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tv   New Day  CNN  December 12, 2013 3:00am-6:01am PST

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than half of country experiencing temperatures below freezing. the northeast could be in for another round of snow this weeshs. in the irony of weather coverage, indra petersons is standing out in a frosty new york city warning you about the cold. >> we are talking about temperatures. pretty much two-thirds of the country below freezing, right here, right now in new york city, 24 degrees. it feels like 14 degrees right now. here's the bad side. we know there's more cold air, more snow on the way. >> everybody throughout the area is at the freezing mark. >> if you thought today was cold. >> the next few days will be cold. >> reporter: another blast of arctic air has millions from the great lakes to the northeast waking up in a deep freeze. city after city, experiencing temperatures 20 degrees or more below average. the coldest it's gotten in the taste of winter.
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forecasters say the windy city already feeling like its earliest subzero temperatures since 1995. earlier this week, morning temps plunged to 6 below zero. the same story in frozen fargo. they've had single digit temps or below for a full week. new yorkers bundling up for their morning commute with brutal wind chills that feels like the teens and 20s. bitter cold temps made fighting this apartment fire in wisconsin challenging for the firefight s firefighters. a reporter for cnn affiliate waow left this banana out in negative 2 degree weather for a half hour. >> i can use this banana as a hammer. >> reporter: hospitals preparing for an influx of hypothermia and forecast bite cases.
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doctors urging people to stay indoors. >> as you get colder and colder, your decisionmaking gets worse and worse. >> take a look at these temperatures across the country. when you can easily see how many people are below freezing, let's do the fun part, let's factor in the wind chill. look at these numbers. so many places feeling like they are 0 right now. in chicago, feels like negative 15 degrees. the story does not end there. we talk about another storm expected to move in. this low will drop down into the south, into the central plains. by tomorrow, we'll be talking about portions of kansas and missouri starting to see the wintry mix. let's bring in all of the action, lack at this, snow from the northeast back down to missouri. still looking at that wintry mix through new england and west virginia and down into the southeast we'll be talking about snow. the question is, are we going to be staying cold?
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yes, for some time. we talk about the cool temperatures here to stay. bad news for the weekend. >> those are not described as cool. those are cold temperatures, indra. they'll wake people this up morning. >> at least we're on the same page for once, kate. >> a rarity but we are. to capitol hill, while you were sleeping lawmakers pulling an all-nighter in the senate to vote on presidential appointments and nominees. they are still going, folks. there's some video, looking at the senate floor. this is actually live pictures. who knew. they're working. >> good. >> work more. i like it. also happening this morning, the house will be voting on a bipartisan budget proposal designed to prevent another government shutdown next month. let's get the later from cnn's joe johns live in washington. >> it's a compromise to stop the
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government lurching from crisis to crisis every few months. it's also the public battle over the direction of the gop that's gotten much uglier recently. the speaker of the house has been caught in the middle trying to referee. now he's throwing punches, too. before the big vote, a family feud over the federal budget between establishment republicans and the forces trying to steer the party further to the right. >> they're using our members and the american people for their own goals. >> the house speaker himself with unusually personal pushback against conservative critics of the bipartisan budget deal. >> this is ridiculous. listen, if you're for more deficit reduction, you're for this agreement. >> boehner was talking about groups like heritage actions, americans for prosperity, the club for growth and others denouncing the plan because they say it increases spending $63 billion over the next two years, does an end run around the
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budget control act and uses gimmicks to raise revenue. heritage action responding to boehner said lawmakers will have to explain to their constituents, many of whom are our members but they've incre e increased sfending, increasing taxes and offering up another round of promises waiting to be broken. that will be a tough sell back home. a difficult spot for some republican street fighters defending it while holding their noses. >> it's the best compromise you can get. it's nowhere close to what republicans like to have. >> tough for the congressional golden boy and former vice presidential candidate paul ryan who co-authored the deal knowing his base will be watching if he ever runs for higher office again. >> if i clog my judgment by what is good for me or political or not, or how does this help me juxtapose against somebody else? this is not right in my opinion. >> anybody who thinks my vote is for sale to heritage action is sadly mistaken.
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i would ask anybody who is attacking these outside groups, what is it these outside groups said yesterday about this deal? that is false today. >> reporter: republicans have their issues with this deal but so do many democrats who wanted to see much more, including an extension of unemployment benefits. so there's something in here for everyone to hate. chris? >> joe, thanks for the reporting this morning. the pilots were deeply confused before landing and relied too heavily on automate the control systems. dramatic new security footage shows the moment the plane hit the sea wall and tumbled down the runway. cnn's rene marsh is live in washington with more. good morning. >> good morning, chris. it's hard to imagine the pilot flying the plane you're on may not fully understand how the automated flight systems in the cockpit work. it's disturbing and that's what new details in the asiana crash
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suggest. new video captured on airport security cameras show the heartstopping moment asiana 214 crashed this july. it hit a sea wall and did a 360 before coming to rest. >> oh, my god. >> reporter: new details about what happened inside the cockpit. the pilot flying told investigators he was uncomfortable landing visually. without an instrument approach to guide him. he was a trainee on the 777 but had substantial experience in other aircraft. on top of that, he didn't completely understand the 777's automated flight system. investigators say he thought the plane's automatic throttle would kick in, increasing speed even in idle but it doesn't work that way. >> we have an issue in aviation that needs to be dealt with,
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with respect to automation and performance when it comes to the interaction between the aircraft and the human being. >> reporter: cockpit voice recorders revealed the pilots knew the plane was plunging, 52 seconds before the crash, a relief pilot called out "sink rate." warning the plane was dropping too fast. the warning repeated in english and korean. he tried but failed to correct the problem. >> right now, airline pilots are not getting enough in-depth training, knowledge about these complex systems. >> reporter: investigators are also digging into whether korean culture which puts a premium on deference to seniority played a role in the bungled landing. >> that's a problem we changed in this country. the captain didn't used to be approachable or listen to others. now we have to because the accident rate demands it.
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>> reporter: the hearing also focused on the airplane cabin's crash worthiness, how did the cabin, the seats, the seat belts hold up in the crash. did they adequately protect passengers? what worked and what can be improved? investigators zeroed in on the emergency response to the crash. we know one of the three victims was run over when firefighters arrived. michaela? >> thank you for that. let's take a look at the headlines at the top of the hour. an explosion outside the u.s. embassy in afghanistan this morning was an accident. a spokesman font interior ministry tells cnn it happened in an arms depot in kabul and was set off by mistake. they have returned back to normal operations. nobody was killed in that incident. the u.s. is suspending nonlethal aid to syrian rebels after extremists took control of a warehouse where equipment was being stored. it was overtaken by the islamic front, a group battling al qaeda
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but not aligned with the rebels back bit united states. nonlethal aid is mostly supplies, including night vision goggles and communications equipment. newtown, connecticut, heading to a memorial today in honor of the victims. 26 people, including 20 first graders were shot to death. several private memorials will be held in newtown this weekend. the lockdown wednesday at american university in washington, well, it turned out to be a false alarm. reports came in that there was a gunman on campus. seconds later, the school warned students to shelter in place and await more information. there was no gun man. police say the man was an off-duty police officer sitting on a bus. people in pretoria spending hours waiting in a line that winds to the capital for miles all to get a glimpse of nelson mandela. his body laying in a casket, partially made of glass in order
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to allow for his face to show. some mourners collapsed in grief and had to be led away. others weeping in silence. a very, very moving image you can see there of the line circling around the city. those are your headlines. chris? the interpreter at the nelson mandela memorial is being accused of being a fake. he's speaking out about the incident. his infamous four-hour performance condemned by groups around the world. the man is saying it's not his interpreting that he is going to defend. he's claiming he's suffering from schizophrenia. >> it is the story it seems like everyone is talking about. now the sign language interpreter is making the rounds in the media ever since he was accused of being an impostor. he says he is a chap of sign language. he defended his actions saying he is qualified and this is a story that has a bizarre twist, a story making headlines around
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the world. >> this morning, the now infamous design language interpreter from the mandela memorial is coming forward, defending his qualifications. >> do you have any formal qualification in interpreting? >> anybody that wants my qualification, the person should get it from the sa interpreter. >> you do have a formal qualification. >> yes, absolutely. >> reporter: he also added he suffers from schizophrenia. >> well, well, eh, yes, i am currently a patient receiving treatment in schizophrenia. >> his performance alongside world leaders has become the topic for signing experts around the world. watch this comparison next to an accredited sign language expert interpreting the same words from the mandela memorial. watch it again in slow motion. you can see the gestures don't come close to matching up. >> former president mbeki.
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>> he just said former president mbeki. former, indicating the past, the sign for president, across and against your body like that and president mbeki has a specific sign name and his sign name is this. all he needed to do for that phrase was sign. that was all. >> reporter: if you watch closely you'll notice him making the exact same gestures repeatedly, even though the speakers aren't repeating the same words. he's been used in at least one other major public event here with jacob zuma. >> i stephen colbert. >> reporter: the controversy fodder for light-night comedians. >> is a scam artist or very, very bad at his job? >> reporter: he says he's employed by south africa's
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translators, a company in south africa. we're still trying to get to the bottom of how he ended up at the memorial. the anc is saying they didn't hire to be at the event. >> it's confounding this happened. >> right. >> i think the sad reality is there are a lot of people who are watching this event that missed out on hearing the speeches and experiencing the memorial because he wasn't signing what was happening. >> right. >> i think that's why there's been so much outrage about this. interesting to note, there have been complaints about him in the past. >> when he was in front of the president jacob zuma was he interpreting the right way? >> it's believed he wasn't. there had been complaints in the past. it's mind boggling he could be there at this point standing feet away from heads of state, including president obama. >> amazing. >> thanks, pamela. some members of the family that survived two days in their stranded car in nevada, they are
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now out of the hospital. how did they hold it together? family members will be sharing new details about their ordeal with cnn. quite a controversy to tell you about. a teen kills four people in a drunk driving crash, gets no prison time. the explanation, was it because he's rich? did the judge agree with that? you're going to want to hear with this. congestion, for the smog. but there are a lot of people that do ride the bus. and now that the buses are running on natural gas, they don't throw out as much pollution into the air. so i feel good. i feel like i'm doing my part to help out the environment. before using her new bank of america credit card, which rewards her for responsibly managing her card balance. before receiving $25 toward her balance each quarter for making more than her minimum payment
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welcome back to "new day." new details on the family of six who survived two days in subzero temperatures in the nevada wilderness. two of them are out of the hospital this morning and the other four are doing very well. their family members spoke to
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cnn about how they survived the amazing ordeal. here's cnn's casey wian with more. >> reporter: christina mcentee in the red leaving the hospital with her 3-year-old daughter chloe, silent but emotional after the two-day ordeal she and her family endured in the subzero nevada wilderness. her fiance, james glanton, seen here, and three of the children remained hospitalized. the couple may not be talking but christina's aunt is sharing new details with cnn. >> very scary. you know, i mean, they intended on being out for a couple hours, you know. and ended up getting into a situation where their jeep flipped over and they were in an area where they were backed up against a hill, so it just camouflaged the jeep. >> reporter: they were experienced visitors to nevada's become country. >> they burn wood, they burn sage brush, they heated rocks to keep the kids warm. they burned a spare tire. they had food and some water. >> reporter: surviving
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temperatures as low as 20 below zero on crackers, chips and cookies with four young children, nothing short of remarkable. >> she said she never saw such strength in little kids ever. they didn't cry. you know, they were scared, obviously but they would play a little bit during the day. >> reporter: mcdermott said the couple never lost hope and were growing desperate and about to begin walking toward help when they were found tuesday. >> she said it was the happiest moment of her life, relief, joy, tears and then the shock kind of set in. she's an amazing mother. she stayed strong for her kids and her niece and her nephew the entire time. she worked side by side with her boyfriend to make sure those babies were taken care of and that they survived. >> reporter: survived to celebrate little chloe's fourth birthday today. casey wian, cnn, lovelock, nevada.
