Skip to main content

tv   New Day  CNN  July 16, 2013 3:00am-6:01am PDT

3:00 am
exclusives for you. this morning, we are bringing you all sides of the george zimmerman story. first, we brought today you'll hear from prosecutors and their key witness and most importantly you'll hear from one of the jurors speaking out only to cnn in the hopes of helping people understand their verdict. >> this juror will tell you why some originally wanted to vote guilty, what changed their minds and what they decided about those key 911 tapes and what brought the six women to tears during their deliberations. it's a remarkable interview. >> we'll take what she says and put it through the filter analysis. we have jeffrey toobin, danny cevallos, sunny hostin and vinnie politan. in addition we want to wrbrg you up to speed on a north
3:01 am
korean ship seized by panamerican vessel. gas bryces spiked 16 cents. we want to know how high they are going to go, that's coming up. we're going to get to the exclusive interview wh the juror who only wants to be known as b-37 in a moment but first breaking news on the reaction to the verdict. overnight dozens arrested one cameraman hospitalized. with the justice department now weighing in this situation continues. cnn's alina machado live in california. >> reporter: things have remained calm and peaceful in sanford, florida, for the third night in a row we've seen protests in other cities across the country. hundreds of protesters across the country voicing their opposition to the not guilty verdict. overnight in los angeles, police say incidents of vandalism and
3:02 am
assaulted have resulted in more than a dozen arrests. >> unfortunately the rights of the many have been abused by the actions of a few. >> reporter: paramedics treated a local news crew at the scene, the lapd said someone throughout a hard projectile at the crew, hitting the photographer in the head. in oakland, california, all lanes of interstate 880 were shut down by hundreds of protesters, a similar scene in houston. and in atlanta, in front of the cnn headquarters. hundreds of thousands of people have signed an online petition by the naacp pushing for a civil rights case against zimmerman. attorney general eric holder says the justice department will continue investigating possible federal charges. >> moreover i want to assure you that the department will continue to act in a manner that is consistent with the facts and the law. >> reporter: florida prosecutors say they are still convinced zimmerman is guilty.
3:03 am
>> one word to describe george zimmerman. >> murderer. >> reporter: meanwhile zimmerman's parents say they are sorry for the tragedy. >> we are deeply sorry for this tragedy, deeply sorry, and we pray for that family, we pray for trayvon martin. >> reporter: zimmerman's parents say the family have received death threats and say their lives will likely never be normal again. from the reaction outside the courtroom to what was happening inside the jury room this is a cnn exclusive. juror b-37 as she was known sitting down with cnn's anderson cooper, the first to speak out about what led to their verdict, what was going on in the video interview. she did the video in shadow fearing what would happen to her
3:04 am
identity. at first the jury was split down the middle. >> did you take an initial vote to see where everybody was? >> we did. >> how was that first vote? >> three not guilties, one second-degree murder and two manslaughters. >> can you say, do you want to say where you were on that? >> i was not guilty. >> how do you then go about deciding things? >> we looked through pretty much everything. that's why it took us so long. we're looking through the evidence and then at the end, we just, we got done and then we just started looking at the law, what exactly we could find and how we should vote for this case. and the law became very confusing. >> tell me about that. >> it became very confusing. we had stuff thrown at us, we had the second-degree murder
3:05 am
charge, the manslaughter charge, self-defense, stand your ground, we had gotten it down to manslaughter, because the second-degree wasn't second-degree anymore. >> so the person who felt it was second-degree going into it, you had convinced them okay it's manslaughter. >> through going through the law. and then we had sent a question to the judge. >> you sent a question out to the judge about man laugter. >> yes and what could be applied to the manslaughter. we were looking at the self-defen self-defense. one of the girls asked if you can put all the leading things into that one moment where he feels it's a matter of life or death to shoot this boy or if it was just at the heat of passion at that moment. >> so did that juror wanted to
3:06 am
know whether the things that had brought george zimmerman to that place. >> exactly. >> not just in the minute or two before the shot went off. >> exactly. >> did you feel like you understood the instructions from the judge? because they were very complex. >> right. and that was our problem. i mean, there was a couple of them in there that wanted to find him guilty of something and after hours and hours and hours of deliberating over the law and reading it over and over and over again, we decided there's just no way, other place to go because of the heat of the moment and stand your ground and we a right to defend himself, if he felt threatened his life was going to be taken away from him or he was going to have bodily harm he had a right. >> even though it was he who had gotten out of the car, followed trayvon martin, that didn't matter in the deliberations, what mattered was the final seconds, minutes, when there was an altercation and whether or
3:07 am
not in your mind whether the most important thing was whether or not george zimmerman felt his life was in danger. >> that's how we read the law, that's how we got to the point of everybody being not guilty. >> when you all realized okay, the last holdout juror decided okay manslaughter, we can't hold george zimmerman to manslaughter, there's something we can really hold him to, not guilty, in that jury room, what was emotionally what was that like? >> it was emotional to a point but after we had put our vote in and the bailiff had taken our vote that's when everybody started to cry. >> tell me about that. >> it's just hard. thinking that somebody lost their life and there's nothing else could be done about it. i mean, it's what happened. it's sad. it's a tragedy this happened, but it happened. and i think both were
3:08 am
responsible for the situation they had gotten themselves into. i think both of them could have walked away. it just didn't happen. >> it's still emotional for you? >> it is, it's very emotional. >> so what do we understand from what we just heard from juror b37. we bring in criminal defense attorney danny cevallos. does it seem like they were focusing on the right things, asking the right questions in that room? >> it does. i'm always surprised what jurors focus on. on the whole i feel this juror and this jury in particular they were focusing on a lot of the proper issues, the issues they should have been focused on and i think that goes to not only the jury instructions but the attorney's submission, o'maras when he tells them what they should analyze. in this case the jury instructions and i read them
3:09 am
with jeff toobin and we agreed they were confusing. >> if had been a guilty verdict you say something she said in the interview would have been grounds for an appeal. >> whether or not jury instructions become appealable or improper if they're so confusing as to mislead the jury and how that's defined includes does it require further clarification on an important issue and that's what we saw. the jury needed clarification on at least one issue like manslaughter so even though there are no comebacks from a not guilty verdict i have to wonder if it had gone the other way would that have been an appealable issue. it's hard to say. >> we didn't hear an answer whether or not she didn't understand them, it was just they were confusing. but it was not guilty so there's no appeal for the defense. there's a lot of talks whether they were the right jurors. we heard her say we heard her
3:10 am
say he was guilty of not using good judgment and "we wanted to get him for something. we tried." >> it's interesting you could read it one way, i thought this juror said the jury concluded that zimmerman did some questionable things right up until the moment of the altercation, once the altercation started then it appears they included it was trayvon martin's martin he threw the first punch, he said as much. however, when she talks about zimmerman you hear the language of some kind of liability. we felt that he had done something wrong, we felt that he had gone a little too far, and i'm paraphrasing what she said but you hear the language of criminal negligence if not maybe even the depraved heart murder but i don't think it ever rose to that level. however there seem to be culpability and she says they wanted to find him guilty of something but there wasn't anything there although they ultimately concluded under the law as they understood it he didn't do anything.
3:11 am
when you hear her talk she could go either way. >> she sounded like a lot of people outside the jury for all the things that bothered them it ultimately came down to self-defense. >> exactly. if it came down to self-defense, that's a get out of jail free card as mark o'mara observed to manslaughter and jeffrey toobin said this also, of manslaughter and second-degree murder. they went through each and every element, they adhered to their duty but boy, i mean, it's interesting to hear their walk through the path. >> and that it was very, very difficult for them and they took it seriously. danny cevallos, thanks so much. we'll have more of this exclusive interview in our next hour and remember anderson will be here in 8:00 to describe the situation to us. >> another big story we should be paying attention to in the northeast an oppressive and dangerous heat wave making life miserable for tends of millions of americans.
3:12 am
look at this map, those in the deep red areas are in for a whole lot of hurt. it's going to be a scorcher, temperatures in the 90s but feel much hotter than just that and doesn't look like we're going to get a break any time soon. indra petersons is braving the hot temperatures with more. >> reporter: good morning. we're part of that deep red you just showed us. we're talking about the early morning hours and already 80 degrees. kind of taking a look around me, a lot of people trying to take advantage of the cooler part of the day going for the early morning jogs. they probably have to get used to it. this affects the country for a pretty much big part of the week. heat and humidity continue to pummel the east coast as a brutal heat wave sends temperatures off the charts from michigan to maryland. >> it's just really hot out here. i feel like i'm going to melt. >> reporter: the heat is no laughing matter. heat kills an average of 119 people per year and this heat wave could last all week. >> your body temperature starts
3:13 am
to rise higher than your ability to get rid of heat, expire, cool down, your body can get into significant trouble. >> reporter: in new york a major energy company will monitor the city's electrical systems as the temperatures continue to climb. >> the heat wave impacts the system because literally it doesn't cool off. >> reporter: the high voltage from overheated systems have caused power outages throughout new york. >> this indicates there are 1,028 customers without electricity. >> reporter: in washington, d.c., blazing in the mid-90s it's dangerous for anyone outside. >> humidity gets high, every once in a while a guy will pass out. >> reporter: 50 million people are affected, figuring out how to beat the heat. >> i have air conditioning at home. >> staying in the ac. >> reporter: we're not just talking about high pressure hanging around and the warm temperatures for one day. it will stay with us for the next several days.
3:14 am
we have a lot of concern. major cities, new york, d.c., southern new england, definitely a lot of warm, humid air to be dealing with, really throughout the week with the heat indices, you combine temperatures ten degrees above normal for july with high humidity in the afternoon we're talking about it feeling 105 degrees out there. how long is this going to stay, when are we going to see threli. that is the end of that week, that's a mixed bag could mean some severe weather so we have to watch out for that as well. another story breaking this morning, authorities in panama have seized a north korean flagship they say was carrying a cargo of undeclared weapons. barbara starr has the latest from the pentagon. what is this about? >> chris, details still come in. the panamenans said it was a north korean ship carrying
3:15 am
weapons. the president decided to tweet a picture of it. he tweeted a photo of the cargo, it appears to be weapons in shipping containers. he is asking for an international team of inspectors to come on board this ship and find out exactly what it is. president martinelli says the north koreans hadll of this hidden in a cargo of sugar, so now it remains to be scene what exactly the north koreans were up to but apparently when the panamanan seized this ship a lot of draw ma broke out, the crew resisting arrest, the captain apparently attempting suicide, according to the panamanans they got a tip from some intelligence service this cargo of weapons there. the question, who were the north koreans up to, who were they selling it to. very close to the u.s. and the
3:16 am
p panamanians take great pride in maintaining control over the panama canal. they are not happy at all. chris? >> the big question where were the weapons, if that's what they are, where were they headed. barbara starr thanks so much. >> weapons hiding amongst brown sugar does sound a little suspicious. >> i don't think it can sound anything else but we have to learn more about it. >> barbara will be all over that. a lot of news developing at this hour, straight to michaela pereira. >> big day. making news russian president fl vladimir putin is not sympathetic to edward snowden's ordeal. he says he wants snowden out of his country asap. putin doesn't want it to affect the relations to the u.s.. a dramatic capture of the leader of the ruthless zetas cartel. his truck was stopped outside of
3:17 am
a checkpoint sunday, he had $2 million and eight weapons when he was captured, two people were arrested. trevino faces organized crime, homicide, torture and money laundering charges. police are investigating a suspicious powder on a flight discovered in the plane's bathroom shortly before landing. flight 460 landed safely and thankfully no one was injured. controversy forming david petraeus even before he starts his next gig. now he's taking a massive pay cut. gawker reported city of university of new york was going to pay petraeus $200,000 to be a visiting professor, that's reportedly eight times what a first-time adjunct professor was paid. later that figure went down to $1. petraeus' attorney said it was never about money. a woman in china tried to squeeze between two walls to get home. she was trapped for seven hours
3:18 am
overnight before foengds in the neighborhood found her. firefighters broke down one of the walls to cut her out. i bet she won't take the shortcut anymore. >> it's got to be more to that. >> conspiracy theory. >> they thought she was a ghost. >> trapped for seven hours is bad. it doesn't matter what led you to be in there, the poor woman. i'm happy they got her out. another example not here at home but abroad, these first responders, they just get people out of terrible situations all the time. >> every call they get you don't know what to expect. that's what amazing me about our first responders. >> thank you for what you do. when we come back cnn's exclusive interview with rachel jeantel. what was going through her mind when she was on that stand. also, just in time for your
3:19 am
big summer vacation, gas prices skyrocketing. they've gone up in the summer but going up fast. we'll tell you how high they might climb. ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪ ♪ hooking up the country helping business run ♪ ♪ trains! they haul everything, safely and on time. ♪ tracks! they connect the factories built along the lines. and that means jobs, lots of people,
3:20 am
making lots and lots of things. let's get your business rolling now, everybody sing. ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪ ♪ helping this big country move ahead as one ♪ ♪ norfolk southern how's that function? ♪ i don't know. how did you get here? [ speaking in russian ] look, look, look... you probably want to get away as much as we do.
