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tv   Early Start With John Berman and Christine Romans  CNN  April 1, 2014 1:00am-3:01am PDT

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breaking news overnight. the search for missing malaysia airlines flight 370 inn intensifying, the mystery of its disappearance widening. a new report that poor communication could have wasted days in the effort to find the vanished jetliner and new information now about the last words from the cockpit. who said them and how even this information keeps changing. we cover all the angles and all the twists and turns as they unfold this morning. good morning, everyone. great to see you today. welcome to "early start." i'm john berman. >> and i'm poppy harlow.
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it is tuesday, april 1st, 4:00 a.m. on the east coast. there are very important, new details to tell you about in the development in that search for flight 370. a malaysian government source telling cnn investigators are convinced someone in the cockpit or on board the plane is responsible for that sudden turn off course. they consider the disappearance of flight 370 a criminal act. and with that explanation, they're altering the official version of the final sign-off from the jetliner's cockpit. jim clancy is live in kuala lumpur for us this morning. and jim, we understand you just obtained a transcript of the final communication. what does it show you? >> reporter: this is the full transcript between the tower and flight mh-370. in it, you hear all of the things that are going on between the pilots on board the aircraft, air traffic control, ground control, the kuala lumpur tower, as this flight proceeds. it carries through, you know,
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from the time that they say that they want to take off, cleared for takeoff at 12:40.38, 370 32r, 32 right, cleared for takeoff, goodnight. then malaysian airlines said "cleared for takeoff, malaysia 370, thank you, bye." the final transmission comes at 1:19.29, and the transcript from -- this is from malaysia airlines flight 370's cockpit, says "goodnight malaysian 370." this came to us via senior government source, highly credible. i'm not an expert in aviation. we're going to have some pilots take a look at this. but i can tell you, as i went down through this three, four times and read everything, poppy and john, what stands out to me is how routine it is. there is nothing that appears amiss in this at all. but it does clear up a lot of
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the questions, i think. it gives us one of the few really hard facts that remains, one of the few things that is known about this flight. and what was going on in the cockpit, what was going on in the conversation with the tower just before it disappeared. back to you. >> well, and that confirming those final words were not, as malaysian authorities said weeks ago, "all right, goodnight." jim, also, the head of the international travel association or iata, is in kuala lumpur and had some interesting things to say. what did he say? >> reporter: this meeting was already scheduled, i believe. it's an operations meeting, if you want to call it that, call it that, an ops meeting that brings together industry experts, executives, airline executives, brings together people that are interested in aviation. and tony tyler, the director general of iata, said that two
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things really stand out. number one, they have to get a grip, the countries have to get a grip on controlling the passengers who board flights, that the two stolen passports just point out the problems that people have in confidence with their security. they have databases available. they have to see that all countries are using those databases to help insure safety aboard flights. even if those two people, those two individuals who are iranians, believed to be trying to emigrate to europe, even if they had nothing to do with the disappearance of the flight, that's a problem. number two -- and i think this stands out in everyone's minds -- they have to implement a way to track planes. the reason that we've got everyone down scouring the southern reaches of the indian ocean is because we have no real idea, no real evidence of where this plane went down. that shouldn't happen today in an age where we track packages.
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>> right, everything. >> reporter: we track vehicles, we even track pets, poppy? >> right. appreciate the reporting this morning and telling us more about what is in that transcript from what was communicated between the plane and the tower. >> yeah, that's a new development. we've all been waiting for that transcript. >> right. >> it's in jim clancy's hands this morning. we'll get back to that in a little bit as jim pores over the details. meanwhile, it has been one dead end after another in the search for flight 370. this is the latest. three days wasted. that is according to a new report. the "wall street journal" says search teams were looking in the wrong place in the southern indian ocean for 72 hours because of poor coordination, saying the two separate teams were analyzing different data to calculate the plane's trajectory, one looking at radar data, the other looking at satellite data. they didn't get together. remember, they changed the search area, about 700 miles. it's been 25 days since flight 370 vanished. the search at sea is turning up plenty of debris, but none of it so far can be connected to the
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missing jetliner. let's get the latest on this search from atika shubert. she's been manning the situation for us from perth, australia, near the air base. atika, what's the latest this morning? >> reporter: well, they've got 12 planes up in the air searching that area, an area the size of ireland. that's according to the new coordinator, chief air marshal angus houston, who held a press conference earlier today. and he was very clear that this is not something that's going to be wrapped up quickly, even if they find debris soon. this is something that's going to take weeks, if not longer, he said, to go through. so, some tough words today. take a listen to what the deputy ceo of the australian maritime safety situation said, mick killny. he basically put into perspective what we're looking at in this search. >> currently, we believe we're looking in the place that gives us the best probability of success. as that information is refined we may move that effort, but
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currently, that's where we are. we have by no means exhausted that search area yet, and we will continue to make every effort we can to give the people who are flying the best probability we can. >> reporter: reading between the lines there, they're basically saying they're doing the best they can, but the bottom line is, they don't even know whether or not they're looking in the right place, john. >> best they can, atika. as they keep on searching, they keep turning up debris, which causes some hope, but it keeps turning up to be junk from fishing vessels and the like, causing a lot of frustration, as you've been reporting. our atika shubert in australia. thanks very much. well, for the families of the 239 people on board flight 370, more heartache, more frustration, more confusion, frankly. debris sightings in the indian ocean raising their hopes and then dashing them. their distrust of the malaysian government mounting by the hour. now they're preparing legal action. david mckenzie joins us from beijing this morning. david, you have been with these families throughout, and throughout from hope to despair. tell me what the latest is in
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terms of the potential legal action they could take here, because i know there was a major development late last night. >> reporter: well, that's right, poppy. you know, there are a number of law firms that have representatives at that hotel where hundreds of family members have been held up for these weeks, trying to find out anything about their loved ones. and as is always the case in an airline crash like this, you know, the legal options start to mount. and at this stage, those legal options could be potentially severe for the manufacturers, but we don't know until, of course, they conduct an investigation. i spoke to the head of litigati litigation. ran yek law. >> we have to believe it crashed. although the minister of defense said we believe it crashed, we
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still need to know for sure that it crashed. even finding a small piece of the plane, a cushion, a window, will help us in our legal case. >> reporter: well, certainly, no lawsuit can proceed until they find some debris. and as you say, a major development in this, that law firm, which filed a petition to get information from both boeing and malaysian airlines from a circuit court in chicago, they had that petition thrown out. the judge said it was not valid. the law firm says they will appeal that ruling, but we'll certainly try to push through with the lawsuit in this case, has very real implications, of course, in aviation law if they push through for the families as well, but every family member i've spoken to say it's not about the money, it's about having some kind of closure about their loved ones. >> and i'm wondering, david, if you've gotten any reaction from the family members yet to the fact that we know now from the transcript that the final words out of the cockpit were different than malaysian
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authorities originally said, not significantly different, but still different. and in this investigation, any fact we can get our hands on is key. are they reacted to that or the "wall street journal" report that days were really wasted because of a lack of communication in terms of where that key search area should be? >> reporter: many of the family members have already accused malaysian airlines of delaying the investigation and not giving the right amount of information. they have not yet received a transcript from the airline representatives. in a meeting that is ongoing right as we speak. so, we will see if they get that transcript that jim was reporting about. and certainly, it would fit with their overall anger and frustration in this case, that as they have tried to figure out what happened to those on board, they have repeatedly pointing the finger at the airlines and at the government, and so has the chinese government, for that matter.
