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tv   CNN Newsroom  CNN  November 19, 2013 6:00am-8:01am PST

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>> that's the good stuff. it's a reason it's called "the good stuff," people. >> now time for some good stuff. >> times two. >> good stuff equals better stuff. >> just math. >> good morning, guys. >> we've got the great stuff for you as far as you know. >> "newsroom" starts right now. good morning, everyone. i'm john berman. >> and i'm christine romans. carol costello is off today. you're looking at a live picture from gettysburg, pennsylvania, where sceremonies are under way to mark the anniversary of president lincoln's speech there. >> scheduled to speak, as well as pennsylvania governor tom corbett. absent this morning, however, is president obama. this is a man who swore in on the oath of office twice on the lincoln bible, announced his
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candidacy for presidency, but is not going to the 100th anniversary of the speech and is taking political heat for that. we'll talk about that this hour. george zimmerman is back in jail, expected to go before a florida judge this afternoon. this time he is accused of pointing a gun at his girlfriend. it's just his latest run-in with the law since his acquittal in trayvon martin's murder. in sanford for us this morning, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, facing felony aggravated assault as well as other charges, police spent hours going through the home he shares with his girlfriend as they try to figure out exactly what happened. >> what's going on? >> he's in my house, breaking all my [ bleep ] stuff because i asked him to leave. he has a freaking gun, breaking all my stuff right now. >> reporter: that's the 911 call
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that police say george zimmerman's girlfriend made during a domestic incident that turned violent. >> you put your gun in my freaking face and told me to get the [ bleep ] out. this is not your house. no. get out of here. >> reporter: the woman told the 911 operator she was pushed out of her house by zimmerman and that he had a shotgun, ar-15, and two handguns inside. she also said the fight started after she had asked the 30-year-old to leave. but zimmerman tells a different story in his own 911 call. >> my girlfriend, for lack of a better word, is going crazy on me. >> reporter: police were already at the house when zimmerman made the call. he told the operator he wanted everyone to know the truth about what happened. >> just started smashing stuff, taking stuff that belonged to me, throwing it outside, throwing it out of the room, throwing it all over the house. she broke a glass table because she threw something on it.
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>> reporter: zimmerman went on to explain how the fight started, saying the woman told him she was pregnant and wanted to raise the child without him. >> she got mad because i guess i told her i would be willing to leave. i guess she thought i was going to argue with her. she's pregnant. i'm not going to put her through that kind of stress. >> reporter: he denied using a wepn to threaten the woman, responding officers say they used the alleged victim's key to get in and pushed through furniture that zimmerman placed behind the door. they found him inside, unarmed and his demeanor described as passive. >> he has had the opportunity to encounter situations similar to this in the past, offered no resistance and cooperated the entire time. >> reporter: it's not the first time zimmerman has had a brush with the law since he was acquitted of murder in the shooting death of 17-year-old trayvon martin. in september, his estranged wife accused him of assault. police investigated and no charges were filed. >> florida suv --
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>> reporter: he has also been stopped twice for speeding. once in texas, where he got a warning. a second time in florida, where he was ticketed and fined $256. now zimmerman is being kept away from other inmates because of the high-profile nature of this case. and if he is granted bond today, authorities have already requested that he be subject to electronic monitoring. john, christine? >> alina machado, thank you. now to toronto. mayor rob ford is declaring, in his own words, an outright war. after a city council vote stripped him of most of his powers. ford's pledge came after a chaotic meeting where he made gestures, you're looking at him right there, toward a council member who had allegedly drunk driving issues. at another moment, he actually knocked down a different council member. here it is, right there. that's an illegal block, folks. he was running to the aid of his brother who was arguing with hecklers. ford did help her up and later
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apologized. if it's not weird enough in the first episode of his new tv show, "ford nation," the mayor reissued his pledge to stay in office. >> i'm not stepping down. i'm not an alcoholic. i'm not a drug addict. i was elected to represent the people of this city with 380,000 some odd votes, the largest in canada's history. people are telling me to stay the course, keep fighting for the little guy. >> there's a whole lot going on up there. senior international correspondent nic robertson is in toronto with more on how this wild city council session unfolded. nic, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, john. it was a five-hour session. they didn't know, for most of the time, really where they were going or what they were doing. they amended the motions that they wanted to pass. they had multiple votes, even, to decide if they were going to
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vote at all. the chaos, the confusion, the confrontations. but it really all just ended up with the mayor declaring war. >> the item is amended. >> reporter: mayor ford went down in an overwhelming vote. his answer? >> this, folks, reminds me of when, when i was watching with my brother, when saddam attacked kuwait. you guys have just attacked kuwait. and you will never -- [ laughter ] >> okay, please -- >> you will never see something, mark my words, friends, this is going to be outright war in the next election. >> reporter: the battle began, even before the vote. another mayor ford moment he might like to forget. in council chambers, shouting at members of the public. and then this, accidentally
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knocking an elderly councillor to the floor. not his finest hour. >> mayor ford, your time's up. okay? mayor ford? >> reporter: in the battle to strip his powers, few in the council, except his brother, doug, on his side. >> what is happening today is an overthrow of a democratically elected mayor, illegally. this is what you see in third world nations. >> "ford nation" comes to sun news. the mayor of mayhem, like you've never seen him before. the booze, the dope. >> you've heard the criticism and the councillors. now tonight, i want you to listen to me. >> reporter: in a new talk show, creating his own world. "ford nation." >> i want to thank my supporters for sticking with me. i guarantee you're going to see a change in the next few months. >> reporter: his words, his message for an hour, under control. until he stepped out of the studio, falling over a