3:21 am
with priceline express deals, you can get a fabulous hotel without bidding. think of the rubles you'll save. with one touch, fun in the sun. i like fun. well, that went exactly as i planned.. really? now save up to 60% during summer hotel sale. use code "summer" on priceline's. wi drive a ford fusion. who is healthier, you or your car? i would say my car. probably the car. cause as you get older you start breaking down. i love my car. i want to take care of it.
3:22 am
i have a bad wheel - i must say. my car is running quite well. keep your car healthy with the works. $29.95 or less after $10 mail-in rebate at your participating ford dealer. so you gotta take care of yourself? yes you do. you gotta take care of your baby? oh yeah! welcome back to "new day" everyone. it is money time and our focus on the sudden surge in gas prices. you felt it at the pump you don't need me to tell you about it. what does it tell you for the rest of the summer. alson kosik is here with us. >> prices are moving higher. if you look at the trend overall
3:23 am
they are going higher. the average price of a gallon of gas $3.64 a gallon, up 16 cents from a week ago. gas prices have been up and down, they were the highest in march but that trend is going higher especially as we dig in deep into the summer driving season which we're in right now. there are lots of factors. >> what is behind it? last week when i was talking to christine romans we were talking about overseas oil prices but what's pushing them up? >> there are several reasons and one of them is those tensions in egypt, the suez canal is an important shipping center for oil so it's not an issue of supply, it's more of an oil delivery issue so that bleeds into supply. another thing squeezing prices, lots of refinery shutdowns, some are scheduled, some aren't scheduled and this is happening as the perfect storm meaning time, we're having that peak summer driving season so that's also adding to the pressure as well. >> look into your crystal ball and how high for the rest of the summer at least do you think
3:24 am
we're going to go? do you think the trend is going to be up or is the dip coming? >> tlenrends are continuing. shutdowns are continuing and it's hurricane season time, oil platforms and refineries could be damaged. >> and shut down even for a short period of time it has some affect on the pump. alson thanks so much. >> you got it. coming up next on "new day," another cnn exclusive you don't want to miss, one on one with rachel jeantel, she was one of the star prosecution witnesses in the george zimmerman trial. her reaction to the not guilty verdict and what she thinks of critics who call her friend trayvon martin a thug. ready for this, few things generate interest like a panda and you're looking at two of them because this time there is news first time more than 20 years a panda in an american zoo has given birth to twins. you're looking at them, look how tiny they are. we're going to check in with the
3:25 am
mom and their cubs. >> they grow up fast. i'm phyllis and i have diabetic nerve pain. when i first felt the diabetic nerve pain, of course i had no idea what it was. i felt like my feet were going to sleep. it progressed from there to burning like i was walking on hot coals... to like 1,000 bees that were just stinging my feet. i have a great relationship with my doctor... he found lyrica for me. [ female announcer ] it's known that diabetes damages nerves. lyrica is fda approved to treat diabetic nerve pain. lyrica is not for everyone. it may cause serious allergic reactions or suicidal thoughts or actions. tell your doctor right away if you have these, new or worsening depression, or unusual changes in mood or behavior. or swelling, trouble breathing, rash, hives, blisters, changes in eyesight including blurry vision, muscle pain with fever, tired feeling, or skin sores from diabetes. common side effects are dizziness, sleepiness, weight gain and swelling of hands, legs and feet. don't drink alcohol while taking lyrica.
3:26 am
don't drive or use machinery until you know how lyrica affects you. those who have had a drug or alcohol problem may be more likely to misuse lyrica. having less pain -- it's a wonderful feeling. [ female announcer ] ask your doctor about lyrica today. it's specific treatment for diabetic nerve pain. to hear more of phyllis's story, visit lyrica.com. saving time by booking an appointment online,
3:27 am
even smarter. online scheduling. available now at meineke.com.
3:28 am
♪ billy joel "walking in my sleep" hopefully not perfect for you, got to be wide awake. it's tuesday, july 16th, i'm chris cuomo. >> and i'm kate bolduan along with michaela pereira. rachel jeantel is speaking about george zimmerman and about his defense team. take a lying right now, you see these smoke stacks, they're
3:29 am
coming down. there will be a big implosion in about 15 minutes live from a power plant in hollywood, california. we'll bring it to you, always like to see that as long as it's safe. >> you like those implosions? >> i like to see things get blown up and fall down but that's me. >> good to me. >> and you like news, what do you have for us? >> we all do, don't we? good morning to you at home. for the first time a juror in the george zimmerman trial is breaking her silence. juror b37 believes george zimmerman had a right to defend himself and the shooting of trayvon martin should have never have happened in the first place. >> i think both were responsible for the situation they had gotten themselves into. i think both of them could have walked away. it just didn't happen. >> b37 went on to say all the jurors broke into tears after handing in their not guilty verdict. a sizzling week will be
3:30 am
scorching the northeast. we do not expect record-breaking temperatures but there are heat advisories in boston, philly, the d.c. area and new york city. the heat will expand into the midwest and northern plains over the next couple of days. relief is not expected until the weekend. senators meeting again to try to prevent the nuclear option that's the democrats' threat to wipe out republican filibusters of the president's cabinet and agency nominees and put them to a majority vote. nearly all 100 senators met late into the night but could not hash out a deal, two cabinet nominees and five agency appointees are up this morning. a group of deaf kuser ins are suing starbucks saying workers at two new york city locations were cruel and refused to serve them. an attorney for a dozen deaf customers say they were ridiculed, laughed at and told to leave. in one incident last year a deaf customer says he was continually told to repeat himself to the point that a worker started laughing hysterically.
3:31 am
starbucks for their part says they're investigating the allegations. the driver who crashed his van into a toledo motel, going about 100 miles per hour now under arrest. the shirtless suspect is seen on camera running away from the crowne inn motel. amazingly two people inside the room he crashed into are both okay. workers tell cnn affiliate wtol police soon caught up with the driver outside a nearby kmart. the baby pan dass, congratulations in order for lun lun, the panda in zha atlanta. the giant panda gave birth to twins monday. oh, we have a sneak peek at the zoo's live panda cam. >> she's awake watching her babies as well. >> she's definitely contemplating her belly button. the twins have not been spotted. they were surprised as zookeepers were expecting only one cub. it's the first set of twin pandas born in the u.s. since
3:32 am
1987. our producer miguel has been monitoring the panda cam. we haven't seen the pandas yet this morning. >> they're so teenie. >> they have eclipsed by mom. >> names? >> lun lun is working on it, the mom's name. >> i know. >> i think it's fun when you involve the kids and have the community naming the pandas. >> what have you got, kids? >> what do you think? >> lun lun? >> that's the mom. >> nigel and basil. >> i like when people name their dog very undog like, steve. one of them will be dave the other one will be molly. dave and molly the twins. >> we'll work on that and find out what the names will be. >> a panda named frank. is that so bad? it's an american panda. we'll keep contemplating that and much more news to the cnn exclusive that she was the star witness for the prosecution in the george zimmerman trial
3:33 am
and she captivated much of the nation with her gripping and sometimes contentious testimony. for the first time rachel jeantel is speaking out. she talked with piers morgan last night about the verdict and also who trayvon martin really was. >> tell me first of all your reaction to the fact that george zimmerman was acquitted. >> disappointed, upset, angry. >> what is your view of george zimmerman? >> weak. if you were a real man, you would have stand on that stage and tell what happened. >> in your heart, what do you believe happened? >> he was trying to get home and he was and that's a fact. he keeps telling me the man's still watching him so if it was a security guard or policeman they'd come up to see him do you have a problem, do you need help, like normal people. >> if george zimmerman had done
3:34 am
that, if he'd introduced himself as a neighborhood watch patrolman, what would trayvon have said to him do you think, no, i'm just trying to get home. >> be honest with me rachel do you think that was racially motivated or more of a case somebody he thought was a young thug, black or white? >> it was racial, let's be honest, racial, if trayvon was white and he had a hoodie on, would it have happened? >> one thing we didn't get in this trial, rachel, was a real sense of what trayvon martin was really like. what kind of guy was he? >> he was a calm, chill, loving person, loved his family, definitely his mother. >> he was a good friend to you? >> yes. >> a kind friend? >> yes. >> was he ever aggressive? >> no. >> did he ever lose his temper? >> no. >> did he take a lot of weed? >> no. >> how much would you say? >> twice a week. >> is that normal for teen agers in your community.
3:35 am
>> yes, real normal. >> what effect did it have on you, trayvon's death? >> you can't believe what just happened. you were just a minute on the phone with the person, and people got the nerve to tell me oh why? >> seemed to me a different character to the one we saw in court. >> i was dealing with a lot of stress for 16 months i think. >> and you were grieving a friend. >> i was grieving. >> doug west gave you a very hard time the defense attorney. >> hmm, don west. >> what is your view of him? >> mmm, mmm, mmm, what do i have to say? i'm a christian. i never cussed out don. the only reason i have not said nothing to don westin because my
3:36 am
parents taught me better. that's an adult. you don't have the right to disrespect an adult. >> the juror who was interviewed by anderson cooper for cnn said that she felt sorry for you. you're uneducated, you have no communication skills, what do you feel about what that juror said about you? >> angry. upset. when the state closed, they tried to explain what kind of person i am and you could see the kind of person i am. you can't be too honest. the jury is so shocked what i said and they're acting like the generation we got now don't say that. >> are you an honest person by nature? >> yes. >> you took that seriously. >> yes, because mind you, who wants to be in a murder case? you think i would make all that up to be in a murder case, never knew it was going to be
3:37 am
nationwide. so why i'd make that up, deal with the b.s. to get to trial, how do i make that up? >> the last point is a big one. people love to judge and social media only makes it easier for us but when you want to think about rachel jeantel, she said it perfectly there, 16 months she had to deal with this, she lost her friend. >> she's 19 years old. >> she's 19 years old, she's part of a murder case now. she knows she's on national television all the time and people feel so free to judge her reactions and behavior. >> a case that has such massive implications, too. >> people care so passionately about it. remember she did not ask to be put in this position and you don't know what it would be like if you were on that stand. >> hard enough for you to live on the fact her friend was on the phone with her before his life was taken. >> tough, tough, tough. we'll take a break on "new day" and when he come back the
3:38 am
scandal rocking the mayor of san diego, new allegations how he groped workers inside his own office and why he's refusing to step down. we're moments away from, what am i looking at here? yeah, you'll wait and want to see spectacular power plant implosion. >> see, everybody wants to see it. you even want to see it. i think farmers care more about the land than probably anyone else.
3:39 am
we've had this farm for 30 years. we raise black and red angus cattle. we also produce natural gas. that's how we make our living and that's how we can pass the land and water back to future generations. people should make up their own mind what's best for them. all i can say is it has worked well for us.
3:40 am
3:41 am
hasselbeck. welcome back to "new day," everybody. the mayor of san diego refusing to step down. bob filner is accused of touching and kissing supporters and staff people. now many are calling for his resignation. cnn's stephanie elam has that. >> bob filner is to blame!
