Skip to main content

tv   New Day  CNN  October 3, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PDT

3:00 am
>> announcer: this is "new day" with chris cuomo, kate boldaun and michaela pereira. >> welcome to "new day," we made it, it's friday, october 3rd, 6:00 in the east. for all the talk how few are at risk, now 100 people in the dallas area are being monitored for symptoms of the deadly ebola virus. that's how many people could have been in direct or indirect contact with thomas duncan, the ebola-stricken liberian man who landed in texas last week. the blame for people being exposed is expanding from just the texas hospital that failed to test the man, to the man himself. officials in liberia want to prosecute duncan claiming he lied on a questionnaire when asked if he had been in contact with anybody with the virus. >> we're learning the identity of a freelance cameraman who contracted ebola in liberia working for nbc. we're told the 33-year-old will be flown back to the u.s. for treatment. his father says doctors are
3:01 am
optimistic about his prognosis. all the latest developments with the ebola crisis, beginning with chief medical correspondent, dr. sanjay gupta. quite a series of developments overnight, sanjay. >> no question, the cameraman working for nbc, his name is ashoka mukpo, 33 years old, working on projects in liberia for the last three years, this past tuesday he started working for nbc. the next day he started having some, started feeling not well, some aches, he got his temperature taken and it was a little bit elevated. that prompted this whole testing, testing came back and now they're en route back to the united states. mukbo and the entire nbc team. the rest of the team appears healthy and they'll be checked out when they get here as well. as for mr. duncan, he's where he needs to be, in the hospital, still in serious but stable condition. and members of his family and friends are in quarantine, also where they need to be. but i will tell you, none of this came too easily.
3:02 am
health officials now looking at 100 people in the dallas area who may have had contact with thomas eric duncan. >> there could be additional cases who are already exposed if that occurs, systems are in place so that they will not further spread ebola. >> as officials work to contain the spread of the virus, many are questioning how did it get here. in liberia, duncan came into contact with an infected woman on september 15th. four days later, the 42-year-old was screened three times and showed no symptoms. and was therefore permitted to board an airplane. but liberian authorities now say duncan lied about his ebola exposure on a health questionnaire, he was asked if he cared for or came into contact with an ebola patient and he answered no. he flew from monrovia to brussels and boarded united airlines flight 591 en route to washington, connecting to flight 822 to dallas. while the cdc maintains he was
3:03 am
not contagious during his journey, united airlines now voluntarily contacting passengers who flew on those flights. in dallas, duncan stayed in this apartment complex for days before feeling sick and seeking medical care only to be sent home from the hospital with antibiotics, even after telling them he had just travelled from africa. >> the hospital now admits they missed his travel history, due to a workflow breakdown. duncan was with his girlfriend, louise, her child and her two nephews. louise, speaking exclusively to cnn's anderson cooper, recalls her fear, when the family needed to be quarantined. >> they were going to be monitoring all of us, my son should stay home, my enough few, everyone should stay home for 21 days. we should not come outside. if we step outside, then they're going to take us to court. they will commit a crime. >> health officials say the
3:04 am
family hasn't shown any symptoms of the disease. late thursday, a special team was deployed to clean the apartment and remove items duncan used. but they were turned away because they lacked the proper permit to transport hazardous waste. >> did the cdc recommend that you clean your apartment? >> i told them i just -- mattresses on my bed and clorox and dirty clothes in the plastic bag, all sealed up and that's it. >> how are you coping with this? >> i'm just hanging in there, depending on god to save our lives. >> i'll tell you, some of the details are just remarkable. and i imagine many of the people taking care of mr. duncan and his friends and family wish they could get some of these as a do-over. but nevertheless, the good news is it sounds like mr. duncan is stable and his family, still, michaela, has not shown any symptoms. they'll continue to be monitored for a total of 21 days. >> the hope is they won't and they'll get the resources and
3:05 am
support and advocacy they need, sang jai, we'll talk about that throughout the hours. we know that the ebola outbreak in africa, the hot zone is spreading so quickly, the defense department is increasing the number of troops sending to west africa to help aid in the fight against this deadly virus. pentagon correspondent barbara starr joins us with details. >> here at "new day" we have exclusive details on how the pentagon plans to keep those troops safe. with 3,000 troops already tapped to head to ebola-ravaged west africa, cnn has learned the u.s. military is increasing its fight against the deadly disease. hundreds more troops are being added to plans to help the infected countries contain and control ebola. >> it's america -- our doctors, our scientists, our know-how, that leads the fight to contain and combat the ebola epidemic in west africa.
3:06 am
>> approximately 200 u.s. troops are already in liberia. secretary of defense, chuck haggle has signed orders for another 700 to head to africa in coming days, to staff a command headquarters. 700 more army engineers will be going to help build and advise on mobile hospitals. >> we're standing up a field hospital and treatment units. we'll be training thousands of health workers. >> even before most have left the u.s., military officials tell cnn the pentagon is considering drastic measures to insure they don't come back to u.s. shores with the disease. >> we are working with experts right now, on this. >> that could include enforced isolation for 21 days, the ebola incubation period, for high-risk troops who may have come in contact with the disease. all troops deployed will be monitored daily for symptoms. and all service members will
3:07 am
face increased monitoring for those 21 days, before they are allowed to return to the u.s. >> this is a complex emergency, beyond a public health crisis. that has significant humanitarian, economic, political and security dimensions. >> and so, how worried is the pentagon? well those troops are going to take their own food, water, fuel, all of their own supplies for that six-month deployment. they don't want to have to use anything from the local region. think of it this way, 3,000 troops coming back. they could have been in contact with tens of thousands of americans when they return. so they want to make sure before they come home, they are 100% healthy. chris? >> well barbara, there's 100% chance that there's going to be exposure, that these men and women are going to be in harm's way. everybody should know that when they're sending them in. there should be no surprise, if anybody gets it and they'll just have to do what they can to contain it. hopefully part of it has to do with the speeding up of getting
3:08 am
vaccines for these people. our thanks to barbara starr. let's get perspective, the latest with dr. irwin redliner, the director for the national center for disaster preparedness at columbia university. we do not want to spread false panic. we understand and we believe that ebola is not easy to catch and it can be treated much better here in the u.s. than it can be abroad. and yet -- you started out saying not you, but those in control, those people are fine, five, six people, 20 people, 80 people, now it's 100 people, they're looking for people on the plane. what's going on? >> a couple of things happening simultaneously. the actual science, the evidence, that says we have a limited amount of real possibility of people getting sick from contact with this individual. and then we have the public pressure and the anxiety that's been created by the understanding that we now have ebola in the united states of america. so public officials are trying to walk a very fine line here between assuaging the public
3:09 am
anxiety about the disease, versus what we know about the science of the disease. and that's where we end up with this kind of confusion about how many people are we tracking? why are we tracking so many people? are these people that they're tracking actually in danger of getting sick? and actually for the vast majority of them, they're not in real danger. they're in some anxiety state as far as the public is concerned. but they're not in real danger. >> all right. well that's a little comforting, at least it's about public policy, instead of the ignorance about the actual disease. but then the virus, one head-scratcher. the first couple of doctors who came back, thank god they're okay now, they're in bubble suits, now you have people locked in an apartment complex. in texas. i mean what's going on? where's the urgency? >> well we need a lot more information, this is one of the things i'm very concerned about. was, which is the public health reaction to this particular identified case, this mr. duncan. and people are under armed guard, they can't leave the
3:10 am
apartment. the public officials are coming by theoretically and taking their temperature a couple of times a day but they're not taking care of their food needs. the bedsheets that this guy are sleeping on are still on the bed. >> why haven't they been moved into a facility where they can be properly treated? >> when the dust settles on this acute challenge right now, we really have to dig into how the public health officials reacted and responded to this particular case. and it's not just this guy. it's the entire family. that feels like they've been abandoned. >> trapped in an apartment with fouled sheets from when the guy was sick, will was a power outage there from bad weather. the doors were kept open of all their neighbors. >> right. >> it does not seem like good preparedness, objectively. and then you get to the hospital, do you have any belief that this is about bad software. a software problem, that's why they avoided common sense when dealing with this first patient. >> we're just in the throes of installing electronic medical records in hospitals and health
3:11 am
departments in the country. in this particular situation, you're the triage nurse, you're screening people. the guy says i've just come from liberia. >> conversation is over, i'm going to test you. >> it's not -- you then go, verbally and you get the chief of the e.r. and you say i got a guy from west africa with a fever, he's got to be tested. >> even if he doesn't have a fever. >> if he says i was in liberia, why not test? >> we're on the road to a blood test right at that very moment. i think there's probably, there are problems with organizing the electronic health record information that will be fixed. that is a glitch. but that doesn't excuse the absence of whoever triaged the guy from getting up, getting the doctor and saying we got a problem right here. >> most alarming to me, the important point to end on here. you're not surprised that we're seeing problems with preparedness and response. you're saying, this was inevitable. because? >> it's inevitable because we've had literally a decade of disastrous cutbacks in funds for hospital preparedness and for
3:12 am
public health preparedness. we're now paying a small price for that what i worry about is what this this was bird flu, something very contagious and very lethal? we'd be in a boatload of trouble right now. and we have to get this adjusted. >> i know there's a coordination issue, also, because in texas you're dealing with the local health officials, they're the ones in control, not the cdc. you have to figure this stuff out. because if the best can you do is lock people in an apartment complex? along with the fouled sheets and not giving them food? we have to be able to do better than that. >> we should be and i think eventually we will be. the question is will this be a wake-up call or a snooze alarm. we hit the snooze button and we're back into complacency. will there be action following this? >> i think we can agree, it's not about spreading false panic, it's about forcing accountability to get this right. because a as you're saying, this could be much worse. thank you very much. we know you have a lot of questions and they're growing, in the next hour the latest from
3:13 am
you, and the 8:00 hour, we'll get your questions and then we're going to talk to this man before that, dr. thomas friedan. he is the man in control at the centers for disease control and prevention, we're going to get there and get your questions and talk to him. and where do you get them to us? on twitter, use the #eeblaqanda. breaking overnight, another massive cybersecurity breach, this one affecting tens of millions of customers, at banking giant jp morgan chase. hackers may have compromised the accounts of 76 million personal customers and seven million small businesses. how successful were they? how concerned should you be? chief business correspondent christine romans is here with more. >> ever arey day you've got hac trying to get into the vaults of banks to get your information. 76 million jp morganchase accounts and seven million small
3:14 am
business accounts, that's half the households in america. their information gotten by hackers. what did they get? they got names, addresses, phone numbers, email addresses and internal jp morgan chase information relating to such users, they didn't get your credit card number or password or social security number. what could happen here? this is the kind of information that is just a goldmine for people trying to recreate your identity. or trying to do phishing expeditions, to call you up on the phone and say, hi, i'm calling from chase, give me your social security number and your address, i want to verify some information. do not do that. chase says, they have not seen this point. they're very closely watching it. it's more likely someone is going to try to phish around, call you up, send you an email to try to trick you into them getting more information. so just be careful about that. >> heads up, everybody, we'll be covering this more throughout the day. thanks so much, christine, for that alert. let's turn it over to john.