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photographer. >> i didn't push her! >> reporter: that's all he said. >> didn't even touch her. >> reporter: now we understand the mayor is taking phone calls for his constituents today out there, helping them. he's also manning a legal challenge against his council here, he thinks he's going to win support when he realized the councillors were breaking the law, this is the belief that they will swing behind him. >> we'll have to see about that. meantime he seems to have some personal space issues. nic robertson for us in toronto. thanks so much, nic. >> both ford and his brother have been fired up over recent events in toronto, taking on their political enemies. senior political correspondent bill weir has more. >> reporter: the target of almost daily protests. on the council floor of city hall, a political parriah and on
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""saturday night live"" opening sketch punch line ♪ your mayor and [ bleep ] >> reporter: in the heart of the suburban ford nation, he is the greatest public servant they have ever known. >> don't step down. >> i'm not stepping down. don't worry. >> we are praying for you every day. >> yes, we are. >> more poor people than there are rich people and i stick up for the poor people. that's the bottom line. >> reporter: his brother invited us here to witness this love, counterweight to the gauntlet of political foes downtown, doing all they can to strip away his powerful lead. >> it was 4 -2 to strip down your emergency powers. from the outside that seems like you guys are political outcasts. >> you know how you want to make friends at city hall? keep spending taxpayers money. let them go on their free trips,
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free food, do whatever they want. do what you want with your money, not taxpayers money and turn around and cry poor, and say we don't have any money. bs. we have more than enough money. >> reporter: do you have any political allies left? >> well -- >> reporter: did you ever have any in the beginning? >> no. we had the power of the people. i'll workday in, day out to knock these councillors off. i'll workday in, day out to knock them off. >> reporter: really? >> i didn't, and bring "ford nation" live across the city. >> you have other candidates you'll foster in these wards to try to repeat what you guys have done? >> 100%. >> reporter: really? >> yeah. we make chicago politics look like a tea party. we do. it's vicious. >> bill, you show me one other major city, i've saved $1 billion that's turned it around like i have. roads are getting done now. it's clean. it's safe. crime is down. things are happening. we have more jobs, we created over 50,000 jobs in one year
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last year. >> reporter: take all of that, given all of that, couldn't you be even more effective if you were a little healthier in your lifestyle? >> i'm trying to lose some weight, working out. i'm not perfect. >> reporter: why not see some addiction specialist just to make sure? >> i'm not an addict. why go see an addict when i'm not an addict? i'm not an alcoholic or a drug addict. >> how much do you want him to do? >> why see an addiction specialist when i'm not an addict? you can spin it, tell me whatever you want. these people know i'm not. i show up every day at work. sure, i've gone to a party and had a couple of drinks in me. >> like we all do. >> i'm only human. you ever got drunk before, bill? >> reporter: of course. >> sure. >> reporter: but i'm not running -- >> it doesn't matter. that's the thing. i don't look at myself as the mayor. i look at myself as just a normal, regular person. >> of course, a normal, regular person. we'll talk with a man who has known mayor ford for over a decade, serves as a moderator
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for the new show, joe wormington. just ahead we'll ask him if rob ford is just a regular, normal person. >> also what it's like to be in the middle of that circus. >> cprinceton university is reay to vaccinate the student body for a rare form of meningitis. there's still a hurdle to clear. we'll tell you about it next.
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an al qaeda-linked group taking responsibility for this morning's suicide attacks near the embassy in beirut. >> 23 people were killed, 146 others injured.
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the group behind it warns that attacks will continue until hez bola pulls out of syria. xs where john f. kenky was shot have been removed. dallas said they wanted to lay down new asphalt and remove any hazards ahead of the memorial. related to bank's past mortgage policies. >> i'm curious, how much of this $13 billion will actually get to people who need it? >> about $4 billion marked to consumer relief, value of loans written down. there could be new money for loans for low-income americans and an outside overseer to make sure that jp morgan follows
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through. $4 billion of that $9 billion to go to consumers. >> it would be nice if consumers can feel this. >> there's never been one bigger. bigger than any drug industry deal and also bigger than the bp horizon deepwater -- >> heroes in 2007 and 2008. now they're paying up big. princeton university officials are taking action against a rare meningitis outbreak. >> centers for disease control prevention want the vaccine to be given to students even though it is not approved in the u.s. cnn's alexandra field joins us. >> reporter: good morning, christine and john. cdc board will have to sign off before the cdc can officially recommend it. for now, university leaders and health officials are in agreement, they want to import a vaccine that's not been for use here in the united states. the goal is to bring it to princeton university to try to stop an outbreak of meningitis b the.
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they plan to recommend the vaccine for most students. fda has given the cdc approval to import the drug through an investigational drug program. the vaccine is called bexsero, not approve for the record u.s. in this country. it is the only vaccine used to protect against meningitis b. it's a two-dose vaccine, made by the company novartis, manufactured in italy. it was approved for use earlier this year in europe and australia. cdc says this is a safe vaccine. we also asked a doctor and here is what he had to say about bexsero. >> there are no major safety concerns with this vaccine. it's been used in europe. it's very safe. there will be a few sore arms, a few students who get a degree of fever for a day, but this is an effective and safe vaccine. it's a good thing. if i had a child at princeton, i would tell them to get this vaccine. >> reporter: and if this vaccine does come to princeton as planned at this point, it would only be available within the princeton community. the recommendation would be for all 5,000 undergraduate students
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to get the vaccine. graduate students who live in dormitories would also be recommended to get the vaccine and certain people with prior and pre-existing medical conditions who would qualify for it. beyond that, the vaccine would not be any more widely available. christine, john? >> alexandra field, thank you so much at princeton university today. still to come for supporters of toronto mayor rob ford, who can't get enough of the controversial lawmaker? for those of you who just can't see enough of him, good news for you. there's a tv show that follows his every move. a chat with a member of "ford nation" is next. 1ñp
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[ paper rustles, outdoor sounds ] ♪ [ male announcer ] laura's heart attack didn't come with a warning. today her doctor has her on a bayer aspirin regimen to help reduce the risk of another one. if you've had a heart attack, be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen.