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but certainly, the malaysian airlines say they're doing everything they can to provide information to these families. so, you know, all in all, as these weeks drag out, it's certainly a very messy situation for everyone involved. >> absolutely. >> poppy? >> thank you, david, appreciate it. >> again, the breaking news, cnn just obtaining the transcript of the final conversation between the cockpit of flight 370 and air traffic control. our jim clancy in kuala lumpur has that transcript. we're going over it right now, trying to figure out if there are any details in there that we did not know before. >> right. >> we'll be following all the latest news on the search for malaysia airlines flight 370 all morning. but first, ukraine expected to get big support today from the united states. congress voting on millions of dollars of aid, also punishment for russia. we're live in moscow with reaction right after the break.
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welcome back to "early start," everyone.
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the search for flight 370 incensifying in the indian ocean. no sign yet of the missing jetliner. a report in the "wall street journal" heightening the frustration. it says that search crews spent three days looking for flight 370 in the wrong place because of poor communication between countries. and now the malaysian government is backtracking on what they say took place in the final transmission from the cockpit. instead of "all right, goodnight," authorities now say that the pilot or co-pilot actually signed off by saying "goodnight malaysian 370." now, we also just learned of the new transcript. we actually have our hands on it now. jim clancy in kuala lumpur has a transcript of the full final conversation. we will break that down for you in a little bit. still poring over that. again, that just in. meanwhile, 20 planes and ships searching for any sign of flight 370 off the coast of australia, still coming up empty. now to the developments unfolding in ukraine. here in washington, the house is
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finally expected to pass a measure today providing to ukraine aid and also those tighter sanctions on russia. and now, there are reports that russian president vladimir putin has ordered some of his troops along the ukraine border to withdraw. at least that is what he told german chancellor angela merkel on a phone call. let's go to phil black live in moscow for us this morning. what do we know from that phone call between the two leaders? >> reporter: well, that's the interesting thing, poppy, we're not hearing about this from the kremlin, we're hearing about it from germany, where the government there says it was a phone call between putin and the german chancellor, angela merkel, in which putin said he had ordered a partial withdrawal of forces from the ukrainian border. now, what does that mean? how many soldiers? so far, the russian government has confirmed that only one motorized infantry battalion has completed what it calls exercises near the border and has returned to its base. that's only hundreds of soldiers compared to the tens of thousands that nato believes are
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still lined up across the ukrainian border, standing there at a very high state of readiness. now, it's likely we'll hear more about nato's assessment today as foreign ministers from the alliance get together in brussels to decide the next step in dealing with this crisis, poppy. >> phil black, appreciate the reporting this morning. we'll get back to you later in the show. thank you. some other news we're covering, developing this morning, obamacare open enrollment officially over. for some people it was deja vu all over again as they were scrambling to get in under the deadline wire. over 1 million people flooded the site monday, many running into glitches that may have been reminiscent of the rollout last fall, although the glitches nothing compared to the ones last fall. those thwarted yesterday will get an extension. now the administration says sign-ups could reach one of their early goals of 7 million. the final tally not expected for some time. meantime, new general motors ceo mary barra testifies before the house today on why it took the company a decade to recall
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some 2.2 million vehicles due to faulty ignition switches. 13 deaths and 31 crashes have been linked to that defect. meanwhile, gm is recalling 1.3 million more vehicles. this just happened yesterday, for a sudden loss of power steering. that brings gm's total recalled vehicles to nearly 7 million for the year for various issues. >> more importantly, you will be covering this hearing in washington later today. >> we will. >> long day for poppy harlow. also in washington today, a closed-door meeting between lawmakers and secret service director julia pierson. last week, three agents were sent home from the president's overseas trip after one of the agents was found out -- was found passed out drunk. that follows a car crash during a detail last month. and of course, the 2012 scandal involving agents and sex workers in colombia. the meeting today will reassess reforms put in place after that incident. and a plea from the governor of washington state as the death toll from that tragic landslide
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rises. there are now 24 confirmed deaths with 22 people still missing or unaccounted for. on monday, governor jay inslee asked the president for a major disaster declaration to bring more resources to that state to help. the estimated financial costs have reached tens of millions of dollars. the number of dead is expected to climb. all right, happening now, ships and aircraft searching the wreckage -- for the wreckage of missing malaysia airlines flight 370. we're live with the conditions that crews are dealing with right now, right after the break. ♪ led to the one jobhing you always wanted. at university of phoenix, we believe every education- not just ours- should be built around the career that you want. imagine that.
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welcome back to "early start." at this hour, an australian ship carrying a u.s. navy pinger locator is churning toward the flight 370 search zone in the indian ocean. it is expected to arrive some time thursday, ready to attempt to find the jetliner's black box, if, indeed, it is even in that area. let's bring in will ripley. he is off the coast of free mantle, australia, this morning. will, what can you tell us? i know you were even further offshore and the weather was very intense, but the captain told you this is pretty good. it gives you a sense of the conditions, right? >> reporter: yeah, yeah. can you believe this is a clear day, and we are in a very, very calm area right now, relatively close up to free mantle here, and you can still see that the boat is bobbing around. you have to kind of watch your footing a little bit. when we headed about 12 miles out, which is just a small
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fraction of how far the "ocean shield" is right now, because they've been sailing for about 20 hours, about a third of the way to the search zone, but just 12 miles out on a clear, calm day, take a look at how the captain described the weather conditions that we were feeling. >> i feel sorry for the guys on the "shield" heading out to the wreck zone, because we're at idle. we're running along about 5 knots. those guys are punching upwards of 15 knots, so every wave is straight over the top. >> reporter: even for a large ship like the "ocean shield." >> large ship, it will just be over the top at three times the speed we're doing. >> reporter: you know, we had to hold on to the side of the boat just to make sure that we didn't tip over, and what just kept striking me is these are good conditions. the conditions out there much worse when you have waves several stories high, higher than most buildings. you might have a ship relatively close to you that you can see one minute, can't see the next. nevertheless, the "ocean shield"
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making good progress, expected to arrive in the search zone, we are told by the australian defense force, either late thursday evening, or by the latest, on friday, poppy. >> and they made that decision to send the pinger locator out there, even if they don't have any idea if this is the correct search zone, but they're going to do the best they can. give us a sense of how challenging it is, will, because i know i had heard some fact like it can only go sort of 3 miles an hour and only cover about 150-square-mile area in about an hour's time, or in a day's time, is that correct? >> reporter: you're absolutely correct. >> in a day's time? >> reporter: yeah. yeah, absolutely right. you know, this is what's interesting about this technology. a lot of people are pinning so much hope on the "ocean shield" because it has these two high-tech tools. the underwater microphone can detect the ping from a data recorder. and it has an underwater drone that can scan the ocean floor. but as great as this technology is, it needs to work within a more narrow search area, and the hope was that we by now would
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have identified where this jetliner wreckage is, and really, we just don't have a clue at this point because everything that's been recovered, examined on board the ships that are out there right now hasn't been connected to the flight. and so, for example, the microphone has a one-mile radius. it can hear the ping within one mile. when you have a search zone the size of poland, well over 100,000 square miles, think of the chances of being one mile away from the data recorder. >> right. >> reporter: they're not very good. >> absolutely. many odds against them, but we're wishing them the best out there. appreciate it this morning. thanks, will. all right, we do have breaking news in the search for flight 370. >> we do. >> moments ago, cnn obtained the transcript of what was said from the cockpit of missing malaysia airlines flight 370, between the cockpit and air traffic control, the final words, the final conversation. our jim clancy poring over it right now, and we'll have a live report right after the break.