3:42 am
and he needs to resign! >> reporter: san diego mayor bob filner hasn't been in office a year yet but he's already fighting for his job. filner's chief of staff has resigned, his fiance has left him and calling for his resignation and heading up the chant, former city councilwoman donna frye. >> we need to stand by our women who have been abused, who have been sexually harassed and stand up for them and get him out of office. >> reporter: the political fire storm prompted the mayor to release this video on youtube. >> when a friend like donna frye is compelled to call for any resignation i'm clearly doing something wrong. i'm embarrassed to admit i have failed to fully respect the women who work for and with me. >> reporter: marco gonzalez alleged the mayor forcibly kissed and groped several women. >> says things, come on, you know you love me, just give me a
3:43 am
kiss. let's go up to my office. no one will know. >> reporter: filner made it clear he's not going to step down. >> it's very important that i think we continue with my priorities, that's what i was elected to do with the vision i have for the city, and we've made some very great strides and those will continue. that's why i'm not resigning. >> reporter: can the embattled mayor survive the storm? >> politics is ultimately about trust. when your own fiance turns on you, when your closest friends and political allies level accusations against you it's almost impossible to rebuild that trust. >> reporter: stephanie elam, cnn, los angeles. time for around the world, russian president vladimir putin says he wants nsa leaker edward snowden to leave russia as soon as possible, but he is not ruling out snowden's request for asylum there. phil black has the latest from moscow. >> russian president vladimir putin blamed the united states for trapping edward snowden
3:44 am
here. he says from the moment snowden left hong kong the u.s. has intimidated other countries and that's why he can't leave. putin hasn't ruled out granting snowden asylum. he said as soon as he can be transferred to another country he will do so. mexico's notorious zetas cartel is under arrest not far from the border. >> the notorious drug lord was arrested on a remote road in a border city. mexican marines had the area under surveillance for some months and when they stopped his pickup truck they found $2 million in cash, eight guns and two other men. perhaps mexico's largest drug cartel was known for his gruesome violence. in 2009 he was indicted in the united states on a $5 million
3:45 am
reward placed on his head. >> thanks so much for that. apple is now investigating reports that a woman in china was electrocuted by her iphone 5. the family claims she died answering a call while her phone was charging. david mackenzie is in beijing with the latest. >> chinese state media say a woman has been electrocuted and died using an iphone 5 when it was charging. apple the electronics giant says they are saddened by her death and that they are investigating the reports. state media says the woman's body showed clear signs of electrocution but they did say that smartphones like this give off tiny voltage and chinese authorities have warned consumers here not to use dodgy cell phone chargers. apple used to be known just for creating products here in china but increasingly it's an important market for the company. kate, back to you. >> david, thanks so much.
3:46 am
terrifying, clearly something they need to investigate. >> absolutely. we'll take a break and when we come back, we've been watching the smokestacks that are going to be imploded. right now we're showing them there. live picture in. >> it looks like it's happening. >> it's imploding, let's watch. >> second boiler, the third boiler. you know all four boilers are down. and the first smoke stack there it is starting to lean. >> this is all okay. this is a controlled implosion of an old power plant they're knocking down make way for something else. >> this is said to be the biggest power plant implosion in history, one of the biggest general demme lagss in the past 20 years. >> 50 years old, think of the technological advances since then. >> since the '60s the broadcaster is saying it stood and they brought it down, remember it's a controlled implosion so they make the
3:47 am
stacks fall the way they want and everything around them is kept safe and they can deal with the deconstruction after it. >> when you look at the size of what it was the pile of rubble is remarkably small. they're going to build a brand new power plant that will be much more efficient. >> looks like it went well. let's hope it did. >> where you don't want to live is the way the cloud is going. >> downwind. >> that's unfortunately downwind and not a very good place to be. >> they likely evacuated folks in light of that. >> talk amongst yourselves. you know it was fun to watch. >> come on people. happy tuesday, we'll be right back. ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪
3:48 am
♪ hooking up the country helping business run ♪ ♪ build! we're investing big to keep our country in the lead. ♪ load! we keep moving to deliver what you need. and that means growth, lots of cargo going all around the globe. cars and parts, fuel and steel, peas and rice, hey that's nice! ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪ ♪ helping this big country move ahead as one ♪ ♪ norfolk southern how's that function? ♪
3:49 am
this is what i call american ingenuity and what smart people in indiana can do when they put their mind to it. >> this is his backyard a guy built a roller coaster in his backyard.
3:50 am
3:51 am
♪ all right keep your hands inside the moving vehicle in your backyard. we want to show you our must see moment, might be called you must have a lot of time on your hands and all the courage in the world. this is john ivers of southern indiana, where is it, kate? >> vincenze, indiana. >> he did not just build a homemade roller coaster he made two in his backyard, one of them called blue force. it is a 20 foot tall climb and a g force drop. he used scrap metal and old parts from his j to make the rides. gave my dad props to flooding the backyard to an ice rink this brings your game up. >> we'll have hoosiers that are
3:52 am
going to be a little upset about one aspect of this. this is called a great use of your day. >> yes. he's going to have a lot of neighbors coming out to visit. >> it's about the community. in vincenze he might have neighbors for miles. >> there will be screams of glee coming from that backyard. >> who wouldn't want a roller coaster in their backyard. if i had those we'd just be throwing food to the kids at the back door and never come inside. i could never do it. >> impressive, looks good. indiana, everything good comes from indiana, that is what you learned this morning. coming up we do have two very big exclusives we've been talking about. pivotal people from george zimmerman's murder trial speaking to cnn and you won't see it anywhere else, right here on "new day." we'll hear from the first juror to break her silence since the verdict and the last person to talk to trayvon martin on the
3:53 am
night he died, rachel jeantel. plus the latest on the family of a little boy sucked into the sand dune on lake michigan, they say he's lucky to be alive. we have the details about the incredible race of time to save his life and how he's doing today. ford fusion. who is healthier, you or your car? i would say my car. probably the car. cause as you get older you start breaking down. i love my car. i want to take care of it. i have a bad wheel - i must say. my car is running quite well. keep your car healthy with the works. $29.95 or less after $10 mail-in rebate at your participating ford dealer. so you gotta take care of yourself? yes you do. you gotta take care of your baby? oh yeah!
3:54 am
mhandle more than 165 billionl letters and packages a year. that's about 34 million pounds of mail every day. ever wonder what this costs you as a taxpayer? millions? tens of millions? hundreds of millions? not a single cent. the united states postal service doesn't run on your tax dollars. it's funded solely by stamps and postage. brought to you by the men and women of the american postal worker's union. peoi go to angie's listt for all kinds of reasons. to gauge whether or not the projects will be done in a timely fashion and within budget. angie's list members can tell you which provider is the best in town. you'll find reviews on everything from home repair to healthcare.
3:55 am
now that we're expecting, i like the fact i can go onto angie's list and look for pediatricians. the service providers that i've found on angie's list actually have blown me away. find out why more than two million members count on angie's list. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. loses his computer, exposing thousands of patient records to identity theft. data breaches can happen that easily. we don't believe you should be a victim of someone else's mistake. we're lifelock. we constantly monitor the web so if any of your personal information is misused, we're on it. ♪ ow. [ male announcer ] call 1-800-lifelock or go to lifelock.com today.
3:56 am
kate middleton and prince william are expecting the baby any minute now. royals say they don't care what gender it is as long as it's healthy enough to never work a day in its life. >> william's brother prince harry is said to be excited he'll be an uncle for the first time and no longer be the only
3:57 am
one running around the royal palace naked. >> we look forward to welcoming the little bundle of joy. >> craig ferguson is so funny. >> he is. you hear it which means it's time for the rock block, a quick roundup of stories we'll be talking about. straight to it, michaela. >> first up in "the chicago tribune" rod blagojevich is back, he's appealing his conviction, he was sent to prison for trying to sell president obama's senate seat. the risk of high blood pressure for american kids has shot up by 27% over the last 13 years. yale university researchers blame thickening waistlines and more salt in the diets for the increase. and from "the wall street journal" new fossil evidence proofz proves t. rex was a hunter. the tooth buried in the spine of another dinosaur proves he was a hunter and not a scavenger. we go toalson kosik with today's
3:58 am
business minutes. >> the dow and nasdaq closing at their highest level since the last decade. mercer consulting says employers expect workers salaries to go up next year by an average of 2.9%. let me ask you this who works the hardest, those who live in mexico. mexicans work about 519 hours more than the typical american for an annual pay of $9,885. chile comes in second, korea comes in third. now let's get to indra petersons outside with the weather. >> it's a hot one, many cities dealing with the heat wave, southern new england, d.c., new york, philadelphia, all of you looking for temperatures ten degrees above normal for july, on top of that adding tons of humidity, heat indices, 95 to 105 degrees, here's the problem it's expected to last all week long. remember heat is the biggest
3:59 am
killer of all, so stay safe today. >> we'll have to bring you back inside, indra, it's going to get too high. if you check your clock it's almost the top of the hour. time for the top news. >> trayvon is not a thug. that's just their opinions. >> a cnn exclusive, inside the jury room, one of the zimmerman trial jurors breaks her silence. was race a factor? who screamed they believed was on that 911 call and why did some want to vote guilty? outrage and protests against the verdict turned violent overnight. dozens arrested this as a key witness for the prosecution speaks out in another cnn exclusive. rachel jeantel in an interview you can only see here. dangerous heat, a brutal heat long heat wave is burning up the eastern half of the country. is it going to be the worst week of the summer, can the power
4:00 am
grids hold? >> your "new day" starts right now. >> announcer: what you need to know. >> we thought nathan was dead and they said he's got a heartbeat. >> announcer: what you just have to see. this is "new day" with chris cuomo, kate bolduan, and michaela pereira. >> good morning, everybody. welcome back to "new day." it's tuesday, july 16th, 7:00 in the east, i'm chris cuomo. >> good morning, everybody, i'm kate bolduan joined by news anchor michaela pereira. >> good morning. >> coming this up hour we're covering all the angles of the george zimmerman case including a juror speaking out fort the first time about how they reached the controversial not guilty verdict. after they were divided at the very beginning what she says led to the decision that sparked protests across the nation.
4:01 am
later we'll talk with rachel jeantel. trayvon martin's friend, key witness for the prosecution, she's going to talk about what it was like for her, that experience and something that she'll call b.s. that happened in the trial. we'll have her legal team, jeffrey toobin, danny cevallos, sunny hostin what it means how this verdict came to be. a lot of headlines, new developments in the recovery of a 6-year-old boy we remember telling you about this yesterday he was trapped for nearly four hours under a sand dune. doctors calling his survival a miracle. >> taken is, wait until you hear that story. >> how long he was trapped, it's amazing. >> we'll get to the exclusive interviews in a moment. first breaking news the tension building since the didment zm verdict hit a flash point on the west coast. protesters raided a walmart, attacked people on sidewalks and in san francisco even blocked a major freeway. more than a dozen arrests were
4:02 am
made in l.a. with the police chief saying this will not be allowed to continue. we begin with aflee machado live from sanford, florida. >> reporter: good morning, chris. things remained calm and peaceful in sanford, florida. for the third night in a row we have seen protest in other cities around the country. hundreds of protesters across the country voicing their opposition to the not guilty verdict. overnight in los angeles, police say incidents of vandalism and assaulted have resulted in more than a dozen arrests. >> unfortunately the rights of the many have been abused by the actions of a few. >> reporter: paramedics treated a local news crew at the scene, the lapd said someone threw a hard projectile at the crew, hitting the photographer in the head. in oakland, california, all lanes of interstate 880 were shut down by hundreds of protesters, a similar scene in houston.