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okay. he has his own tv show, my friends, the latest turn for rob ford and his brother, doug. >> they call it "ford nation." here is a clip. >> rob and doug totally unplugged. >> i'm not proud of what i've done. it's very humiliating. >> the mayor of mayhem like you've never seen him before. >> just picture they're saying i was in front of a crackhouse. there's a 78-year-old mother that lives in there, it's not a crackhouse. >> the booze, the dope. >> i'm not an alcoholic. i'm not a drug addict. >> the honest truth. >> joining us from toronto, one of the show's moderators and columnist for "the toronto sun," joe warmington. i have to ask you, i don't know the man personally. is he playing us here? is he playing everybody, using this to become even, i guess, more famous with his "ford
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nation," dropping these populous one liners? is this all an act for him? >> absolutely. he is playing to the american audience as well with the kuwait audience. it went over everybody's head here. it went over no one's head south of the border. he understands he is a world-famous star right now. whether he is in the tenth minute or 14 1/2 here in toronto he has used up 8- 3/4 of his political cat lives. he sees it as something bigger. >> he keeps saying he's humiliated. he doesn't act like a guy who is humiliated. >> you know what? i don't know. you guys are the experts at dealing with political stuff down in the u.s., but i don't think i've ever heard anybody ever say that they've smoked crack cocaine and had it work for them. and yet this guy here -- i went down to the game right after -- the toronto argiles being in the
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cfl in toronto. i went with the mayor in his car, walked into the stadium in the rogers center. it was like going in there with beyonce. it was incredible, the reaction he received. i have never seen anything like that. i cover all the major stars that come to toronto. and many do over the last 22 years. that's the big story, to your question, is that what's the ground game like for him? and how are people reacting to him out there? not what's going on with council and people in the fancy suits but the regular voters. >> well, sir, you've known rob ford for a long time and have been at the other end of some of his rants before. yet you seem supportive of him in some ways in this case. you think the city council has overstepped its boundaries by voting to remove some of his powers. why is that? >> well, i do. i've never seen anything like it, for one thing. anyone that treat it is like it's normal or wrong, i know there are dead canadians and
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americans buried all over the world. i know it's a cliche and punch line for some people but the freedoms we have were fought and won and that people died for. yet these guys out of nowhere come in with 24 minutes notice and say let's change it, because it's rob ford. he hasn't been charged with a crime. i don't like what he has done and i'm not defending any of it. i'm not supporting him specifically, but the whole notion, john, that you can take a democratically elected person and just throw them out, say let's take all the procedure and power and isolate them over here is shocking to me. it's way more serious than anything he has been alleged to have done and admitted to. that's my feeling on it. i don't know if that will gain any traction with my colleagues in the media, because, again, it seems to be that the popular thing is to pile on him here. but, you know, there's more important things than somebody with personal failings. that is democracy. people voted this guy in. until he is locked up or in jail or dead, which i know a lot of
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people would like to see, he's the mayor. and i think he should be able to be the mayor until otherwise. >> are you concerned for him, sir? >> i am. i mean, that's the other thing. a lot of people don't know him. about ten years ago, i was talking to him in his office. we used to do stories about the waste at city hall. i was one of the guys that loved to do those stories with mayor ford. and i said, you know, you should run for mayor. and he said, ah, you know, i would have to lose 100 pounds. and i said, you know what? just be you. a year or two after that, maybe three years after that, ooh im not sure. he was running for mayor. i broke that story. and so i don't want to jump off this thing. again, i'm not a personal friend. i have been on the receiving end of some of his temper tantrums and that kind of thing. but, again, how i would vote i'll keep to myself. but overall, he is elected and he is a human being. >> being you in some cases has
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brought him awfully close to some danger and some trouble, it seems. also the voters have no recowers, no way to remove him from office even if they wanted to at this point, like we do in many places in the united states. still, joe warmington, we love your viewpoint, moderator of rob ford's new tv show "ford nation." >> toronto sun. >> what did i say? >> toronto star. >> sorry. thank you for the correction. still to come, we are following the horrific day two of the tornadoes in the midwest. a tornado survivor says she won't rebuild. >> i'm too scared. i'm just terrified. i can't do it. absolutely crushed by these twisters. we'll have a live report from the ground. customer erin swenson ordered shoes from us online but they didn't fit. customer's not happy, i'm not happy. sales go down, i'm not happy. merch comes back, i'm not happy. use ups. they make returns easy.
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vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. good morning. welcome back. i'm christine romans. >> and i'm john berman in for carol costello this morning. survivors of sunday's
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midwest tornadoes. >> one kept the camera rolling as the twister headed straight for his home. he and his family are still standing. the house is not. we spoke to his wife, mandy lancaster. >> after you came out of the basement and saw what this tornado did to your house, were you incredulous that you survived? >> yes. i don't know how anybody made it there thank you this. >> we'll have much more on this family's story in the next hour. now we turn to brian todd with the story of two devastated towns. >> reporter: christine, john, i'm standing in the middle of what used to be the h & h feed store here in illinois. this was the main office of the store. right now they're just trying to salvage anything they can. a desk, some toys that the family's grandchildren played with. this sign, which was found, we're told, about 25 feet up in one of those trees. the residents and victims of this town are shell shocked all
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over the place here. this town had the highest death toll of any down in this whole cell of storms. three dead here. for many of those who survived, there's almost nothing to build on. chastity taber is trying to salvage anything that's left but also trying to absorb it all. when she gets a moment to describe what happened to her -- >> unreal. just terrifying. you just don't think that things like this will happen. you just don't think -- all day i said it's just going to rain, you know. it's going to be fine. and it's not. it hits. i don't know. >> rorter: tabor got out of her mobile home in brookport, illinois, along with her fiance and daughter moments before the tornado hit and took shelter in a gas station. >> reporter: is there anything?
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>> no. no. pictures. i had my baby bracelets when she was born, my grandfather's -- everything is just -- there's just nothing. >> reporter: five people live in jason jones' mobile home. only one was here when the tornado hit. his father-in-law, who jones says survived, despite being thrown out of the home when it flipped on its side. jones' daughter risks her life to go inside and try to collect valuables. jones says there's one possession he's desperately trying to recover. >> i have a shirt that was put into a picture frame and -- i mean, it was just sentimental. just little things. just something to make me get back up every day. >> reporter: residents throughout brookport tell these stories. three people dead, all from blunt force trauma as a tornado ripped apart their mobile homes.