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>> amazing. it is money time. facebook got friend last night. what does that mean? chief business correspondent christine romans is here to explain. >> it will be added to the s&p 500. december 20th, less than two years after its initial public offering. mutual funds may have to add facebook to the stock. it's up 86%, jumping up 4% in after hiv hours trading on that news. it wasn't a great day overall for wall street. good budget news got investors thinking the fed may be pulling back on stimulus. perspective for the year, the dow is up 21%, the nasdaq up 33%, the s&p 500 up 25% this year. hard-core fans shell out big bucks for their favorites. $40 for a movie? would you pay $40 for a movie when hobbit the desolation of smaug hits theaters, fans can get a super ticket for 40 bucks
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along with popcorn. you get seats, advanced online copy of the current movie as well as the first hobbit movie. >> those other things come with it. >> look at my hand. those other things come along with it. >> the cuomo pointing it free. >> i look like uncle sam there. >> that's a punishment. >> it's not just to see the movie. you get other stuff. >> $40. >> this is role reversal here. >> i am cheap. you're getting other stuff. as a value proposition there's other stuff there. >> okay then. we're going to take a break. when the music ends we move on. praise pore republicans and democrats in congress finally coming to compromise on a budget deal but will it pass? will they go through with it? a political gut check is next. this is a controversy you'll want to weigh in on. you avoid prison time after killing four people while driving drunk. that's what this one teenager did. his defense is drawing a heated response. was he too rich and spoiled to be guilty?
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my mantra? family first. but with less energy, moodiness, and a low sex drive, i saw my doctor. a blood test showed it was low testosterone, not age. we talked about axiron. the only underarm low t treatment that can restore t levels to normal in about 2 weeks in most men. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18 or men with prostate or breast cancer.
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xarelto® can cause bleeding, which can be serious, and rarely may lead to death. you are likely to bruise more easily on xarelto® and it may take longer for bleeding to stop. tell your doctors you are taking xarelto® before any planned medical or dental procedures. before starting xarelto®, tell your doctor about any conditions such as kidney, liver, or bleeding problems. xarelto® is not for patients with artificial heart valves. jim changed his routine. ask your doctor about xarelto®. once a day xarelto® means no regular blood monitoring -- no known dietary restrictions. for more information and savings options, call 1-888-xarelto or visit goxarelto.com. welcome back to "new day," everyone. time now for our political gut check of the morning. later today, the house is expected to vote on a bipartisan budget deal. you heard me right. crafted by republican congressman paul ryan and
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democratic senator patty murray. it's getting support from leaders but will rank and file members follow their lead? john king is here with what we can expect. i know we can never expect the final outcome of any vote, especially in this house. but how do you think the vote is looking today? >> you know, we've had these conversations in the past where you say i don't know. checking with everybody, kate, late last night and a quick e-mail or two this morning, people expect this to pass and pass comfortably. they do believe there will be a significant number of house defections, those conservative members, mostly the tea party members who doesn't think this is a good enough deal. a few liberals might vote no because there are things they don't like. if we pass this deal, number one speaker boehner says it's a good compromise in definite reduction. number two, it takes the threat of a government shutdown off the table and republicans can head into 2014 to protect their house majority by focusing almost exclusively on the president and health care. that's his biggest argument, if we pass this, the political
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climate in 2014 is much, much better. we'll see the vote count today. there's zero doubt in the leadership. i think this will pass comfortably. >> what do you make of speaker boehner yesterday? a lot of people have been latching on to him coming out, standing firm against conservative groups who some came out in opposition to this deal before it was released and announced. he basically said this is ridiculous. if you support deficit reduction you should support this deal. i can hear even from new yorks moderate republicans saying, finally. >> and some conservative republicans saying whoa. this has been bubbling in the speaker for a long time, because maybe it's an ad run against the bill itself, maybe it's an ad run against one of his members. these are tacks are attacks on john boehner. it's been happening for years. he's privately vented many, many times and to the leaders of these organizations. this time, he only said that once he was pretty confident he
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had the votes. he was trying to send a signal "a" to those groups and "b" to his members. i tried it your way. remember that government shutdown? i didn't want to do that. i follow your lead. that hurt us. you better follow me now because i have the better path to 2014 success. >> i may be jet lagged. i think this is great what we're hearing here. boehner saying the fringe types back off. we're here to do a job. we have to kroms. government has to work for the people. you have ryan standing up and stating that he made this deal for all the right reasons. and to me, it's like this is exactly what's supposed to happen. is this just jet lag talking? i hope we hear an echo from the left by the way when they start coming forward about extending unemployment benefits and stuff like that. >> there's a lot bubbling in that bottle, too. we talked about this. that batt that bottle is not as public
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because we have a democratic president. the point speaker boehner and paul ryan are making we are the majority party in the house. if we were the minority it might be different. we're the majority. we have a responsibility to be part of a governing coalition. that means we have a responsibility, we may not like it but the democrats run the senate. there's a democrat in the white house and we have to cut the best deal we can. that is their position. there are younger members, more conservative tea party members who want to be opposition movement. speaker boehner says i have a title, i have to do my job. >> i want to get your take on this all-nighter that we've been watching play out in the senate. we see this once in a while in covering the hill. i probably saw it maybe three times that this happened for different reasons. you've got on one side budget deal, congress working on the other side you have in the senate, you have all-nighters because republicans are forcing democrats to play i guess what we could call a silly game. you can fight me on that, over democrats enforcing the nuclear option on nominees. is this silly or emblem atic ona
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bigger problem? >> why would i fight you, kate? >> i'll fight. >> this is proof, this budget deal is most likely to pass. as chris notes, it's proof, at least a down payment there can be old-fashion compromise in washington. most people think that's a good thing. the senate staying all night is proof there's a lot of bad blood in the water. the republicans are mad the democrats changed the rules. harry reid calls this the all-night temper tantrum by the republicans. if the tables were turned, they have been in the past, he would find any maneuver he could to take it out. this budget deal does not create kumbaya in washington. it is a step forward. the republican leader mitch mcconnell orchestrating this tactic has a tea party challenge back home. he thinks every day how can i prove to the folks back home that i'm fighting the democrats? this is one example of it. >> there we go. >> i'll take it. if they're going to show vengeance for breaking the
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60-vote rule, i can understand why they're upset, they're saying we're going to force you to work more, i'll take that vengeance any day of the week as an american citizen. it's much better than the alternative. >> stay up all night, you have to come up with an argument, maybe they win the argument. >> they're earning their pay. >> thanks, john, great to see you. to the headlines where there is no argument about the cold. we can all agree we need to bundle up. arctic air is blanketing much of the country, giving us an early taste of winter. temperatures in many areas hovering 20 degrees below averages. and for those of you along the east coast, your weekend plans could be in jeopardy. snow is on the way, up to 2 feet in parts of the northeast. the pilots of an asiana jet that crashed in san francisco this summer were deeply confused about the plane's automated system, that according to investigators that testified wednesday. that accident left three people dead, nearly 200 injured. the ntsb released new video
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showing the plane tumbling down the runway after hitting the sea wall. funeral services will be held today for the texas college student shot and killed by campus police officer. authorities say 23-year-old cameron redus was fighting with the officer after a traffic stop, even took the officer's baton and hit him with it. the family doubts the official's story. that officer is on paid leave during the investigation. nasa engineers dealing with quite an urgent situation. they're trying to figure out what caused one of the international space stations two cooling systems to shut down. nasa says all life support and critical systems are protected. the crew isn't in any danger. none of the experiments being conducted on board were affected. check out what is left of a woman's car in houston. bridget butler survived this freak accident when a utility pole snapped in half and crash right through her windshe'll, just missing her by inches. firefighters made butler stay in
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her car until energy crews were able to get there and turn off the power. you have to look at that. it's a shish kebab through the middle of the vehicle. >> for me it's never about why it happens but what the person makes of way that happened. a million reasons why it missed you. >> now what do you do. >> she lives another day. coming up on "new day," a story you're not going to want to miss. here's why. a teenager gets probation after a fatal drunk driving wreck. is this an example of different justice for the rich and the poor? we'll lay it out for you. you can decide. what would the world be like without mail delivery? it may be far fetched. one country is soon going to find out. will we see the same here in the u.s.? stay with us. ♪
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let's go around the world now starting in ukraine. thousands cam muched out in the capital city demonstrating against the president's refusal to sign an agreement with the european union. diana magnay has more from kiev. >> reporter: protesters here in independence square have rebuilt their barricades after police tore them down. in the early hours of wednesday morning, they used everything they can get their hands on, including snow and ice to make
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their blockades strong. the ukrainian president says he's prepared to sit down to discuss a solution to this problem and he wasn't use force against peaceful gatherings. the opposition says they won't talk until their demands are met. as one of them told me, you can't fit a roundtable into a square prison cell. kate? >> diana, thank you so much. and it is a winter wonderland in jerusalem. the city is experiencing some of the heaviest snowfall it's seen in decades. karl penhaul is in the thick of it. >> reporter: this is what jerusalem woke up to this morning, driving snow and freezing temperatures. this really is quite unusual in the city, the last time there was a significant dump of snow in the month of december was all the way back in 1953. now, weathermen say there's an icezy blast coming down from the north pole that could last to the weekend. school classes have been suspended for many. time now for a little bit of fun.