4:03 am
and in atlanta, in front of the cnn headquarters. hundreds of thousands of people have signed an online petition by the naacp pushing for a civil rights case against zimmerman. attorney general eric holder says the justice department will continue investigating possible federal charges. >> moreover i want to assure you that the department will continue to act in a manner that is consistent with the facts and the law. >> reporter: florida prosecutors say they are still convinced zimmerman is guilty. >> one word to describe george zimmerman. >> murderer. >> reporter: meanwhile zimmerman's parents say they are sorry for the tragedy. >> we are deeply sorry for this tragedy, deeply sorry, and we pray for the departed. we pray for trayvon martin. >> reporter: zimmerman's parents say they have received death
4:04 am
threats and they say zimmerman remains in hiding and likely stay in hiding to are a very long time. >> thank you so much. amid all of this for the first time we are hearing from a juror in the george zimmerman trial. she says zimmerman's heart was in the right place on the night trayvon martin was killed. cnn's anderson cooper sat down exclusively with juror b37 who is in shadow as you see because she says she fears for her family's safety. >> how significant were the 911 tapes for you? >> the lauer tape was the most significant because it went through before the struggle, during the struggle, the gunshot, and then after. >> you had the parents of trayvon martin testifying, you had the family of george zimmerman, friends of george zimmerman testifying about whose voice it was on the 911 call. >> um-hum. >> whose voice do you think it was on the 911 call? >> i think it was george zimmerman's. >> did everybody in the jury
4:05 am
agree with that? >> all but probably one. >> and what made you think it was george zimmerman's voice? >> because of the evidence that he was the one that had gotten beaten. >> i want to ask you about some of the different witnesses. rachel jeantel, the woman who was on the phone with trayvon martin at the start of the incident. what did you make of her testimony? >> i didn't think it was very credible but i felt very sorry for her. she didn't ask to be in this place. she didn't ask -- she wanted to go. she wanted to leave. she didn't want to be any part of this jury. i think she felt inadequate toward everyone because of her education and her communication skills. i just felt sadness for her. >> what did you think of george zimmerman? >> i think george zimmerman is a man whose heart was in the right place but just got displaced by
4:06 am
the vandalism in the neighborhoods and wanting to catch these people so badly that he went above and beyond what he really should have done, but i think his heart was in the right place. it just went terribly wrong. >> do you think he's guilty of something? >> i think he's guilty of not using good judgment. when he was in the car, he had called 911, he shouldn't have gotten out of that car. but the 911 operator also when he was talking to him kind of egged him on. i don't know if it's their policy to tell them what to do, not to get out of the car, to stay in their car but i think he should have said stay in your car, not, can you see where he's gone? >> do you feel george zimmerman should have been carrying a gun? >> i think he has every right to
4:07 am
carry a gun. i think it's everybody's right to carry a gun as long as they use it the way it's supposed to be used and be responsible in using it. >> you can't say for sure whether or not trayvon martin knew that george zimmerman was carrying a gun? >> no. >> so you can't say for sure whether or not trayvon martin reached for that gun. >> right, but that doesn't make it right. there is not a right or a wrong, even if he did reach for the gun, it doesn't make any difference. >> how so? >> well, because george had a right to protect himself at that point. >> so you believe that george zimmerman really felt his life was in danger? >> i do. i really do. >> based on the testimony you heard, you believe that trayvon martin was the aggressor? >> i think the roles changed. i think george got in a little bit too deep, which he shouldn't have been there, but trayvon decided that he wasn't going to let him scare him and get the one over up on him or something
4:08 am
and i think trayvon got mad and attacked him. >> what did you think of the testimony of trayvon martin's mother and father? do you find them credible? >> i think they said anything a mother and father would say, just like george zimmerman's mom and father. i think, they're your kids. you want to believe that they're innocent and that was their voice, because hearing that voice would make it credible that they were the victim, not the aggressor. >> so in a way both sets of parents kind of canceled each other out in your mind? >> they did, definitely, because if i was a mother, i would want to believe so hard that it was not my son that did that or was responsible for any of that, that i would convince myself probably that it was his voice. >> how critical was it for you in your mind to have an idea of whose voice it was yelling for
4:09 am
help? how important was that yell for help? >> i think it was pretty important because it was a long cry and scream for help that whoever was calling for help was in fear of their life. >> do you feel that george zimmerman had race playing a profile in this? do you think it was suspicious? >> i don't think he did. circumstances caused george to think that he might be a robber or trying to do something bad in the neighborhood because of all that had gone on previously. there were an unbelievable number of robberies in the neighborhood. >> so you don't believe race played a role in this case? >> i don't think it did. i think if there was another person, spanish, white, asian, if they came in the same situation they were trayvon was, i think george would have reacted the exact same way.
4:10 am
>> why do you think geoe zimmerman found trayvon martin suspicious then? >> because he was cutting through the back, it was raining, he said he was looking in houses as he was talking down the road, kind of just not having a purpose to where he was going. he was stopping and starting, but i mean, that's george's rendition of it but i think the situation where trayvon got into him being late at night, dark at night, raining, and anybody would think anybody walking down the road, stopping and turning and looking, if that's exactly what happened, is suspicious and george had said that he didn't recognize who he was. >> was that a common belief on the jury that race was not, that race did not play a role in this? >> i think all of us thought race did not play a role. >> nobody else felt race played a role.
4:11 am
>> i can't speak for them. >> that wasn't a part of the discussion in the jury room. >> no, we never had that discussion. >> why did you want to speak? >> i want people to know that we put everything into everything to get this verdict. we didn't just go in there and say we're going to come in here and just do guilty/not guilty. we thought about it for hours, and cried over it afterwards. i don't think any of us could ever do anything like that ever again. >> obviously emotional there at the end. we bring in jeffrey toobin, and criminal defense attorney danny cev cevallos. did the jury seem they arrived the at the verdict the right way, listening to the interview what is your take? >> certainly based on the
4:12 am
evidence, that's all you can ask of a jury. i thought she displayed a remarkable mastery of the evidence including frankly some of the things i missed in the testimony. i also think she indicated a great deal of sympathy for george zimmerman, more than i would have expected. at one point in the interview anderson said do you feel sorry for trayvon martin and she says i feel sorry for both of them. that really rocked me back when you consider that trayvon martin is dead, and, but, but, you know, this is why we have jurors. i thought it was a rational verdict, that was a rational discussion of the evidence and here we are. >> what do you think of how the jury vote breakdown went, when they went into the room she says that three jurors were thinking not guilty, three jurors were thinking guilty, two manslaughter, one second-degree murder. does that surprise you that they began there and where they ended up? >> no, because when it splits like that, somewhere some minority is going to get
4:13 am
eventually worn down to zero. so either that or they deadlock, but what i would be interested to hear this is a juror who clearly by her own words was not guilty from the minute that door closed in the jury room so the question becomes what about the person who voted depraved heart murder on the first poll? that person would have an interesting story to tell because they went from the door closes, i believe we that ill will and i believe he's guilty of depraved heart murder to complete 180 degrees where eventually that person had to capitulate and say, fine, you got me. i'm hungry, i want to go home, it's a not guilty. that's the decision process that would be fas nationing to dissect. >> and a lot of the speculation during the trial was, is this jury getting what really matters, what's being confused. what did it mean to you when we heard the juror say that race wasn't an issue, that they didn't like that he got out of the car, they don't like a lot of the things that george zimmerman did. they think he was guilty of not
4:14 am
using good judgment but that it was all about self-defense. what does that mean to you? >> if they excluded race from their analysis that was proper under the law because race was not an element of any of the crimes charged or self-defense. i thought it was fascinating that in her words what she described thought that george went too far, she used language like that. as soon as you hear went too far that is the language of an imperfect self-defense, the language of manslaughter so it's interesting to me even though some people wanted to find him guilty of something, but she ultimately felt that he was not guilty yet she uses language i think the prosecution would agree is part of the language of manslaughter. >> if you look at the facts of the case, every dispute before her, before the jury, she thought the defense won. whose voice was it calling for help, she thought it was george zimmerman, who initiated the
4:15 am
fight, she thought it was trayvon martin. when it comes to the disputed fact she was very much with the defense. >> what about what was seen as one of the most pivotal moments at least from those watching from the outside when both, when mothers both testified saying that was my son's voice on that tape. she said that very canceled each other out those testimonies. does that surprise you? because from looking in from the outside, that seemed that that must have had an impact. >> not really. the parents testifying, of course we all have a bias about our children and i thought it really vindicated the defense' decision to call all those other witnesses to say that was george's voice, you had four, five, six witnesses say that sounded like george zimmerman and there was no hesitation in her voice when she said to anderson i thought that was george zimmerman calling for help. >> the fact they reached such a conclusion, so many people on
4:16 am
more sides, more say george zimmerman. danny cevallos, jeffrey toobin thank you. in our next hour anderson will be joining us more in the 8:00 hour to get his impressions from that great exclusive interview. the sweltering combination can of heat and humidity hitting the northeast could turn deadly. take a look at that red zone, millions of people in the northeast are feeling this heat wave and in you live in the midwest or northern plains you're going to feel it later this week. let's talk more with indra petersons outside which means she's hot here in new york city. it was about 85 degrees at 2:30 in the morning. what is it like out there now? >> reporter: literally, it's actually 80 degrees here right now but here is the deal we are talking about 70% humidity. now that the sun is out the difference it's right on my back and oppressive. the cool time of the morning pretty much doesn't exist. it's here to stay and going to affect a huge chunk of the nation, take a look.
4:17 am
heat and humidity continue to pummel the east coast as a brutal heat wave sends temperatures off the charts from michigan to maryland. >> it's really hot out here. i feel like i'm going to melt. >> reporter: the heat is no laughing matter. heat kills an average of 119 people per year and this heat wave could last all week. >> your body temperature starts to rise higher than your ability to get rid of heat, perspire, et cetera or cool down, then your body can get into significant trouble. >> reporter: in new york a major energy company set up a command center and they'll monitor the electrical systems as the temperature continues to climb. >> the heat wave impacts the system because it doesn't cool off. >> reporter: it has already caused power power outages without power.
4:18 am
>> this indicates there are 1,028 customers without electricity. >> reporter: in washington, d.c., blazing in the mid-90s it's dangerous for anyone outside. >> humidity gets high, every once in a while a guy will pass out. >> reporter: 50 million people are affected, figuring out how to beat the heat. >> i have air conditioning at home. >> staying in the ac. >> reporter: we're not expecting to see relief, heat is the biggest killer of all weather events. 120 people have died a year from this so think about that, do not underestimate the heat. wear the light colored clothing drink your fluids. temperatures 95 degrees you add in the humidity even in the afternoon it will feel like 95, even 105 degrees out there. again it's going to last for several days. we are looking for the relief as far as when are we going to see that relief, not until the weekend. we're talking about a cold front omoving in, but hot and moist air that is norg when you combined that with a cold front we could be talking about severe weather for the second portion of this week especially heavy
4:19 am
rain as we go into the weekend, be monitoring that as well. for now one thing at a time, it is hot out here. i don't know if you can see the sweat dripping off my face, it's getting worse. >> we don't call it sweating, we call it glistening. >> thank you. >> exactly. there is a lot of news develop at this hour, straight to michaela for the latest. >> we'd forgive her if she jumped into the fountain. >> she'd get arrested. >> but we have an attorney on hand. a north korean ship seized in panama and military weapons found on board hidden in a cargo of brown sugar. panamanian authorities say the 35 crew members resisted arrest and that the captain tried to kill himself. it's not clear exactly what kind of weapons were found. the ship had sailed from cuba. at first authorities thought it was hauling drugs. more coming up. we can learn more today about why actor cory monteith died. the coroner in canada has finished the autopsy now. early results could be released
4:20 am
today but toxicology test results could take longer to come back. the "glee" star was found dead saturday in a vancouver hotel room, he was 31 years. authorities have ruled out foul play. moments ago a planned implosion in ft. lauderdale for florida power and lights, prt everglades plant a 350-tall smokestacks stood for 50 years. new $1 billion plant will be built on the same site set to open in 2016. obese boy scouts, those who weigh more than 100 pounds above their ideal weight are not allowed to attend this year's national jamboree. leaders say this will be the most physically demanding in its history and scouts had to meet certain fitness standards. they'll participate in kayaking, rock climbing and mountain biking. a group of russian women, a
4:21 am
beautiful sky diving record they created a giant freefalling flower, beating the old record of 88 people. if you notice the hole in the center it was done to honor their former captain. that a sight. >> amazing how they hold that together. >> all women, amazing. >> they're called pearls of the sky. >> they were high, too. 20 minutes past 7:00 on the east. when we come back you're looking at rachel jeantel the last person to hear trayvon martin alive. the prosecution's star witness is speaking out against the verdict. >> and the latest on the little boy right there who was swallowed up by a sand sink hole. we'll hear from his grandfather who said it was a miracle this boy survived more than three
4:22 am
hours buried alive. we've been bringing people together. today, we'd like people to come together on something that concerns all of us. obesity. and as the nation's leading beverage company, we can play an important role. that includes continually providing more options. giving people easy ways to help make informed choices. and offering portion controlled versions of our most popular drinks. it also means working with our industry to voluntarily change what's offered in schools. but beating obesity will take continued action by all of us, based on one simple common sense fact... all calories count. and if you eat and drink more calories than you burn off, you'll gain weight. that goes for coca-cola, and everything else with calories. finding a solution will take all of us. but at coca-cola, we know
4:23 am
when people come together, good things happen. to learn more, visit coke.com/comingtogether at university of phoenix we kis where it can take you.cation
4:24 am
(now arriving: city hospital) which is why we're proud to help connect our students with leading employers across the nation. (next stop: financial center) let's get to work.