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in new minden, il noirks a smaller town not far away, one of the strongest tornadoes, ef-4, leveled joseph hoye's farmhouse and killed hoye and his sister. his friend of 35 years came by to rescue a swan, goose and other exotic animals hoye collected. i asked him about the loss of his friend. >> don't like it one bit but it's part of life. at least he's not laying around hurting somewhere. >> reporter: some are determined to rebuild in place but others -- do you want to come back here and live, chastity? >> no. >> reporter: why not? >> i'm too scared. i'm just terrified. i can't do that. uh-uh. no. i couldn't even sleep last night. >> reporter: for those who do want to stay, there's a lot of rebuilding to do. officials tell us 45 to 50 homes here in brookport were damaged
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or destroyed. the mayor says that makes up at least half this town. christine? >> brian todd in brookport, illinois. thank you, brian. 50 years after jfk is assassinated, his daughter, caroline, is carving out a new family legacy, meeting with the japanese emperor at the imperial palace in japan in her new role as ambassador to japan. kyung lah has more. >> reporter: clutching cameras and waving, thousands of japanese line the streets to watch a daughter fulfill her father's sojourn. she's completing the mission he couldn't fulfill, says this woman. this is significant here. jfk was to be the first u.s. president to visit japan, but he was assassinated. 50 years later, nearly to the day of his death, his only surviving child made her way through the streets of tokyo by
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horse-drawn carriage to the emperor. she passed by many in this crowd who witnessed the first-ever images broadcast from the u.s. to japan. caroline is like my friend, she says. of course, we are in totally different worlds. but, to me, she is special. this is the sort of enthusiasm usually reserved for pop stars or the japanese royal family. do you remember anyone ever getting this excited about a u.s. ambassador here in japan? heck, no, say the watanbes who traveled 200 miles to be here. ask anyone about job qualifistics. caroline kennedy doesn't have a lot of diplomatic experience. that doesn't matter, she says, emphatically. she can do the job. this is a country, after all, where blood lines trump all. why american nancy nichols, who lives in japan, who says this child of camelot is royalty
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here. >> making a full circle and closening the bonds that we have. and i think it's great. >> reporter: after a brief ceremony with emperor, ambassador kennedy returned to her carriage to begin her path in u.s./japan history. kyung lah, cnn, tokyo. >> we talked about the 50th anniversary of the jfk assassination. today marks the 150th anniversary of the gettysburg address, abraham lincoln's speech, most important 275 words, in most ways, in u.s. history. noticeably absent from this event, president obama. he has taken some criticism for not being there. we'll talk about that and have live coverage in the next hour. we will also speak with historian ken burns, his latest film about lincoln's speech
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called "the address." in other news, george zimmerman set to be arraigned in a florid courtroom after being arrested and charged with felony assault, charged with pointing a gun at his girlfriend. zimmerman, on the other hand, says she was the aggressor in the argument. this is his latest run-in with the law since his acquittal in the death of trayvon martin. senior correspondent jim acosta has more on the latest health care fiasco. jim? >> reporter: that's right. president obama touted jessica sanford as an obama care success story. that's not how she sees it. i'll have an exclusive interview with jessica sanford in a few moments. [ male announcer ] what if a small company
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you give them the giggles. tylenol cold® helps relieve your worst cold and flu symptoms. but for everything we do, we know you do so much more. tylenol cold®. and our giant idaho potato truck is still missing. so my dog and i we're going to go find it. it's out there somewhere spreading the good word about idaho potatoes and raising money for meals on wheels. but we'd really like our truck back, so if you see it, let us know, would you? thanks. what?
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did the obama administration know that health care.gov was
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dead on arrival? new hearing kick off next hour in washington. and then there's this. a woman the president touted as one of the obama care success stories is now telling a different story. cnn senior white house correspondent jim acosta joins us with that. >> reporter: that's right, president obama mentioned jessica sanford in a speech he gave at the rose garden about obama care and its rollout. he acknowledged at time there were problem with his healthcare.gov but pointed to the story of jessica san kford, 48-year-old single mom who bought what she considered affordable insurance. she wrote an e-mail to the president, thanking him, basically, for passing the affordable care act and the white how was so moved by jessica sanford's e-mail that they included it in the president's remarks on october 21st. here is a bit of those comments
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from the president. >> i recently received a letter from a woman named jessica stan -- jessica sanford in washington state. here is what she wrote. i am a single mom, no child support, self employed. and i haven't had insurance for 15 years because it's too expensive. i was crying the other day when i signed up. so much stress lifted. now that is not untypical for a lot of folks like jessica, who have been struggling without health insurance. that's what the affordable care act is all about. >> but in the days following that speech from the president, jessica sanford tells cnn she started to receive letters from the washington state health exchange, explaining that the tax credit that they initially told her she was going to get was not going to happen. that raised the price of her health care plan that she was going to buy from washington state's health exchange. she now says because of that -- we're showing some of those
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documents on screen. because of that, she can no longer afford to buy insurance in washington state and now at this point she doesn't think she's going to have health care coverage come the beginning of this year, this coming year. i talked to jessica sanford late last night about all of this. here is what she had to say. >> it was like riding a big roller coaster. they have my credit card. they have the payment date. and then, you know, once again i'm knocked down. and this time it's to zero. and at my rate of pay, with my family size, i just don't understand why i wouldn't get at least a little help with the tax credit. it was a huge disappointment. and especially since i had -- my story had been shared by the president, i felt like, you know -- i just felt really embarrassed that he had quoted my story and then come to find that the washington health plan finder, the website here in our state, had grossly miscalculated
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or are having a problem figuring their tax credits. and so at least for right now, i don't -- i'm not going to be getting insurance. >> reporter: now we did talk to officials with the washington state health care exchange and those officials have responded to us that they're looking into jessica sanford's matter, but they have not yet reached any conclusion on that front. meanwhile on another front, the white house is dealing with another embarrassing revelation today. that is a report from a consultant that was advising the department of health and human services. that report was handed over to cnn last night by the house energy and commerce committee. that report states that last spring top administration officials, including health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius and officials at the white house were told that there were problems with the development of healthcare.gov, the federal website, of course, where people can go online and buy insurance.
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according to a white house official, we just received a statement from a white house official that they're saying, quote, flags were definitely raised throughout the development of the website, talking about this report released by the house energy and commerce committee, but they are saying at the white house, nobody, quote, anticipated the size and scope of the problems we experienced once the site was launched. christina and john, more questions for this white house about the rollout of the president's signature health care achievement, legislative achievement. >> i think it's pretty clear that no one anticipated the size of potential problems and they've got a lot to fix. jim acosta, senior white house correspondent. thanks, jim. >> you bet. moms across the country took to social media to give the education secretary a little piece of their minds. >> another headache for the administration. now after fierce backlash, arne duncan is saying he's sorry for his comment about white suburban moms but he's not backing down from what he says prompted the
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comment. we'll hear from both sides. that's new at 10:00. [ male announcer ] if you can clear a crowd but not your nasal congestion, you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec-d®. powerful relief of nasal congestion and other allergy symptoms -- all in one pill. zyrtec-d®. at the pharmacy counter. they always have. they always will. that's why you take charge of your future. your retirement. ♪ ameriprise advisors can help you like they've helped millions of others. listening, planning, working one on one. to help you retire your way... with confidence. that's what ameriprise financial does. that's what they can do with you. ameriprise financial. more within reach.
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welcome back, everyone. really strange news out of hollywood. the father of late actress brittany murphy thinks she was poisoned. >> the coroner listed the cause of her death as anemia. >> i had a feeling that there was a definite murder situation here. yes, it's poison, yes, i know that. >> nischelle turner joins us right now. >> reporter: big allegations, big suspicions. this is a very strange story, you're right, john. and at this stage there are more questions than answers. but you herd her father on good morning america saying his daughter was poisoned.