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breaking news overnight, cnn obtaining the transcript of the final cockpit conversations between flight 370's crew and air traffic control. malaysian investigators now admitting they were wrong about the last words that came from the cockpit of flight 370 before it went silent. cnn has gotten a hold of that official transcript. what was really said and what officials are saying now. they're not sure who said the final words, the captain or the co-pilot. also right now, boats and aircraft searching for the wreckage of flight 370, but how do they know they're in the right place? so many questions still to be
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answered. we have live, team coverage on all of the angles and everything that has happened overnight. welcome back to "early start," everyone. i'm poppy harlow. >> and i'm john berman. 30 minutes past the hour. great to see you this morning. up first, we are covering the breaking news. cnn just minutes ago obtaining the transcript of the final conversation between the flight 370 crew and traffic control. details on that in a moment. also, a source telling cnn that investigators are now convinced someone in the cockpit or on board that plane is responsible for that sudden turn off course. these malaysian officials telling cnn they consider the disappearance of flight 370 to be a criminal act. and without explanation, they are altering the official version of the final sign-off from the jetliner's cockpit, that as part of this transcript that cnn just got its hands on. jim clancy live in kuala lumpur, has been poring over the details of that. i've just been looking at it myself, jim. tell me what you make of it so
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far. >> reporter: routine. routine is the word that jumps out at you when you look this over. you hear other aircraft, you know, mh-370's put on hold, if you will, as a flight from frankfurt is given priority for ground control. you hear the pilot getting ready for takeoff, the pushback. all these things are recorded here. and you get down to the end of it, which on my copy here is three pages long. you have air traffic control in kuala lumpur at 1:19.24 saying, "malaysia 370 contact ho chi minh 1:20.9, goodnight." now, that's the frequency that the plane would contact the ho chi minh city control tower. malaysia 370 replies "goodnight malaysian 370." now, some aviation experts,
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people more familiar with this, say that the pilot or co-pilot -- we don't know which one was saying that now -- we were told earlier it was the co-pilot. but whoever said it should have, in the proper terminology, repeated that frequency, 1:20.9. they did not. not a major transgression. it was a routine flight at 1:19.21, the last transmission. >> a lot of language like maintaining level, climbing, climbing. nothing out of the ordinary, seeming to us, jim. but again, this is a significant piece of information to now have in your hands over there. investigators have been reluctant to turn this over. a lot of people wanting to see they for the first time, so not insignificant that at least we see these details. >> reporter: it is, you know, for us, we've been asking for this since practically day one.
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what we need to see now are the military radar records that would give us an idea of how the plane made its turn, how it veered off of its scheduled flight path, and suddenly ended up on route to the indian ocean, you know, less than 90 minutes after it took off from kuala lumpur. as you reported, nic robertson reported that some of the investigators are saying they're investigating this as a criminal act. that radar record would really speak to that as well. it might help to differentiate, you know, why they believe that, rather than a severe mechanical failure, john. so many questions, so few answers, so few facts, but the transcript of what went on between the cockpit and the control tower that night is one of them that we have in our hands. back to you. >> and we will continue to go over that. great reporting. jim clancy in kuala lumpur, thanks so much. it has been one dead end after another in this search for flight 370. here is the latest. three days wasted.
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that's according to a new report out from the "wall street journal," which says search teams were looking in the wrong place in the southern indian ocean for 72 hours. why? because of poor coordination, saying there were two separate teams analyzing different data to calculate the plane's trajectory, one looking at radar data, the other looking at satellite data. it has been 25 days since flight 370 vanished. the search at sea turning up plenty of debris but nothing that can be connected to the missing jetliner. let's get the latest on the search from atika shubert live from perth, australia. i know the search is going on, ten planes in the area, multiple ships, but tell us about the weather conditions, because that is critical for this visual search at this point in time, and the days are running out to find the data recorder. >> reporter: yeah, the days are definitely running out. the weather, unfortunately, is not so great today. it has been deteriorating. but according to the group commander here, he says that the planes are pushing ahead and so
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are the ships. visibility is pretty low, but they're still trying to spot any pieces of debris that could potentially be from the plane. so far, however, we have not had any reports. we are expecting some of the planes to be landing back here at pearce air base, and if they report anything, we'll definitely let you know, poppy. >> and in terms of who's coming there, i know that you've got the malaysian prime minister coming there this week, correct, who's going to be touring the base? >> reporter: yes, he's going to be touring not just pearce air base here, but also, of course, talking to all the coordinators of the search as well as the investigation, because it's not just planes that are taking off from pearce air base, but anything that they do find in the indian ocean is going to be brought back to perth. >> right. >> reporter: and this is where, essentially, they're going to try to put the plane back together with any debris they actually find. >> thanks for the reporting this morning, atika. appreciate it. we'll bate back to you shortly. >> for the families of the 239 people on board flight 370, it's
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just been more heartache, more frustration. all those debris sightings that atika's been reporting on in the indian ocean, they've been raising hopes, but they've all turned out to be fishing junk and other debris, dashing the hopes of the families. and their distrust of the malaysian government really seems to be mounting by the hour. our david mckenzie joins us live from beijing this morning. david, give us a sense of what they're doing right now. >> reporter: well, john, they're in a briefing with malaysian airline officials and malaysian government officials, and this has been a regular scenario in the afternoons here in beijing, morning your time, and they have been getting these briefings to understand technically why they are coming to the decisions that they are coming to. but certainly, as you say, the family members have repeatedly expressed their frustration, their anger, even storming the malaysian embassy last week. so, you know, now the situation is this. it really could end up being a legal battle. and i spoke to one of the leading law firms that is at the
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hotel trying to gain clients from these family members that are still in shock. >> we have to be certain that the plane actually crashed. although the minister of defense from malaysia has said that they believe it crashed, we still need to know for sure that it crashed. and only finding even a small piece of the plane, a cushion, a window, will help us in our legal case. >> reporter: well, certainly, they say that once they get that debris, they'll have a parallel investigation. that law firm, ribbeck law, has had some questions asked about it, including the fact that the initial planes have been -- the information that they were seeking from a chicago court wasn't, in fact, a direct family member of somebody on board. so, certainly some questions being asked about them. they say they've done everything by the book, but certainly now, the issue is will this go to court? some new news that happened
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overnight was that the asiana airline, which was the airline that most recently had a deadly incident on a boeing 777, which crash landed, effectively, in san francisco last year, they are admitting now that that was a combination of a mechanical issue and pilot error. and certainly, that will be also a major lawsuit against boeing, i suspect. john? >> interesting confluence of developments there. david mckenzie in beijing for us. thanks so much. >> for weeks now, the search for flight 370 has been conducted above sea level. part one of what will hopefully be a two-part mission, because when and if a plane or a ship spots something connected to flight 370, that is when the hunt for the missing jetliner goes below sea level. here's our tom foreman. >> reporter: all of the searching so far up in the south china sea over the malacca straits, up into europe, down into the indian ocean, to the edge of the southern ocean, all of that has been really part of
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just the first search, the search for one solid clue to tell them where to look under water. the search above water can be fairly fast. we're off the coast of australia now. they've been moving through those areas over there. they've defined and redefined them and moved them around. they can search maybe 90,000, 100,000 square miles a day in one of those areas because they can fly over it and look. but when you talk about diving down into the water, when you talk about getting deeper down under the surface there, it gets much more complicated and far, far more time-consuming. let me show you what we're talking about here. if you start talking about being underneath the water, you can no longer look with your eyes in any fashion, because it's dark down there. you actually have to use a device of some sort, whether it's a sonar device to image the bottom of the ocean or whether it's a pinger listener trying to find those data recorders back there. but what you get is a very small window that you can look into,
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not a vast vista, and this may only reach out a mile, maybe two miles in very good conditions. that limits how much you can search, maybe 50 square miles a day. so, if you have 90,000 square miles to search, that's a big, big difference and it's going to make a big difference to how much ground you can cover. still, they must get the top part of this equation worked out before they can even think about starting the underwater part. >> yeah, absolutely, and that is the challenge ahead, to get a small enough area so that pinger locator can work and they don't have that right now. >> they haven't even started with the difficult part of the search yet. we'll follow the latest breaking news in the search for malaysia airlines flight 370 and new details about the final words from the cockpit crew to air traffic control in a little bit. but first, the u.s. getting more involved in the crisis in ukraine. today congress voting on aid and how russia should be punished for really trying to take over, actually, effectively taking over part of the ukraine. we're live with the latest after the break.