4:25 am
welcome back to "new day" everyone. this is a miracle this boy is alive, 6 years old trapped inside a sand dune for nearly four hours. doctors say the indiana boy remains in intensive care but he is moving his arms and legs and could make a full recovery. the latest from pamela brown. you've been following this from the beginning. it's good to hear even slightly good news about his condition. >> not only did 6-year-old nathan woessner survive against all odds he's doing better than
4:26 am
expected according to his doctor i spoke with last night. nathan's grandfather is sharing what it was like at the moment any family member would dread, he learned his grandson had been swallowed by a sink hole. >> we thought nathan was dead. >> as 6-year-old nathan woessner recovered in the hospital his grandfather holds back tears as he recalls the terrifying phone call he got from his daughter friday afternoon. >> she was hysterical and she said "dad, dad, we can't find nathan. he is, he is under the sand dune. qur". >> reporter: his grandson was following his dad on a sand climb at indiana national park when suddenly he slipped into a sink hole and disappeared underneath a mound of sand. >> by the time the park people got there they had dug a hole between four and five feet deep
4:27 am
and still could not find nathan. >> reporter: after more than three and a half agonizing hours, rescuers discovered nathan 11 feet underneath and rushed him to the hospital in critical condition, breathing but unconscious. four days later, nathan is responsive and moving his limbs. he remains on a breathing tube as doctors work to clear sand out of his fragile lungs. >> if he continues to recover at rate he is we expect him to be off the ventilator by the end of the week. >> reporter: doctors believe an air pocket kept nathan from suffocating. he's expected to make a full recovery. >> in the pages of the bible you read about all the miracles and it's exhilarating to read about those miracles in the bible but this one came home to us. >> nathan's doctor told me over the phone it may be a few weeks, even months before we find out for sure whether he suffered any brain damage but it's a promising sign that he's opening his eyes and responding to simple commands. and the doctor said obviously
4:28 am
the family is going through a tough time right now, very emotional for them but the doctor told them we're going to get through this, that he's doing better than anyone could expect after what he went through. >> you were saying it was fortunate that he was with a friend at the time that he went missing because they wouldn't have been able to find him because he was completely covered by sand. >> we were talking about this yesterday, this is a large area, a lot of kids play around this area. had he not been with a friend who knows what happened. she believes his friend saved his life because he could point exactly where that sink hole was. >> terrible because of what they knew, terrible because of what they didn't know. imagine once the kid comes and says where he is, hours they had to wait. few story end with another chance. we'll take a break. when we come back on "new day," this woman, rachel jeantel, friend of trayvon martin says it's all b.s., that's her
4:29 am
comment about the not guilty. verdict. we'll have a lot more with her exclusive interview. a story in california, a man who woke up, no memory of his past and can he only speak swedish. that's later on "new day." ♪ [ crashing ] [ male announcer ] when your favorite food starts a fight, fight back fast with tums. trusted heartburn relief that goes to work in seconds. nothing works faster. ♪ tum, tum tum tum tums!
4:30 am
♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] the all-new 2014 lexus is. this is your move.
4:31 am
enjoy the whole family at a homewood suites, schedule a 5 o'clock meeting at a hilton garden inn, or hit the links at a waldorf astoria. get great rates at our ten top hotel brands during the great getaway. book now at hiltongreatgetaways.com.
4:32 am
♪ welcome back, everybody. this is "new day," tuesday, july 16th. i'm chris cuomo. >> good morning, everyone, i am kate bolduan joined by news anchor michaela pereira. coming up in this half hour more offen kren's exclusive interview with the woman on the phone with trayvon martin in the final moments of his life. that's right there what rachel
4:33 am
jeantel thinks of the jury's decision to acquit george zimmerman. a child custody battle involving actor jason patrick, the respected actor. this battle could wind up changing one state's law. we'll bring you the full, fascinating story. there's a lot of headline s so let's get to michaela pereira. plans are in the works for a trayvon martin national day of action, protests in over 100 u.s. cities over the weekend has demonstrations continue in the wake of george zimmerman's acquittal. cbs cameraman assaulted and injured overnight in a violent protest in los angeles. later today eric holder addresses the naacp's convention and is expected to address growing demands for federal civil rights charges against zimmerman. heat advisories in effect for parts of massachusetts, could be c connecticut and rhode island. temperatures in the 90s will combine with high humidity making things uncomfortable in the northeast and mid-atlantic
4:34 am
regions and it will feel hotter, heat indices are expected to soar well over 100 degrees. former supporters are turning up the heat on san diego mayor bob filner to resign and sharing details of their sexual harassment claims. filner says his behavior has been misinterpreted and insists he will not step down from his post. encouraging news of randy travis, doctors say he is awake and undergoing physical therapy. they say he will, however, need months to recover, they're also trying to wean him from a ventilator. the grammy winner has been fighting a viral illness that aggravated a chronic heart condition. first of all i do not know this, apparently you can teach an old dog new tricks. the owner of the skateboarding bulldog who became an internet sensation in other countries.
4:35 am
he plans to help dogs in shelters. i do not know that dog. >> all the motivations in that story to a dog, why he started his foundation, what he wants to do after. >> i feel they need to be explained. >> not only does that dog skateboard he's fast. >> i've seen him before that dog. >> have you? >> when you give him all of the human traits people like me think a dog is a man in a dog suit. this is how it happens. coming up next on "new day" she was the last person trayvon martin talked to before his confrontation with george zimmerman but her testimony didn't help win a conviction. cnn's exclusive interview with rachel jeantel is coming right up. later jennie mcare thee new host of "the view" many questioned if she's the right choice given her controversial views on autism and vaccines. we'll take it on in our pop
4:36 am
four. and didn't know where to start. a contractor before at angie's list, you'll find reviews on everything from home repair to healthcare written by people just like you. no company can pay to be on angie's list, so you can trust what you're reading. angie's list is like having thousands of close neighbors, where i can go ask for personal recommendations. that's the idea. before you have any work done, check angie's list. find out why more than two million members count on angie's list. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. i love you, angie. sorry, honey.
4:37 am
4:38 am
4:39 am
welcome back, everybody. this young woman became the reluctant star of the george zimmerman trial, now for the first time since her contentious testimony, rachel jeantel is speaking out in an exclusive interview with piers morgan rachel jeantel remembered her friend and had some choice words for the defense. >> tell me first of all your reaction to the fact that george zimmerman was acquitted. >> disappointed, upset, angry. >> what is your view of george zimmerman? >> weak. if you were a real man, you would have stand on that stage and tell what happened. >> in your heart, what do you believe happened?
4:40 am
>> he was trying to get home and he was and that's a fact. he keeps telling me the man's still watching him so if it was a security guard or policeman they'd come up to trayvon and say do you have a problem, do you need help, you know, like normal people. >> if george zimmerman had done that, if he'd introduced himself as a neighborhood watch patrolman, what would trayvon have said to him do you think, "no, i'm just trying to get home." >> be honest with me rachel, do you think that was racially motivated or more of a case somebody he thought was a young thug, black or white? >> it was racial, let's be honest, racial, if trayvon was white and he had a hoodie on, would it have happened? >> one thing we didn't get in this trial, rachel, was a real sense of what trayvon martin was really like. what kind of guy was he?
4:41 am
>> he was a calm, chill, loving person, loved his family, definitely his mother. >> he was a good friend to you? >> yes. >> a kind friend? >> yes. >> was he ever aggressive? >> no. >> did he ever lose his temper? >> no. >> did he take a lot of weed? >> no. >> how much would you say? >> twice a week. >> is that normal for teenagers in your community. >> yes, real normal. >> what effect did it have on you, trayvon's death? >> you can't believe what just happened. you were just a minute on the phone with the person, and people got the nerve to tell me oh why? >> seemed to me a different character to the one we saw in court. >> i was dealing with a lot of stress for 16 months i think. >> and you were grieving a friend.
4:42 am
>> i was grieving. don west gave you a very hard time the defense attorney. >> hmm, don west. >> what is your view of him? >> mmm, mmm, mmm, what do i have to say? i'm a christian. i never cussed out don. the only reason i have not said nothing to don westin because my parents taught me better. that's an adult. you don't have the right to disrespect an adult. >> the juror who was interviewed by anderson cooper for cnn said that she felt sorry for you. you're uneducated, you have no communication skills, what do you feel about what that juror said about you? >> angry. upset. when the state closed, they tried to explain what kind of person i am and you could see
4:43 am
the kind of person i am. you can't be too honest. the jury is so shocked what i said and they're acting like the generation we got now don't say that. >> are you an honest person by nature? >> yes. >> you took that seriously. >> yes, because mind you, who wants to be in a murder case? you think i would make all that up to be in a murder case, never knew it was going to be nationwide. so why i'd make that up, deal with the b.s. to get to trial, how do i make that up? >> riff elting interview. joining me to talk more about this cnn legal analyst and former federal prosecutor sunny hostin. our viewers know you were in the courtroom and with us for every step of the way and especially this dramatic part of the trial. what are your impressions when you see this interview with piers? is this the same rachel jeantel you saw in the courtroom? >> the exact same person i saw
4:44 am
in the courtroom. we were talking about her testimony i said what came across to me was her authenticity. she is who she is. that is the kind of witness i used to put on the witness stand every single day as i was a prosecutor in d.c., people being themselves through no fault of their own happen to be on the witness stand because they happened to see or hear something and i thought that a person like that so authentic was really credible and incapable of putting on airs, incapable of shaping her testimony to fit the situation. she happened to be on the phone with trayvon martin and after listening to juror b 37. i'm shocked. >> that's exactly what you wanted to talk to you, she's being authentic, that's the type of witness you want to have on the stand. when you hear the juror tell anderson cooper that she felt sorry for rachel, she did not consider her a credible witness
4:45 am
what does that tell you? >> i was shocked by that, stunned. i was stunned. >> did you see that in the courtroom? >> i did not. >> that they weren't -- >> i did not and i understood rachel jeantel said on the witness stand just the way i understood her interview and the way she communicated with piers morgan and it's shocking to me because many people observing the trial were saying things like well these other witnesses they were dressed up, they had ties on. that means they maybe had a better closet. that didn't mean that they were more credible, and so it's shocking to me. upon reflection i guess perhaps that is the way people view someone like rachel jeantel but that certainly wasn't my view. >> i want to ask you about another part when piers asked her about, was race involved, and she said it was racial, it was racial, but then when you hear what the juror told anderson that race was not any part of the deliberation, never
4:46 am
any part of their discussion, what do you make of that? >> i don't know how to reconcile it. i certainly believed that in observing the trial, kate, that race wasn't an element of the crime but of the elephant in the room. profiling is criminal, not necessarilily racial. in retrospect when i listened to juror b37 and listened to the feedback of people that observed the trial it seems that people with their own perceptions of race perhaps put that lens on when they were viewing the testimony and that makes race a very big part of it. >> would that have changed the legal analysis if juror b37 who said yes that was part of our deliberation. how would that have changed the legal analysis? >> for me it wouldn't have, i was looking at the evidence as a former prosecutor, looking at it neutrally. >> sunny hostin a lot more to talk about. >> absolutely. >> the trial ends and people are
4:47 am
having passionate discussions across the country. great to have new new york. >> thanks. still to come on "new day" a man wakes up in a hospital, has no idea who he is, total amnesia. what about this? when he starts to speak, he's only speaking swedish and he is not from sweden. plus for those of you who saw this baby and said oh, look, there's kim and kanye's new baby, how nice. we'll tell you why grandma kris jenner may have pulled a fast one on all of you, straight ahead. ♪ [ male announcer ] wouldn't it be great if all devices had backup power? the chevrolet volt does. it's ingeniously designed to seamlessly switch from electricity to gas to extend your driving range. no wonder volt is america's best-selling plug-in. that's american ingenuity to find new roads. right now, get a 2013 chevrolet volt
4:48 am
for around $269 per month. ♪ hooking up the country whelping business run ♪ ♪ trains! they haul everything, safely and on time. ♪ tracks! they connect the factories built along the lines. and that means jobs, lots of people, making lots and lots of things. let's get your business rolling now, everybody sing. ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪ ♪ helping this big country move ahead as one ♪ ♪ norfolk southern how's that function? ♪
4:49 am
boy this picture everybody was saying they were getting a glimpse, didn't fool me. i knew the real deal and i'll tell you.
4:50 am
4:51 am
all right, all right, kanye. welcome back to g"new day," everyone. >> i'm going to give you more. number four on this new day, kris jenner faking everyone out. she promoted her new talk show with this picture on facebook. a lot of people would think that's her granddaughter northwest, right? no, it was the picture of a baby of a stylist on the show. of course, i'm giving you the side eye this morning, ms. jenner, because we knew there was going to be some kind of stunt on the very first day, but it's a cute baby. very cute baby. i can't wait to see that nor
4:52 am
north west, though. did the world get its first instagram movie trailer? the studio behind the new steve jobs movie is giving us a new way to give a sneak peek at the film. they posted a 15-second trailer on the smartphone app, a movie about the innovator giving us innovation. abc announcing jenni mccarthy will be the new co-host for "the view." we talked about this last week, guys, it's come true now. the controversy is mccarthy's previous statement was linking some vaccinations to autism and she's been outspoken about this. her son was diagnosed with autism years ago, she said now he doesn't have it it, but she linked it to him getting a plethora of vaccinations early on, which a lot of parents with kids with autisms think that's part of it.