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and then he produces a toxicology report that says his information backs him up. heavy metals were discovered in hair samples that the lab tested, things like arsenic, copper, lead, murky and uranium. now he has been suspicious that she died due to a combination of pneumonia, iron deficiency, and, quote, multiple drugs. and at this point the coroner has no plans to re-open the inquiries into the deaths of miss murphy or mr. may. onjack. we stand by our conclusions as opinions. like we said, the questions got bigger from her family because her husband died a few months after she did. >> how did he die?
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>> of pneumonia. >> the same thing. the family as alluded this entire time that something else was going on here. they wanted to find out what they thought was really behind these deaths. but again, the cornoncoroner's said, no, we're not re-opening this. the father and family say they're going to go forward and still ask questions. >> certainly suspicious, no matter what. >> still to come for us. controversy on the field. really? really? tom brady falls short on monday night football with help from the refs. the dwe is, should the patrioted have had one more shot at the end zone? the answer is yes. we'll explain why in just a moment. ♪
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all right. it was a controversial call to say the least that doomed the new england patriots as they lost to the panthers on the final play of the game. and andy scholes is here with us. >> good morning. this play has a lot of people talking. should there have been a penalty to give the patriots another chance? let's take a look. they were down by four. brady goes for this man in the end zone. but a flag was thrown when the interception. he was clearly interfered with. he basically bear hugs him in the end zone. >> you can't do that. >> but get this. the officials get together and
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they pick up the flag because they said the pass was uncatchable. >> when you're being tackled it's uncatchable. >> tom brady had the same by. he had words with the physician when he went into the tunnel. but he did take the high road in the news krorchs. >> i didn't see the play either. we had plenty of chances and we don't make any excuses. i wish it didn't come down to that. and they're going to make the call or not make the call. >> the fan who fell from the upper deck after trying to slide down the railing on sunday, has been banned for life. amazingly, both he and the fan he fell on are okay after being treated at a local hospital. and it looks like one head butt equals one game suspension. eric walden has been suspended to this helmet to head butt that
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he dplifrd. >> that looks so painful every time you see it. >> berman was off the air for like a month after your last head butt. >> the next hour of "newsroom" begins right now. >> we want to take you right now to gettysburg in pennsylvania. on that site that's a ceremony marking the 100th anniversary of the address from president lincoln. >> one person noticeably absent from this komc commemoration. and. >> he announced his cannedsy in
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springfield, illinois. he took a train trip to washington for his first inaugurati inauguration. so like we said, there's a little bit of a controversy there. in the next half hour we'll speak with ken burns about all of this. he's working on a documentary about his gettysburg speech called, "the address". >> now, going to mayor ford. the mayor was outraged by the vote calling it a coup ke clairing that he will not step down from office. his brother says that his goal is to help some of his colleagues lose their job after they voted against the mayor. >> for his part, he's touting his record while shaking off the claims that his partying has hurt his job. >> you show me one other major city that has saved a billion
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dollars. our roads are getting down. it's clean. it's safe. we have more cranes in the sky. we created over r50,000 jobs last year. >> reporter: but couldn't you be even more effective if you were healthier in your lifestyle? >> i'm not perfect. >> reporter: why not see addiction specialists just to make sure? >> i'm not an addict. >> nic robertson joins us now. ford nation or fort circus, whatever you want to call it, continues, nic. >> reporter: it does. the mayor is out deal with phone calls from his constituents. but the legacy of that five-hour session is still ringing through the halls here. but it was really essentially a five-hour slamming match at the end of which the mayor declaring war. >> the item is amended --
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>> reporter: mayor ford went down in an overwhelming vote. his answer. >> this, folks, reminds me of when sudan attacked continue wait. you guys have just attacked kuwait. and you will never -- you will never see something that -- mark my words, friends, this is going to be outright war in the next election. >> reporter: the battle began even before the vote. another mayor ford moment that he might like to forget. in council chambers, shouting members of the public. and then this. accidentally knocking an elderly councillor to the floor. not his finest hour. >> mayor ford, your time is up. mayor ford. >> reporter: in the battle to strip his powers, few in the
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council, except his brother doug, on his side. >> what is happening today is an overthrow of a dremcallily elected mayor illegally. this is what you see in third world nations. >> "ford nation" comes to -- the boos, the dope. >> you've heard the criticism and the councilors. now tonight, i want you to listen to me. >> reporter: in a new talk show creating his own world, "ford nation." >> i want to thank my supporters for sticking with me. i guarantee you're going to see a change in the next few months. >> reporter: his words, his message, for an hour under control until he stepped out of the studio falling over a photographer. >> i didn't push her. >> that's all he said. >> i didn't even touch her. >> reporter: so we asked one of the moderators on that show, isn't the mayor just getting another opportunity to pull the
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wool over the eyes of the voters here? this is what he said. >> he understands that he's a world famous star right now and whether he's in tenth minute or 14 1/2, here in toronto, he's used up 8 3/4 of his political cat lives. but he sees something bigger and he's playing it for all it's worth. >> reporter: he might have just a quarter of a cat life left. but really there are a lot of people out here in the suburbs who still support him. back to you. >> nic, you spoke to the deputy mayor who now has a whole lot more power because of the city council vote. what have you learned? >> reporter: yeah. this is a guy who wants to kind of take it a little easy and step back. he says the mayor is overheated
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right now, let's maybe leave it until after christmas. we both share a passion about football, we can find common ground there. we'll work a straenl to go forward. but he said at the end of the day, if this doesn't work out, we'll call on the province to come in and remove the mayor if he continues to be a problem. i said, are you going to give him weeks or months? he said, let's be looking around february. so the council is going to give him a little time to see if he can cool down and get along with the work here. >> thanks so much. >> terrifying images from the midwest. an illinois woman kept pleading with her husband to get the shelter as this twister was bearing down on her house. but transfixed by the storm's power, that man kept taking the video. we have that story and that amazing video.