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>> took one right in the dome. he's got a nice shaped head, too. >> he does have a nice shaped head. he does need to put a hat on. >> i know, right? >> it was a good throw. >> slow on the delivery. a snow ball fight you can't mess with that. >> don't mess with karl penhaul. this is a moment. you'll want to take a second and listen to this. this is a story everyone will have an opinion about. here's the situation. a teenager kills four people in a drunk driving crash. no question about that. the sentence, however, probation and treatment. even more controversial, the reason why. the defense says it's not just that the defendant was 16 years old but that ethan couch's wealthy parents spoiled him to the point he didn't know how to be responsible and the judge agreed. alina machado is at the cnn center following this for us. >> reporter: the 16-year-old's defense was that he was a product of afl fleaffluenza, th
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lived a life of privilege and never learned a life of consequence. there is growing outrage following the lenient sentence handed down to a wealthy teen involved in a deadly car wreck. ethan couch admitted to drinking alcohol the night his speeding truck caused a chain reaction crash that killed four people and severely injured two others in tarrant county, texas. his sentence, ten years of probation. not the 20 years of prison prosecutors asked for. the victim's loved ones were stunned. >> he'll be feeling the hand of god, definitely. he may think he's gotten away of something but he hasn't gotten away with anything. >> the wounds that it opened, only makes the healing process that much greater. and much more difficult. >> reporter: eric boils lost his wife and daughter in june. >> we had over 180 years of life taken, future life, not 180
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years lived but 180 years of future life taken and two of those were my wife and daughter. >> holly and shelby boyles were helping breanna mitchell, a 24-year-old who had a flat tire. ryan jennings also stopped to help when couch's vehicle slammed into them. all four were killed. >> how many people are injured, do you know? >> one, two, three. multiple. >> multiple? >> i don't know how many. >> reporter: three hours after the crash, couch's blood alcohol level was 0.24, three times the legal limit in texas. a psychologist testifying for the defense reportedly called couch a product of, quote, affluenza, said he was brought up to spend money instead of saying sorry. and sometimes you don't get your way. the judge opted for probation and therapy over prison time.
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>> taking him away from his family and teaching him to be a responsible citizen, that's a con quensz. >> reporter: for the families of the victim, that's simply not enough. >> money always seems to keep ethan out of trouble. this was one time i did ask the court that -- for justice and that for money not to prevail. and ultimately today, i felt like money did prevail. >> reporter: now, the families of couch's victims have filed civil lawsuits against the teen and his family. one of those victims is a teen who was riding with couch and who is now paralyzed because of the crash. kate? >> wow. thank you so much for that. that is tough to watch. >> right? what's your gut on it. >> my gut is i don't think affluenza has anything to do with the decision to get behind the wheel when you've been drinking. >> mic? >> there's one word i can't even say on tv. i find it interesting because i
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think if the tables were turned they wouldn't do the same thing. isn't the goal of punishment to make someone pay the consequence of their behavior? then we've failed, the justice system has failed. >> it's a complicated question. i think we'll have to look carefully at why the judge said what he said. we'll bring in sunny hostin. >> i'm curious to what sunny will have to say. >> it's more complicated than it seems on the outside. >> as it usually is. let's get back out to indra with the chilly temperatures. >> we have a bite out here, kate. it feels like 14 degrees right now. i know i am not alone. take a look at the entire country. we're talking about a good two-thirds of the country right now, below freezing. now, let's factor in the wind chill. you're talking about it feeling like zero, even in places like santa fe. chicago, you are below zero, the negative teens. this is what we'll be dealing with. let's talk about the change. we see lake-effect snow. negative 20 to 25 degrees below
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normal. that's a danger this morning. wisconsin, minnesota, illinois today, we are going to be looking for today lake-effect snow i mentioned, 1 to 2 feet off lake ontario. but we all know there is another system out there, this guy will be diving south from montana, making its way into the central plains as we go in through later today. by tomorrow, if you're in for missouri and kansas, you'll be talking about a wintry mix. as you go towards the weekend, we are in store for this again, the northeast back down through the northwest, looking for snow, even the wintry mix, new england, back through west virginia. this chill will be lasting for some time with dangerous arctic temperatures a good 20 degrees below normal here to say. >> the talk of lake-effect snow makes me home sick. >> you're alone on that one. >> now we're back to disagreeing. short lived. >> i like the stars over indra's head. i haven't decided if it's a s l
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angelic thing or antlers. >> don't take it, indra. canada's mail delivery seems to be going the way of the dodo. is that a real thing? maybe elvis is not gone after all. we found a teenager whose voice is a dead ringer for the king. it's our must listen to and our must see moment ♪ i'll be so blue just thinking about you ♪ fight back fast with tums. heartburn relief that neutralizes acid on contact and goes to work in seconds. ♪ tum, tum tum tum tums!
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welcome back to "new day." this is big nfl news. redskins head coach mike shanahan is benching rg3 for the rest of the season so he'll be healthy for next season. what's the deal here? >> this didn't go over well with rg3. he tore his acl at the end of last season but he says he wants to play out the rest of the season. but he has no choice to do what mike shanahan said. some people are questioning shannon's motive for benching his franchise quarterback. some think he's doing it to
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actually get fired. shanahan shot down that yesterday, saying he actually got snyder's blessing before he made the move to bench rg3. >> we're about to see a monumental change. the league is planning to ban home plate collisions. the new rules being discussed are banning catchers from blocking the plate. both owners and players will have to approve the proposed changes. alabama kicker cade foster had a pretty bad couple of weeks after missing three field goals against auburn. to cheer him up, president george w. bush send him a handwritten letter. check it out. it read dear cade, number 43, life has its own setbacks, i know, although you will be a stronger human with time. >> he was getting death threats on twitter after missing the field goals.
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president bush, to take the time to send him a letter like that is a cool deal. >> the poor kid. it's not like he wanted to miss those kicks. it's very nice for the president to do that. >> that is really, really nice. >> really cool. >> i love that. i don't like anything else andy scholes said. i don't like the rg3, the home plate collision. >> i have a question about the home plate collision thing but i know they're not going to give us time to talk about it. i'll send you an e-mail after the show. mail him a letter. great segue. snail mail may be rare these days but are we ready to give it up entirely? canada may very well be. wednesday, the country's postal service, canada post, says it will phase out home mail delivery within the next five years. i'm guessing this comes down to a question of dollars and cents or looneys and toonnys, if you
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will. >> cold, hard cash. it is so expensive to deliver from the post office to someone's door step. and right now about a third of canadians get their mail door to door simply too expensive. this would be converting it to community mailboxes. >> like the big units you see at the end of the block? >> that's enough to save money. >> an awful lot of money. the problem here, people send e-mails, use package delivery companies. the united states congress has to approve anything the postal service does. they're going to cut jobs, raise postage stamp prices and in five years eliminate this door-to-door delivery. in urban centers. >> is this a model for the u.s.? >> it could be.the u.s. postal service has been bleeding money. it's interesting in the u.s. we have the u.s. postal service teaming up with amazon, actually teaming up with amazon to do sunday delivery.
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interesting things they are trying to do. chris and i were talking about this earlier. when you think about the model of the postal service as a government service, this is something that defined civilization. when you became a country that was actually you could take care of your citizens, it meant taking a letter right up to your door and handing it to someone. do we need that anymore? >> as a way of keeping the country connected initially. as you had the pioneering movement people were spreading out. the worry was how do we stay together? and post was fundamental. is time for this kind of change? my concern is what happens to those jobs. >> well, should the government be doing wi-fi? should it be something like that that is a government initiative? you're right about the jobs, in this country and i'm sure in canada, too, these are jobs that built middle-class lifestyles. these are important stepping stones to the middle class. >> has there been backlash in canada. >>? rural areas you'll still get your delivery and there and in this country, a lot of big new housing developments have been doing the community mailboxes.
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>> my sister has that. >> i have an old house built in the '30s. i get the mail through my front door slot. in another development a half town away, those people have community mailboxes. it's a new development. >> will it get the canada post back on track or is this the beginning of the end for that? >> absolutely. >> christine romans, i will head to canada for christmas and ask the people. my parents, aka, the people. >> time now for today's "must see moment." this is a whole canadian block. one canadian radio station believes elvis presley is still alive. you might agree with them after you listen to this. let's listen to this. ♪ i'll be so blue ♪ just thinking about you >> oh, yes, that is 16-year-old
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david, leaving listeners and the staff astonished with his spot-on cover with elvis's "blue christmas." a 16-year-old embodying -- >> we're not going to be talking about this next week that's it's a hoax. >> i don't know how you can say that's a hoax. >> is the voice coming out of his mouth? >> i understand what he's saying. >> i was very anxious and worried about what you were saying. there was a sense of urgency. oh, yeah. it comes down to whether or not the kid is actually singing or not. >> he needs to be reset. >> i got a little jet lag. i go to africa, elvis is back, the government is working, rg3 is out, there's no more home plate. what the heck! >> what is going on? that was beautiful. he even had the hair. >> 16 years old. >> i think we need to take a break.
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coming up next on "new day," $400 million and climbing, folks. tomorrow's mega millions drawing is the ultimate stocking stuffer. but what will it really buy you? we'll have a reality check on that, coming up. >> did you get us a ticket? or . so as his financial advisor, i took a look at everything he has. the 401(k). insurance policies. even money he's invested elsewhere. we're building a retirement plan to help him launch a second career. dave's flight school. go dave. when people talk, great things can happen. so start a conversation with an advisor who's fully invested in you. wells fargo advisors. together we'll go far. [ chicken caws ] [ male announcer ] when your favorite food starts a fight,
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real beef and accents of vitamin-rich veggies. to help you put more play in your day. beneful. play. it's good for you. it went from the big fluffy flakes to the little ones, back to the big ones and then pounding. >> deep freeze, a polar express sweeping through the east this morning. bone chilling, record-setting cold for literally half the country. and another storm right behind it. we are live with the latest. >> new video of the asiana
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flight as it crashed in san francisco. you con see it nearly flip over. and new today, the government start deciding if cell phone calls should be allowed on planes. >> the infamous sign language interpreter speaking out, defending his qualifications. what does he blame for his signing gibberish? and an expert joins us live to translate what exactly he was saying. >> your "new day" starts right now. >> announcer: this is "new day" with chris cuomo, kate bolduan and michaela pereira. >> 7:00 in the east. welcome to "new day." if the weather is this cold now and snowy now, imagine what winter is going to be like. >> that's right. another premature cold snap is hitting more than half the country. the mercury sinking in places like chicago and boston, plus more snow could hit the northeast this weekend. indra petersons is out there in new york city, in the new york city cold with details. good morning, indra. >> good morning.