3:15 am
breaking this morning, isis , on the border between city of syria and turkey. they now control the southwest corner of that city and kurdish fighters are trying to push them back. this comes after turkey voted to authorize military action against the terror group in both iraq and syria. australia is also announcing it will launch strikes against isis, but only in iraq. our phil black is in the turkey border with the latest. good morning, phil. >> what we've been seeing here in the east of kobani is a lot of shells falling over the city. particularly this eastern and southeastern site. and then as you mentioned a short time ago, this news from kurdish fighters still in the city, that isis has advanced into the southwestern corner and now control that part of the city. they, those kurdish fighters say they are responding to that. trying to put fighters into position. they've been predicting this for
3:16 am
the last 24 hours, that isis would reach the city and enter it. the kurdish fighters say they've been placing fighters in sniper positions to try and resist that entrance into the city. what we've seen up until now has been isis trying to deal with those snipers and those sniper positions through artillery, through shelling. now it appears they're advancing on foot. we've started to hear small arms fire in the distance as well. which suggests this close-quarter fighting has already begun. now the kurdish fighters believe that this close-quarter fighting in the city street to street, house to house, that suits them. that is to their advantage, because they know the territory. but they're now beginning to fall back really to their very last point of resistance. john? >> quite a struggle. it will be interesting to see how turkey spontsds to this. they say they will be involved in the crisis. our phil black right on the border, thanks very much. all right now first, it was four. now health officials in texas are tracking 100 people.
3:17 am
who could be at risk because of possible contact with an ebola patient. why the jump? how bad will it be tomorrow? are they just reaching? is this just about appeasing the public or following the science. we'll ask dr. sanjay gupta and our team of experts. we'll head overseas where a possible break of tensions in hong kong. the country's embattled leader sending his second in command to meet with student leaders, he also has a warning for them. we'll take you there. ♪ t-mobile's network has more data capacity than verizon or at&t. it's a network designed differently. a network designed data strong.
3:18 am
[♪] great rates and safety working in harmony. open an optimizer +plus account from synchrony bank. visit myoptimizerplus.com to open an account. service. security. savings. synchrony bank engage with us.
3:19 am
yoplait light is now better than ever. it still melts in your mouth. with 90 calories. and is now aspartame free. yoplait light. it is so good; it's better than ever. we've always been] at the forefrontumman, of advanced electronics. providing technology to get more detail... ♪ detect hidden threats... ♪ see the whole picture... ♪ process critical information, and put it in the hands of our defenders. reaching constantly evolving threats before they reach us. that's the value of performance. northrop grumman.
3:20 am
watch this. sam always gives you the good news in person, bad news in email. good news -- fedex has flat rate shipping. it's called fedex one rate. and it's affordable. sounds great. [ cell phone typing ] [ typing continues ] [ whoosh ] [ cell phones buzz, chirp ] and we have to work the weekend. great. more good news -- it's friday! woo! [ male announcer ] ship a pak via fedex express saver® for as low as $7.50.
3:21 am
want to take you to hong kong where tensions are simmering where police and protesters face off yet again. hong kong's chief executive saying his government is open to talks with activists, but he made it clear he is not going to step down. will ripley is live in hong kong with the latest for us. want to get a sense of how things are feeling there on the ground, will. >> well the numbers out here today are certainly smaller. one because it's a work day, two, because there's been torrential rain on and off. remember when the streets were a sea of people, many thousands of them. now it's just a handful. in fact they're having a hard time, michaela, maintaining some
3:22 am
of their barricades. there was a situation over here up there on the pedestrian bridge where the police actually were removing some of the barricades, protesters started screaming, people ran up the stairs and put the barricades back in place. they're also trying to get supplies in here to the distribution tents, but again, their numbers are smaller. the real test for this movement is going to be the weekend. will there be more people who come here. more and more we're getting a sense that the city is divided, there are anti-occupy protesters numbering in the thousands who are clashing right now in one of the city's working-class neighborhoods, telling these people that it's time to go home. that the city has suffered enough financially. there's gridlock here and they say it's time to get back to work. michaela? >> you talk about the division between the regular folks who are saying, i need to go to work, i need to make a living. you kids go away. stop with the protests, this isn't going to accomplish anything. give me a sense of how that is playing out in the streets. where you are.
3:23 am
oftentimes when we see the protests going on there's a group of rabble-rousers that sort of stir things up. is that happening there? >> yeah, so there's a few different elements here. there are some working people, but a lot of those are gone today, because they had to go back to work. there are the students, the peaceful students we've seen here sitting on the streets, sleeping here overnight, doing homework. setting up makeshift classrooms here on harcourt road, which is normally a congested boulevard leading into the central business district behind me. but there's another element, hong kong city leaders, michaela, sent out a strong worded statement about this, they say a radical element has moved in a small group of people who are trying to provoke the police, trying to escalate this into some type of confrontation that be presumably seen on the hundreds of television cameras stationed around the city. >> i want to bring in our managing editor of "quartz" bobby ghosh who has been watching this situation unfolding in hong kong. it's interesting, we're learning
3:24 am
that the second in command to the chief executive there in hong kong has agreed to meet with leaders. first, how genuine does that feel? given the fact that the chief executive has dug his heels in and said no way, i'm not meeting, but i'll send my second in command. >> it's optics, he said he's not going do resign. he said he's not going to give into any of the demands for more democracy. so you don't start, this is not a negotiation, you don't start a negotiation by saying you're going to get nothing. this is much more an attempt to seem to a larger section of the population, that he's being conciliatory. so he can say look, i tried, i reached out to the students, i sent my number two to talk to them, they're not listening. >> do you think the talks will accomplish anything? we know the students have sort of said, we have very strict demands, we are going to take further action, again threatening to sit in some of these government buildings, we've seen some attempts to do that. >> both sides are painting
3:25 am
themselves into different corners of the room. the students are saying yes, we'll talk. but we're not changing our demands. so a lot depends on what actually happens when the number two and the students begin to talk. and as will said right there, everything depends on what happens in the weekend. if there's once again, once the working day is already over in hong kong. if the crowds begin to swell again, and over the weekend you see again the tens of hundreds of thousands of people out in the street that will put a lot of pressure on the chief executive. and then that might force beijing to have, it might force beijing to come to some sort of a decision. whether it's a tough one, crack down, or sacrifice their chief executive. >> look into your crystal ball. how do you see this? there's such a concern. the sheer number of people there, with the sheer amount of tension that is building. it sometimes sub sides, sometimes increases, how do you see this ending? >> i think cy leung, the chief executive has no more credibility. it's a question of when he goes. i think beijing will want to
3:26 am
save his own face, give him an opportunity, buy him some time. to say all right now i'm stepping down. i'm not stepping down because the students pushed me. they'll find some other explanation and let him go he has no credibility, even though the students will all go home, he's been completely undermined in hong kong and in the face of the world. >> bobby ghosh, we'll be watching it, and i know you will be, too, thanks so much. medical experts say there is zero ebola transmission on planes. yet united airlines is contacting everybody who was on board thomas duncan's flight. is there a real risk to those passengers? our experts are here, they've got answers.
3:27 am
big day? ah, the usual. moved some new cars. hauled a bunch of steel. kept the supermarket shelves stocked. made sure everyone got their latest gadgets. what's up for the next shift? ah, nothing much. just keeping the lights on. (laugh) nice. doing the big things that move an economy. see you tomorrow, mac. see you tomorrow, sam. just another day at norfolk southern. faster than d-con. what will we do with all of these dead mice? tomcat presents dead mouse theatre. hey, ulfrik! hey, agnar! what's up with you? funny you ask. i'm actually here to pillage your town. [ villagers screaming ]
3:28 am
but we went to summer camp together. summer camp is over. ♪ [ male announcer ] tomcat. [ cat meows ] [ male announcer ] engineered to kill. [ male announcer ] tomcat. [ cat meows ] you need to see this. show 'em the curve. ♪ do you know what this means? the greater the curvature, the bigger the difference. [sci-fi tractor beam sound] ...sucked me right in... it's beautiful. gotta admit one thing... ...can't beat the view. ♪ introducing the world's first curved ultra high definition television from samsung. use steam to give you both crisp vegetables and juicy chicken... and you pour the sauce. healthy choice café steamers.