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we've got someone on the ground for us in washington, illinois. what kind of stories are you hearing? >> reporter: well, today is the day, the first real day, where people have to start making decisions. the adrenalin and shock has started to wear off. you're looking at 200 to 400 homes just here in washington. and this is going on around the state of illinois. people are safe, they're happy that they survived the storm. now, it's what are we going to do? are we going to rebuild? their insurance agents are now on the ground here trying to help people through the process. keep in mind. this is november. we're going up against not only the holiday season here, but winter. so people have to now come to the real grim reality of their new reality in trying to make the decisions. it's a heartbreaking stage of the evolution of the survivors
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of any disaster. >> and ted, still hundreds of thousands of people without power. and to see people picking through the rubble to find something to remind them of a home they're not going to go back to. simply heartbreaking. >> reporter: you're absolutely right. it is heartbreaking. and we talked to a couple of people yesterday, they found a piece of china and it made their day. you're looking at other people's stuff where your house used to be. it is really hard to deal with. >> all right. we've been moved by the minerals. if you have been moved and would like to help, go to cnn.com/impact. it has links to groups giving aid to that. we'll be right back. [ female announcer ] we give you relief from your cold symptoms. you give them the giggles.
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that coffee breaks down tooth enamel. thankfully, she uses act restoring mouthwash. it rebuilds tooth enamel, making your teeth two times stronger. act. smile strong. george zimmerman is back in jail. he's expected to go before a florida judge this afternoon. this is his fourth run-in with the law since being acquitted of the death of trayvon martin. >> this time he's accused of pointing a gun at his girlfriend and breaking a table while the two argued. he's charged with felony assault. >> reporter: george zimmerman spent the night in jail in a cell by himself. authorities are keeping him away of other inmates because of his high profile.
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meanwhile, the police spent their night searching the home as they try to figure out exactly what happened. >> what's going on. >> he's in my house breaking all my [ bleep ] because i asked him to leave. >> that's the 911 call that the authorities say that george zimmerman's girlfriend made. >> i'm doing this again? you broke my glass table. you broke my sunglasses and you put your gun in my freaking face and told me to get the [ bleep ] out. this is not your house. >> reporter: she told the 911 operator that he was pushed out of the house by george zimmerman. she said the fight started after she she asked the 30-year-old to leave. but he tells a different story may in his own 911 call. >> for lack of a better word, my
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girlfriend is going crazy down here. >> reporter: they were already at the house when he made the call. he told the operator that he wanted everyone to know the truth about what happened. >> she started smashing stuff and kicking stuff that belonged to me that belonged to me. she broke a glass table because she threw something on it. >> reporter: he went on to explain how the fight started. saying that she told him she was pregnant and wanted to raise their child without him. >> she got mad that i stoler i would be willing to leave. i guess she thought i was going to argue with her. >> reporter: he denied using a weapon to threaten the woman. respongtding officers said they used the alleged victim's key to get in. they found zimmerman inside, unarmed, his demeanor described as passive. >> he's had the opportunity to
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encounter similar situations in the past. ez cooperated the entire time. >> reporter: it's the not the first time he had a brush with the law since he was acquitted of the shooting death of trayvon martin. in september his estranged wife accused him of assault and no charges were filed. he was stopped twice for speeding, once in texas where he got a warning, a second time in florida, where he was ticketed and find $256. now if zimmerman is bonded out this afternoon, authorities have requested that he be placed on electronic monitoring. meanwhile his girlfriend told investigators she was not pregnant. her mother tells us she is doing well and is in a safe place. >> sounds complicated. we'll be right back. [ female announcer ] we give you relief from your cold symptoms. you give them the giggles. tylenol cold® helps relieve
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so you may have heard about one walmart store's attempt to help its workers feed their families. we're live in atlanta with more here. and this is basically a food drive at one walmart that's raising a lot of attention. people are saying, hey, wait a minute, this kind of feeds into the storiline that walmart doesn't have great pay for all of its associates. what can you tell us? >> and if you're thinking about asking other walmart workers to help other walmart workers who can't feed their families? this wasn't in the main part of the store, but this sign was in the back for workers to donate. you can see it from.
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please donate food items here so associates in need can enjoy thanksgiving dinner. now, a walmart associate said there's special specifics going on at this walmart. for example, somebody might have just lost a spouse, that's why they're having problems. but it does play into the idea that the company is not paying its workers called a living wage. and we just had the study a couple of weeks ago that said more than half of walmart workers make less than $25,000 and end up on government assistance. tax payer dollars, you and me. >> and this comes right before the holiday season. walmart has done a whole lots of outreach to get positive stories. >> there are so many protests going on around fast food establishments and a whole
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conversation going on about how much is it fair to pay your kpees when it comes to the low wages. are these stepping stone jobs? not anymore with the job market like it is. >> and i spoke to the ceo at walmart. and he said, you can still move up. he said that their pay is higher than the retail industry standard. but the question is, is the retail industry standard good enough to raise a family and go to college on. and it feeds into the minimum wage argument and discussion and debate as well. when you're creating so many jobs in the economy that are jobs that are $8, $9, $10, $11 an hour jobs, that's where all the growth is, that's where the concern is. >> and when you see a sign that says, hey workers, can you help the other workers, and they still can't feed them, it's
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certainly jarring to think of a family that can't afford thanksgiving even when they've got people in the family who are at work. it's tough stuff out there. >> a walmart spoex person said that last year at this store that was basically a food drive to help a mother who was not getting child support payments anymore. so it was a specific case last year. and they're doing it again. so, it just does really highlight, even if you're working, some people don't have enough to put food on the table. >> checking out the top stories right now. an al qaeda linked group is taking responsibility for a suicide attack in beirut. >> the group warns these attacks will continue until hez ba la pulls out. >> and meanwhile, disgraced
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senator john edwards, he's heading back to work. he plans to open a law practice in north carolina with his old partner and his daughter. this is his first time back in the public eye since he was acquitted of campaign finance charges last year. he made a lot of money as a lawyer back in the '90s. >> a $13 billion settlement between the justice department and jp morgan chase. and this deal relates to as one cause of the financialcise. there's 4 billion in there for consumer relief, homeowner relief. still to come, duncan still apologizing about his remark about white suburban moms. next. an irregular heartbeat, not caused by a heart valve problem. that puts jim at a greater risk of stroke. for years, jim's medicine tied him
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tylenol cold®. welcome back, everyone. education secretary duncan now apologizing for his comments slamming, quote, white suburban moms. >> he said this, it's 'fascinating to me that some of the pushback is coming from sort of white suburban moms who all
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of a sudden their child isn't as brilliant as they thought they were and their school isn't quite as good as they thought they were. >> renee marsh is in washington with more. what are they saying now? >> reporter: the comment about the suburban moms, that went viral. and the backlash was fierce. they took to social media and the moms really let the department of education secretary get a piece of that i mind. and now he's telling cnn he's sorry. in defending a controversial program to raise math and english standards nationwide, the education secretary instead added fuel to the fire. he said some of the pushback is coming from sort of white suburban moms who all the sudden their child isn't as brilliant as they thought they were. >> for somebody who is trying to teach people how to communicate, he needs to take some lessons
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himself. >> reporter: this is one of those white suburban moms. her son, brandon, is a special needs student. she worries the new standards known as common core with its frequent testing will deprive other students with the individual attention that he received. >> the more mechanicized we make education, the more those children are going to fail. >> reporter: the president of one teacher's union tweeting did duncan really blame soccer moms? more than 1700 people have joined the moms against duncan facebook page. and more than 1900 signed a white house.gov petition to have him fired. >> do you regret making the comments or saying them the way you did? >> obviously i didn't say them perfectly achgd apologies for that. >> but he's not backing down. >> my point is that children need a well rounded world class
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education. we have challenges in not just in our inner cities but in our sbub ban areas too. >> to pretest, the critics kept their kids home from school monday. but country dan says, tougher standards are a good thing. >> this is a state-lead effort. and raising standards is hard. and telling the truth is hard. we actually lie to parents and lie to families. told them their children are being successful when they weren't. that happened to make politicians look good. >> some states already started implements common core. and there's a wide range of criticism, some calling it a government takeover of education, some saying it's too stringent, others saying it's not stringent enough.