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i'm always the baby in the studio. it's a good 50, 60 in there. it's always freezing in there. now i am taking that back. it feels like a whopping 14 degrees out here this morning. oh, yes. we have a chill. we are not alone either. we're talking about a huge chunk of the country dealing with temperatures below freezing this morning and that's not the only thing. another storm headed our way. >> everybody throughout the area is at the freezing mark. >> if you thought today was cold. >> the next few days will be cold. >> frigid temps gripping the nation as millions from the great lakes to the northeast are waking up in a deep freeze. city after city, experiencing temperatures 20 degrees or more below average. the coldest it's gotten in the taste of winter. forecasters say the windy city already feelgik subzero temperatures since 1995. earlier this week, morning temps plunged to 6 below 0. it's the same story in frozen fargo. they've had single digit temps
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or below for a full week. new yorkers bundling up for their morning commute with brutal wind chills that feel like the teens and 20s. bitter cold temps made fighting this apartment fire in wisconsin challenging for the firefighters. it's so cold in wisconsin that a reporter for cnn affiliate waow left this banana outside in negative 2 degree air for just 30 minutes. >> when we come back, we find the banana completely frozen solid. so frozen in fact i can actually use it to hammer in this nail. >> reporter: and in minnesota, this is one of the coldest spots in america. hospitals preparing for an influx of hypothermia and frostbite cases. and doctors urging people to stay indoors. >> as you get colder and colder, your decisionmaking gets worse and worse. longer you're out, more damage can be done and it could be fatal. >> reporter: let's look at the maps.
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we're talking about a huge section of the country. only in the southeast spared from these temperatures being below freezing. let's throw the wind chill in there. a good negative 15. that's what it feels like in chicago right now. santa fe, only 3 degrees. this is where it gets dangerous. you start talking about temperatures in the morning with the wind chill that feels like negative 20 to negative 25 degrees. that's where the danger is and that's where the threat is today especially out towards places like minnesota. here comes the next system. we are to the done with this yet. dropping out of montana, going down to the central plains, looks like tomorrow we'll be talking about kansas and central missouri. we'll start to see some of the wintry mix. as we go through the weekend, talk about bad timing other than the fact a lot of people can be indoors, we still have the next system affecting the northeast all the way back to the midwest. my question to you guys, chris, are you comfy in there? are you nice and warm. >> you look great, indra. take one for the team.
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we'll have you use a banana to drive in a railroad spike after the next system comes through. >> awesome. >> that will be novel. it's been a long night in the u.s. senate. republicans are forcing an all-night session to protest democrats changing the rules to limit filibuster power. they're still in session right now. good news is, it looks like actual work is getting done. many of you are attacking me for saying that, saying with no, no, no, this is vengeful play. an appeals court judge was affirmed this morning and another one is scheduled for later. a vote on the budget deal is expected today but it could prove tricky for some republicans. here to explain, cnn's joe johns. joe? >> this is both to stop the government from lurching from crisis to crisis every few months and there's a public battle over the heart and soul of the republican party that's gotten much uglier recently. the speaker of the house has been caught in the mid. now he's throwing punches, too.
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>> reporter: a family feud between establishment republicans and the fors trying to steer the party further to the right. >> they're using our members and they're using the american people for their own goals. >> reporter: the house speaker himself with unusually personal push back against conservative critics of the bipartisan budget deal. >> this is ridiculous. listen, if you're for more deficit reduction, you're for this agreement. >> reporter: boehner was talking about groups like heritage action, americans for prosperity, the club for growth and others denouncing the plan because they say it increases spending $63 billion over the next two years. does an end run around the budget control act and uses gimmicks to raise revenue. heritage action responding to boehner said lawmakers will have to explain to their constituents, many of whom are our members but they've achieved by increased spending, increasing
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taxes and offering up another round of promises waiting to be broken. that will be a tough sell back home. a difficult spot for some republican street fighters defending it while holding their noses. >> it's the best compromise you can get. it's nowhere close to what republicans like to have. >> tough for the congressional golden boy and former vice presidential candidate paul ryan who co-authored the deal knowing his base will be watching if he ever runs for higher office again. >> if i clog my judgment by what is good for me politically or not, or how does this help me jex to pose against somebody else? this is not right in my opinion. >> anybody who thinks my vote is for sale to heritage action is sadly mistaken. i would ask anybody who is attacking these outside groups, what is it these outside groups said yesterday about this deal? that is false today. >> reporter: republicans have their issues with this deal but so do many democrats who wanted
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to see much more, including an extension of unemployment benefits. so there's something for everyone to hate in this, chris. >> i'll take it. thanks so much, joe. we'll check back in with you. new details in the asiana crash at san francisco airport. the ntsb released these frightening images. we're learned the pilot was concerned about landing without the help of a navigation system out of order at the time. let's bring in the founder and editor of runway girl network, an aviation consultant. mary kirby. thanks for coming in. >> thanks for having me. >> let's roll the video. what do you see in this new surveillance video? >> it is confirming a lot of what we know, that the aircraft was definitely descending too quickly and they were coming in too low and too slow.
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and then the cart wheel as you can see, absolutely happens when they hit that wall. so it has confirmed what we knew in that regard. the new information really is what we know now about the pilots. >> what we're learning from the hearing. this is a hearing with the ntsb. the pilots of the plane saying he was very concerned about landing the plane without that airport navigation system that was out of order at the time. also saying it was very stressful and very difficult. i'll tell you, for anyone that flies, that is very disturbing to think that the pilot of your plane essentially doesn't know how to handle the plane without these controls. >> very, very disturbing. in fact, there seems to be a lot of confusion in that cockpit about the auto throttle which is hugely concerning. this is aviation 101, piloting 101. >> do you think this say problem in that cockpit or do you think this is a bigger problem industry wide when we're talking about commercial airlines? >> we have a wider problem here, a recent report revealed by the
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faa compiled by experts show that more and more pilots are relying on automation and not their manual skills. so what do we need to do about this? i think there's a real sense in the industry that we need to start looking at reintroducing more manual flying and also improving the training. clearly training needs to be improved to this particular airline. >> it does make you wonder why this pilot was behind the controls at all in the first place, if he clearly wasn't comfortable landing this aircraft. >> why didn't he express his discomfort much earlier on? it's not unusual for a pilot that doesn't have that many hours in a new type to be where he's at. he's learning and the pilot to his right is the instructor pilot and would be and should be helping him. however, the fact that he didn't mention this, you know, his discomfort with this particular aircraft is highly concerning. he had many others on other types, the boeing 747 and the a-320. one wonders if in those crucial
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moments perhaps he reverted back to the training on a prior type, say, for example, the a-320 where the auto tlotle is quite different than on the bowing aircraft. >> it's no solace for any of the families that lost loved ones, one airport navigation system was out that led to this impact. that's tough to stomach. >> they should have been able to do a visual approach without a doubt. very, very quickly from the standpoint of what occurred in that cabin, it's essential to look at the knowledge space that we now have with respect to premium passengers and economy class passengers. the premium passengers had a different seat belt than the economy class passengers. the economy class passengers had the ones that suffered spinal injuries. >> the ntsb has not stopped. we might not be talking about it
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every day but they're continuing the investigation. >> that's right. >> thank you very much for coming in. >> thank you. >> great to see you. the obama administration likely getting some breathing room on iran after all. that's because congress isn't expected to approve new sanctions against iran until next month at the earliest. the house could vote on a nonbinding resolution that spells out terms for a final deal as early as toll. the senate will likely hold off a vote until january in order to not interfere with the passage of a defense bill before christmas break. now to the newly wed murder trial unfolding in montana. on wednesday, the jury for the first time heard jordan graham admit to pushing cody johnson off a cliff. an fbi agent testified she finally cracked after he confronted her with the security camera image of her entering the park with johnson. graham's mother is expected to take the stand today. in new york, police are investigating what they call the death -- the suspicious death of a mexican diplomat's 4-month-old
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son. that little boy was taken to the hospital tuesday, covered in bruises. he was declared dead about 30 minutes later. the identities of the parents have not yet been released. no arrests have been made. police are awaiting autopsy results and cause of death. one person was killed but eight others survived after a small plane crashed into the pacific ocean off the hawaiian island of molokai. one person reportedly swam to shore. no word yet on why that plane went down. >> check this out. a fight breaking out in the parliament of georgia. tensions coming to a boil over plans to support ukrainian opposition. government officials tossed their papers in the air and went at it. others tried to interfere to try to keep the hot-headed politicians from hurting one another. fortunately, no one was injured during the scuffle.
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>> they got it out of their systems, had their vote and then you move on. >> then you move on. >> seriously? >> no. not seriously and not in the ukraine. very serious situation there. >> yes, we are. >> they are real problems there. >> real issues. >> you know what it's time for. >> yes, i do. >> money time. your money. tomorrow, friday 13th. that's scary. no. here's why. could be very lucky. the mega million prize has rolled over for the 20th time, leaving an estimated jackpot of $400 million. that's what's on the table. the second largest mega millions jackpot ever, the fifth largest in north america. how do i know all this? chief business correspondent christine romans told it to me and there she is at the magic wall. >> for millions of americans this is their personal financial planning. right? the lottery. an estimated jackpot of 400 million bucks likely to rise. if you asking for a lump sum, which you should do by the way. that's my recommendation when you win.
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the lump sum option will put you in at $216.4 million. you're looking at somewhere around $130 million after paying uncle sam. i'll take that. what could you buy with $130 million? maybe you want a new car. let's get a bugatti. you could buy 56 of them with your winnings. maybe you're interested in something shiny, maybe the elizabeth taylor diamond. i hope you have a lot of security. you could have 14 of those. but you really should know what the odds are. i hate to be the bearer of bad news. the odds of winning are about 1 in 259 million, that means you're 22 times more likely to be attacked by a shark, 42 times more likely to die from a bee sting and 345 times more likely to be struck by lightning in any givenier. the good news, you have a 1 in
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15 chance of any prize. enjoy the 2 bucks. that being said, here's how you grow your money since your chances of winning are so very small. is what i think you should do. instead of getting stung by a bee, open up a 529 savings plan, max out your 401(k) or make sure you have 3 to 4 months savings. i use this story as a trojan horse, my friends. >> that's what i was saying. >> i give you my lecture early. >> this story was totally misbilled. >> you gave us vegetables instead of chocolate. >> you pulled that one off. >> krchristine romans. >> i would like to give you spinach with your cupcake this morning. >> one of the few people i thought it was impossible to dislike. and then just like that. wow, that was terrible. >> i still want a lottery ticket, after all that. why not? live the dream. we'll take a break.
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coming up next on "new day," just days away from the first anniversary of the newtown massacre. we'll talk to an officer who's pieced together new details about what happened and what led to that fateful day. watch this. i don't know how your sign language is, mine's pretty good. do you know what this means? absolutely nothing. the question is, why is this clearly confused interpreter, in quotes, defending his performance at nelson mandela's memorial? schizophrenia, does that have something to do with it? that's what he says. we'll give you the real deal when we come back. so ally bank has a raise your rate cd that won't trap me in a rate. that's correct. cause i'm really nervous about getting trapped. why's that? uh, mark?