4:53 am
>> she's going to bring it, exactly. the bad news, team breezy, number one story, a los angeles judge has revoked chris brown's probation after he left the scene of a minor car accident. the probation was in connection with the beating of his then-girlfriend rihanna. he has another hearing in august to decide whether or not he'll face any jail time. i want to add a quick note, his team released a statement saying they believe this is a complete misunderstanding that the case will be dismissed, they believe, in the next couple weeks. >> nichelle, thanks very much for that. when we come back, the protests about the zimmerman verdict becoming anything but peaceful, details on that ahead. plus, we're going to bring you the man who woke up with no memory of his past and no clue about his present and he can only speak swedish. is he swedish? coming back. la's known definitely for its traffic, congestion, for it's smog.
4:54 am
but there are a lot of people that do ride the bus. and now that the busses are running on natural gas, they don't throw out as much pollution to the earth. so i feel good. i feel like i'm doing my part to help out the environment. should have disrupted man. instead, man raised a sail. and made "farther" his battle cry. the new ram 1500 -- motor trend's 2013 truck of the year -- the most fuel-efficient half-ton truck on the road -- achieving best-in-class 25 highway miles per gallon. guts. glory. ram.
4:55 am
4:56 am
4:57 am
welcome back to "new day," everyone. you know what that music means, a quick roundup of stories you're going to be talking about today. first up, michaela. >> first up, lawyers for private bradley manning asking the judge to dismiss aiding the enemy. he's accused of leaking thousands of u.s. documents. veterans found those diagnosed with most forms of cancer are far less likely to develop alzheimer's disease. those numbers went down for vets who received chemotherapy.
4:58 am
a new way to see if your child has adhd. the first brain wave test to diagnose the disorder in children. time now for alison kosik for today's money talk. >> it is money time, good morning. goldman sachs second quarter earnings were almost a dollar per share over what was expected. net revenues were $8 billion. air force thunderbirds are going to be up in the air again. they were grounded in april because of federal spending cuts, but the air force won a temporary reprieve from the cuts. can buffalo bill rescue harrisburg? thousands of artifacts to try to erase debt. the items were collected for a museum it never built. now outside with the weather. >> we are sweating in new york city today, but we're in the the only ones, major cities dealing with the heat. all of southern new england, d.c., new york, philadelphia.
4:59 am
all talking about temperatures today 10 degrees above normal. this is definitely not a dry heat. we're adding 50% humidity, 95 to even 105 degrees. yes, we know the all-star game is tonight. 9:00 tonight, 80 degrees, a lot of people kind of sweating it out together. i think i'm good right here, guys. >> thanks so much. we are now at the top of the hour, which you know means is hour, which you know means is time for the top news. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com that day i was so shaken, like, wow, this is really happening? he really dead? >> a cnn exclusive. breaking her silence, a juror in the george zimmerman trial speaks only to cnn. revelations from inside the jury room. three originally wanted to vote guilty. a scorcher. the most brutal week of the summer for the east coast, a dangerous heat wave with no end
5:00 am
in sight. what you need to know this morning. medical mystery. meet the american veteran who woke up in a hospital speaking only swedish with no idea who he is. we piece together the clues, who is this mystery man? your "new day" continues right now. what you need to know -- >> do we want to exclude fathers who want to be involved in their child's life? what you just have to see. >> it's all over that you escaped from jail. i'm like, what? this is "new day" with chris cuomo, kate bolduan, and michaela pereira. welcome back to "new day," it's tuesday, july 16th. 8:00 in the east. good morning. >> as always, news anchor michaela pereira with us. cnn has two important exclusives in the george zimmerman case for you. the only juror to break silence
5:01 am
does so with anderson cooper. anderson is going to join us live. >> and the prosecution reacting to the guilty verdict and what they think happened. we'll talk to hln's vinnie politan about his interview. we're watching stories for you, a north korean ship seized in panama was found with weapons onboard. we'll tell you more about that. also, interesting story after actor jason patrick is pursuing a legal fight that could have serious impact on paternity laws, certainly a story you want to pay attention to. we have a busy day, let's get started. >> we will have all that, especially a interview with juror b-37. first, protests turned violent overnight. a highway blocked, a walmart taken over, and a cameraman assaulted. alina machado has all that and more from sanford, florida. good morning, alina. >> reporter: good morning,
5:02 am
things remain calm and peaceful in sanford, florida, but the third night in a row we have seen protests in other cities in the country. hundreds of protesters around the country voicing their opposition to the not guilty verdict. overnight in los angeles, police say incidents of vandalism and assaults have resulted in more than a dozen arrests. >> unfortunately, the rights of the many have been abused by the actions of a few. >> reporter: paramedics treated a local news crew at the scene. the lapd said someone threw a hard projectile at the crew, hitting the photographer in the head. in oakland, california, all lanes of interstate 880 were shut down by hundreds of protesters. a similar scene in houston. and in atlanta in front of the cnn headquarters. hundreds of thousands of people have signed an online petition by the naacp pushing for a civil rights case against zimmerman.
5:03 am
attorney general eric holder says the justice department will continue investigating possible federal charges. >> i want to assure you that the department will continue to act in a manner that is consistent with the facts and the law. >> reporter: florida prosecutors say they are still convinced zimmerman is guilty. >> one word to describe george zimmerman. >> murderer. >> reporter: meanwhile, zimmerman's parents say they are sorry for the tragedy. >> we are deeply sorry for this tragedy. deeply sorry. and we pray for the departed. we pray for trayvon martin. >> reporter: zimmerman's parents say they have been receiving death threats. they also say zimmerman remains in hiding and that he will likely stay in hiding for a very long time. kate? >> alina, thanks so much. let's get to a cnn
5:04 am
exclusive, one of the six responsible for a verdict talking publicly for the first time. cnn's anderson cooper with us now, sat down with juror b-37. he's going to be here to talk to us about that exclusive sit-down in a few minutes. first, the interview, you're not going to see the juror's face, because she fears for her family's safety. >> did you take an initial vote to see where everybody was? >> we did. three not guilties, one second-degree murder, and two manslaughters. >> do you want to say where you were on that? >> i was not guilty. >> how do you then go about deciding things? >> we looked through pretty much everything. that's why it took us so long. we're looking through the evidence, and then at the end we just -- we got done and then we just started looking at the law, what exactly we could find and how we should vote for this
5:05 am
case. and the law became very confusing. >> yeah, tell me about that. >> it became very confusing. we had stuff thrown at us. we had the second-degree murder charge, the manslaughter charge, then we had self defense, stand your ground. we actually had gotten it down to manslaughter, because the second degree wasn't second degree anymore. >> the person who felt it was second degree going into it, you had convinced them it was manslaughter? >> going through the law. and then we had sent a question to the judge. >> you sent a question out to the judge about manslaughter. >> yes. and what could be applied to the manslaughter. we were looking at the self defense. one of the girls said that -- asked if you can put all the leading things into that one moment where he feels it's a matter of life or death to shoot
5:06 am
this boy or if it was just at the heat of passion at that moment. >> so, that juror wanted to know whether the things that had brought george zimmerman to that place, not just in the minute or two before the shot actually went off -- >> exactly. >> did you feel like you understood the instructions from the judge, because ty were very complex. >> right. and that was our problem. i mean, there was a couple of them in there that wanted to find him guilty of something, and after hours and hours and hours of deliberating over the law and reading it over and over and over again, we decided there's just no way other place to go. because of the heat of the moment and the stand your ground. he had a right to defend himself. if he felt threatened his life was going to be taken away from
5:07 am
him or he was going to have bodily harm, he had a right. >> even though it was he who had gotten out of the car and followed trayvon martin, that didn't matter in the deliberations, what mattered were those final seconds, minutes, when there was an altercation and whether or not, in your mind, whether the most important thing was whether or not george zimmerman felt his life was in danger? >> that's how we read the law. that's how we got to the point of everybody being not guilty. >> when you all realize, okay, the last holdout juror has decided, okay, manslaughter, we can't hold george zimmerman to manslaughter. there's nothing we can really hold him to, not guilty. in that jury room, what was, emotionally, what was that like? >> it was emotional to a point, but after we had put our vote in and the bailiff had taken our vote, that's when everybody started to cry. >> tell me about that. >> it's just hard. thinking that somebody lost their life and there's nothing
5:08 am
else could be done about it. i mean, it's what happened is sad, it's a tragedy this happened, but it happened. i think both were responsible for the situation they had gotten themselves into. i think both of them could have walked away. it just didn't happen. >> it's still emotional for you. >> it is. it's very emotional. >> for many others also. let's go from juror b-37 to a man known as ac360. anderson cooper, good to have you with us. obviously, she wanted to stay in shadow and stick to her juror number. what did she realize after she was out of sequester what this case meant? >> she said she had no idea how big this case had become, how much interest there was in it. she was stunned when she got back to the hotel room and after they had made their decision and when they arrived at the hotel, apparently it was empty, nobody
5:09 am
was there, then people realized there had been a verdict. by the time the jurors left her hotel, she described it like disneyland. she's been really overwhelmed at the amount of interest in this case and just how many people are, you know, trying to pursue her, her family, and, you know, she finds it offputting, obviously. >> this is the first time we're hearing from any of these jurors. everyone wants to know what was going on in that jury room. did she give you any indication of the relationship between the jurors? they, obviously, deliberated from 16 1/2 hours and were together weeks on end. >> we're going to have more of that tonight. she said at one point one of the jurors actually talked about leaving the jury room, leaving the jury, because of some family issues and that they all talked that juror into staying. nothing to do with the case, but more just personal family issues. they said to that juror, look, you've come this far, you have to continue with it. she said that they all, by and
5:10 am
large, got along pretty well. you know, i'm not sure how close they are, that they are going to stay in contact or anything, but it was interesting to hear, to me, that as soon as they got in that room, there were three of them when thought not guilty, juror b37 was one of them, two felt manslaughter, and only one felt second-degree murder. >> how they got that person from second-degree murder to not guilty. >> it was the person first went to second-degree murder, down to manslaughter, then three for manslaughter, then they sent out for jury instructions of the judge on manslaughter and then they finally -- then there was one holdout toward the end in the last couple of hours. >> did you get a sense for them it was about fitting the facts into the law or do you think their main focus seemed to be self defense and the justification for zimmerman's actions? >> they ended up focusing on just those last few seconds and minutes of the struggle and did george zimmerman fear for his life and that's really what it
5:11 am
boiled down to for them. they never talked about race, not once, she says. she didn't consider it. she doesn't think any of the other jurors considered it, and some of the jurors, she said, wished they could have come up with something. wish they could have found him guilty of something, bad judgment. >> which is unusual, by the way, for jurors to be saying let's see if we can find them guilty. usually you're not supposed to have that disposition. >> a number of them felt this is somebody who killed somebody and he should not have gotten out of the vehicle. she believes george zimmerman was too eager and he should not have gotten out of that vehicle. >> they brought a lot of what we were talking about outside, the jurors were thinking about these things. >> that's what i want to talk to you about, the regular people aspect. all of us have to sit on a jury at some point. >> i've never been selected yet. i keep going, never been selected yet. >> shocking. >> i know. >> these are regular folks to ask to be a jury of their peers.