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welcome back, everyone. we'll have more coverage in the search for flight 370 in just a moment, but first, new developments in the crisis in ukraine. here in the united states, in washington, the house finally expected to pass a measure today providing aid to ukraine and imposing tighter sanctions on russia, and there are reports that russian president vladimir putin has ordered some of his troops along the ukraine border to withdraw, to pull back. that is what he reportedly told german chancellor angela merkel. let's get the latest from phil black live in moscow this morning. phil, what can you tell us? >> reporter: yeah, john, that's right, it has not come from the kremlin, this talk of withdrawal, but from the german government, that says it was in a phone call between vladimir putin and angela merkel that putin said he had ordered a partial military withdrawal. now, what does that mean exactly? how many troops are we talking about? so far, the russian government has confirmed that only one motorized infantry battalion has been called back from the border after completing exercises
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there. a battalion, that's just hundreds of soldiers. that's compared to the tens of thousands that nato believes are still stretched along that ukrainian border at a very high state of readiness. now, it's likely we'll hear more of nato's assessment today as foreign ministers from the alliance get together in brussels to discuss their next steps in dealing with the ukrainian crisis. and while russia is signaling its intention for what so far looks to be like a modest military withdrawal, it is also pushing what it believes to be a diplomatic solution to the crisis. moscow says ukraine should adopt a new federalized constitution. that's one that would take powers away from the central government in kiev and give them to local, regional administrations. now, not surprisingly, the ukrainian government is a little suspicious of russia's intentions here. its belief is that russia is looking for another way to carve up the country, only this time without firing a single shot. it believes that russia would seek influence, perhaps even control of those russian-speaking regions and their local administrations, and thus, essentially bypass that central government in kiev.
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so, from ukraine's point of view, that initial idea looks to be a nonstarter, john. >> you can understand, phil, why the ukraine government might be a little suspicious of the intentions from russia, certainly understandable. our thanks to you. as you said, perhaps an insignificant operational pullback from the border there, but could be symbolically important. phil black in moscow, thank you. >> we'll continue to follow that. and breaking news this morning on that transcript that cnn has obtained between flight 370 and the tower. we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] this is the cat that drank the milk... [ meows ] ...and let in the dog that woke the man who drove to the control room [ woman ] driverless mode engaged. find parking space. [ woman ] parking space found. [ male announcer ] ...that secured the data that directed the turbines that powered the farm that made the milk that went to the store that reminded the man to buy the milk that was poured by the girl who loved the cat. [ meows ] the internet of everything is changing everything. cisco. tomorrow starts here.
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china. they say from available public information. look at that route there. it shows a lot of twists and turns, not straight lines like we've seen from the official malaysian versions. a lot going on before that final left turn south. it's raising even more questions about exactly what happened to flight 370. cnn and other organizations asked malaysian officials about the track monday, getting only a cannot confirm or deny response. joining us from london is former pilot and aviation consultant alastair rosenschein. you know, alastair, thanks for being with us. give me a sense, as you look at that composite sketch from the families, does that even seem possible to you? >> well, of course, it's possible, but i have no idea how they got hold of it. you know, there's an awful lot that the families have claimed that is really off the wall, in
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some cases. i'm afraid i don't know where on earth they got that picture from, and i would be very skeptical about it. >> yeah, no, they say they get it from composite information that they've been given. they've pieced it together. that's how they came up with this sort of loopday loop, which is different than the left-hand turn so far described by malaysian officials. >> right. and one of the questions, as we try to get more information on that image and what information exactly went into creating it and if the airline or malaysian officials will comment on it, what we do know now, because cnn has the official transcript between flight 370 and the tower, is that the final words were not "all right, goodnight," they were "goodnight malaysia 370." as a pilot who does, you know, these sign-offs all the time, is that a material difference? should we be paying attention to what malaysian officials told us weeks ago were the final words and now we're hearing it is
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something different? >> no, it sounds perfectly innocuous. i think that the malaysian authorities putting out the incorrect final words was really a question of benign incompetence, rather than anything significant. >> benign incompetence, alastair, has been afflicting this entire investigation, it does seem. we learned today from the "wall street journal," the "wall street journal" reporting that the search area, 700 miles from where they're now searching, they may have been searching in that wrong area because two separate teams were simply not communicating -- >> right. >> -- on what they thought the flight route was. is that an example in your mind of the benign incompetence you're talking about? >> well, that would certainly be a case in question. i mean, you know, to involve so many assets in a search and such huge cost and urgency, to not communicate between the various agencies would be a very grave error. and it appears that they're still looking in the wrong place in any event.
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you know, i have to add here that everything that i've heard about this could well be explained by a technical problem which occurs suddenly, causing the flight crew to turn back. and then if they had become unconscious due to hypoxia, depressurization, the plane could have flown on its own into the indian ocean and could be well west of where they're searching at the moment. >> excellent analysis and also the analysis we're getting from other experts, too. still very much a possibility that it was a mechanical situation, craft failure, rather than a criminal act, which at least one malaysian official continues to tell cnn. alastair rosenschein, thanks very much. we'll have more on the top news about flight 370, including the new transcript just obtained by cnn between the cockpit and air traffic control right after the break. that's a man interviewino.for a job. not that one. that one. the one who seems like he's already got the job 'cause he studied all the right courses from the get-go.
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all right, the month of march came in like a lion, and it is going out like a lion, at least for some. a blinding spring blizzard slamming the border of minnesota. >> wow! >> did i say that correctly? >> minnesota. >> minnesota and north dakota monday, whipping up winds in
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excess of 50 miles per hour, shutting down highways, dumping more than a foot of snow. 5 fresh inches expected today. >> man, i can say minnesota that way, being a proud native. and speaking of my home state, take a look at a frightening scene in rural minnesota. a funnel cloud ripping through the tiny town of st. leo. three farms reported damaged. some counties had simultaneous blizzard and tornado warnings. they cannot wait for the summer there, that's for sure. let's take an early look at our weather, including thunderstorms and tornado watches. chad myers has that. good morning. an active looking map here, although blizzards, also a lot of wind in the area, too, red flag warnings or fire warnings out there across the midwest. obviously, things haven't really started to grow yet, so they're not green. those brown things in the wind can burn rather quickly. 81 in dallas, 78 in houston. and when you have cold weather,
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or at least cool in kansas city, and temperatures above 80 degrees in dallas and also all of north texas, you can certainly get severe weather, and that's possible again for a little bit tomorrow. but really, wednesday and into thursday, as this cold front pushes the warm air away. it's that battle, warm and cold. we get it every spring. >> all right. happy april, everyone. "early start" continues right "early start" continues right now. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com breaking news overnight. cnn has just obtained a transcript of the final words between the flight 370 crew and air traffic control. new information revealing malaysian authorities incorrectly reported the last words transmitted from the plane's cockpit before it went silent. and now we're learning it may not have been the captain who uttered those words. who was it? also, this morning a new report claiming poor communication between countries could have wasted days in the effort to find the vanished jetliner.