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welcome back. saturday marks one year since 20 young children and 6 educators lost their lives in the massacre at sandy hook elementary. matthew covered the shooting for the daily news and moved to the newtown commune to the try to piece together what happened on that horrific day, try to make some sense, bring out some lessons. the book is called newtown, an american tragedy. it offers some context as well that is needed so, so well. good luck with the book. few things need to be discussed more or am i wrong? let's start there. there are those who say leave them alone, nothing can be learned. don't obsess on the obvious. and yet you don't agree because you wrote the book. what do you make of that
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perspective? >> i live there. i understand its perspective. but let me tell you something. i know there's a tendency to act like what happened was a weather event. i'm convinced that this tragedy is something that could have been prevented. and when i tracked through adam's life and i was able to access years worth of nancy lanza's, the mother's, e-mails, the deterioration of mental health. this is a mother who identified that her son was mentally ill and sought professional help. still, adam was not on medication. the fact that we have a lot of dangerously mentally ill people around who are not being treated, to me says that you can expect this rising trend of mass shootings to continue unless we figure out a solution and that starts with the information and finding out why, which is what my book focuses on. >> fair disclosure. i certainly agree with what you're saying right now. i've written about it, i report about it right now.
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not everybody does. let's take two steps back about other things in this book. we'll get back to mental health. there's a lot of reporting. first of all, the school, you reveal in the book new safety measures have been put in place. could things have been done differently at the school that day? what does the record show. >> chris, sandy hook elementary was a school that did everything right. their security was the kind with the camera. you have to be buzzed in, show i.d. if you have a gunman who's going to shoot their way through the window, there's no amount of security that will help. >> armed security guards? >> i don't think that you can just put -- look, that may or may not help. i really don't know. but my inclination and conjecture would be that's not the solution. the solution, again, comes back to mental health. >> and the journalism of it would reveal the community is now going in that direction with the new school. what do we know about that? >> no. they're going to keep high
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security standards but newtown is on edge. i mean, you can't go anywhere near a school without being stopped by several police officers asking you for identification and i think it's going to be the new normal there for a little bit. >> you take a look of time, you talk to a lot of people about the lanza family, the mother, the son. as you said earlier, you traced is pattern of this kid's dissent into illness, what seems like illness. what happened when nancy lanza, if your reporting is right, said doctor there's something wrong? what did she hear from doctors? to the school, help him, he has special needs. what were the reactions? >> from the e-mail i had access to, she was frustrated and didn't feel like adam was getting the help he needed. this is at a younger age. as he gets older, he gets called into this world of violence and surrounds himself -- isolates himself with guns and he's searching serial killer websites. clearly very disturbed and sick.
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now he's past the age of 18 and her options are limited. how she can keep these guns in the house knowing this is an answer that my book can't answer and i don't think -- >> no sense from friends, those who knew her about why, even though she was so concerned, she kept encouraging him through this joint activity, hobby of shooting. if she had such concerns, why? >> the impression i get she was asked about this by friends on occasion. it was one of the rare ways the mother and son could bond. it was clear in my research that nancy loved her son dearly and why she let these guns in the house is something -- it's inexplicable. >> something else you develop in here that does have an answer. there did seem to be a flash point. there was a teacher that seemed to be treating this kid the way nancy wanted to and seemed to work for the kid. he leaves the school. how big was that?
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>> richard novia became friends with nancy. he was adam's high school counselor. and he related to adam, he knew about the bullying. he into you that adam was very different and would withdraw. he worked with adam and slowly he was getting him out of his shell. for somebody as sick as adam, getting him out of his shell men the that adam would respond to commands. richard said he was leaving the school. nancy said she did not trust anybody in the school to protect her son and then pulled him out. that began this -- right after that, adam cuts off contact with his brother, cuts off contact with his dad, is barely speaking to his mom, isolates himself in his room and this spiral accelerates. >> that takes us to the seminole question, what could have been done differently? i believe, many experts suggest that's where the problem lies, how we deal with mental health. a portion of the proceeds from your book is going to a charity in the name of one of the young
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victims there. it goes to dealing with brain health. people dismiss this, matt. they say don't get away from the guns. don't distract me. mentally ill are not inherently violent. there's no relation here. what do you believe the reality is. >> i know you've covered several of the mass shootings, too. yes, look, if we don't do something to treat these violently ill people, then this trend will continue. you can talk about all these other issues and they all might be important in their own right. nobody's ever explained to me a gun law that could have been passed that would have prevented this. nancy bought these guns legally. she broke the law and gave them to her son. who is extremely disturbed. moving forward, we have to do something to figure out what to do with these sick people, because in the '60s when we got rid of the mental institutions, they were supposed to be replaced with these community
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outreach programs but that hasn't really happened. i've spent time in the book talking to mothers who feared their son or daughter could do something equally violent. their recourse is to call the emergency room or the police. and neither one of these two are equipped to deal with severely mentally ill people. >> one of the messages that comes through clearly is you understand the community very well and that the families, especially the families -- even the families that were worst affected want something better to come out of this situation. want it to be discussed in a way that doesn't just exploit what happens there but understands it going forward. are you confident in that? >> i am. but it begins with the information being out. if begins with people backing up at these passionate debates and clear-mindedly examining the facts, look, you've seen the pictures of jared loughner, james holmes. they are severely ill people. this doesn't use what they're doing but there's more out there. that should be our focus to
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prevent the next one. >> matthew, thank you very much. good luck with the book. appreciate you coming on to talk about it. very important issues here. kate, over to you. >> thanks, chris. coming up next on "new day," the sign language interpreter who's accused of being a fraud is speaking out and talking about his schizophrenia. could that have something to do with what happened during the mandela memorial? we'll also talk with an expert about what he was actually saying. and later, a supermodel and a scandal. how elle macpherson is caught up in a huge lawsuit against her husband.
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welcome back to "new day." glad to have you with us. here are some of the stories making news at this hour. here we go again. yet another taste of winter, when it's still officially fall. more arctic air has sent temperatures into a nose dive in many parts of the country. chicago reporting below zero temperatures already early this morning. more snow could be hitting the northeast this weekend. the house expected to vote today on the budget deal announced this week. it would increase spending modestly over two years in an effort to reduce the deficit long term and avoid another government shutdown next year. that vote could prove tricky for republicans also facing major brush back from conservative groups angry about higher spending. the u.s. military is set to begin flying forces into the war-torn central african republic to help stop violence there. officials say two planes will unload troops in the capital city and leave quickly to avoid violence. air lifts are expected to continue for about a week.
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discussions are ongoing about what other help the u.s. can provide. a 19-year-old new york city college student died after suffering major brain trauma during a fraternity retreat this weekend. the young man was reportedly blindfold and made to carry a heavy object then tackled repeatedly. the game is called glass ceiling. police say an ambulance was never called. when he was driven to the hospital, that young man was already unconscious. an update to a story we've been following. the colorado 6-year-old who was accused of sexual harassment for kissing a girl on the hand has been allowed to go back to school and the offense has now been classify as misconduct, not sexual harassment. hunter's mother had argued the girl was fine with the kiss because she and hunter considered themselves boyfriend and girlfriend. those are your headlines at this hour. chris, over to you. >> thank you very much. now to the translator at nelson mandela's memorial? am i using the wrong word
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calling him a translator? you decide for yourself. he tells a johannesburg radio station he's perfectly qualified, actually qualified and adding he's getting treatment for schizophrenia. the question, is he sick and that's what happened with his interpreting or is he a fraud? for now, what was he even trying to say? that's what we're trying to figure out here. we'll bring in john wolf nelson, he is an r.i.d. certified american sign language interpreter. thank you for being with us. appreciate it. >> absolutely. >> can we play the sound? >> men, women and children must live side by side, dreaming the same dream, realizing that the crucible of time in our land, we salute you. >> obviously one of the grandchildren there speaking in english. it's being translated into south african, we believe. what's your general impression
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bh of what you saw or didn't see? >> we see a person gesticulating rhythmically. they seem to be create something sentences. you see him pausing. it looks like he's thinking about the next part of the interpretation. >> do you recognize this as sign language. >> i'm not a linguist. this does not look like sign language. >> if you don't know south african sign language, why is this still instructive of being wrong to you? >> well, we can see here that he's not using any facial expressions. >> let's stop here for a second. you're saying the face itself, too stoic. >> exactly. >> what are you supposeded to do? >> any interpreter, any person who uses any sign language will use their face and body to convey the inten, the emotion. >> that's part of the training. >> absolutely. >> it's not just style. you're supposed to do it. >> that's the important aspect. we are trained. >> you kept seeing a rhythmic, a
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pattern but to you that could be more dance moves than actual sign language. >> they look like gestures. and they're repetitive. >> this is him doing his thing. now, we want to also show him -- let's go to the next clip. okay. let's say not understanding south african vernacular and translating is relevant. this woman is also doing south african. she's doing the same type of translation he is. if you watch, i'm no trained translator but it seems like they're doing very different things. what do you pick up here, john? >> very different. again, interpretations will vary from interpreter to interpreter because of the lens they bring to the job and how they choose to represent the message. this woman is actually creating phrases. it looks like she's using actual language. this is not. >> right? okay. just to be clear about it, your best guess, is this man a trained translator. >> no, absolutely not.