5:12 am
what was her demeanor like sitting with her, anderson? was she shaken up by this experience? >> she was. i met with her probably about two hours before we did this interview. we didn't think we were going to do the interview. i knew she was in new york, we just met and started talking. in the course of that, she was crying and she was -- this was something that was very difficult for her to talk about. she cried multiple times, not on camera, just talking about the experience. >> do you think that's because of what happened since or because of what went on in the courtroom? >> what went on in the courtroom. it weighs on her very heavily, that this is something which, you know, she takes it very seriously and the jurors take it -- i think all the jurors take it very seriously. they see a different case than we all see on television. they see a much more limited case. >> she covered all the things that people were speculating about outside about should he have gotten in the car, should he have continued pursuit, what he thought about trayvon and
5:13 am
why. they considered all of these things. they weren't blind to these things. >> she actually points out, interestingly, something that didn't get a lot of attention, the 911 operator told george zimmerman we don't need you to do that, follow trayvon martin, but she points out at the same time the 911 operator was asking george zimmerman to keep an eye on trayvon martin and what building number are you at, and so she felt the 911 operator was in a way encouraging him to continue engagement. >> we know that she was pursuing -- thinking about writing a book. she had a book agent, but shortly after that was announced that she then put out a statement saying no longer is she going to be pursuing that. they said that the statement that i see, she said i'm returned to my family and society in general and realize the best direction for me to go is away from writing any sort of book. kind of, to me, shows that it really has been a traumatizing thing. >> i think she didn't really get, again, how big this story had become and what kind of a
5:14 am
reaction, you know, the book she had been talking about is her husbands and attorneys, she thought it would be interesting for them to write a book together about serving on a jury, but clearly, there was a lot of negative reaction and so i think they were surprised their agent -- this agent they got suddenly put this out there so publicly. and so she doesn't want to talk anymore, doesn't want to do anymore interviews, she just wants this to stop. >> so important, people are divided on this and they have a lot of opinions. you needed to hear the perspective of the jury. thanks for getting that done, anderson. >> there's going to be much more tonight on ac360. >> about 20 minutes of the interview that we haven't played yet. >> we'll definitely listen to that. anderson, thank you so much. that on ac360 this evening only on cnn. you don't want to miss it. the heat, the heat wave that's happening, the kind of heat that make it is hard to breathe. millions are sweating out a
5:15 am
miserable heat wave this morning. check out the areas in deep red facing temperatures well into the 90s but will feel hotter than that. >> do you ever sweat? >> anderson doesn't sweat, i can tell you that. will you discuss this with us? >> yeah, i don't want to hurt your feelings, you guys, i like you guys but this tree behind me is my new best friend. it is literally blocking the sun and it's a huge difference. when you can handle a minute or two, but it's the prolonged heat that makes it so hard. that's a situation we're dealing with this week all across the country. take a look. heat and humidity continue to pummel the east coast as a brutal heat wave sends temperatures off the charts from michigan to maryland. >> it's really hot out here. i feel like i'm going to melt. >> this heat wave could last all week. >> your body temperature starts to rise higher than your ability
5:16 am
to get rid of heat, perspire, et cetera, or cool down. your body can get into significant trouble. >> in new york, a major nrmg company will monitor the city's electrical systems as the temperatures continue to cline. >> a heat wave impacts the system because, literally, it doesn't cool off. >> high voltages have already caused power outages across new york. >> this indicates customers without electricity. >> in washington, d.c., it's dangerous for anyone working outside. >> humidity gets high, harder to breathe, just sweat a lot. every once in awhile a guy will pass out. >> the soaring temperatures are affecting nearly 50 million people this week, all trying to figure out how to beat the heat. >> cranking up the air conditioning. >> stay in the ac. >> here's the problem, people always underestimate the heat. it's actually the biggest killer of all weather events. over 600 people die a year from
5:17 am
heat-related illness. this huge high pressure is going to stay with us really all the way up into the beginning of the weekend. temperatures are going to be so oppressive out there, major cities, especially, that's what makes it so hard. d.c., southern new england, philadelphia, new york today, even michigan and detroit, they are dealing with the suppressive heat that feels like 95, even 105 degrees. we're not going to see relief until the end of the week. we keep talking about this, it is a mixed bag, all this humid moist air, and now we have a severe weather threat towards the end of the week. like we said, one thing at a time. first we have to deal with the heat. check on your neighbors, wear loose-fitting clothing, and drink water. a story breaking overnight that could have huge international implications. they were searching for drugs but found hidden weapons instead. and it's only gets more bizarre from there. barbara starr has the latest from the pentagon, good morning,
5:18 am
barbara. >> good morning, kate. now appearing on panama television with new details saying when his authorities ceased this ship, the crew not only resisted arrest, but the captain tried to fake a heart attack, and when that didn't work, then committed suicide. the panamanians are furious about this. they thought there were drugs on board, they stopped it, they started searching, and they found what they believe are missile parts. the president of panama tweeting this photo coming right out in public and showing what his people found onboard this ship. it appears to be missile parts, at least in shipping containers. he is now asking for an international team of inspectors to go aboard this ship and find out exactly what is hidden on this ship. why is this so important? of course, the panama canal, a major transit zone for the
5:19 am
international economy for shipping. the panamanians take great pride in controlling it. they are not happy about this alleged smuggling attempt by the north koreans. >> a lot of people aren't happy about this alleged smuggling attempt. great to see you, barbara, thank you so much. where were the weapons going, we don't know yet. >> at least we know now. >> good point. all right. a lot of news this hour. let's get to michaela for the latest. >> just into cnn, russian news media reporting nsa leaker edward snowden has applied for asylum in russia. he is wanted for releasing sensitive information about the government's spying investigations. overnight, supporters of mohamed morsi clashed with opponents in cairo, killing at least seven. 260 people were wounded. violence broke out when morsi
5:20 am
supporters tried to block major roads, thus angering his opponents. tensions in egypt driving up gas prices here at home. the average price of a gallon of unleaded is now $3.64. that's up 16 cents in a week. one congresswoman michele bachmann's staffers busted, sanchez has pleaded not guilty to second-degree theft. bachmann spokesman said he's no longer working for the office, no word on what sanchez is allegedly reported to have stolen. in minneapolis, a sheriff admits an inmate's release was likely the jail's mistake. she was arrested for vehicle theft thursday. she and her husband called a wxin reporter when they realized she was being called an escapee. >> you're under arrest, come with me.
5:21 am
you're under arrest. >> you promised me. what are you -- hang on, what are you doing to me? >> you're under arrest. >> i'm on the phone with john layton right now -- >> i don't care. she's got two felony warrants, she's under arrest, i'm sorry. two felony warrants? i didn't do anything. >> majors said she was framed for the auto theft by an identity thief. her accuser insists, though, she is a criminal. bizarre story there. lastly, for the first time ever, a player who is not an all-star won the home run derby. oakland's yoenis cespedes took advantage of that opportunity. he crashed 17 home runs in the opening round alone. that secured him a spot in the finals where he faced off against the nationals bryce harper. he added six more home runs for a winning total of 23. the all-star game will kick off tonight in new york's citi
5:22 am
field. that's going to be a hot game. >> in more ways than one. >> being able to dunk a basketball and being able to hit a home run i would love to be able to do. probably not going to happen. >> do it once would be really amazing. coming up on "new day," he is a murderer, that's what prosecutors are calling george zimmerman. they are speaking out, pulling no punches. we're going to tell you what they have to say. and this medical mystery we've been talking about this morning. an american man wakes up in california not knowing who he is and only speaking swedish. >> now has blonde hair there, too. see that? ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪ ♪ hooking up the country helping business run ♪ ♪ build! we're investing big to keep our country in the lead. ♪ load! we keep moving to deliver what you need. and that means growth, lots of cargo going all around the globe. cars and parts, fuel and steel, peas and rice, hey that's nice! ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪ ♪ helping this big country move ahead as one ♪ ♪ norfolk southern how's that function? ♪
5:23 am
vietnam in 1972. [ all ] fort benning, georgia in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve military members, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy, get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve.
5:24 am
this man is about to be the millionth customer. would you mind if i go ahead of you? instead we had someone go ahead of him and win fifty thousand dollars. congratulations you are our one millionth customer. nobody likes to miss out. that's why ally treats all their customers the same. whether you're the first or the millionth. if your bank doesn't think you're special anymore, you need an ally. ally bank. your money needs an ally. your next trip is calling you. saying, "dan, schedule a 5 o'clock meeting at a hilton garden inn." or "dan"... hey, dad. ..."explore your family tree at a homewood suites."
5:25 am
[ family ] hi, dan. or "put your feet in the sand at a waldorf astoria." never stop vacationing, dan. book during the great getaway for great rates at our ten top hotel brands. travel is calling you to hiltongreatgetaways.com. welcome back to "new day," everyone. this is a bizarre and puzzling medical mystery unfolding in california. an american man wakes up in a hotel room, okay, with no
5:26 am
memory, though, of who he is or where he came from. even stranger, he is now only speaking swedish. cnn's elizabeth cohen is in atlanta with more on this bizarre story. hi, elizabeth. >> hi, kate. it really is bizarre. doctors don't completely know what to make of it. this man was clearly american, clearly did speak english at some point, but now says he can't, and in addition, he says that his whole past life is a blank. four months ago, police found this navy veteran unconscious in a southern california motel 6. on him, a u.s. passport and his veteran's i.d. identifying him as michael boatwright, but when he woke up in the emergency room, he'd never heard of michael boatwright. he said his name was johan ek and spoke only swedish, according to this interview with "the desert sun" newspaper. he couldn't explain why he had five tennis rackets or who this
5:27 am
woman was in the photo found with him. his whole past, a blank. walk in my shoes for one day and you'll experience the nightmare of a life time, he told the newspaper. a hospital social worker helped boatwright set up this facebook page and discovered he lived in sweden in the 1980s and ran a consulting company. he lived in china, too, teaching english. on the school website was this photo and boatwright's own essay revealing he was married to a japanese woman and had a 12-year-old son. so why was he in southern california? he told cnn the clues suggest he's a tennis coach. he'd arrived during tennis tournament season. his diagnosis, boatwright is in what's called a fugue state brought on by trauma. >> stressful events, life changing events, family deaths or loved one's death, recent travel or major accidents. >> for now, boatwright is at desert regional medical center. they'd like to send him home as soon as they learn where home is.
5:28 am
>> now this story has hit the swedish media big time and swoosweds are coming forward saying they knew him in the 1980s and a woman in louisiana said she saw pictures and this is her brother. kate? >> we've got to follow up on this, elizabeth, and track his progress, especially if he can find his family and what happened to him to get him in the state. thanks so much, elizabeth. it is shocking, interesting on so many levels, but shocking because it's a medical mystery, but also, as he said, a nightmare of a lifetime for him. >> sounds hard to believe, but the fugue state thing, that's real. i covered a story once about a young guy gets married, on the way to the honeymoon, disappeared from the airport, found him in the woods two days later and he didn't remember anything about what he was for years. >> years, it was years? >> years. >> how our brain functions until it stops in a situation like that. something so small is off and it can change your life
5:29 am
dramatically. >> find what that was that set that off. >> hope it usually comes back. we'll follow that one for you. when we come back on "new day," a look at the zimmerman trial through the eyes of the prosecutors, what do you think went wrong with their case? and jason patrick says he's a father fighting to keep his 3-year-old son in his life. what the child's mother is saying, he's not the father really, just a sperm donor. driv? i drive a ford fusion. who is healthier, you or your car? i would say my car. probably the car. cause as you get older you start breaking down. i love my car. i want to take care of it. i have a bad wheel - i must say. my car is running quite well. keep your car healthy with the works. $29.95 or less after $10 mail-in rebate at your participating ford dealer. so you gotta take care of yourself? yes you do. you gotta take care of your baby? oh yeah!
5:30 am
"that starts with one of the world's most advancedy," distribution systems," "and one of the most efficient trucking networks," "with safe, experienced drivers." "we work directly with manufacturers," "eliminating costly markups," "and buy directly from local farmers in every region of the country." "when you see our low prices, remember the wheels turning behind the scenes, delivering for millions of americans, everyday. "dedication: that's the real walmart" everybody has different ideas, goals, appetite for risk.
5:31 am
you can't say 'one size fits all'. it doesn't. that's crazy. we're all totally different. ishares core. etf building blocks for your personalized portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus, which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal.
5:32 am
welcome back to "new day," everybody. it is tuesday, july 16th. i'm chris cuomo.
5:33 am
>> hey, everyone, i'm kate bolduan. straight to michaela pereira for the five things you need to know for your new day. >> let's do this. number one, attorney general eric holder will address the naacp's national convention. the justice department is investigating possible federal charges in the zimmerman case. number two, jodi arias back in court today. prosecutors want to set a date to retry the penalty phase of her murder conviction. the show must go on for the first time since an aerialist fell to her death last month, cirque du soleil reopens today at the mgm grand in vegas. a heat wave is blanketing the east coast with oppressive humidity and temperatures in the 90s. heat indexes will be well over 100 degrees in some areas. number five, the big apple hosting major league baseball's all-star game tonight. met's phenom matt harvey starting for the national league with max scherzer on the hill for the a.l. be sure to go to
5:34 am
newday.cnn.com for the latest. >> thank you, michaela. he's a murderer, he's lucky, that's what the prosecutors in the george zimmerman trial have to say. vinnie politan, host of hln's "after dark" sat down with angela quarry and the lead prosecutor. let's listen in. >> what was the prosecution theory of what actually happened? >> well, we were left with inconsistent witnesses in terms of what actually happened and his story, and what we were trying to prove is his story was false. our belief as to what happened, he chased down trayvon martin. he was going to make sure trayvon martin didn't get away and was going to be there when the police got there. >> there was no sort of narrative that this jury could follow, that america could follow. >> the problem you've got in a trial is, you can't say jury don't speculate and ask them to speculate, so we're left with a
5:35 am
defendant's story and what we tried to prove his story was false. >> and the injuries indicate there was some sort of a struggle. we never said trayvon didn't do something to george zimmerman. what we said is, you can't take a concealed weapon and encourage or insight a fistfight, which is what he did by stalking a teenager who didn't know who he was and whipping your gun out and shoot, never revealing the details how he was able to pull his gun if he was being beaten as clearly as he claimed. no dna on trayvon martin's hands, and those lies were put in front of the jury one after the other after the other. >> the verdict, trayvon martin's parents weren't there. did you know they weren't going to be there? >> yes. i don't think she could take much more of them assailing her son, trying the victim in a case where he was an unarmed teenager just walking home.