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>> renee, he has talked about this lying to -- we've been lying to ourselves and parents and school districts about how good they are for so long because of politician. it's something that he's been passionate about over the past couple of years. turn of phrase no so fortunate. renee marsh, thanks. >> it's not going to be easy under any situation when you use that language. princeton university students are closer to getting a vaccine to ward off a potentially dangerous and deadly strange of meningitis. alexandra field joins us now from princeton in new jersey. what's the latest? >> reporter: the princeton officials are recommending that
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most students take it. they're ready to offer thousands of students a vaccine that is not proofed for use in the united states. it's an effort to stop a outbreak that's showing up on campus. >> pending final cdc approval, the university is prepared to accept these recommendations and make arrangements access to this vaccine. >> reporter: since mar, a rare and deadly strain of meningitis has been linked to the university. now they're prepared to recommend the vaccine bexsero. and vac nations will be free and voluntary. >> it's like the cdc proofs it, i would take it. >> reporter: it's the only vaccine available to protect
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against meningitis b. it is not yet approved in the u.s. it's been administered to 8,000 people. and the cdd says it's considered safe. some doctors say it's key to stop the outbreak following spring break. >> there are a number of people, we don't know what proportion in that student population that are carriers of this bug back in their throats. they're feeling fine. nobody knows that they have it. but they can spread it and give it to others. >> reporter: it will only be available as an option at princeton university. but there's no estimate on how many students will take it. >> i want to do a little more research and find out exactly what the vaccine entames. >> reporter: there are still a lot of moving parts to all of this. a cdc review board will have to
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sign off on the plan before they officially recommend it. and still, the university says they hope to have the first doses of the vaccine available in december. >> everyone in your piece kept saying it's safe. the question is, why hasn't it been approved in the u.s. yet? >> reporter: this is a new drug. and medical ex-sperpgt plaining that they decided to go first to europe and it's quite possible that they would have game to the u.s. in the near future. >> thanks so much. >> still to come this morning. a milestone in american history. the 150th anniversary of the gettysburg address. we're going to speak with a man who wants all americans to learn the words to this famous speech by heart. documentary filmmaker ken burns joins us next. ale announcer ] wu have sinus pressure and pain, you feel...squeezed.
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welcome back. for president obama the road to the white house began six years ago in springfield, illinois, where he announced his candidacy in a town that was the home town of abraham lincoln's political career. he calls him one of his heroes. he took the oath of office twice on lincoln's bible and he assembled his own team of riv rivals, like len con did. >> but on a day when bun of lincoln's key speeches is marking its 100th anniversary,
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the president is notably absent there. they did pay tribute by taking part in a special project designed to honor this important part of len con's legacy. it's called "learn the address". >> our father's brought forth on this continent -- >> a new nation conceived in liberty -- >> and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equally. >> now we are engage in a great civil war. >> testing whether that nation -- >> we are met on a great battlefield of that war. >> we have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting place. >> joining us now is the man behind this project, ken burns. good morning. so nice to see you. why do you think -- >> good morning, christine. >> why do you want american's to learn lincolns words by heart? >> i just phoned the film called
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"the address" with boys of learning difficulties. and i said if they can do this, we can do it. and why can't we all do it particularly in this fractured time. i reached out to all the living presidents, leaders in business, and stars and media, and other places, taylor swift. and they immediately responded. so that people are now beginning over the last week that the campaign was launched to upload their own versions. we've got stadiums reciting it. the entire u.s. soccer team. it's been a wonderful moment. this is the most important speech in american history where lincoln doubles down on the declaration and says we really do mean that all men are created equal. he gave us our marching orders and we're still on the marching
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orders that he gave us that day. >> you know 270 words that really made history, just two minutes long. president obama has often looked to lincoln for inspiration. so many have. and president obama is not at the ceremony today. what would his presence have meant there today, do you think? >> well, i think it's the other way around. he's an extraordinarily modest man and i spoke to him about it. he invested so much time and energy with dr. king's speech, arguably the second greatest speech in all of american history, i think he didn't want to feel like he somehow would own both of these speeches. he helped us tremendously on this. and it's been an amazing thing. his presence would have turned this into a zoo. this allows folks to come here and commune with lincoln, to walk the battlefield and understand the terrible sacrifices that happened here.
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this is the greatest and bloodest battle in all of american soil. and lincoln came four and a half months later to dedicate this place and reinvigorate our american promise. extraordinary words. presidential protriat its finest. and we hope inspired by these young boys with learning differences, that the rest of us can learn it. i don't just mean school kids. john and christine, i want you to learn it and memorize it. with like to sing in church and "take me out to the ball game." when we do things in unison, we feel better. and in these fractured times being reminded of this union that lincoln gave his life to preserve is an important exercise. we internalize the meaning of these words. >> we have a lot to live up to, that's what i think when i hear those words.