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>> he doesn't really know what he's doing? schizophrenia, you're not a psychologist, i understand, but if that were the cause, when we looked at an earlier example of him translating, we noted the same types of traits. have you ever heard of somebody having some type of breakdown that destroyed their ability to translate? >> i have not. if the person knew sign language, one would assume that regardless of their mental state they would actually still be able to create language for themselves. this is not sign language. >> obviously i don't mean to block here. they seem to be doing very different things in frequency, direction of their hands and in mimicking what is being said by the actual speaker? >> absolutely. >> and the face is very active. seems she is using oral references. >> yes, she's mouthing some of the words and using her face to indicate what she's expressing,
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the intention and the spirit of the speaker as well. this gentleman is not. >> what is the chance that you could get away with this in the united states? where you could do what he's doing and somebody wouldn't seem to know right away? >> unfortunately you'd be surprised. we actually see in our field a large number of people who may take a few sign language classes, know a little bit of sign language, purport themselves to be a sign language interpreter and go into the field and earn money portraying sign language interpreting without actually knowing what they're doing, being trained or certified. >> how? >> that's a good question. at sign talk all interpreters are vetted for their credentials, they are screened and personally interviewed. it's a good question. we do writing and talking about the rights of disabled people in the united states. within we take that from pape near action every day in the field, there's a big disconnect. >> i guess really we're waiting for people, obviously, i don't understand sign language so i can't judge it. you're waiting for people who are deaf to basically come
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forward and say that person was way off. if you don't have that urgency and you don't have that setup where people are comfortable coming forward and there's a mechanism to complain you may not know. >> that's true. better on the front end, include deaf people in the conversation about hiring interpreters. we often talk about the rights, how to get people access to language and information but we don't include them when we take their rights from paper into real life every day action. >> just to be clear, unless we learn something about the psychology of this, the illness of it, that changes our analysis, is this man a real translator? >> in my opinion, no. >> it's not about the language barrier. you have another example here. she is demonstrating things you'd recognize as translating? >> absolutely. as stated by brun know drukken, this person is not known to the south african death community. this he had included this people in the conversation when preparing such a memorial event they would have known that. >> the real harm here isn't so much about him, it's about all
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the people who were hearing impaired that didn't get to appreciate what was said that day. >> it's about a gentleman who stole the voice of one of the greatest peace activists of our time. he silenced his voice because he decided to do a fraudulent thing and cut off access to deaf people all over the world to messages being delivered on this historic day. >> well said. thank you very much for joining us. >> appreciate it. >> thank you. coming up next on "new day," elle macpherson is accused of less than model-like behavior. why she's being called out in a huge lawsuit against her husband. later, the big debate about cell phones on planes begins today. are americans ready to fly the chattier skies? ♪
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♪ baby don't it the hold out ♪ baby but it's cold outside >> it sure is, it appears. let's get back out to indra petersons with the latest in the sinking temperatures that seems to be happening everywhere. >> that number is deceiving, kate, 24, because it doesn't have the wind chill outside. it's a whopping 14 degrees, cooler than the 18 it felt like this morning when you were here. we're fighting over things like this penguin hand warmer. i'm holding coffee, not because i want to drink it, because it keeps my fingers warm.
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i know i am not alone. a hewn chunk of the country this morning below freezing. pretty much only in the south they have temperatures that are above normal. temperatures again, with the wind chill, look at that, look at chicago and the negative teens below normal. let's talk about what we're expecting today. yes, we'll still be seeing lake-effect snow. keep in mind if you are anywhere around michigan, minnesota, you're talking about temperatures that feel like negative 20 to negative 25 degrees below normal. that's where this chill becomes downright dangerous. ontario, 1 to 2 feet of snow off of the lakes. the big story remains more cold air and another storm expected to come into the region. it will produce a big snowmaker by the end or the beginning of the weekend. a couple days away. from the northeast back to the midwest, look for more snow. another round of wintry mix. that will be the concern when you talk about new england back through missouri and of course rain in the southeast. these temperatures, there you
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go, we're taking you day by day, staying well below normal. this is not going to change as more arctic air moves in towards up. >> this is the cutest hand warmer i have ever seen. >> isn't it? >> we'll fight over this in ten seconds, i promise you that. >> i don't want to see a brawl, indra. play nice. thanks so much. stunning allegations against this morning supermodel ep lle macpherson. the $100 million wrongful death suit claims he was piloting without a license and caused the death of a close friend. her alleged her, pressuring a grieving widow to accept a payout. here's cnn's nischelle turner. >> down here. >> reporter: former supermodel elle macpherson's billionaire husband is at the center of a bombshell lawsuit. daria pastakova filed a lawsuit
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for a whopping $100 million. the suit alleges sopher caused a helicopter crash that killed her husband, lance valdez in 2012. according to the complaint, he was recklessly flying attempting to land the helicopter. turbulence suddenly hit when the chopper was less than ten feet off the ground. sopher allegedly pulled back too sharply on the controls causing the helicopter to spin out of control and rear backwards some 75 feet, causing it to crash violently into the ground. valdez's widow alleges he flew the aircraft without an up to date and valid helicopter pilot license. after the crash, she says sopher duped her into this contract giving her 2 million in insurance proceeds.
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an effort she alleges in the complaint to conceal that he was piloting the helicopter for the primary purpose of avoiding his own personal liability. >> this is a case of someone who was defrauded into signing away her rights. if they can show those kind of shenanigans, i think that will go a long way to convincing a court that that release should be taken back. >> an alleged cover-up involving a billionaire, married to a world renowned celebrity. it may not be a coincidence that the 34-page complaint reads more like a compelling hollywood script than a court document. >> this complaint was not written for the court. it was written for you and for you. aligned against the defendants in this case. >> cnn reached out to the lawyers for comment. they didn't reply. a rep said the supermodel had no comment.
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coming up, you expect to hear crying babies, sneezing, coughing and other sounds on a plane, but what about cell phone check? who's for it? who's against it. cell phones on a plane. tweet me. afghanistan in 2009. on the u.s.s. saratoga in 1982. [ male announcer ] once it's earned, usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve current and former military members and their families is without equal. begin your legacy. get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve.
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it's the only way to introbrett larson. a an important day for anyone who flies on a plane. the debate period on whether to lift the ban on cell phones in a
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flight. just as a new poll is released showing how most people feel, brett is joining us now. i'm going to talk to my cell phone through this whole interview. the fcc is starting this little comment period. basically, what they're going to decide, if cell phones are or not harmful, if they harmfully interfere with flight. >> i think they have concluded that the technology is such that yes, you can have cell phones on planes. they're not going to go down because of that. how many times have you been sitting there and you're in flight and someone's phone rings. so, clearly, even in those little moments, you can see ha the technology is safe. it is now going to come down to is this a good idea. >> who decides that? >> i think the consumers. my guess is the lawmakers are going to say fine. some airplanes are going to make
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bank on this. they're going to say we have great cell service in a pod, we can put you in a pod and no one will be bothered by you. like we saw with train systems and we don't have this on subways, i think they're going to inevitably have to do some sort of quiet zone on a plane where you can go behind a partition and sit there and you're not going to be able to sit and talk. >> they used to have a smoking session. >> so, yes or no? >> i say yes, consumers don't want it. >> i think the marketplace will eventually say they don't want cell phones on the plane and quinnipiac university poll agrees with me. should cell phones be used on planes? yes, 30%. no, 59%. >> it's going to come town to airlines making the decision or you can apply with cell phone conversations with us. >> delta has said no. other airline rs looking into
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it. >> they charge for wi-fi. could they charge for voice calls? >> remember the phones on the backs of the planes? >> the superman movie. now, i guess it's not fair to say that we have phone, we know it will work out. you had to pay for those phones. it was expensive. this will be different because anybody can do it. >> that may be what the airlines will do. it's $8 a minute. >> there's $150 surcharge from security you'll need from all angry passengers. more to be seen here. comeing up, the sign languae translator accused of being a fraud speaking out to cnn. hear what he says about the mandela memorial, his revelations and his schizophrenia. that's the cause. the interview you have to see coming up. and a texas teenager gets probation for drunk driving,
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the now infamous interpreter accused of signing gibberish explains himself to cnn. why did he say his signs were off? houston, we have a problem. an important pump failing aboard the international space station. how serious is it? too rich to do time? a ruling causing anger across the country. a 16-year-old let off with just probation after killing four people. his defense, he was too spoiled to know the right thing to do. >> your new day continues right >> your new day continues right now. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com good morning and welcome back. it's thursday, december 12th, 8:00 in the east. we're going to have that interview in just a moment. it's being fed from south africa as we speak, but first, winter isn't here yet, but it feels
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like it. much of the country has been hammered with freezing temperatures and yet another round is on the horizon. ingrid peterson is tracking the conditions for us. >> good morning. the temperatures continue to go down and not the way we want them to go. it now feels like 11 degrees standing outside. at least we're not in single digits and looking for the upside. take a look at the country. huge chunk of the country really seeing below freezing. you add in the windchill, look at these temperatures. a lot of us are dealing with this morning, definitely some dangerous conditions, but also lake effect snow. today's not really the big story unless you're off the lake. anywhere from 1 to 2 feet of snow possible. but it's when that next system moves in that the fun continues. we've been dealing with system after system. here comes the next guy dropping south from montana going around the central plains there, so
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kansas, m mo, look for that wintry mix. why does this happen? on the weekend? another round of snow. anywhere from the northeast back to the midwest. wintry mix from new england through west virginia and the temperatures stay cold. they'll get used to it. >> we are hearing that an emergency space walk could be on the agenda to fix a problem at the international space station. operations on the station have been scaled back after a pump shut down in the cooling system. nasa says the space station and crew were never in danger. but the agency is hard at work on fix. let's bring in john zarrella. >> it is a serious problem anytime you have an issue on board the international space station. there are two of these pumps on the space station used to cool the interior and exterior. one went down yesterday. starting failing. nasa was able to get it back up and running, but it is not
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working properly, so they have had to shut down some noncritical systems in three different modules up there. the u.s. harmony, the columbus module, the european module and the japanese module. now, the mission management team is meeting this morning. they're going to try and figure out whether a space walk would be required to fix this. in may, they did a space walk for a similar issue in the cooling system and then three years ago, back in 2010, the pump that is, there was a pump that failed and it was replaced by this pump that's now failed. so it's a serious situation. it's one of what they call the big 12. big 14 issues they are always practicing for in case they need a space walk to go and replace this pump because those pumps, chris, are on the outside of the international space station. back to you guys. >> john, stay on top of that. let us know what happens. so, just in, we were just
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hearing kate, she was saying we were waiting to get this interview fed. the sign language translator at nelson mandela's memorial. he's defending his ridiculed performance, saying the reason it didn't go well is because he is schizophrenic, saying he is perfectly qualified. now, an official in south africa is admitting mistakes happen, but also defending the interpreter saying there is no sign language standard in the country. it's not just about signing. it's about security and how did this man get past there, get put so close to so many world leaders if he is not an interpret interpreter. what did we learn? >> that this man says he's qualified. he was standing through all of those memorials with all those world leaders, including next to president barack obama, signing through that whole period and then the scandal broke. several experts here in south africa saying he wasn't signing
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anything. that it was all a fake and that none of it made sense. we tracked down this man in the township. we talked to him. he remains defiant and says it's perhaps because of his mental illness. take a listen. what sort of disability do you have? >> i'm suffering from schizophrenic, which is uncontrollable and -- i'm under a treatment positively -- you can look at my portfolio. it speaks itself. from the event i was doing in my country. my portfolio, it shows exactly that i've been a champion of what i've been doing. >> well, i kept on pushing him about that portfolio, asking him was he qualified, where he zud
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stu studied. he wouldn't answer. when the government was put to the task for this question, they said that company has disappeared. >> we're reading that. the owners of the company that they can't find them right now, that raises suspicious. the government saying there's no real unified standard to vet whether they're a translator. what do we know about how carefully this man's background, if not his skill set was vetted before he was put so close to so many world leaders, includingii the president of the united states? >> he said he wasn't a security threat at all. he said he's been next to south africa's president for years doing sign language. through all those years, why didn't anyone bring up this issue and if anyone wants to charge him for a crime, he's ready to be charged, but the question remains, how did he get
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so close to these world leaders and how could on such a big stage, someone effectively sign rubbish? he was doing his job and if anyone says he's not, they should come speak to him. >> certainly, some answers needed here. there's going to be to have proof of his mental illness. they're going to have to figure out how he was vetted and know something about his background to justify he's not a security threat, but thank you for providing some pieces to the puzzle. appreciate it. let's take a look at headlines at this hour. a blast outside the u.s. embassy in afghanistan was an accident. that, the official word this morning. a spokesman tells cnn it happened at an arms depot in kabul and was set off by mistake. the assistance force nearby says everything is back to normal and nobody was killed. the pilots of an asiana jet that crashed this summer were
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confused about the plane's automated system. that according to investigators testifying wednesday. the accident left three dead and nearly 200 injured. the ntsb also released new video showing the plane tumbling down the runway after hitting the sea wall. newtown residents heading to washington today for a vigil at the national cathedral. saturday will mark the first anniversary of the sandy hook massacre, where 26 people were shot to death. several private memorials will be held in newtown this weekend. george zimmerman will not face charges for his arrest following a domestic dispute last month. his girlfriend said zimmerman pointed a gun at her during an argument, but later said she didn't want charges filed. prosecutors decided not to move forward. for his part, zimmerman denied those charges from the start. it is being described at the bling ring meets the hangover movies.