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we have live coverage from all the angles and everything that happened overnight and is happening this morning. good morning, everyone. welcome to "early start." i'm poppy harlow. >> and i'm john berman. it is tuesday, april 1st, 5:00 a.m. in the east. thank you so much for joining us. up first, we have breaking news. we now know the final words spoken between the flight 370 cockpit crew and air traffic control. cnn just obtaining the full transcript and we'll have those details for you in just a moment. but first, new this morning, a malaysian government source telling cnn investigators are convinced that someone in the cockpit or on board the plane is responsible for that sudden turn off course. and again, at least one malaysian official telling cnn they consider the disappearance of flight 370 to be a criminal act. and without real explanation, they are altering the official version of the final sign-off from the jetliner's cockpit. jim clancy live on the phone from kuala lumpur this morning. jim, you obtained the transcript now. a lot of people have been
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waiting for this for an awful long time, but you now, at least, have it, the transcript of the final communications, the conversation between the cockpit crew and air traffic control. what have you learned, jim? >> reporter: john, if you can hear me, we're in the midst of just a major, torrential downpour here. we obtained this transcript of the conversation between the pilots on board flight 370 and the control tower, kuala lumpur tower, as well as ground control. they show, if anything, a completely normal conversation. we understand now that the government is going to release this transcript to all of the media in the coming hours. it sets the record straight. it is something that they say they held back because of the investigation, that they feel that they can release it now. it says, and i'm quoting here,
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there's no indication of anything abnormal in the transcript. it does, perhaps, definitively clear up how the pilot signed off. he signed off "goodnight malaysian 370," and that is what we know at this stage. but again, what's remarkable is that it's so routine, john. and as you look at this, all you can think of is that moments, moments after that transmission went out, this plane began to vanish, and they are still looking for it in the indian ocean. john, i'm going to have to sign off, because i can't hear you at all. and i just want to say thank you to everybody there at "early start," and we'll try to talk with you again in a half hour's time. bye-bye. >> great to hear from jim clancy, in the middle of a torrential downpour in kuala lumpur. but the important bit of information he just delivered, he now has the transcript of that final conversation between the cockpit crew and air traffic
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control. the language seems very routine, seems mundane. it is confirmation that the final words spoken from the cockpit were "goodnight malaysian 370." >> right, and now the question is who uttered those words? did it come from the captain? did it come from the co-pilot? that is something we still don't know. but you know, it has been one frustrating dead end after another in this search for missing flight 370. here's the willlatest. three days wasted, according to a new report from the "wall street journal," which says that search teams were looking in the wrong place in the southern indian ocean for 72 hours because of poor coordination. the report says that two separate teams were analyzing different data to calculate the plane's trajectory, one looking at radar data, the other looking at satellite data, and then just not coordinating, not talking for quite a long period of time. it has now been 25 days since flight 370 vanished. the search at sea turning up plenty of debris but nothing that can be connected to the missing jetliner. let's get straight to perth,
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australia. our atika shubert is live there. what can you tell us about this search this morning? >> reporter: well, the search continues, but weather is deteriorating over the search area, and that means low visibility. and this is pretty key for any search planes up in the air. they really need to get down low and see if they can spot any of that potential debris. we haven't had any reports yet, but we do expect some planes to be landing pretty soon. in the meantime, the coordinating center did have a press conference today, and they really showed just how difficult the task is. take a listen to what mick kinley said, from the australian maritime and safety association. >> currently, we believe we're looking in the place that gives us the best probability of success. as that information is refined, we may move that effort, but currently, that's where we are. we have by no means exhausted that search area yet, and we will continue to make every effort we can to give the people who are flying the best probability we can.
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>> reporter: they've deployed a tremendous amount of assets. they have 12 planes flying over the search area, at least 10 ships scouring the seas trying to find anything. so far, they haven't turned up any potential debris from the plane yet. poppy? >> you know, when you talk about the terrain that they're searching, the weather not being ideal there by any means, the fact that this pinger locator can only go about 3 square miles an hour. i was listening to an expert who was saying on anderson cooper's show last night, talking about how this terrain is even more difficult than the initial search area. part of it is over an area called broken ridge, that can make it so much more difficult to locate that pinger sound, if they are in the right vicinity. and the days are running out. >> reporter: yeah, and the key is there that the tpl-25, that towed pinger locator, is a fantastic piece of equipment, but it needs to be deployed where they know the flight data recorder might be, and at this
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point, they have no debris to give them any indication where it might be. they don't even know at this point if they're looking at the right place. >> wow. and we know that, of course, the malaysian prime minister's going to be on the ground there, i believe tomorrow and thursday, touring the air force base there, seeing the search operations firsthand. so, we look forward to hearing more about that. thank you for the reporting this morning, atika. >> and of curourse, for the families of the 239 people aboard flight 370, it's more heartache and frustration every time the debris sightings in the indian ocean raise hopes, then dash them when they turn out to be just, you know, fishing junk. and the distrust of the families of the malaysian government seems to be growing by the hour. now it seems they're preparing to take legal action. david mckenzie joins us live from beijing this morning, where there's been a lot of developments all morning, david. >> reporter: well, that's right, john. certainly, they have been briefing the family members here in beijing with the latest information. it doesn't appear that the
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families, at least, have gotten that transcript that jim was talking about, at least not yet. and as you said, these weeks, as they drag on, incredibly frustrating for the families. some of them have resorted to anger. a bunch of them have gone to kuala lumpur to protest and to try and get high-level meetings with malaysian airline authorities. a lot of fingers being pointed at the malaysian authorities. even today with the new revelations about the change in that transcript. but all of this leads into the possibility, of course, of legal action. and i spoke to a senior attorney who's here on the scene in beijing, who wants to represent many of these families. >> we have to be certain that the plane actually crashed. although the minister of defense from malaysia has said that they believe it crashed, we still need to know for sure that it crashed. and only finding even a small piece of the plane, a cushion, a
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window, will help us in our legal case. >> reporter: well, that law firm hasn't been without controversy. they had an initial petition thrown out yesterday in a chicago federal court, saying that it was early too and that they didn't really understand the law. they're firing back, saying they'll appeal that decision. they want to go after boeing and malaysian airlines, though many experts say it's way too early to tell, of course, what caused this crash. >> david, i want to read you a statement we just got from the malaysian government. it says "the international investigations team and the malaysian authorities remain of the opinion that up until the point at which it left military primary radar coverage, mh-370's movements were consistent with deliberate action by someone on the plane." that seems consistent with what malaysian officials have been telling cnn, that they believe that whoever turned that plane did it deliberately. they still are telling cnn they think it could be a criminal act. is that what they seem to be telling the families as well?