5:36 am
we can never lose sight of that fact. he didn't know who george zimmerman was, yet this man followed a teenager who had done nothing but walked home in the rain in a hoodie and then put a bullet through his heart because he got punched in the nose. >> one word to describe george zimmerman. >> murderer. >> george zimmerman. >> lucky. >> trayvon benjamin martin. >> i don't know there's one word that can describe a victim. a victim. >> trayvon benjamin martin. >> pray, p-r-a-y. he never had a fighting chance. >> all right. let's bring in vinnie politan, vin vinny, thanks for bringing us this interview.
5:37 am
great job, as expected. let's start with angela. people are remarking how impressive she is when discussing the case and she certainly seemed very powerful in the interview with you. what's your take on why she didn't try it? >> she doesn't try all the cases. she's the boss, right? there's people that she trusts, like bernie, who's been doing this for 30 years. so she generally doesn't try cases, although there is one she's going to try in september, which is a similar case, which is jordan davis as the victim, dunn as the defendant. so she does get in the courtroom once in awhile, but generally that's not her role in the office. but, yeah, you're correct. she's passionate and she is very, very well spoken and persuasive. >> vinnie, what about using the word murderer, is there ethical considering about that when the prosecutor uses that word? >> i was thinking about it, then i took a step back and thought more about it.
5:38 am
if she didn't say that, you know, if she said, innocent man, if she said, not guilty, then people would be all over for saying, well, you accused him of murder, how dare you, you didn't believe in that charge, didn't think you could prove it. what it told me is this is exactly what she believed happened that night and this is exactly what they believe they could prove and that's why they charged george zimmerman with second-degree murder. >> vinnie, they seem much more persuasive in your interview than trial. what's the difference, only knowing what you show in the courtroom? >> yes, and what they really said when you listen to them, though, at the moment the gun comes out, they don't have a story. because their only witness at that moment is trayvon martin and he's dead and the eyewitnesss have differing accounts and none of them see that moment. the only person who tells the
5:39 am
story is george zimmerman. they felt the best way to prove their story was by disproving his story, because why would he lie? why would he lie unless he was covering up what really happened? and that's difficult when you're talking about the burden of proof, chris, when you're proving your case by disproving the defendant's case. it's really a tough situation that they were put in in this trial. >> it's very, very difficult to do, also, right, which is why there's so much speculation early on by legal eagles such as yourself about how if all you can do is prove he's a liar and you can't tell me beyond a reasonable doubt what really happened, you're going to have a problem. >> yeah. well, and here's the thing, you don't have to prove exactly what happened beyond a reasonable doubt. you have to prove the elements of the crime. but the elements of the crime, because it was a justification case, a self defense case, are so intertwined with the facts that it became very, very tough
5:40 am
for this prosecution team, because they didn't have to prove self defense to the defense. they just had to make it seem reasonable to this jury. if one reasonable explanation was self defense, then the proper verdict is not guilty, and i think that's what kind of happened in this case. >> i wonder what will be their take when they hear what the jurors said to cnn about trying to find him guilty, it would be interesting to see where their heads are after they hear that juror. great interview, thanks for bringing it to us, appreciate it. kate? coming up, jason patrick involved in a fierce custody battle that could change the law in california. also, the royal baby watch is on. we'll take you to london where the excitement is building to a fever pitch over kate and william's arrival. ♪
5:41 am
[ male announcer ] you wait all year for summer. ♪ this summer was definitely worth the wait. ♪ summer's best event from cadillac. let summer try and pass you by. lease this all-new cadillac ats for around $299 per month or purchase for 0% apr for 60 months. come in now for the best offers of the model year. "stubborn love" by the lumineers did you i did. email? so what did you think of the house? did you see the school ratings? oh, you're right. hey babe, i got to go. bye daddy! have a good day at school, ok? ...but what about when my parents visit? ok. i just love this one... and it's next to a park. i love it. i love it too.
5:42 am
here's our new house... daddy! you're not just looking for a house. you're looking for a place for your life to happen.
5:43 am
hey, buddy? oh, hey, flo. you want to see something cool? snapshot, from progressive. my insurance company told me not to talk to people like you. you always do what they tell you? no... try it, and see what your good driving can save you. you don't even have to switch. unless you're scared. i'm not scared, it's... you know we can still see you. no, you can't. pretty sure we can... try snapshot today -- no pressure.
5:44 am
the child custody battle between a hollywood star and his former girlfriend that could change california law. it's a fascinating -- it's a fascinating story. what they would do would give certain sperm donors the ability to sue for parental rights. michaela has been tracking this story. it's complex, it's a big deal. >> it is a big deal and there's emotion wrapped up. a bitter custody battle between actor jason patrick and his former girlfriend drawing a whole bunch of attention, setting the stage for many modern family custody cases. the outcome could influence the sperm donation insemination process nationwide. actor jason patrick is used to being in the spotlight. >> that was odd. >> but now he's getting attention not for what's happening on screen, but off it. >> i've had my son stolen from
5:45 am
me, and i have to do anything i can to get him back. >> patrick and his former girlfriend danielle schreiber are in the midst of schreiber's son, born after she was inseminated with patrick's sperm back in 2009. >> i didn't donate my sperm, i gave my sperm to have a child with danielle. >> patrick claims he was always a father to gus, but schreiber says that's not true. they duked it out in a california courtroom in february and the judge ruled in schreiber's favor based on the state's uniform parentage act, which states the donor of s seman -- >> i need to have some type of consent with both parties. >> but patric, with a new california bill in mind, says he's not giving up. enter sb-115, an amended bill
5:46 am
that if passed would give sperm donors a chance to claim custody, even after the child is born. when jason offered me his sperm, it was under the condition that his donation never be made public and that he would not be a father to the child. for me, this is never been about preventing contact, this is about preserving parental rights. >> the bigger picture in this is what is the public policy? >> family attorney esther panic says the rules need to be clearer. >> do we want to exclude fathers that want to be in a child's life or protect for single mothers that want to choose for themselves and their child what that child's future is and who can be involved in it? >> a vote is expected next month. patric has filed for an appeal, hoping this time around the court will view him as gus's father, not just a sperm donor. this is the challenge in this
5:47 am
story, the two adults disagree on their relationship. they differ vastly. she sees him as a sperm donor, he says he was a parent and was in a relationship with her and they decided to have a baby. that's a key part of this battle specifically. >> also raises this question, so, if we're not married but we want to have a baby and it's not happying and we use ivf, i have to be careful, because under that california law as it is right now, i may not be seen as the way i may see myself. >> you initially think, you know, they should have hammered something out on paper beforehand, but when you hear from his perspective what their relationship was, he would think there's no reason for any kind of a contract. >> his specific case is sort of a rare occurrence. in a broader sense, there are a lot of people concerned this is going to allow men or sperm donors to change their mind at a whim, so there's concerns about this that hurt mothers. >> they are going to have to balance that out, but remember
5:48 am
you go through a lot of paperwork when you're a sperm donor to make it clear what you are and what you're not. good story, michaela, thank you for bringing to us. we've had a lot of tough stuff today, how about good stuff. social media can be a nuisance, let's be honest, but it can also be a big blessing. here's a story of just that. little hazel only 2 years old is facing a rare type of cancer that affects infants and young children. they used tape to spell out a message, send pizza, room 4112. it was a joke really, that is until readit got ahold of it. readit, social media. a picture of the message wound up on the site, it went viral. before long, pizza after pizza started showing up. take a listen. >> she woke up from her nap to the tons of pizza in her room and she thought it was great. she ended up having three slices and had a party with her
5:49 am
friends, there was music playing, she had a great time. it brought us hope and encouragement in a time of despair for our family. >> even at that age, they know pizza. this wound up being soul food. little hazel was overjoyed and there have been so many pizzas, the hospital respectfully asked they stop. what do we know now, hazel's spirits are lifted but she faces a tough road ahead, more rounds of chemo and a surgery to remove her tumor. if you want to help, you can visit hope for hazel on facebook and donate there. this family has a big struggle in front of them, but even when you don't think it's going to matter, it can really mean so much to somebody. >> they were having fun trying to pass the time to put up that message, then it just lifted her spirits, so sweet. big smile. >> go to facebook and help if you want. that's the good stuff. we want to hear your stories. let us keep telling the good news. tweet us, go to facebook, use the #newday.
5:50 am
more good stuff in hollywood. when she's not shooting her hit tv series, lucy lu takes on another role, unicef ambassador. she recently visited lebanon in this "impact your world." >> reporter: hi, i'm lucy lu, and we can make an impact for syrian children. syria is in a terrible situation right now. there's civil war going on that is creating absolute pandemonium and people are fleeing into lebanon, into jordan, into iraq. 6 million people have been displaced and half of them are children. these children are suffering, they have lice, and they've lost family. they are not going to school, not getting the medical attention they need, there's going to be a lost generation of children if this continues. children deserve to have a childhood. what happens on the other side of the world isn't just their
5:51 am
business, it's our business, because we share the same water, we share the same environment. if we understand that, we are actually one community, then it makes the world so much smaller, much more tangible for people to understand. unicef is currently desperate for donations for syria. it's our duty as human beings to give back. join the movement. impact your world. cnn.com/impact. >> got to keep these stories coming, got to learn how to impact our world. good for lucy lu. got to take a break, when we come back, royal baby walk. everyone's watching for when the little baby comes. changing more rapidly than healthcare. by earning your degree from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to advance your career while making a difference in the lives of patients. let's get started at capella.edu.
5:52 am
aren't always the most obvious. take the humble stevia plant, with a surprising secret to share: sweetness. truvia sweetener. zero-calorie sweetness, born from the stevia leaf. from nature, for sweetness.
5:53 am
all right, are you still 50/50 on this? >> i love "new day." alert.
5:54 am
5:55 am
the beach on your tv is much closer than it appears. seize the summer with up to 50% off hotels at travelocity. welcome back to "new day," everyone. speculation about the royal baby is running wild this morning. cnn's max foster has more from london. hey, max. >> reporter: kate, i can't tell you that the other kate is three days overdue, so literally could be any day now, and we heard from what will be the step grandmother of this child, she gave a good indication that it could be soon, too. let's listen to what she had to say last night. >> we're all waiting.
5:56 am
i think so, i think so. >> we wish you all well. >> he or she will be there. >> he or she by the end of the week. never have we been so prepared, kate and chris, for a story to break. >> we are there, you are there, we are watching and waiting. so, we will be there with you. thanks so much, max, we will watch it all day long. we'll be right back after this. the great outdoors, and a great deal. grrrr ahhh let's leave the deals to hotels.com. perfect! yep, and no angry bears. up to 30% off. only at hotels.com. ♪ hooking up the country whelping business run ♪ ♪ build! we're investing big to keep our country in the lead. ♪ load! we keep moving to deliver what you need. and that means growth, lots of cargo going all around the globe. cars and parts, fuel and steel, peas and rice, hey that's nice! ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪
5:57 am
♪ helping this big country move ahead as one ♪ ♪ norfolk southern how's that function? ♪
5:58 am
5:59 am
a big day of news today from george zimmerman to what we're dealing with to the weather, to weapons that may have been found down in panama. thanks to coming to all of us about it. >> no kidding. that's going to be it for "new day" with us. "cnn newsroom" with carol costello starts now. "newsroom" starts now.
6:00 am
"newsroom" starts now. ♪ -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com a cnn exclusive, juror b37 speaks out. >> i think george zimmerman is a man whose heart was in the right place. i think both of them could have walked away. it just didn't happen. it's just hard. thinking that somebody lost their life and there's nothing else could be done about it. this is pro trayvon martin rallies in oakland turned violent. also, the prosecution star witness that wasn't. >> don west gave you a very hard time, the defense attorney. >> don west. >> what is your -- what is your view of him? >> lucky i'm a

236 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on