3:29 am
3:30 am
breaking news in texas, some 100 people now being monitored after direct or indirect contact with ebola patient thomas eric duncan. meanwhile, in liberia, a freelance cameraman for nbc waiting for a flight back to the u.s. after being diagnosed with ebola. are we getting the real deal? about controlling any spread risk here in the u.s.? are we doing the right thing, sending troops to west africa to stop the virus there? should we stop travel to and from that area of the world for right now? let's get some answers to these obvious questions, we have our lieutenant colonel, rick
3:31 am
francona, cnn military analyst. we have mary sciavo, cnn aviation analyst. the former inspector-general of the department of transportation. and dr. sanjay gupta. cnn's chief medical correspondent. lady and gentlemen, please engage the obvious for me. sanjay, we've been beating this drum. it seems like someone doesn't know what they're doing. you told me people on the plane weren't at risk. now you're trying to find the people on the plane. you told me it was just a handful of people. now you're up to 100. you had people in bubble suits and containing them, now they're locked in an apartment complex in texas. it's not breeding confidence, fair point? >> fair point from the optics of it. part of it is is the collision of understandable fear, around ebola colliding with the science of what we know. one of that hasn't changed, the science part of this. when it comes to the passengers, it's understandable they would want to know if they've been on
3:32 am
a plane with a guy who subsequently developed ebola. and is in a hospital in dallas. are they at risk? the real question. you heard from the cdc director. it fits with the science, he said there's zero chance they're at risk. a couple of different points you brought up. just take these four people now in quarantine, in dallas, family and friends of mr. duncan. be clear why they're in quarantine. they're not sick, they're not at risk of transmitting the virus to other people. dleer n they're not sick, which is why people in hazmat suits are not surrounding them. they're not excreting the virus, why sequester them, so they can consistently be monitored to see if they develop any illness. they'll get their temperature taken. that's why they're in quarantine. not because they're a threat to the general public. >> but how they're being treated seems a little off. when you have the sick people in the bubble suits it seems to express some kind of urgency.
3:33 am
these people are locked in their own apartment. they still have the bedding from when the sick man was there. they're not getting their food, the power went out in the apartment complex. neighbors had to open their doors. just doesn't seem like the right way to show you're prepared for the situation, sanjay. >> absolutely, chris. i don't know what excuses you can come up with this. what excuses we can come up with earlier in the week, why the man was sent home without his travel history being adequately known. those are just bad stumbles and you know, what's particularly tough about this, is you know for months they've been thinking about this, for months i think chris, you and i talked months ago and said, this is going to happen, what has happened this week. someone is going to show up here and be diagnosed with ebola. so several of these, they could have anticipated several of these needs, they didn't clean up this apartment. so there's still sheets and towels, and part of the reason they said is they couldn't find a medical contracting company who would do the job. if you get a call yesterday, will you go clean up an apartment that you know, potentially is contaminated with
3:34 am
ebola, you're not going to have a lot of takers on that the point is they should have figured some of this stuff out earlier. who is going to do this. and there's a lot of growing pains here, chris. >> sanjay, you're going to stay with us on the show. so when we do dr. friedan from the cdc, we can put the right questions to him. it's accountability time for them. mary, the planes are back in the air that have been used when someone was diagnosed. they say well, we cleaned them. with the ambulance, they cotton-balled it and put it behind a big wall. are we doing the right thing with the airplanes? should we be flying to that part of the world at all right now? >> no, we should not. an airplane presents a very unique threat vector. when you move an airplane from west africa to the united states, it's like you're moving a small village here from west africa. it's not only the passengers, you've got the caterers and the water. the people who clean the bathrooms, the people who put luggage on board. you've moved a whole city with the potential problems, not to mention the passengers on board and of course the cdc is talking
3:35 am
out of both sides of its mouth. it says standing in moon suits telling people not to worry, saying there's no problem. but yet the cdc yesterday issued guidelines, saying if you have a suspected passenger, if you suspect somebody on board had ebola, the cleaning crew is supposed to board in moon suits, with face protection, double-gloving, closed shoes, et cetera. that's so contradictory to what they're telling the american public. i think the government is learning on the fly here. >> sanjay, you're shaking your head. >> i don't think it's contradictory, mary. if someone is sick with ebola, then they could potentially spread the disease. that is known, that is what has been said all along. if you're comparing it to how the family in dallas is being treated, again, the reason they don't have people surrounding them with hazmat suits is because they're not sick. everyone has said all along. when you are sick you can transmit the virus and that's the highest concern time period. >> and look there's no question that the trick in communicating this is just because you're near someone who has it, doesn't mean you'll definitely get it.
3:36 am
and if you don't show symptoms, you can't be contagious to other people. that's the disconnect. that's the finesse point that people have to get and it's tricky and we'll try to keep being consistent on the message. the last point to have you here, lieutenant colonel francona, we're sending the men and women who matter the most in terms of safety, when we think of the u.s. trying to keep the troops safe, into what can only be seen as a situation where they'll be exposed to ebola. the idea that they're going to get out there have clean is naive at a minimum, is it the right move. >> they bring a set of unique capabilities that no one else has. they can move a the although of things quickly and set up capabilities they need over there. they can do all sorts of things, they can bring more sanitation, water purification, communications, security, whatever is needed over there. the u.s. military can provide and they can provide it quickly. that's why the president is doing this. they're, we're the people you call. >> what about the world health organization? >> they don't have these kind of resources. they can bring small things to bear. we're talking about thousands of people moving a lot of cargo, we
3:37 am
do that better than anybody else. we have the capability. we train to do this all the time. much of our training is done in africa, building hospitals, building clinics. building orphanages. now we're doing it for real. when there's a real need. so i think that this is a good use of the military. in a noncombat environment. >> lieutenant colonel francona, mary sciavo, dr. sanjay gupta. thank you very much to all three of you for clarifying the main points of push-back. the questions are growing as the situation does, in the 8:00 hour, we'll be answering your questions, keep using the twitter #for us, ebolaqanda. we know you have questions and we'll get to them. and we'll talk to dr. friedan from the cdc about it. the #again, i want to keep giving it to you is ebolaqanda. a man who lost his life to ebola, now his widow has made it
3:38 am
her mission to help other victims of the virus along with their family. we're going to ask her about the work that she's doing and what she thinks it will take to stop this terrifying outbreak. some unique perspective for you, ahead. when i had my first migraine, i was lucky. that sounds crazy, i know. but my mom got migraines, so she knew this would help. excedrin migraine starts to relieve my pain in 30 minutes. plus, sensitivity to light and sound, even nausea. excedrin migraine works.
3:39 am
today, more and more people with type 2 diabetes are learning about long-acting levemir®, an injectable insulin that can give you blood sugar control for up to 24 hours. and levemir® helps lower your a1c. levemir® is now available in flextouch® - the only prefilled insulin pen with no push-button extension. levemir® lasts 42 days without refrigeration. that's 50% longer than lantus®, which lasts 28 days. today, i'm asking about levemir® flextouch. (female announcer) levemir® is a long-acting insulin, used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with diabetes and is not recommended to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. do not use levemir® if you are allergic to any of its ingredients. the most common side effect is low blood sugar,
3:40 am
which may cause symptoms such as sweating, shakiness, confusion, and headache. severe low blood sugar can be serious and life-threatening. ask your doctor about alcohol use, operating machinery, or driving. other possible side effects include injection site reactions. tell your doctor about all medicines you take and all of your medical conditions. check your blood sugar levels. your insulin dose should not be changed without asking your doctor. get medical help right away if you have trouble breathing, swelling of your face, tongue or throat, sweating, extreme drowsiness, dizziness, or confusion. (male announcer) today's the day to ask your doctor about levemir® flextouch. covered by nearly all health insurance and medicare plans.
3:41 am
3:42 am
welcome back to "new day," let's look at the headlines right now. one of the biggest cybersecurity breaches ever, banking giant jp morgan chase says the accounts of some 76 million personal customers and seven million small businesses were compromised. the company insists there is no evidence that account numbers, passwords or other personal information was stolen by hackers. pretty unsettling. isis has entered the key city of kobani on the border between syria and turkey. they now control the southwest corner of that city. kurdish fighters are trying to push them back. this after turkey voted to authorize military action against isis in both iraq and syria. australia also joining the u.s.-led coalition, saying it will launch air strikes against isis in iraq. abortion opponents in texas celebrating a federal appeals
3:43 am
court ruling that allows the state to enforce a sweeping anti-abortion law. it effectively closes all but seven abortion facilities in that state. trumping a lower court decision. the law requires clinics to meet hospital-level operating standards to remain open. abortion rights advocates are expected to appeal. so sometimes joe biden says stuff. the vice president had a speaking engagement at harvard university's institute of politics last night. afterwards, a member of the student government tried to fire off a question, so listen to this. >> i'm a senior at the college. i'm the vice president of the student body here. >> isn't it a bitch? excuse me. that vice president thing? >> all right, i have to give that one a genuinely funny thing. but the vice president afterwards, assured the student that he really loves his job of being vice president and he also likes quote the guy that he works for. >> i didn't understand the context of a female dog in that
3:44 am
discussion. >> well that's a whole other issue, mr. cuomo. >> we have so much to work with here. >> i still love biden for what he is, and his candor is refreshing. he owns it. what more can you ask, perfection? >> we turn to you for that. >> in all seriousness, we have some serious situations moving through texas. storms doing some damage. >> rough day in dallas, severe storms making their way through the area. winds as strong as 100 miles per hour. many reports of wind damage were out there. take a look, downed power lines as well as trees and unfortunately the same line of storms is still with us even this morning. now kind of pushing through houston. kind of making its way farther east. you can see the line of storms, where the heaviest rain today will be will be around the ohio valley. the storm is still going to be here even towards the weekend in through tomorrow, northeast, you're going to get the bull's
3:45 am
eye of the heaviest rain. keep in mind, this is a strong cold front. that's the reason we did see the severe weather. so behind the system, how about your first flurries of the year? that's the time of year already for the midwest. they're going to see the snow flurries, for the rest of you it just means the cold air has moved in. i mean look at this. you're seeing a lot of blue on the map. already seeing temperatures below freezing. all the cold air, this cool air is pushing east by even as early as tomorrow. look at the highs, chicago, you want a high? try 48 degrees for your weekend. on saturday, all this cool air makes its way to the northeast. about a day later or so. so temperatures will be diving down as well. if you say 60s aren't bad, we didn't talk about the morning lows, the morning lows in the 30s out towards chicago. some 40s. >> lovely new york city. >> i'm staying indoors. it's that time of year already. inside. >> i'll tell you what, a little bit of context here, what's going on in texas, it matters to the ebola situation. the storms are hitting that apartment complex where the family is held up. power went out and people had to
3:46 am
leave their windows and doors open to deal with the situation what does that mean in terms of any spreading risk? >> and challenging getting to people. we saw the video. >> a lot of layers of concern here so we'll stay on the story. as you know, the first case of eebla has been diagnosed in the united states. now one woman is on a crew said to help victims and their families, she has a unique motivation. ebola killed her husband, he's an american and it happened this summer. you're going to hear from her, ahead. ♪ ♪
3:47 am
come from all walks of life. if you have high blood sugar, ask your doctor about farxiga. it's a different kind of medicine that works by removing some sugar from your body. along with diet and exercise, farxiga helps lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. with one pill a day, farxiga helps lower your a1c. and, although it's not a weight-loss or blood-pressure drug, farxiga may help you lose weight and may even lower blood pressure when used with certain diabetes medicines. do not take if allergic to farxiga or its ingredients. symptoms of a serious allergic reaction include rash, swelling or difficulty breathing or swallowing. if you have any of these symptoms, stop taking farxiga and seek medical help right away. do not take farxiga if you
3:48 am
have severe kidney problems, are on dialysis, or have bladder cancer. tell your doctor right away if you have blood or red color in your urine or pain while you urinate. farxiga can cause serious side effects, including dehydration, genital yeast infections in women and men, low blood sugar,kidney problems, and increased bad cholesterol. common side effects include urinary tract infections, changes in urination, and runny nose. ♪do the walk of life ♪yeah, you do the walk of life need to lower your blood sugar? ask your doctor about farxiga and visit our website to learn how you may be able to get every month free.