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>> reporter: well, certainly, the family briefings have been in line, in general, in recent days, at least, with what is being told to people in malaysia and around the world. i think those early days and weeks, they got so much criticism for not giving information that they have been a lot more careful to give the family members information. the problem is, john, every bit of information we get can be read in multiple ways, so a deliberate action could just mean the pilot trying to save the plane, it could be someone with ulterior motives that then went wrong, and all of this just really has more questions for the families. nothing exceptionally concrete has come out of this, except for that one statement from the malaysian prime minister saying that the plane most likely went down in the southern indian ocean. >> right. >> reporter: now, that is also something the family members have criticized heavily. they say that, you know, they haven't seen that evidence and
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they want concrete evidence before they can start any process of closure. >> frustrating ambiguity. david mckenzie in beijing. thanks so much. >> australian officials continuing to search for flight 370 around the clock. the weather in the indian ocean is a very big factor, because this is really so much a visual search from up in the air and on all of those ships. let's turn to indra petersons. looking at the weather there, today not ideal. what does it look like going forward? >> yeah, unfortunately, you'll start to see some clouds making their way snrint. conditions are currently deteriorating as you see the system making its way into the region. all it takes is a little cloud cover, even add in rain, high winds and the visibility goes way down. very easy to see. we do have a system in that region. unfortunately, right now it's producing some of those tough conditions that they've been concerned with. as far as rain, you can see as you go forward in time, you're still looking at some showers and spotty showers, nonetheless, making their way through the region. that's going to continue, at least for the next 48 hours or so. the one thing, the one plus we have there is you can actually
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see the winds are starting to back off throughout the next 48 hours. not to say there won't be periods where those winds do pick up here and there, but regardless, the general trend is they are backing off, which has a huge impact, of course, on wave heights. currently seeing them really between 3 and 15 feet, but of course, any time you kick up the winds, you kick up wave heights as well, so a mixed bag still. >> absolutely. some of the toughest terrain in the world and couple that with bad weather. >> only good news is they're further north, where the weather is a little bit better for the search area. >> thank you, indra. we'll be following the latest on the search for missing malaysia airlines flight 370 all morning long, including information obtained by cnn on the final words of the crew to air traffic control. first, ukraine expected to get big support from the united states today, congress voting on millions in aid and on punishment for russia. we're live from the border straight ahead. (dad) well, we've been thinking about it and we're just not sure.
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measure today providing aid to ukraine and imposing tighter sanctions on russia. and now this morning there are reports that russian president vladimir putin has ordered some of his troops along the ukraine border to withdraw. at least, that's what he told german chancellor angela merkel. our karl penhaul is live from the border between russia and ukraine this morning. good morning, karl. >> reporter: good morning, john. the problem is, with that kind of news about a possible russian pullback, the people in this border region of northeast ukraine really aren't trusting moscow's word anymore. at best, as well, we've heard that putin talking to germany, saying he's pulling back a battalion, that may be no more than 800 russian troops, and we know that before, earlier in the week, there were thousands ranged along that border. and so, that is why we're seeing this kind of response among the local population. these men are civilian volunteers, and they've come together to form a self-defense militia. there are more, but these are
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the ones manning a checkpoint right now. some of them have military experience, but essentially, they've been working civilian jobs, and they say the army, the ukrainian army is not tough enough to stand alone, we must also do our bit to help them. and so, they've set up these kind of barricades at a roadside che checkpoi checkpoint. they say if russians were to roll on, they would set this stuff on fire to set up a smoke screen, if russian troops come down what is a major highway towards kiev. they've also been digging trenches as well, pretty shallow trenches, but they say these will serve as firing points, either for them, if they're issued with weapons, or for the ukrainian soldiers, if they have to use this as a sort of fallback position. all this, really, john, just to illustrate that the threat of a possible russian invasion is really palpable for these people, and it's going to take a lot more than a single battalion pulling back from that russian border to convince people like this that the threat is over.
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john? >> wow, karl penhaul with a vivid illustration of really the distrust right now in ukraine about russian intentions. thanks so much, karl. terrific report. this morning, obamacare open enrollment is officially over, and it was really deja vu for those scrambling to get in under the wire. well over 1 million people flooded the site monday, many running into technical glitches reminiscent of the disastrous rollout last fall, but those thwarted in the last-minute dash will get an extension to register and not face that penalty. also now, the administration says sign-ups could reach an early goal of 7 million, could reach. the final tally, though, not expected for some time. >> though i'll bet if they get over 7 million, the white house will release it as soon as they possibly can. >> right away. new general motors ceo mary barra testifies before the house of representatives today on why it took the company more than a decade to recall 2.2 million vehicles due to faulty ignition switches. 13 deaths, 31 crashes have been linked to the defect. meanwhile, general motors recalling 1.3 million more
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vehicles for a sudden loss of power steering. that brings gm's total to nearly 7 million recalls for various issues this year, and again, i should say, poppy harlow headed to d.c. just after this show. >> right, we'll be covering it. >> to cover this hearing. >> absolutely. global stocks mostly higher right now, with the exception of tokyo. we had a slew of economic data already this morning come here in the united states. let's take a look. futures pointing to a higher kickoff for the second quarter. the dow closing higher yesterday, but it ended lower for the quarter, snapping a four-quarter winning streak. you're going to want to keep an eye on auto stocks today. not only is general motors ceo mary barra the hill testifying before house representatives about the major gm recall, but carmakers are set to release their sales report for the month of march. we have seen a nice, healthy rebound in auto sales since the depths of the recession, but numbers dropped sharply during the unseasonably cold winter. we'll see if they can bounce back.
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investors are hoping they can now that spring is sort of here. so, the key will be the general motors hearing before the house, the first time we'll hear her public comments, responses to questions. we've read some prepared testimony, but we'll cover that throughout the day for you on cnn. >> fantastic. happening right now, ships and aircraft searching the wreckage to see if they can find any sign of malaysia airlines flight 370. we're live with the search conditions that crews are dealing with. i always say be the man with the plan but with less energy, moodiness, and a low sex drive, i had to do something.
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welcome back to "early start." at this moment, an australian naval ship carrying a u.s. navy pinger locator is churning toward the flight 370 search zone in the indian ocean. it is expected to arrive thursday, ready to help find the black box, if that black box is, indeed, in that area. that is a huge, huge if, with no debris sightings of any significance even yet. let's bring in will ripley off the coast of free mantle, australia, this morning. will, tell us about this technology. >> reporter: hey, yeah, john. you know, 21 hours into this voyage, the "ocean shield" now heading towards australia. as you mentioned, an arrival time either late thursday or friday at the latest. but the ship is running into some pretty bad weather right now. we're told there are strong winds, heavy seas, very low visibility affecting not only the "ocean shield" as it approaches the search area, about one-third of the way there, but also all of the ships that are currently in the search area in the indian ocean. today we headed out about 12 miles offshore, because we
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wanted to see for ourselves what the weather conditions are like. and before i tell you how we were thrown around, because we were thrown around quite a bit on the boat, this was a clear day here. the conditions were considered calm. but you can see from the video just how not calm it was. >> i feel sorry for the guys on the "shield" heading out to the wreck zone because we're at idle. we're running along about 5 knots. those guys are punching this at 15 knots, so every wave is straight over the top. >> reporter: even for a large ship like the "ocean shield"? >> large ship, it will just be over the top at three times the speed we're doing. >> reporter: john, you know, we talked, too, about this equipment, this high-tech equipment that is on the "ocean shield." we've been telling you all about it how this underwater microphone can detect the ping from a black box. but here's the problem, the radius that it can detect is relatively small, and we're heading to a search area that, as you know, is enormous. so, the chances of getting close to the wreckage without any sign
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of debris just yet, pretty slim, which means the "ocean shield" may serve, essentially, as another search boat with a visual search for debris floating on the water, until we can get a better idea where this plane is. >> that's right, it's there really just in case they do look out and find any trace of it. will ripley off the coast of australia, thanks very much. >> of course, we'll continue to follow the latest on this continued search. day 25 now for missing malaysia airlines flight 370, including details contained in a transcript of the final cockpit conversations with air traffic controllers. cnn has just obtained that full transcript. we'll have live team coverage right after the break. i've always kept my eye on her... but with so much health care noise, i didn't always watch out for myself. with unitedhealthcare, i get personalized information and rewards for addressing my health risks. but she's still gonna give me a heart attack. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare.