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more than a dozen teens allegedly arrested for partying and ransacking a vacant mansion last month. the los angeles sheriff's office says the damage they called with what they stole added up to at least $1 million. among the loot cops seized, armor, scuba gear, armani seats and a $250,000 mounted snow leopard. apparently, they bragged online. does this sound oddly familiar at all? >> that they learn from the movies? >> no, we've done a story like this. the retired football player, he didn't have the -- >> stuffed snow leopard. i don't know if that's legal. >> i don't either. >> interesting to see what's done to those kids. the parents of a georgia teen want to know one thing. what really happened to their son. 17-year-old kendrick johnson's body was found in a gym mat. his death was ruled and accident, but his parents claim
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he was murdered, pointing out several red flags in the investigation. protesters joined their cause yesterday at the georgia state capital demanding answers. victor blackwell is live in the atlanta with the latest. good morning. >> good morning. attorneys for the johnsons say that looking forward over the next few weeks and months, we're going to hear more of this pressure they're placing on state and local officials. that rally was to urge the governor of georgia to order a coroner's inquest. the state's official claimed kendrick johnson climbed into a mat to reach for a shoe. that was 11 months ago. and was killed by his own body weight. it was an accident. the family's pathologist said there was evidence of trauma. a jury would be impanelled, which would override the state and determine his death was a
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homicide. one speaker yesterday said we're not asking for it. we don't come hat in hand. we demand it because justice demands it. the governor's office has said they will wait for the federal investigation to be completed. >> and the funeral home is kind of getting drawn into this as well. what is the family alleging the funeral home did and how did they say this impacts the investigation? >> cnn was first to report in october that kendrick johnson's organs were missing and he was stuffed with newspaper when his body was exhumed. they said the funeral home committed a fraud and they misled the family. also, participated in a cover up and here's how it could affect the outcome of the case. they believe those organs would have refuteded the state's claim this was an accident. possibly would have shown evidence of trauma. we know that after our report in october, the secretary of state's office launched an investigation, so this may run
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parallel. soon we're hoping to get a response. the outcome of that investigation launched two months ago. >> thank you so much for staying on top of this story. we'll follow up with you of course. up next, new details about the family that survived two days in their stranded car in nevada. how did they hold it together? young children there. an aunt is sharing new details about their ordeal with cnn. and more incriminating testimony against a montana bride accused of murdering her new husband by pushing him off a cliff. we'll tell you what jordan graham's friend had to say. [ female announcer ] you get sick, you can't breathe through your nose...
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welcome back. we're learning new details about the incredible survival of a family of six that was stranded in the nevada wilderness. two of them are out of the hospital already it seems and the other four are doing very well. their family members spoke to cnn about how they survived. casey is in texas, nevada rather, with more on this. good morning, casey. >> good morning. it's 5 below zero this morning here in lovelock and i'm pretty bundled up. hard to imagine a family with young children surviving conditions as low as 20 below zero for two days, but this family did. christina in the red, leaving the hospital with her 3-year-old daughter, silent but emotional after the two-day ordeal she and her family endured in the nevada
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wilderness. her fiance seen here wheeling an iv stand seen here. the couple may not be talking, but christina's aunt is sharing new details with cnn. >> very scary. they intended on being out for a couple of hours and ended up getting into a situation where their jeep flipped over and they were in an area where they were kind of backed up against the hill. >> they were experienced visitors to nevada's back country. >> they burned wood, they burned sage brush. they heated rocks. to keep the kids warm. they burned a spare tire. you know, they had food and some water. >> but surviving temperatures as low as 20 below zero on crackers, chips and cookies with four young children, nothing short of remarkable. >> she said she never saw such strength in little kids ever. they didn't cry. they were scared, obviously, but you know, they would play a
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little bit during the day. >> she said the couple never lost hope, but they were growing desperate and were able to begin walking toward help when they were found tuesday. >> she said it was the happiest moment of her life. relief, joy, tears, you know. and then she said then the shock kind of set in. she's an amazing mother. she stayed strong for her kids and her niece and her nephew, the entire time. she worked side by side with her boyfriend to make sure that those babies were taken care of and that they survived. >> survived to celebrate little khloe's fourth birthday today. doctors say they hope the other four family members will be released from the hospital today. the family releasing a statement thanking the rescuers, hospital personnel and the public for their concern. >> thank you very much. we want to turn now to a
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provocative testimony in the murder trial of a montana newlywed. jordan graham is accused of killing her husband eight days after their marriage by shoving him off a cliff. now, the coroner says he wasn't wearing a wedding ring when he was found. also, a parade of witnesses saying graham told her husband she had a surprise in store for him that day. >> cody johnson's friends arrived for the third day of his murder trial. they testified jordan graham was not an overwhelmed newlywed who accidentally pushed her husband of eight days off a cliff, but a regretful bride who planned to kill. eddie said he saw his friend the day he died and asked him to go golfing. johnson said he couldn't because jordan says she has a surprise for me. three others testified the same thing, who said his new son-in-law also mentioned the
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surprise to him. the defense down played it and graham told the fbi it was a barbecue with friends. later that night, he plunged to his death in glacier national park. johnson grabbed her, she pushed and he fell to his death. prosecutors have a different version. they say graham wanted out of her marriage and plotted to kill her new husband. deputy coroner richard sign testified downstream from johnson's body, he found a black cloth. prosecutors raised the theory that at the cliff, graham blindfolded her husband possibly with the cloth, before pushing him from the back face first to his death. the attorneys have already been fighting about how this cloth was used. all right bhished, the multiple lies graham told investigators
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until an interrogation where she was shown this image. at a higher resolution, it's clear. graham is a passenger in the car sitting next to her husband, putting her at the scene of the crime. caught, the jury listened to graham's statement to the fbi where she finally admitted she pushed her husband to his death. her lawyers expected to begin arguing this morning what they believe motivated this young bride to lie. >> for those following this, that second question winds up being most important. yes, it's dramatic when the defendant acknowledged she did it, but why will be the difference. >> there's no dispute she pushed her husband off the cliff. the motivation now. up next, more from david mckenzie and the south african ininterpreter tor from the m
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mandela memorial. and don't blame a teen for causing a fatal crash. blame his parents for spoiling him too much. does that make sense to you? is that justice? does it give accountability for the deaths involved? four of them. controversial story and a judge's decision coming up. [ laughter ] smoke? nah, i'm good. [ male announcer ] celebrate every win with nicoderm cq, the unique patch with time release smartcontrol technology that helps prevent the urge to smoke all day long. help prevent your cravings with nicoderm cq.
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just in. welcome back. we're hearing more from the sign language interpreter at nelson
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mandela's memorial. he said he is qualified, but schizophrenic. the south african government speaking out as well in equally bizarre fashion. david, what's the latest? >> well, we tracked him down and the latest is is he's defiant. he's bemused with the fact that -- had no idea what he was saying. through the whole time, four hours, interpreting for people including president obama. obviously, questions about the security for someone who says he's on medication for schizophrenia for this event. when i put those questions to him, he defended his record. are you embarrassed by this scandal? >> not embarrassed. it's a, it's a -- this is a wake up call. this is the wake up call.
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at bus stations, at the department of education, which interpreter you call a fake. which teacher qualified to teach sign language? is it a fake? and how many originals do you have? i understand if someone from u.k. or another country said, i didn't understand that interpreter. then i would say maybe i don't do the right one, but i was ininterpreter in my country. if i have to be charged by doing anything wrong, of doing what i believe it was right, then it's okay. >> so, you think you were doing south african sign language. >> that's what i think i was doing and if i was doing something wrong, there must be something that it could have
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been long time ago because it's not the first time i've been interpret interpreter. >> where did you learn sign? >> it's a question of my -- interpreter. >> on your cd, what does it say? >> i don't want to discuss it, you know. >> well, very defensive there about his record. he wouldn't specify where he had trained, what his qualifications were. he said he's been doing this for several years. in fact, we've seen footage of him doing it for president zuma of south africa. why do people only call it on on him now in they think it's incorrect, but he also said he's not a security threat. if the government wants to charge him with any crime, he's ready for that. >> i think the only thing you can do now is to test his ability to interpret in english and that's the only way you're going to get an answer.
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>> i asked him several times and he refused. >> thank you very much. >> david, thank you. so, what many people are calling a staggering sentence in texas. a teen who killed four people while driving drunk avoiding jail time. 16-year-old ethan couch was sentenced to ten years probation after he admitted guilt. part of the defense in this, that his wealthy parents are to blame for spoiling him. please explain. >> a judge reportedly said during sentencing that it was the teen and not his parents who was responsible for his actions, but some are are saying the judge's decision to keep the boy out of prison is denying justice to the victim's families. ethan couch's attorneys argue he is the product of what's been called affluenza, living a life of privilege whose parents never taught him that bad behavior has real con quenss. he admitted to drinking alcohol
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the night he caused the crash that killed four and hurt two others in tarrant county, texas. his sentence, ten years of probation. not the 20 years of prison prosecutors asked for. the teen's defense and the judge's lenient sentence have sparked outrage. his victim's loved ones are stunned. >> he'll be feeling the hand of god definitely. he may think he's gotten away with something, but he hasn't. >> the wounds that it opened only makes the healing process that much more difficult. >> eric boyles lost his wife and daughter that night in june. >> we had over 180 years of life taken, future life, not 180 years lived, but future life taken and two of those were my wife and daughter. hollie and shelby boyles were helping breanna mitchell and a
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youth pastor. >> how many people, do you know? >> one, two, three. multiple. i don't even know how many. >> oh -- >> three hours after the crash, his level was .24. three times the league limit in texas. the term affluenza came from a psychologist who said he was brought up to spend money instead of saying sorry if you hurt someone and he never learned about not getting your way. >> taking him away from his family and teaching him to be a reasonable citizen, that's a consequence. >> but for the families, that's simply not enough. >> money always seems to keep ethan out of trouble. this was one time i did ask the court that for justice.