3:49 am
3:50 am
hope for an american freelance cameraman who has been diagnosed with ebola while working in liberia for nbc. this comes months after an american man succombed to the disease in west africa. patrick story was diagnosed with ebola this summer and died days later. he left behind three beautiful girls and a wife. she's made it her mission to help survivors and family members of those battling infectious diseases. joining thus morning from minnesota, deconte kofa, the widow of the late patrick
3:51 am
sawyer. the last time we spoke, darling, you were reeling from the loss of patrick. how are you and the girls doing? >> the girls and i are doing okay. we're doing really good. we're keeping it together. we have a lot of support from our family member, friends and community. so we're doing well. thank you. >> i'm so glad to hear that. it's nice to see a smile on your face, i know it's not been easy. >> yeah. i could barely smile before. >> you barely could. i was thinking about the fact that you are in an extraordinarily rare situation. you can very much relate to what is going on in dallas. we see the situation of a patient there, who has been diagnosed. his loved ones are now quarantined in a home there. >> yeah. >> what have you been hearing? what have you been watching? and what are you feeling when you see this situation play out? >> yes. so the moment i found out about it was on your channel, on cnn, i was watching the news.
3:52 am
and i heard about it. breaking news. and it took me back. it took me back to the day patrick died. well actually the day before. the day i found out he had ebola. and so it took me back to that. and those feelings. and i immediately could connect with what the family there may be going through. the first thing i thought about was his family. >> they are quarantined, locked up under armed guard. being forced to stay in their home out of concerns, right? they're concerned about the fact that they may have come into contact with him and of course the authorities are now checking every person who may have come into contact with this patient. i know that you have really found a sense of purpose in spreading awareness and fighting for more justice and dignity and also fighting the spread of ebola. tell me about your concerns about the situation in dallas.
3:53 am
>> that's right. that's right. my concern about the situation in dallas is, is that people may panic and there's no need to panic. i don't believe. because thank god we live in america. the u.s. it has the best health care system in the world. and so we're able to identify, contain and treat with compassion, folks who are diagnosed with ebola. and so, there's no need to panic, we're not going to have an outbreak here like we do in west africa. so that's the good news. the thing is that this is a wake-up call. that ebola can come here at any time. if nothing is done to eradicate it in the west african region. >> it's a two-part thing. so let's continue talking about the vein here, i want to ask you what you have heard from the liberian-american community. i know you're in contact with your friends, your network. the community there. we know there are liberian americans all across the united
3:54 am
states. what are you hearing? >> yes. they're afraid, they're afraid of being stigmatized. the liberian-american community, the members that i spoke with, my own friends and family members, and well-wishers are, they're afraid of being stigmatized. they don't want to be ostracized because they're liberians. and to be labeled. a friend of mine was telling me yesterday, that she went to the hospital because she had a sore throat. and her, her doctor, who has been her doctor for many, many, many years, stood and talked with her from across the room. she said she said to him -- i know you know i'm liberian, but i want you to know that i haven't been to liberia in many years and i haven't gotten in contact with anyone who went to liberia. and she just felt -- you know, just weird about the situation. but could understand his fear. and so that fear is real. and folks want it to stop.
3:55 am
they want something to be done to bring an end to this. >> well fear is a powerful emotion, we know. i appreciate you urging calm. i really do. let's talk about the situation in west africa. you have spoken quite powerfully and i know you're doing work here in america to spread awareness about the need for more to be done. what would you like to see happening in west africa, aside from eradicating the disease entirely. but specifically, what would you like to see? you want to see more personnel sent? you want to see airports close? what would you like? >> yes. yeah. i heard earlier on your segment where someone was questioning if it's the right thing to send troops down there. to help with the virus. whether it's right to send folks, u.s. military and i say absolutely. absolutely. >> are you concerned about their welfare? >> i am. i am concerned about their welfare and so i really hope that all precautions being taken. so that they're protected. but the thing is, if we don't help there, if we don't send
3:56 am
troops there, if we don't send health care professionals there to help, because i mean obviously they need the help. let's face it. they're not equipped there to handle this situation. >> what about other international partners? i imagine that there are many people in america that are saying the responsibility isn't just on american shoulders here. >> and i agree with that. i agree with that, i urge other international partners to step up, too. because ebola is everyone's problem. it's all of our problems. and so it's not just an american problem or west african problem. >> decontee, i want to ask you one last thing. louise, the woman quarantined in their apartment in dallas, obviously it's a trying time for her as a mother, as a woman, living here with this threat of ebola very real in her world. what would you say to her right now if she's watching? >> you know, i'll say to her, you're not alone. you're not alone. i'm with you.
3:57 am
i hear you. i see you. i can imagine, i'm probably the only person, or one of the few people well the only person here in the u.s. that knows what you must be going through. stay calm. listen to the instructions, don't leave your home. we're praying with you. and we hope that all is well. i will do everything in my power to reach out to you. so just stay calm. and the kofa foundation is committed to helping families like louise's. >> and maybe she can get some resources and support from you. we appreciate that. d decontee kofa, thank you so much. hopefully the message will reach louise's ears. >> thank you. a lot of news today to get to, let's start with it right now. an american freelance
3:58 am
cameraman in liberia tested positive for ebola. >> the cameraman was flown back by nbc to the united states. >> health officials now looking at 100 people in the dallas area who may have had contact with thomas eric duncan. >> did mr. duncan lie to airport screeners about being exposed to ebola? >> the fact that he knew and he left the country is unpardonable. >> my son should stay home. and everyone should stay home for 21 days. good morning, welcome back to "new day." breaking news out of texas. health officials there scrambling to keep up with the growing ebola crisis, they're monitoring now, about 100 people who had direct or indirect contact with thomas duncan. the liberian man being treated for the deadly virus right now in a dallas hospital. if duncan recovers, authorities in liberia plan to prosecute him. they claim he lied when he told
3:59 am
them he had not been in contact with anyone infected with ebola. we also have new information this morning about this man -- freelance nbc cameraman who was in liberia, just tested positive for the virus. he, too, is going to be flown back to the u.s. the question is can we keep flying patients home without increasing the risk to american communities? we've got every angle of this breaking story covered for you this morning. beginning with chief medical correspondent, dr. sanjay gupta who has spoken with the nbc crew in liberia. doc, what did you learn? >> dr. snyderman and i have been trading emails and i. they're on their way back, as you know, she said she doesn't know how this particular gentleman, mr. mukpo, was actually exposed. that's something that's still being investigated. but he did have a fever and that's what prompted his testing. the rest of the crew sounds like they're doing fine. but she did point out that they're all going to be quarantined when they get back. so sort of standard protocol with someone who has come in contact with ebola. one of the things i'll tell you as well, when we come to mr.
4:00 am
duncan and his family, there's obviously been a lot of missteps. they're in the places they need to be, but right now, you know, it's, it's clear that it hasn't been an easy path to get there. health officials now looking at 100 people in the dallas area, who may have had contact with thomas eric duncan. >> there could be additional cases who were already exposed. if that occurs, systems are in place so that they will not further spread ebola. >> as officials work to contain the spread of the virus, many are questioning how did it get here? in liberia, duncan came into contact with an infected woman on september 15th. four days later, the 42-year-old was screened three times and showed no symptoms. and was therefore permitted to board an airplane. but liberian authorities now say duncan lied about his ebola exposure on a health questionnaire. he was asked if he cared for or came into contact with an ebola patient. and he answered no. duncan flew from monrovia to
4:01 am
brussels. then boarded united airlines flight 951 en route to washington. connecting to flight 822 to dallas. while the cdc maintains he was not contagious during his journey, united airlines now voluntarily contacting passengers who flew on those flights. in dallas, duncan stayed in this apartment complex for days before feeling sick and seeking medical care. only to be sent home from the hospital with antibiotics, even after telling them he had just travelled from africa. the hospital now admits they missed his travel history due to a workflow breakdown. duncan was with his girlfriend, louise, her child, and her two nephews. louise speaking exclusvely to cnn's anderson cooper, recalls her fear when the family needed to be quarantined. >> they were going to be monitoring all of us, my son should stay home, my nephew, everyone should stay home for 21 days. we should not come outside.