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breaking news overnight. cnn obtaining a transcript of the final cockpit conversations between flight 370's crew and air traffic control. malaysian investigators now admitting they were wrong about the last words that came from the cockpit of the flight before it went silent. cnn has gotten a hold of the official transcript. what it really said and why officials are saying they're not sure if it was the captain or the co-pilot who uttered those last words. also right now, boats and aircraft are searching for the wreckage, but how do they know they're even in the right place? many, many questions continue this morning. we have live coverage on all the angles and everything that happened overnight. >> welcome back to "early start," everyone. i'm john berman. >> and i'm poppy harlow. it is 30 minutes past the hour. breaking news, cnn has just obtained the transcript of the final conversation between the flight 370 crew and air traffic
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controllers. details on that in just a moment. also new this morning, a malaysian government source telling cnn investigators are now convinced someone in the cockpit on board that plane is responsible for that final turn off course. they consider the disappearance of flight 370 a criminal act. and with that explanation, they are altering the official version of the final sign-off from the jetliner's cockpit. jim clancy joins us on the phone this morning from kuala lumpur. jim, you got your hands on this transcript just within the last hour and a half or so. what can you tell us about it and the final communication made? >> reporter: poppy, if anything, what stands out about this is how normal the conversation is. while i'm no flight expert or pilot, i can tell you that this looks exactly like what you would expect in an exchange between the control tower and any airline flight. the pilot requesting permission, they're setting the runways for takeoff, the tower talking to
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them, the thank-yous, the good mornings, the good days, all going on, you know, just as normally as you would expect them to. it comes to an end at 1:19.24. air traffic control radios "malaysian 370 contact ho chi mi minh, 1:20 decibel nine, goodnight." that's telling him to contact the control tower at 1:20.9. they reply "goodnight malaysian 370," and that is the last we heard from that flight. it was bound from beijing. today the search, of course, taking place in the southern reaches of the indian ocean. really, literally, half a world away. and families and everyone here, of course, want to know answers. we've had so few facts, poppy. this is one of them that we can hold in our hands and look at the transcript. i think the next step would be
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to hear the actual recording of what the pilot said to determine if there's any stress in their voices or anything like that. i think there are all kinds of answers that still need to be forthcoming. back to you. >> so many more answers, especially that the families want. they're waiting and waiting with very few answers. appreciate it this morning, jim. thank you. >> as for the search itself, it's really been one maddening dead end after another. here's the latest. three days wasted. that is according to a new report. the "wall street journal" says search teams were looking in the wrong place in the southern indian ocean for 72 hours because of poor coordination, saying that two separate teams were analyzing different data to calculate the plane's trajectory, one looking at the radar data, the other looking at satellite data. that's why they moved the search zone some 700 miles just a few days ago. it's now been 25 days since flight 370 vanished. the search at sea is turning up a lot of debris, but nothing so far connected to the missing
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jetliner. let's get the latest on the search and the conditions they are facing today from atika shubert, live in perth, australia. good morning, atika. >> reporter: good morning, john. weather conditions were pretty bad in the search area. visibility was low, but the search planes still went out, about a dozen of them in the air. we are expecting the first flights to come back any time now here at pearce air base. but it is very frustrating for them. they're day after day, they're going out for the search, and they're saying they're doing the best they can with the information they've been given. but as you point out, there might have been a few days lost because there simply wasn't enough coordination. and at this point, we're not 100% sure, even, that they're looking in the right place. >> no, the right place, exactly. that search zone has changed and they've been there since, at this point, friday, with, i hesitate to say, nothing to show for it. meanwhile, atika, these underwater search vessels and underwater equipment are steaming out to that area, but that's only because it's there
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and they want to get it on site, not because they have any reasonable expectation that it could locate the black box at this point, correct? >> reporter: absolutely. the first thing they have to do is find some debris from the plane. if they can just find even one piece, then they'll be able to trace it back, figure out approximately where the plane went down, and then they can bring out that tpl-25, that towed pinger locator, but until they have that debris, they really can't deploy it. and so, the "ocean shield" is out there, and it will join the search, but it really can't use its specialist equipment until they find something. >> again, we are awaiting the first of the planes from the search area to return back to that base near perth, where atika is right now. conditions not great today, but we will report back to you what they say when that happens. thanks, atika. >> well, for the families of the 239 people on board flight 370, nothing but more heartache and frustration. debris sightings in the indian ocean raising hopes and then dashing them. their distrust of the malaysian government growing by the day, and now they are preparing to take legal action. david mckenzie joins us this
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morning from beijing, where many of the families are. you have been with these families really through and through. and when it comes to legal action that they may take, i know there's been a pretty significant development overnight. what can you tell us? >> reporter: well, that's right, poppy. certainly, legal action could be on the cards between these families and the manufacturer of the plane, which is boeing, and the airline itself, though some analysts saying it's way too early to, obviously, suggest blame. some legal teams are already doing that. apparently, or in fact, according to a senior lawyer on the scene, all the major players in airline litigation are there at the hotel in the midst of these grieving families, trying to represent them. i spoke to one head of litigation from ribbeck law. here's what she had to say. >> if we find the debris, then we will have our experts analyze the evidence that has been
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provided so far, and then we will continue with our theory of the case, that the plane crashed because equipment failure or mechanical failure, and we will have to prove this case in a court of law against the manufacturer of the plane. >> reporter: that initial petition from ribbeck law was, in fact, thrown out of court, of the federal court in chicago, but they say that they will pursue litigation, most likely against boeing, and possibly, against malaysian airlines. if the search continues without finding any debris which can be linked to the plane, then it becomes a very difficult scenario from a legal standpoint, because they have to prove, obviously, some sort of negligence or mechanical failure in those courts, in those civil courts, but certainly, the families predominantly have told me that their main concern is some kind of closure about their loved ones, and many very far from their mind.
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but obviously, as time stretches on, that will be a factor for people, whose particularly bread-winners, were on that flight. >> absolutely. david mckenzie from beijing, thank you. >> of course, the search for flight 370 depends so much on the weather conditions in that really unpredictable part of the southern indian ocean. our indra petersons has a look at what they're up against today and going forward. >> yeah, and the weather keeps fluctuating here. you can see one system kind of moved out of the region, but you can tell even more clouds now moving into the region. that's the reason they're concerned going forward, at least at this point in time, looking at more clouds. visibility now decreasing and even some rain entering the region. very easy to see in the next 48 hours. unfortunately, this will be the situation as the system does kind of make its way through the area. as far as the rain projected, yeah, we're going to be hit-and-miss some light rain, but at periods of time, they will see some of the heavy rain, which of course, hinders visibility even more. so, we are looking for some little bit of good news in that region, and the one i can give you is the fact that the winds, generally speaking, kind of on the mild side, about 10, 20 miles per hour. yes, there's periods where they're going to see 30,
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40-mile-per-hour winds, but it looks like they are going to be decreasing as they go forward in time. so, that's the one little hint we're looking for. >> any break. any break yet. >> yeah, they need the wave heights to go down. >> absolutely. thanks, indra. we'll continue to follow the latest developments in the flight f search for malaysian flight 370, including communications between the cockpit and the tower. we have it in our hands, just released. first, the u.s. government getting more involved in the ukraine crisis, congress voting on an aid package and also how russia should be punished for trying to take over -- not trying to, taking over part of the country. we're live with the latest. co: i've always found you don't know you need a hotel room until you're sure you do. bartender: thanks, captain obvious. co: which is what makes using the hotels.com mobile app so useful. i can book a nearby hotel room from wherever i am. or, i could not book a hotel room and put my cellphone
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welcome back. more of our coverage on the search for missing flight 370 in just a moment. first, though, new developments from the crisis in ukraine. in washington, the house is finally expected to pass a measure today providing aid to ukraine and imposing tighter sanctions on russia, and there are now reports that russian
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president vladimir putin has ordered some of his troops along the ukrainian board to withdraw, at least that is what he reportedly told german chancellor angela merkel. let's go to karl penhaul, live for us this morning on the russia/ukraine border. what is the latest between this conversation with putin and merk merkel? what do we know? >> reporter: well, poppy, the russian border is just a few miles that way, and that really puts a different aspect on all of these conversations, whether between russia and germany or in paris between john kerry and sergey lavrov, because the people here in this border region really don't trust the russians where they say, okay, putin says he may be moving one battalion of 800 men back from the border, but they still believe that there are many thousands more russian troops massing just over there. and so, people like this, people like these men have formed self-defense militias. normally, these are civilians, but they have had some military experience in the distant past.
