillas' habitat, and you protect so much else.
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but tourism alone is not enough. look how abruptly the tree cover ends here in uganda. the parks are big, but as the gorilla population grows. we're definitely seeing that gorilla families are more crowded. they're bumping into each other more, which unfortunately is often associated with aggression. we're seeing higher rates of infanticide so infants can oftentimes be killed when these families come together. bigger parks cost more money. the un wants countries to set aside a third of their land and sea area for conservation. the developing world wants $100 billion a year to help fund that. we've been told by scientists, we only have this century. and we only have one planet. there's no planet b. mountain gorillas show we can save species from the brink of extinction. the question now is whether the world is ready to commit the money and resources to make it
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happen on a much bigger scale. justin rowlatt, bbc news, bwindi impenetrable forest. and if you want to see more on that story, you can watch "mountain gorillas: a conservation success" — this saturday and sunday at 18:45, and on the bbc iplayer. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. sunny and pleasantly warm and temperatures will lift in the next few days but these are the temperatures we have today in a pleasant 22 or 23 across parts of england and wales and may be across eastern areas of scotland but high or very high pollen levels today. we end with sunshine this evening but the cloud coming in from the north—west heads into northern ireland and scotland and will bring
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some rain and we keep clear skies for england and wales and light winds, so temperatures will dip away to seven or 8 degrees and it will be a milder underneath the cloud for scotland and northern ireland but perhaps not too much rain during tomorrow, just a few showers but equally some glimpses of sunshine but we will keep the light winds and temperatures continue to climb on tuesday making 25 degrees across the midlands and south—east of england and nearer 17 or 18 for scotland and northern ireland.
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rail travellers face the first of three days of strikes in what's expected to be the biggest walkout on the railways in 30 years. last—minute talks between unions and industry bosses continue, but the government says industrial action is likely. industrial action is likely to proceed, and their four people to proceed, and therefore people should take sensible preparations now, because there's no point giving false hope, if you like, that these strikes can be avoided. the government has refused to intervene in talks, insisting they should be between unions and employers. we'll bring you all the latest. also on the programme... travel disruption in the skies, too. easyjet cuts more summer flights while baggage problems at heathrow mean 10% of flights at two terminals today could be cancelled. a report into grooming and sexual exploitation in oldham a decade ago
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says the local council and the police failed

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