4:02 am
if we step outside, then they're going to take us to court. then we will have committed a crime. >> health officials say the family hasn't shown any symptoms of the disease. late thursday, a special team was deployed to clean the apartment, and remove items duncan used. but they were turned away, because they lacked the proper permit to transport hazardous waste. >> did the cdc recommend that you clean your apartment? >> i told them, i said i put the clorox on the mattresses on my bed. and outside eric's dirty clothes are in a plastic bag all sealed up and that's it. >> how are you coping with this? >> i'm just hanging in there. depending on god to save our lives. >> i'll tell you, chris, some of the details, just quite extraordinary. you know after all day trying to get the crew to go clean up the apartment. they get turned away because they don't have permits? the optics of this obviously not good, missteps, a few places now
4:03 am
along the way. but the good news again, chris, if there's any good news, now people in mr. duncan and his friends, family are in the places they need to be, chris. >> i hear what you're saying, sanjay, i don't think it's just the optics, though, my question for you is we're going to have dr. freeden from the cdc on and he's obviously the person responsible for this. texas has become ground zero for this situation, it is the test case to see how we deal, whether we are prepared. it does not look good. the hospital is back-tracking, blaming what happened on software. that's not promising. because they should just be owning the situation, that they missed it. that's how you create better situations going forward. and holding these people in their apartment, is that really the best place for them to be, sanjay? is it really the best situation that we learned about, the dirty sheets and everything they have in their apartment from an interview with anderson cooper? love anderson, thank god he got the interview and got the information out. but shouldn't the government have known that? >> yeah. i mean no question. and look, they may have known that. you know, they didn't share
4:04 am
that. i don't know, but there's no question what you're saying is true, chris, i think that they probably really wish they could get a do-over on this in so many ways. but again, now that the test case is happened and we've seen some of the flaws, i think the big question is, it's going to happen again. you know, we talked about this months ago and said it would happen the first time. and i will tell you and other people have as well, it's going to happen again. so how is it going to be handled differently next time? the idea that we can learn from some of these things to make it better going forward. i hope happens. not sure, but that's whey hope. >> another thing we'll have to pursue is the flight that duncan was on, did go through europe first, where is europe in terms of their urgency for this situation and sending people to west africa? another dynamic here about how we control the spread going forward. sanjay, again, thank you for being with us and we look forward to you helping me out in a conversation with dr. friedan from the cdc coming up. at the cdc, it is all hands
4:05 am
on deck right now. as the u.s. responds to the ebola crisis here at home. president obama has reached out to the mayor of dallas, promising him all the federal resources he needs to treat ebola safely and to keep the disease from further spreading. michelle kosinski has more on the administration's response. she's live of course from the white house. hi, michelle. >> there have been calls for the administration to appoint an ebola czar to deal with all of this. but the administration has said they feel the response is sufficient. and they don't want to add another layer of bureaucracy. so it's been two weeks since we heard the president announce this comprehensive plan to try to stop the spread of ebola at the source in west africa. what is the status of that? how long is that going to take? well so far the u.s. has spent more than $111 million, that is by far, by far more than any other country. behind the u.s. is australia, at $7 million. the uk has just committed more than $100 million and u.s. spending is expected to top $1 billion. how many americans right now are
4:06 am
over there dealing with this? 230. that might sound lower than expected, although the department of defense is about to send the first waves of u.s. troops, more than 1,000 of them. among the goals are to build these ebola treatment units. and a field hospital with a total number of beds of more than 1700. senior administration official tells us that construction is starting now on the first treatment units and all the components of the hospital have arrived in liberia. that is actually expected to be up and running in about two weeks. but all of these places need to be staffed by thousands of people. mostly locals. and right now, the u.s. is starting the process of finding and training those people. michaela. >> and that's the important part. it is really comforting to hear that there are international partners joining the effort for their funds, further resources, michelle, thanks for bringing that up with us. with over 6,000 cases and more than 3,000 fatalities in west africa, the u.s. is now
4:07 am
prompted to send military as you just heard, hundreds more troops to the region to fight the outbreak there. let's get the latest numbers and exclusive new details from pentagon correspondent barbara starr. barbara, what do we know? >> good morning, chris. well here at "new day," we have learned first some of the key details about how the military plans to keep those troops safe in the ebola fight. with 3,000 troops already tapped to head to ebola-ravaged west africa, cnn has learned the u.s. military is increasing its fight against the deadly disease. hundreds more troops are being added to plans to help the infected countries contain and control ebola. >> it's america -- our doctors, our scientists, our know-how that leads the fight to contain and combat the ebola epidemic in west africa. >> approximately 200 u.s. troops are already in liberia. secretary of defense, chuck
4:08 am
haggle, has signed orders for another 700, from the 101st airborne division to head to africa in coming days to staff a command headquarters. 700 more army engineers will be going to help build and advise on mobile hospitals. >> we're standing up a field hospital and treatment units. and we'll be training thousands of health workers. >> even before most have left the u.s., military officials tell cnn the pentagon is considering drastic measures to insure they don't come back to u.s. shores with the disease. >> we are working with experts right now, on this. >> that could include enforced isolation for 21 days, the ebola incubation period. for high-risk troops who may have come in contact with the disease. all troops deployed will be monitored daily for symptoms. and all service members will face increased monitoring for those 21 days before they are allowed to return to the u.s. >> this is a complex emergency.
4:09 am
beyond a public health crisis, that has significant humanitarian, economic, political and security dimensions. >> so how concerned is the pentagon? well these troops will be taking their own food, water, fuel -- all their own supplies to last for six months of deployment. they don't want to have to use anything off the local economy. how concern reasonable doubt they? general dempsey now is ordering a uniformed standard across the military for health protection. and the rules for when the troops come home. they say they hope to keep 100% of the troops safe and healthy. that may be a very tough standard to meet. chris? >> that's just the reality, isn't it, barbara? they're going into harm's way. they often do. this will be no exception. we'll have to follow the situation and make sure they're treated the best they can be. thank you for the reporting this morning. so we have answered some questions about ebola. but of course many remain. most of them are coming from you, so keep sending them, the
4:10 am
twitter #ebolaqanda. we will get answers from our panel in the next hour. protests growing louder in ferguson, missouri, ending what had been a quiet period between activists and police. nearly a dozen people were arrested overnight during protests at the police station. meantime, a mysterious tweet has sparked an investigation into possible grand jury misconduct. cnn's sara sidener has more. >> this is the tweet that has prompted an investigation into the grand jury deciding whether or not to indict ferguson police officer, darren wilson. who shot and killed unarmed teenager, michael brown. the tweet was sent from a st. louis woman's account and says -- i know someone sitting on the grand jury of this case. there isn't enough at this point to warrant an arrest. #ferguson. the tweet sparked suspicion that someone on the grand jury had broken the law and leaked information from proceedings that are supposed to be secret
4:11 am
until a decision is made. the prosecuting attorney's office wouldn't give details of the investigation. but we found the owner of that twitter account. she is denying to cnn she sent the tweet and doesn't want to be identified. >> was that your account that the tweet was sent from? >> right. it was my account but i haven't used it. you know so i'm not sure if someone has hacked into it. because it had been hacked before. but you know, sending out a bunch of spam mails or whatever they call it. and so it's like i quit using it because it's silly. >> did you know someone on the grand jury? >> no. i didn't. >> both the tweet and the twitter account were deleted by wednesday night. the st. louis county court administrator told cnn in a statement concerning the tweet, the matter has been referred to the prosecuting attorney for investigation. the court will hear the matter and take appropriate action if the prosecutor finds cause to believe misconduct has occurred. sarah sidener, cnn, ferguson,
4:12 am
missouri. breaking this morning -- isis is now entered the key city of kobani on the border between syria and turkey. they now control the southwest corner of that city. and kurdish fighters are trying to push them back. this after turkey voted to authorize military action against isis, both in iraq and syria. australia is also joining the u.s.-led coalition saying it will launch air strikes against isis in iraq. the secret service will likely be without a permanent director until at least december. the white house plans to wait for a special panel to finish its review of the agency before making a permanent choice. a series of high-profile security lapses forced julia pierson to resign this week. interim director joseph clancy takes over next week. we will speak with a former agency director here later this hour. a 28-year veteran of the dallas police force fired for ignoring a woman's plea for help. >> right here, what baby i'm on
4:13 am
call. >> that was the response that senior leslie richardson gave to a woman who told him she was being threatened at gun-point and her children were being kidnapped. the boyfriend eventually engaged another officer and was shot and killed. no comment from corporal richardson. >> a horrifying situation there. all right, john, thank you. we take a short break, the centers for disease control keeping an eye on the ebola situation in dallas. this as another american has been infected with ebola overseas and is being prepared to fly home. we will speak with the head of the cdc about efforts to contain this disease coming up next. ( whistle bl)ws okay patrick, one more stop. lets go base, shark, blitz. base, shark, blitz, break! when the game's on the line... okay, this is for the game. the nfl trusts duracell quantum to power their game day communication. flag nineteen, set hut! abort! abort! he's keeping it. hut!
4:14 am
duracell quantum. lasts up to 35% longer than the competition. your customers, our financing. your aspirations, our analytics. your goals, our technology. introducing synchrony financial, bringing new meaning to the word partnership. banking. loyalty. analytics. synchrony financial. enagage with us.
4:15 am
4:16 am
4:17 am
is welcome back to "new day," we're tracking breaking ebola news out of texas. first, four people were identified for possible infection, now it is more than 100. first officials use the hazmat suits to deal with the ebola patients on our soil. now family is locked in an apartment under armed guard and we're learning more about their conditions from anderson cooper's interview than from the government. so the question is obvious -- do officials know what they're doing? or are they learning on the job? we have the best person to answer your questions here. dr. thomas friedan. he is the director of the center force disease control and prevention. we'll also bring in, we have him now there, good, sanjay is with us as well, our chief medical correspondent. so we can have a full discussion with this and obviously, sanjay, your fundamental understanding of what's going on. doctor, thank you for joining us, we know you have a lot on your plate. but cnn is all over this story. we want to make sure the right message is getting out.