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so now they're forming self-defense militias, because they say that if the russians do invade, they will help the military. these may also start up some sort of guerrilla war, breaking down into small units. and that's why these men have been setting up some kind of camp here. let me just basically show you around. you've got sandbags here. we've got sandbags here, and i'll show you, they have been sandbagging here. they're starting to make up molotov cocktails as well, because they say if the russians do advance along this main highway, they will have to stage these kind of guerrilla strikes to try and hold the russians up, to give the ukrainian military time to respond. again, with trenching tools as well, they've been digging in and building little trenches around their outposts, saying this can be a fallback position, firing position, or even if the ukrainian military want to use this as a fallback position and fight. i show you all this, because really, what it does show is, regardless of any talks and any promises of a troop pullback,
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there is a palpable fear here that the russians could roll in at any time. back to you, poppy. >> yeah, absolutely. that really puts it in perspective for us, visualizing that no matter what we are told and what they are told, possibly, from the russian government or what german chancellor angela merkel is told, they do not believe that there is going to be that significant withdrawal, clearly. thank you for the reporting, karl. appreciate it. >> really a physical example, a picture of the distrust between those two nations. >> absolutely. about a quarter to the hour right now and there's a new wrinkle in the search for missing malaysian airlines flight 370. families revealing what they think could be the flight path that the jetliner may have taken before the flight ended in the indian ocean. so, how can their view of the flight impact the investigation? we're going to discuss that right after the break. ♪ [ male announcer ] when fixed income experts... ♪ ...work with equity experts... ♪
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all right, breaking news this morning. cnn has obtained the official transcript of the final conversation between the crew of flight 370 and air traffic controllers. we'll have more on that in just a bit. also, i want to show you a picture that's caused a little bit of controversy here. this is a composite put together by grieving families from flight 370 in china from what they say is public available information. in their view, it shows a different route from the left-hand turn depicted until now by radar, from the radar being released by the malaysian government. they say it raises even more questions about exactly what happened to flight 370. cnn and other organizations asked malaysian officials about this picture monday, getting only a cannot confirm or deny response from them. joining us from london is former pilot and aviation consultant alastair rosenschein. alastair, i want to start with the transcript now, because the malaysian government just released it in full about an hour ago. with it, they put out a statement saying there is no
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indication of anything abnormal in the transcript. we've gone over it. it seems like very routine, mundane language to us. >> yes, perfectly routine to me. an earlier transcript was released to the relatives. it was translated from english into mandarin and back into english, and it provided a language that was not that of the pilot's. but this transcript is perfectly normal. there's nothing there at all that's untoward. >> let's talk more about that, because perhaps something actually got lost in translation here, when we're talking about the final words. because we were told by malaysian officials weeks ago that the final sign-off from the cockpit to the tower was "all right, goodnight." now they're saying, and we see in the transcripts, that it was "goodnight malaysian 370." as a pilot who's very informed, and you know all about these sign-offs, does that matter? is there a material difference here at all? >> only that one version is
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obviously wrong, but i would say the second version, which is "goodnight malaysian 370," is the normal sort of call you would make. i mean, they left out the frequency they're supposed to call for ho chi minh city, 1:20.9, but i think that's irrelevant. one often forgets to say that. >> alastair, so, the families have put together this map of what they believe to be, you know, the flight route of flight 370. they say they put it together from the available public information out there, and it differs from the official version, from the malaysian government right now. you know, is it possible for people who aren't aviation experts to just gather public information that's out there and put together a route that would be so different, seemingly, with that loopdy-loop there than what is being released by officials? >> well, i think it's partly based on a complete breakdown in trust between the relatives, as we now know, and the malaysian authorities. i, you know, whilst an aircraft
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could have followed that route, i have no idea how they came about it. it still puts the aircraft in the same final location, over the andaman sea. and from there, when it was lost on primary radar, we don't know where it went. i cannot comment more than that. i just think it's more than likely incorrect. for a start, it shows a right-hand turn, whereas all along, the official story was that it was a left-hand turn. so, the two things -- one of them is clearly wrong. >> all right, alastair rosenschein, thank you so much for being with us. >> we appreciate it. >> again, the headline here, as a flight expert, alastair tells us nothing out of the ordinary. >> nothing. >> that transcript just released hours ago, the conversation between air traffic control and the cockpit seems mundane, seems routine to him. >> right. >> extremely routine, he says. >> but malaysian authorities still saying they think that someone deliberately did this. the question is what else do they know and when are we going to find out what that is? we're going to have more news, all the top headlines, straight ahead. scott: seems there's a wee bit of confusion out there
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the new ceo of general motors, mary barra, testifies before the house today on why it took the automaker a decade to
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recall some 2.2 million vehicles with faulty ignition switches. 13 deaths and 31 crashes have been linked to the defect. meanwhile, gm is recalling 1.3 million more vehicles, this just happened yesterday, for sudden loss of power steering. that brings the total in terms of gm recalls this year to over 6 million. >> poppy harlow minutes away from catching a plane to washington to cover that in d.c. today. >> right, i'll be covering that. also in washington today, a closed-door meeting between lawmakers and secret service director julia pierson. last week, three agents were sent home from the president's overseas trip after one of these agents was found passed out drunk. this follows a car crash during a detail last month, and of course, the 2012 scandal involving agents and sex workers in colombia. this meeting today will reassess reforms put in place after that incident. global markets kicking off the second quarter on a higher note today, after a slew of economic data came in, stocks pointing to a higher open.
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here in the united states as well, we told you yesterday about michael lewis's comments that the stock market is rigged. now everyone from law enforcement to wall street is weighing in. the fbi pointing to a year-long investigation into those high-speed trading firms that lewis says rig the market. new york's attorney general also says he's been looking into the matter, as are the s.e.c. and the cftc. wall street itself, many people saying look, the market isn't rigged. one expert telling cnn that the rise of electronic trading actually allows regular americans to buy stocks with less hassle and lower fees, but i can't wait to read the book. it was a fascinating report. >> i read the long, extended version in the "new york times" magazine overnight. i couldn't go to sleep because i couldn't stop reading it. it will make you very nervous. poppy harlow on her way to d.c. to cover the gm hearings. everyone watch that. everyone watch that. "new day" starts right now.
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-- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com breaking fluz, we have the trns crypt. the final words between the cockpit and air traffic control are not what we were previously told. our experts weigh in and take a hard like at the investigation. gm recalling a million more vehicles as its ceo heads to capitol hill. why weren't the cars recalled sooner? more than a dozen lives may have been lost because of it. break overnight. the obamacare enrollment deadline passed at midnight. did they hit their target? the new numbers this morning. your "new day" starts right now. good morning. welcome to "new day."
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it is april 1st, but this is not on april fools' day joke. malaysian officials saying they got the communication from flight 370 wrong. let's start with jim clancy who first obtained the new transcript of the communications. this goes to the content and quality of the investigation. please explain. >> reporter: knowing on who is actually saying those words would tell us who was in the cockpit at that time. but the confusion, some of it at least, being laid to rest as we have the transcript of the complete control tower to cockpit of flight 370 in our hands. breaking in morning, a copy of the transcript from flight 370 confirms no one in the cockpit

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