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when you think about what they were going through in that moment in the american experience, we still have a lot to look up to, don't we? >> we do indeed. now, lincoln was coming back and saying, we freed the saves but we have a great deal more work to do. he refers to past in the first sentence. tells you where you are in the second sentence. and then he looks to the future. so these words have meaning for us and inspiration for us now 150 years later. and i think, when we learn them and can recite them, that we hear highly resolve that these dead have not died in vain and the government of the people -- all of these things are the key words of our democracy. and we rededicate ourselves to a higher purpose. >> i think we're still living that new birth of freedom. >> this is the pursuit of
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happiness. it's exactly what it is. we're trying to form a more perfect union. >> thank you so much, ken burns, for joining us this morning. >> we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] this is jim, a man who doesn't stand still. but jim has afib, atrial fibrillation -- an irregular heartbeat, not caused by a heart valve problem. that puts jim at a greater risk of stroke. for years, jim's medicine tied him to a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but now, with once-a-day xarelto®, jim's on the move. jim's doctor recommended xarelto®. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce afib-related stroke risk. but xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem. that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. so jim's not tied to that monitoring routine. [ gps ] proceed to the designated route. not today. [ male announcer ] for patients currently well managed on warfarin, there is limited information on how xarelto® and warfarin compare in reducing the risk of stroke.
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you should not start humira if you have any kind of infection. ask your gastroenterologist about humira today. remission is possible. breaking news for you now. this is shaking the political world, especially in virginia. cnn has learned that virginia state senator deeds has been stabbed and another person at his home is dead. now he's a wealth known figure in the state of virginia. he ran for attorney general and loss by just a few votes. well liked by so many people around the state. question is now, what happened at has house. >> reporter: well, you know, a terrible news that we have just learned from the virginia state police. he has in fact been transported
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to the hospital from injuries sustained from an assault at his home in beth county. that's in the far western portion of virginia. he ran for governor back in 2009. he lost. but he's the kind of person that he's very close to people. he's the type of person that you want to see in politics, says someone that i just got off the phone with. we should hear more tails about what had happened at noon. virginia state police is going to hold a news conference. but yes, terribly disturbing news out of virginia. >> and the virginia state police in a press release says there's a second individual at the residere residence that is deceased. what do we know if anything about what happened? >> reporter: we know an assault took place and somebody did not survive the assault. there are other news
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organizations that the other person is a family member. we have not been able to confirm that. certainly we will know more details at noon. but it does look like it was a rather violent scene. >> we will stay on that. and already prayers have been sent in from politicians on both side of the aisle for him. thanks, appreciate it. other news. self-confessed siller who shot larry flint and left his pairized is set to be constituted just after midnight. he admits to killing 22 people. his reason, he says, to spark a race war. >> i threw that magazine down and thought, i'm going to kill
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that guy. >> reporter: the single unwaivering in this is murder. in 1977, the magazine featured this controversial photo spread. >> and i saw that interracial couple there having sex and it just made me sick. >> reporter: his gaze unwaivering. he recalled from death row his murderous spree. driven by a hate for jews, black, and any whites with them. in st. louis, he staked out a sin gaug and gunned down gerald gordon. he killed two young black then jogging with white female friends. and 13 and 14-year-old cousins were not spared. and even civil rights leaders
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shot. larry flynt would be a killing trophy. >> you hunted him down? >> yeah. i was hunting him down. >> you remember the shots ringing out? >> yeah. sort of like a hot poker hitting me in my stomach. >> reporter: he'll never forget, march, 6th, 1978. the shots like most of franklin's targets, came from a distance. flint would barely survive the two bullets that struck him. he would never walk again. by the time they arrested franklin in september of 1980, at least 22 people were dead. days away from his constitution, franklin spoke to me from death row about his killing spree. >> three years. just the same length of time jesus was on his mission. >> and what was your mission? >> well, to try to get a race war started. >> franklin showed me a tattoo.
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faded with time, you can still make out that it's the grim reaper. >> do you think you're a hire r -- hero? >> that's what they tell me. i would rather people like me than not like me, just like anybody else. i would rather be loved than hated. >> even if they are the nazi party and other hate groups. >> yeah. but they're not the only ones who hate me. >> do you feel any hate looking at me? >> of course not. i have no feeling whatsoever toward you. especially not a female, you know what i mean. >> you shot plenty of women. >> yeah, i know. you've got a point. >> franklin says he's no longer a rayist, that he was wrong and sorry for his crimes. he now wants mercy. fighting his upcoming constitution any way he can.
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there's almost no one in his corner. if you could stop it, would you stop it? >> oh, yes. i would say put him in prison for the rest of his life. >> why? principle. he's filed a lawsuit trying to stop his own shooter's death. but don't mistake all this for mercy. >> is that how you see this? you're for giving him at all? >> i'm not showing him anything. if it wasn't him and it was some other person who shot me, my feelings would be the same. >> reporter: and what does franklin think about the man that he tried to kill. >> my old pal larry. >> your old pal larry? >> i'm not sure he would refer to you as your old pal. >> i like larry. >> but it appears flynt's efforts won't stop. >> most people are heading toward a burning hell and they don't know it. >> do you think something lies for you on the other side of the
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20th? >> yes. but it's not a burning hell. i'm servant of the lord. >> i think we're about out of time. >> well, let's not say that. >> time is important to you now, isn't it? >> oh, yeah. it has been for a long time. and maybe will be again sometime. >> that is chilling to hear those words. franklin says he's repented for all of the murders. and he says he won't be burning in hell but will be in the kingdom of heaven. >> creepy. checking top stories. unofficial xs mark the spot where john f. kennedy was shot. >> and the city of dallas said they wanted to ward off safety hazards for the upcoming ceremony. >> look, daddy, teacher said
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every time a bell rings an angel gets his wings. >> that's right. that's right. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> more than 65 years after the movie "it's a wonderful life" became a christmas classic, a sequel is in the works. a new movie will focus on the grandson. the rest of the story expected to hit theaters in 2015. >> i think they're going to get a tarp bailout. that's what happens in the sequel. why not? >> thanks for joining us. "legal view" with ashleigh banfield starts right after a quick break. stay around. anything we purchase for the paper cottage goes on our ink card. so you can manage your business expenses and access them online instantly with the game changing app from ink. we didn't get into business to spend time managing receipts,
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>> hello, everyone. i'm ashleigh banfield. it's tuesday, november 19th. welcome to "legal view." we want to begin with breaking news. virginia state senator deeds is in critical condition right now. this after being stabbed in his own home in western virginia. mark preston is live with me now in washington, d.c. there are a lot of stories that are floating out there. but what do we know for sure right now,

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