4:18 am
texas has become the ground zero, not because of the numbers involved of who's infected, but how it's being handled. you have the hospital now backing off the common-sense accountability and saying it was about software. you have people trapped in an apartment, we're learning more from them inside than from you about their conditions. it seems to be house cleaners were sent there to clean up a hazmat area. it seems like the planning is not in place. do you agree? >> well, it is the first case of the ebola diagnosed on american soil. and we're all having to work some of the kinks out of what gets done. but you know, key is the focus on what's most important here. what's most important here is identifying everyone who might have had contact with the individual when he was infectious in making sure we track them all for 21 days. and if any of them get sick, isolate them promptly. that's how we break the chain of transmission and control it here. >> i understand that, doctor, but it seems that the confidence
4:19 am
keeps changing in its context. originally, when were you on, you said that's why, chris, we're not looking at those people who were on the flight, because he wasn't sick yet. now they are looking for those people. at first it was just a handful and now the numbers are growing and it shakes people's confidence in whether or not there was planning in place, we shouldn't just be learning now, we should have been preparing for things like this for years and years, that's the concern. >> well, the key thing is to find every person who might have had contact with him between the 24th when he got sick and the 28th when he was isolated. that's the period we're assessing, about 100 people, that doesn't mean they had contact. we're seeing whether they had contact. this is contact tracing, this is tried-and-true public health. this is what we do day in and day out for lots of conditions. and we will identify people both health care associated and community associated, who might have had some contact with him and every one of those will be monitored for 21 days, and the
4:20 am
key thing is to identify if any of those people develop fever and isolate them. that's how we break the chain of transmission. i have to take, i disagree a little bit with one thing you said. ground zero of this is not in texas. ground zero of this is in west africa. and until we stop it in west africa, we're not going to get to zero risk anywhere else in the world. because we are all connected. whether or not we want to try toe restrict travel, the fact is that people travel. people move. and if we restrict travel, it will make it harder to control ebola there and ultimately, increase the risk in other parts of the world, including here. >> sanjay, let me bring you in. the point the doctor just made there is a point of confusion, how would isolating that part of the world make it harder to treat? you could still have all the first responders and the people who need to help going in and out. it just may keep people who are infected from going to other parts of the world. >> anybody could potentially become infected, including first responders, think you need to start carrying the equation out further and further.
4:21 am
you let first responders in. you're going to let them out or not let them out? how is that going to work? if they could potentially be infected, do you still let them out? you could see how various permutations of that just keep going and going. with holding care would be tragic mistake. but let me follow up on something that you said to dr. friedan. dr. friedan, i'm curious about, i know you've had a very busy week. who is in charge? and if you're in charge, i mean, can you mandate things to happen? we know it's going on in dallas, can you say look, here's what you absolutely need to do in dallas. this is required. i'm enforcing this to happen. and if you can't do that, why can't you do that? somebody needs to have some leadership. it seems over the whole situation. >> absolutely. and we work very closely with state and local governments. and when there's an episode in a state or local government, they are in charge and we support them in every way. they assign an incident manager,
4:22 am
they establish an emergency operations system. they outline every aspect and we work very closely with they will. there's a great collaboration, i think the issue that we've been challenged by is what do you do with the waste. that's been an issue that we've been working intensively with the department of transportation, which regulates the movement of potentially infectious waste. that situation i'm confident will be resolved today. we had hoped it would be resolved yesterday. but i think we'll get it resolved today. and the apartment issues i know are very concerning and i know the folks in texas are working very hard to resolve them. i've already been on the phone with them this morning. >> is it necessary to have somebody who is absolutely in charge sort of a czar, if you will, over this? who doesn't just provide guidance or recommendations, but provides mandates? >> in every place, where ebola is spreading, our number one recommendation is to establish what we call an incident management system. where one person is in charge and you break down the tasks into smaller tasks to make sure that everything gets done and
4:23 am
followed up. that's been done in texas. they've done exactly what we've recommended. they have an incident manage anywhere place, we're supporting that person. the state of texas is supporting that person and i'm confident we'll break the chain of transmission there. >> well doctor, as you know, we'll take a wait-and-see approach, obviously. but you know why people aren't inspired by what they see happening in texas. when it doesn't seem optim optimalville people locked in an apartment complex where there's bad weather and they're losing power and it's hard to get them food. it doesn't seem like the best state of preparedness, we'll wait and see on that. let me ask you about something that seems much farther down the road of urgency that seems to be on the back burner. entero virus, hundreds of cases, in 42, maybe more states now. do we know what we're doing with this? because more and more doctors are saying chris, cnn, cover this. this is a real problem. this is really spreading, we've never seen anything like it. do you agree with that assessment? and if so, what are we doing? >> we have not seen widely
4:24 am
disseminated entero virus d 68 like we're seeing this year and we're concerned about it. there isn't a lot people can do. but there are some core things, the bottom line is you can make a difference by washing your hands. not going out when you're sick. covering your cough. getting a flu shot. and if your kid has asthma, making sure it's well controlled. if you do those simple things, you're going to protect yourself. >> so sanjay, give you the final point on this. these doctors seem to be in a minimum, a mild state of panic about entero virus, that they don't have their hands around it. they think it is going to keep spreading. where is the disconnect on that? >> i think this is one of those things where they have a pretty good idea of how the outbreak will probably be controlled. and it does appear to have some seasonal component to it. so there's not any particular strategy for that. and you know in terms of a vaccine or something right now that they would give. but they, you know, they have a pretty optimistic view that this is eventually just going to come to an end. because these seasonal things often do. >> sanjay, thank you very much.
4:25 am
dr. friedan, you do have a lot on your plate as sanjay pointed out, so thank you for taking the time to help us educate the public about what's going on. last think we want to do -- >> thank you very much for covering this. >> it's awe all about keeping it into perspective. not allowing panic to take hold, but at the same time checking sources of confusion, so thank you for having you on again. >> thank you. damage control at the secret service is another big story for you. the search for a new leader begins, a former secret service director is going to tell us what needs to be done to fix that agency. remember, it's not just about outrage, it's about making it better. two medium cappuccinos! let's show 'em what a breakfast with whole grain fiber can do. one coffee with room, one large mocha latte, medium macchiato, a light hot chocolate hold the whip, two espressos. make one a double. she's full and focused. [ barista ] i have two cappuccinos, one coffee with room, one large mocha latte, a medium macchiato, a light hot chocolate hold the whip, and two espressos -- one with a double shot. heh, heh. that's not the coffee talkin'. [ female announcer ] start your day with kellogg's frosted mini wheats cereal.
4:26 am
with whole wheat goodness on one side and a hint of sweetness on the other, it's a delicious way to get the nutrition you want.
4:27 am
4:28 am
4:29 am
welcome back to "new day," let's look at the top stories, jpmorgan chase revealing the information that the personal information of 76 million personal customers and seven small businesses were compromised in a security breach. company officials say there's no evidence that personal information such as account numbers an passwords were stolen by hackers, still very unsettling. in hong kong, the standoff escalating this morning, protests being staged by people who oppose the initial pro democracy protests. this comes on the heels of an agreement between the protesters and local officials to hold talks. the city's chief executive says he is not quitting his job. but will send his top deputy to meet with protesters who are demanding democratic reforms. a group of celebrities whose naked photos were leaked online, they're threatening to go after google now. a california attorney sending the search engine a letter on behalf of a dozen actresses models and athletes, slamming
4:30 am
google for failing to remove the photos more quickly, threatening a $100 million lawsuit. google says it removed tens of thousands of photos, many of them within hours. michaela? a patient diagnosed with ebola in texas, we know that, it's running rampant in west africa. ebola patients being flown back to the u.s. including now we're learning another american, turns out he's a freelance cameraman with nbc was diagnosed in the last few days. we hear at cnn are talking endlessly about ebola the last few days. do we need to? is ebola worth the hype? or are we missing a bigger picture? we want to bring in dr. michael off thorhome, director for the center for infectious disease research and policy. thank you for joining us. you've written a series of strongly-worded op-eds. a few weeks ago one of them came out in the "new york times," called what we're afraid to say about ebola. i'm curious if your concerns have quelled or increased since
4:31 am
writing that op-ed? >> actually unfortunately they've increased. as much as we have responded with promises to do something, when you actually look what's happening on the ground, they're not materializing, we're responding with programmatic bureaucracy time, when the virus is moving in virus time. the situation in west africa continues to deteriorate. >> what is it that you think that we're afraid to say about ebola? >> well i think part of it is the fact that it's a disease that's in africa, it's not here and somehow we can isolate ourselves away from it. and in fact, that's not the case, if this continues to grow in numbers, and does start to spread throughout other parts of africa, this really is a very serious destabilizing factor for all of africa. and you know, we have many infectious diseases we need to be worried about. frankly more people have died in the past year in west africa from hiv and tb and diarrhea
4:32 am
diseases but none of them destabilize the area. we've got to understand we can't respond in weeks and months. we need a response now. and that's not happening. >> long-term, but also immediate treatment now. i do want to push back slightly on something you said, about the concern. and i'm not going to argue with you about the concern, but dr. sanjay gupta on our air yesterday talked about the fact that there is a very real concern that influenza alone, flu, the common flu, kills tense of thousands of people. do we need to put this in perspective at all? >> well first of all, this is in part a media issue. you all have helped define what is scares us versus what hurts us, versus what worries us, versus what really kills us. i think that's a really big point to make here. is that yes, if you listen to your program this morning, we're so focused on what's going on in dallas. we're concerned about dallas and we need to get that right in the future. but those sparks from west africa are going to continue to fly all over the world if we
4:33 am
don't contain it in west africa. look at all the resources and time and effort, besides human suffering that's occurred just in dallas. we have to stop the situation in west africa and we're not doing that and we're not doing that in part because we are responding again so slowly. the way we're going to stop this in west africa number one is try to provide the treatment beds, get people out of the communities, follow their contacts as has been talked about many times and the second thing is we need a vaccine. we can't do this in row tine ti routine time. if we don't, can you pay me now or you can pay me later. we'll end up paying for this. >> we'll pay with lives is the stark reality. interesting because in the artic article, you actually uncover something that's quite disturbing and i'm almost reluctant to bring it up. because i think it is going to add to over-hype and panic. but you mention that there's a possibility that this virus
4:34 am
could mutate to become transmittable through the air. >> well first of all, we shouldn't be afraid to talk about it there's -- >> you can understand why it's going to frighten people. >> it's all in context, it hasn't happened and the part of it is just like what you're asking the question about dallas, why aren't we more prepared? we need to be prepared for the event yauality this virus has b transmitted through the route. we have to ask our is hes the question, what would we do if this should happen like that what would we do if the virus moves out of the three countries and it moves into nigeria or cities like kinshasa or nairobi. >> is there also a chance it could mutate into something less lethal? >> absolutely. it could over time become much less lethal virus. but what we're talking about is
4:35 am
for the foreseeable months. we are going to be living with west africa as it is today. and we have to understand that we just can't continue that situation. >> certainly some food for thought. you can read these articles online. some strongly worded op-eds, appreciate your thoughts, appreciate your candor, dr. michael osterholm, thank you for joining me this morning. clearly the secret service also needs a fix. it will be a while before we learn who the president has in mind to run the agency. a former secret service director weighs in on the shocking security lapses and whey thinks needs to be done going forward.