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and that for money, not to prevail. and ultimately, today, i felt like money did prevail. >> now, the families of couch's victims have filed civil lawsuits against the teen and his family. one of those victims includes a teen who was riding with couch and who is now paralyzed because of the crash. >> thank you. sunny hostin, cnn legal analyst joins us now. you do not agree. you do not like this. let's discuss why in terms of the law and policy. >> in terms of the policy, this really flies in the face of our criminal justice system. there has to be consequences to action. even for juveniles. i think a lot of people feel the system is about rehabilitation, but it's also about punishment and sending a message to not only this defendant, but to others that this type of behavior won't be tolerated. you can't kill four people and paralyze another one and then
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get sent to a rehab facility, i think the cost is about $450,000 a year that his parents are going to pay for, rather than being sent to prison where you learn real adult lessons. >> or you can be. >> that's what the judge just did, exactly. sentenced him to this rehab facility. we're hearing for the first time, this affluenza, how many kids suffered from poorenza like i did in the south bronx, yet get put in jail for a lot less and so, i think that really is -- >> have you heard of this defense before? >> i have never heard of it before and in fact, this psychologist says he's been using it for about 30 years, but this is something i've never heard of. again, it sort of flies in the face of what we do hear of every day in our justice system, which is there are con quenss to actions and for poor kids and rich kids, those should be the same. >> i was watching that poor mother saying he thinks he may
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have gotten away with something and that's i think the concern of a lot of people. we are doing a great disservice to this young man. if he thinks he can coast through life like this. >> exactly. that's the message i think that's being sent and it sets this really dangerous precedent. because are we now going to hear about this from other defense attorneys? of course we are. and it does a disservice to this young man. i suspect though that the government may and i don't know if chris will agree with me, may try to challenge this sentence. and it's not often done, it's rarely done. i know in federal court at the u.s. attorney's office, it was rarely done and you had to get permission, but if there is too lenient a sentence or too harsh or illegal, you can challenge the sentence and it's something we saw in that montana case with the rape, the teacher doing 30 days for rape. we saw that challenged by the
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government and i suspect and hope these prosecutors will do that in this case. >> i don't disagree with you. it's very rare. that's the point you need to highlight. too harsh, illegal, yes, yes. but too lenient. >> sometimes. sometimes. >> very rare and here, the judge laid out what she did. here's my thing i'm trying to get my hands around. you listen with the family members, the relatives, it's just too much to hear. the best people in the world, everything we want to implicate into society wound up by being punished by this kid doing something wrong. >> good samaritans. >> i think we have to and that's why. i don't like when poor kids get sent to jail when they shouldn't. i don't like when people are punished as some type of proxy for change. why isn't the concern in a situation like this that more kids should get this kind of benefit of doubt and the idea of forgiveness and are redemption? we throw away so many lives into the system, i'm not sure what
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bothers me here more. that this kid used money, influence, whatever you want to put, affluenza, i've never heard of that, is that it? or is it the frustration that the kid who did the thing wrong one time doesn't get that second chance. that so many don't get a second chance. >> i think you make a great point. there is a great argument that we just warehouse our kids into prisons and they really do need rehab instead. i think this case is very different though. i think it is in stark contrast because you're talking about someone who killed four people. >> and paralyzed another. >> this was not his first rodeo. he had another drunk driving situation before and so, to now give him a pass this time, given the agrnature of his conduct, i just incomprehensible to me.
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>> so, why do you think she did it? long record, never she's not running again. >> i think she bought this argument. she's probably seen the juvenile justice system not rehabilitate young people and i think she thought well, i'm going to try to make change within the system and this was the wrong thing to do. this was the wrong message and i think she should be senntured and this should be challenged. >> thank you so much. >> thanks. coming up next, you're getting ready, probably making breakfast. steak with a side order of antibiotics. does that sound tasty? probably not. the federal government doesn't think it's healthy either. dr. gupta is going to be joining us to talk about new rules to try to make meat safer. golden globe nominations are coming up. big surprises. big snubs. we'll have them for you. [ male announcer ] if you stash tissues
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are going to pay attention to this. why so important? >> two words, really, antibiotic resistance. about two million people a year get sickened with these infections that are hard to treat with antibiotics. we just don't have good medications for them and about 23,000 people die. if you use too many antibiotics, certain bugs are going to survive and those are going to replicate and become increasingly resistant. antibiotics are placed in feed. and then that feed is then given to these animals, which go towards poultry or some sort of meat or go to the farms for vegetables and things. eventually, the point is it gets into our system and that's how this antibiotic in feed is causing problems in humans. also, 80% of antibiotics in this country are used that way. in feed. about 20% directly to humans, so you can see the magnitude of a
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problem like this. >> that really lays out why that the fda would be taking this on, but if you said 80% of antibiotics are used in livestock, not humans. >> that's right and that can have all sorts of different manifestations. it could get into the food, affect farmers or it's actually if used for other things, including something that could get into our vegetable supply, you start to worry about outbreaks. you may remember there was 134 people sickened. a chicken outbreak and the bacteria was a resistant bacteria. so people were getting sick with something that was incredibly hard to treat because of the food they were eating. that's obviously a huge concern. >> the next question, if you remove antibiotics from feed for livestock, is there then kind of the opposite risk that meat, the antibiotic free meat could be a risk for humans? >> yeah and that's part of the
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concern. there's this balance right now that's been going on for a long time, trying to balance growth promoting medications, these antibiotics with the filthy farm. so, two things could happen. you still run the risk of having animals that are in fact infected, although it's a much smaller risk and you're going to have an increase in cost because they're not promoting the growth of farms and they're going to be regulated, but it can lead to higher costs. i should point out as well, this isn't just the agricultural industry. if you look at medicial information for humans, about 80% of the antibiotics prescribed for sort of cold like things, are unnecessary. 80%. so wildly overprescribed antibiotics and now, you're seeing the consequences. >> coming from a doctor family myself, i've heard that over and over again.
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exactly right. so is there anything that consumers are going to see differently on the shelves right away? >> not right away. it's going to take a couple of years and these are guidelines the fda is issuing, so it's not mandated yet, but two of the big ones have already come plied. the farms are going to require a prescription for antibiotics from a veterinarian before they can get them. right now, they can go buy feed that has antibiotics in it. no questions asked. no preskipcriptions necessary. >> thank you so much. do not forget to tune in to sanjay gupta md. airs weekends here on cnn. coming up next, who is golden in hollywood? golden globes just announced. did your favorite make the cut? [ male announcer ] alka seltzer plus presents the cold truth. [ coughs, sneezes ]
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the battle for hollywood supremacy is getting serious. this year's golden globe nominees were just announced and michelle turner is in l.a. to break it down. just talk about the fact that the globes is the best party of
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them all. >> the actors all let loose and have a good time while getting some awards. this is kind of like my super bowl. there were some prizes, but i want to tell you who the big nominees. first of all, in best picture, "12 years a slave," captain phillips, gravity, rush. best actress in a drama, kate blanchett, judy dench and kate winslet. amy adams was nominated for american hustle. greta gerwig.
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merrill streep. nominees, interest elba for mandela, tom hanks for captain phillips and robert redford in all is lost. comedy category, christian bale nominated for american hustle. bruce dern for nebraska. that's the big categories this morning. there were some surprises, especially in the television category. tina fay and amy poehler are hosting the awards this year. amy poehler was nominated for best actress for a comedy. her show was nominated for best comedy, but tina fey was not nominated because her show ended
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and did not qualify for the golden globes this year. some were thinking where's tina fey, alec baldwin. >> i think also, we downton abbey fans are wondering why the big snub. >> i am a big, big fan of it as well. that's a big question as well. there were a lot of other snubs. i came in late, but i'm a big fan of that, so not a lot of love this morning. also in the movie category, "the butler" was shut out. no nomination for lee daniels or the movie itself. no dallas buyers club best picture nomination, no mandela walk to freedom. no august osage county for best picture as well, but the actors and actresses were nominated in
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those movies, so should be a very interesting year. january 18th, the biggest party in hollywood. i'll be there. >> you will. big indicator for what we'll see at oscar time. netflix also have a fantastic year. say hello to our friends in los angeles. have a great time. thanks so much for that. and chris, getting some nods as well from the hollywood foreign press. >> strong. i look forward to watching. it's always nice. come uing up, a christmas miracle. down on his luck dad finds an artificial christmas tree. wait until you hear what he found in the box and what he did with it. that's what makes it the good stuff. ♪ smoke? no, i'm good. ♪ [ male announcer ] every time you say no to a cigarette, you celebrate a little win. nicorette mini delivers fast craving relief in just 3 minutes. double your chances of quitting with nicorette mini.
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how about a little couch action, shall we? come on. >> it's the most fun you'll have getting healthy. see how others have found a clear vision for an inspired life. to find out more, visit upwave.com. anthony is down on his luck, actually sifting through trash to make ends meet. >> i'm disabled and the economy took off, trying to raise this little guy by myself and with no help from anybody. >> what about me, daddy? >> you're the man, that's why. >> okay, his son is impossibly
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cute, but they're also really impossibly down on their luck. three years ago, he came across an artificial christmas tree in a box. he held on to it. he finally opens the box, inside, $50,000 in barer bonds. he could really use the money, but guess what he's decided to do? return it. >> what's right is right and what's wrong is wrong. i have no right to that. >> but you wouldn't be opposed to an award? >> oh, no. we're struggling to survive here. >> and what an amazing thing. anthony was able to determine the rightful owner. his name is donald h. tran in ohio, but all the numbers have been disconnected and address listed as wrong, so mr. tran, if you are listening, we got your bonds. anthony garfalo has them for you and all he's asking in return is doing the right thing. >> and that is good stuff.
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nice to have you. >> overdressed, i know. >> a lot of news for you this morning. carol costello has it in the news room. >> happening new, signing scandal. the interpreter on the world stage at the mandela memorial telling his side to cnn. he says he's a champion of sign language. plus, republicans square off and split up over a budget deal. your money on the table and they're playing with it. and shut down. hear what the red skins coach is making rg3 ride the pine. making rg3 ride the pine. you're live in the cnn newsroom. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com and good morning. thanks so much for joining me this morning. we begin in south africa where the ininterpreter from the nelson mandela memorial is

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