4:36 am
ring ring! progresso! you soup people have my kids loving vegetables. well vegetables... shh! taste better in our savory broth. vegetables!? no...soup! oh! soup! loaded with vegetables. packed with taste. having a perfectly nice day, when out of nowhere a pick-up truck slams into your brand new car. one second it wasn't there and the next second... boom! you've had your first accident. now you have to make your first claim. so you talk to your insurance company and... boom! you're blindsided for a second time. they won't give you enough money to replace your brand new car. don't those people know you're already shaken up?
4:37 am
liberty mutual's new car replacement will pay for the entire value of your car plus depreciation. call and for drivers with accident forgiveness, liberty mutual won't raise your rates due to your first accident. switch to liberty mutual insurance and you could save up to $423 dollars. call liberty mutual for a free quote today at see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance. you need to see this. show 'em the curve. ♪ do you know what this means? the greater the curvature, the bigger the difference. [sci-fi tractor beam sound] ...sucked me right in... it's beautiful. gotta admit one thing... ...can't beat the view. ♪
4:38 am
introducing the world's first curved ultra high definition television from samsung.
4:39 am
the secret service will likely be without a permanent director until at least december, julia pierson resigned under pressure in the wake of several embarrassing security breaches under her watch. an interim director has been named. but there's plenty of work ahead to repair the agency's image. let's bring in ralph basher, he was the director of the secret service from 2003-2006. he has nearly 40 years of federal law enforcement experience. he also testified at ms.
4:40 am
pierson's congressional hearing earlier this week. great source for understanding this situation. mr. bashham, thank you very much for joining us. >> good to be here. >> you defended julia pierson at the hearing. i want to ask you, why don't you think that the slow to deceptive responses to the last fence-jumping breach and the armed contractor, the security guard in the elevator, why don't you think that those justified a change at the top? >> first of all, in my testimony i did defend the director, but i also was defending the incredible job that the secret service agents, the men and women who are tasked with this incredibly difficult mission do on a daily basis, there is no denying. the events of september 19th at the white house. and the issue with at the cdc in lant.
4:41 am
clearly unacceptable breaches. and the security of the president. and the white house. and i think what is important now is that we have to move on. we have to understand what happened on september the 19th. why were the decisions made or not made. and you have to dig down into that. and understand that. and fix those problems. get, understanding what was going on at the cdc. to better understand why these things are happening. and the services had these incidents over the years. yeah, the service strifes for 100% perfection. then you know, you and i both know this this world, that may not be possible. but when you have these mistakes, you've got to look at them, understand them and make corrective actions, whether it's process or protocol or training,
4:42 am
or leadership. >> the secret service is being painted as broken. do you think that that is a gross exaggeration, is this about tweaking what already works? or is this about rethinking the buyer model? >> that is an excellent, i think that is an excellent point and no, i do not think the secret service is broken. look, just two weeks ago, they were up in new york and were protecting something in the neighborhood of 150 heads of state to include the president of the united states, went off without a hitch. they do this on a daily basis, but the failures, obviously have to be dealt with. and i think with a new director they've got to restore the confidence of the american people. they've got to restore the confidence of the congress. and they've got to move on and the new director has to have the confidence of the president and the white house, he has to also or she also has a great opportunity here.
4:43 am
>> joe clancy is the interim director, he's got good buzz and good experience within the service. a lot of people are saying he should get a fair shot at the job, this is his tryout. he was there during salahi-gate. the people who crashed and got into the white house. do you think that affects his credibility? does he come in tainted? >> as i pointed out, the service strives for 100% perfection, but they will have these incidents occur, but with that particular incident. there was a lot of, there was breakdown in many quarters there. they reviewed that and they've made taken corrective action. and you learn from that, and joe, i'm sure, learned from that. he is well highly respected at the white house, he's highly respected among the rank and file. and he has a good contrary to what some are saying, he has a good team there at the secret service. it's very unfortunate, they're
4:44 am
painting with a broad brush, the services is incompetent and that's just absolutely not correct. take these incidents, take these incidents that's occurred and use them, he's got, he's got the wind at his back right now. and they can make some longstanding you know, concerns at the white house, to be correct. >> political outrage is easy, we see it all the time. it's often more heat than light. we'll stay on the story. the goal sim proxt. and that's not necessarily politicians forte, but it should be the work of the government. we'll stay on the story. mr. bashham. we appreciate you staying with us and help us with this going forward. officials in dallas, we're going to be getting back to them. because they're getting some rough reviews on their response to our nation's first ebola diagnosis, remember, this isn't about how bad ebola is, it's about are we ready for anything if it does get bad? and how about president obama?
4:45 am
our political panel will weigh in next in terms of what the white house is doing here. and we have programming note -- season four of "parts unknown" debuts this sunday, 9:00 p.m. eastern and pacific on cnn. this week, anthony bourdain checking out the boogie-down bronx, discovering the foods that make this borough unique. we'll talk with anthony in the next hour. but first, take a delicious look. >> the bronx is so multifaceted. but for some reason, this is the first place i always take people. because this just oozes and emanates kind of that flavor of the bronx. >> he knows what i like. places like this. 188 cuchifritos on 188th street in the grand concourse, old-school, new york puerto rican good stuff. get within 20 feet of this place and prepare to lose your freakin' mind. >> cuchifrito is a fried pig, here's the tongue chopped up and
4:46 am
deep-fried. >> off parts deep-fried, what's not to like about that. >> the shank. >> we're get gg do get that in there. >> big piece of cicharon. >> so skin chopped up. >> skin and fat. almost like a little meat candy bar. >> amazing. turn the trips you have to take,
4:47 am
into one you'll never forget. earn points for every flight and every hotel. expedia plus rewards. yoplait light is now better than ever. it still melts in your mouth. with 90 calories. and is now aspartame free. yoplait light. it is so good; it's better than ever.
4:48 am
that would be my daughter -- hi dad. she's a dietitian. and back when i wasn't eating right, she got me drinking boost. it's got a great taste, and it helps give me the nutrition i was missing. helping me stay more like me. [ female announcer ] boost complete nutritional drink has 26 essential vitamins and minerals, including calcium and vitamin d to support strong bones and 10 grams of protein to help maintain muscle. all with a delicious taste. grandpa! [ female announcer ] stay strong, stay active with boost.
4:49 am
what if we finally had that would be amazing. hey, what if we took down this wall? what if this was my art studio? what if we were pre-approved? shut up! from finding to financing, how'd you do that? zillow. when i had my first migraine, i was lucky. that sounds crazy, i know. but my mom got migraines, so she knew this would help. excedrin migraine starts to relieve my pain in 30 minutes. plus, sensitivity to light and sound, even nausea. excedrin migraine works.
4:50 am
in the unlikely event someone with ebola reaches our shores we've taken new measures so that we're prepared here at home. >> that was president obama just two weeks ago describing the chances someone with ebola would reach the united states, not so unlikely as all. man in dallas is infected with ebola. 100 other people being mobbored for possible other symptoms. the president pledged federal support to dallas, is it enough? i brick in van jones and kevin madden, a safe distance away in washington. van, i want to start with you and read youing it ted cruz senator from texas admittedly no fan of the president said about
4:51 am
ebola. he wrote a letter to the faaq "due to the obama administration's unclear approach to addressing the threat of the ebola virus, americans particularly the texans who possibly have been exposed deserve specific answers to how the administration is addressing travel to and from the countries impacted by the disease." he said the unclear approach to the threat of addressing ebola, is that fair? >> it's certainly not fair coming from ted cruz. government is always the enemy until you need a friend. ted cruz helped shut america's government down, this time last year, including the cdc. luckily he wasn't engaged in those shenanigans this year because it turns out you need cdc, you need america's government. i'm concerned there is nothing bad that can happen to america that a certain section of republicans won't try to use to attack the president. the good thing about this country right now three things, we have the military that can respond, we have a cdc that's strong funded and aggressively
4:52 am
dealing with this, and by the way, we have obama care. now a lot more people if they get sick they can go to a doctor and get checked out. the government is working and actually a good thing america's government is working right now. these cheap shots are not appropriate. >> kevin i'll get to you in a second. van, all of those things didn't keep a nurse from not telling people this guy had come from liberia and had contact from people with ebola. it doesn't seem to help the four people locked in apartment complex with dirty sheets and towels. the obamacare system didn't put things in place for that. there are certainly kinks in this system >> this is a new situation for the united states but we're responding aggressively and responding well. i think the idea somehow president obama is responsible for all of us, with abunclear response, we have a clear and adwr aggressive response from the government overseas and here. ted cruz is trying to score
4:53 am
political points. we need good information, not misinformation, not panic information, not don't trust your government information. let's get together. >> doesn't van have a point? part of me thinks if there were a strong, federal government response and 1,000 federal health care workers all of a sudden jumped into texas right now i'm not so sure states rights senator ted cruz would be jumping up and down welcoming them, am i right? >> look, john, i don't think many americans look at this through a partisan lens. i think the only way you can really judge the president and by fiat the administration, the government's response is based on their actions and if you look at the actions taken so far, assets have been deployed to africa, resources have been deployed to africa, the resources and assets have been deployed to dallas, the administration has insisted that they've been in close contact with cdc officials there. that's the way that you have to judge the response, and it's going to be a long time when we
4:54 am
see whether or not that response was adequate. the other thing, too, to van's point, i do believe that there is an incredible amount of skepticism right now that the american people have about the government response because there is a confidence crisis. the government hasn't been very competent and good. every time they said don't panic and don't worry about it coming here, now we actually see that it is here. you can see why there is a certain level of justification about the american public skepticism of the federal government's response. >> to be fair they said it's unlikely it's going to come here but doctors like sanjay gupta and cdc thomas frieden have always said if it explodes in africa the way it has in west africa, the three nations, it was going to get somewhere. the idea it could become an outbreak. >> we don't have a global pandemic. not everywhere in west africa.
4:55 am
nigeria beat this thing. it's isolated to a couple of countries. let's be clear in the united states we have very different conditions here. which don't have traditions where we touch dead bodies. the smartest thing we can do is send troops there, what the president did, set up shop there to keep this from becoming a global pandemic. >> the united states is doing much more in these three countries than any other country on earth. other countries are $90 million behind. kevin madden thanks for being with us, van jones, appreciate it. the expanding u.s. effort in west africa will help combat ebo la. will it help slow the epidemic which at least in one person made its way to american soil? we'll have the latest
4:56 am
developments in texas ahead.
4:57 am
♪ there's confidence... then there's trusting your vehicle maintenance to ford service confidence. our expertise, technology, and high quality parts means your peace of mind. it's no wonder last year we sold over three million tires. and during the big tire event, get up to $140 in mail-in rebates on four select tires. ♪
4:58 am
when i had my first migraine, i was lucky. that sounds crazy, i know. but my mom got migraines, so she knew this would help. excedrin migraine starts to relieve my pain in 30 minutes. plus, sensitivity to light and sound, even nausea. excedrin migraine works. having a perfectly nice day, when out of nowhere a pick-up truck slams into your brand new car. one second it wasn't there and the next second... boom! you've had your first accident. now you have to make your first claim. so you talk to your insurance company and... boom! you're blindsided for a second time. they won't give you enough money to replace your brand new car. don't those people know you're already shaken up? liberty mutual's new car replacement
4:59 am
will pay for the entire value of your car plus depreciation. call and for drivers with accident forgiveness, liberty mutual won't raise your rates due to your first accident. switch to liberty mutual insurance and you could save up to $423 dollars. call liberty mutual for a free quote today at see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com another american infected
5:00 am
with ebola, a freelance cameraman working in liberia, now heading to the u.s. for treatment as we learn more about the man diagnosed with the deadly virus in the u.s. and the missteps that led to him being sent home. did that man mislead officials to get back into the u.s.? sitting on edge, dallas officials trying to track counsel as many as 100 people who may have come in contact with that ebola patient. is there enough being done to quarantine the people in the apartment where he first showed sympto symptoms. hackers compromising the accounts of 76 million households, 7 million small businesses, jpmorgan chase now scrambling to contain the fallout. your "new day" continues right now. >> announcer: this is "new day" with chris cuomo, kate bolduan and michaela pereira. >> good morning. >> good morning indeed, welcome
5:01 am
to friday, welcome back to "new day." it is the third day of october, 8:00 in the east. texas health officials are tracking 100 people who may have had contact directly or indir t indirectly with the ebola patient in that state, thomas duncan of liberia, being treated in isolation at a dallas hospital. authorities meanwhile in monrovia, liberia, they plan to prosecute him, if and when he returns back to that nation, because they say he lied when he told officials that he had not ever come in contact with an infected person with ebola. there's also new information this morning about a freelance cameraman for nbc who tested positive for ebola in liberia. he will be flown back to the u.s. for treatment. is that the right move? we'll get insight on the american response from pentagon press secretary rear admiral john kirby in a moment. we begin with chief medical correspondent dr. sanjay gupta. you've been speaking with nbc working with the cameraman who
5:02 am
got sick. >> dr. nancy snyderman out there in monrovia says they're not sure that exactly how he got exposed, although he just joined as a freelancer nbc on tuesday and it was the next day wednesday when he started to feel feverish and subsequently got his temperature checked and that prompted this ebola test. they had been working together for at least a few hours after he started to become feeling unwell, so that's why nancy and her crew are all going to be quarantined as well once they return back to the united states. they're not coming back on a commercial plane, they're coming back and quarantined for 21 days. we're also getting more details about mr. duncan and what's been happening with his family as well over the last day. health officials now looking at 100 people in the dallas area who may have had contact with thomas duncan. >> there could be additional cases who were already exposed.
5:03 am
if that occurs systems are in place so they will not spread ebola. >> reporter: many are questioning how did it get here? in liberia, duncan came into contact with an infected woman on september 15th. four days later the 42-year-old was screened three times and showed no symptoms and was therefore permitted to board an airplane. but liberian authorities now say duncan lied about his ebola exposure on a health questionnaire. he was asked if he cared for or came into contact with an ebola patient and he answered no. duncan flew from monrovia to brussels, then boarded united airlines flight 951 en route to washington, connecting to flight 822 to dallas. while the cdc main tatains he w not contagious during his journey united airlines voluntarily contacting passengers who flew on the flights. >> in dallas duncan stayed in
5:04 am
this apartment complex for days before seeking medical care only to be sent home from the hospital with antibiotics even after telling them he just traveled from africa. >> reporter: the hospital admits they missed his travel history due to workflow breakdown. louise recalls her fear when the family needed to be quarantined. >> we were going to be monitoring all of us. my son should stay home, my nephew, everyone of us should stay home for 21 days. and we should not come outside, if we step outside they will take us to court, that we'll have committed a crime. >> reporter: they have not shown any symptoms of the disease. late thursday a special team was deployed to clean the apartment and remove items duncan used but they were turned away because
5:05 am
they lacked the proper permit to transport hazardous waste. >> did the cdc recommend you clean your apartment? how are you coping with this? >> some of the details just extraordinary, when you put it in the context, chris, of the fact the cdc has had months to plan for this. what happened over this past week this patient arriving here and being diagnosed this was not up expe unexpected. >> i hear you and it's difficult to look at what's happening in texas which is a test case for the united states and see it is proof systems are in place the way dr. frieden at the cdc suggests so and it should not come down to that.
5:06 am
another front in the battle against ebola is of course how you deal with containment in africa. so the defense department is increasing the number of troops it's sending to west africa to fight the outbreak there. can they be kept safe? that's the big concern and this america's battle to fight? let's bring in pent gone press secretary rear admiral john kirby. thank you for being on "new day." the answer to the second question is pretty obvious, yes, it is america's fight, it's everybody's fight. seems a little disproportionate right now, not seeing the world health organization and european partners stepping up but you endorsed the idea to take on the mission of going to west africa and how do you see that mission? >> we see the importance of this mission for our troops for the military to contribute to this effort. i want to stress we aren't the lead agency for the federal government, we are very much in support of cdc and usaid. we're probably going to fly in
5:07 am
about 1,500, 1,700, sorry, up to 3,000 by the time it's all over but there's about 200 on the ground now. our main focus of the effort really are in four things, command and control, logistics training and engineering support. we're not treating patients, the troops are not equipped to do that, that's not their job. we'll try to help establish the infrastructure health facilities, emergency treatment units, that kind of thing so that the health care workers can do their jobs. >> i get why you're emphasizing they're not providing direct care because the concern with sending the troops there is exposure for whatever reason we haven't worked on vaccines, people in the military, whether you're aware or not are highly vaccinated and immunized can't do that with ebola. what do you do to keep your men and women safe there, and god forbid any get exposed and become sick about how they get
5:08 am
back home? zbl >> it's a great question, chris. we're taking a before, during and after approach. before they go they're getting trained on all manner of things going into west africa but specifically getting trained on ebola. these are not medical health care workers inside the military. they're engineers, logistiacians, seabees. they'll get whatever protective equipment in areas where they could face exposure. touring their mission, they'll have access to the military medical health facilities we'll help build down there, so they'll have access to health care while they're in country, they're also going to get constantly and frequently screened while they're there, so we're constantly checking them for symptoms and their health, make sure they're okay. we would do that anyway. certainly we're going to do it there. after they get home there's another screening process put in place where they are constantly monitored for a period of time and we're still working out the
5:09 am
details for if they show any symptoms. if the worst should happen and while they're there one of them is getting exposed, we've got protocols in place, assets ready, we'll get them out of the country and get them out of there quickly, safely, with all the medical attention they could need. we're well aware of the risk here and taking every measure we can to try to mitigate that risk. >> if a man or woman gets sick there the military is prepared to do better than just locking them in an apartment until they pass the period of diagnosis. >> we'll do everything we need to make sure our troops have the medical care that they need and their families get the support they need as well. >> all right, so least we forget, admiral, there is a war going on as well and not just the war against ebola. the reports are menacing about how isis is advancing. is that accurate? do you believe they are advancing or do you believe they are being held in check? >> i think it's a mixed picture, chris. yes, they are certainly advancing in some areas. we've seen them active in anbar
5:10 am
province. they're continuing to put pressure on the town in kobani you guys have been covering so well. clearly they have desires and capability to advance in some places but in other places they aren't moving in any great speed or any significant fashion. they are being held in check by iraqi security forces and kurdish forces. again it's a mixed picture like most combat areas are mixed pictures. we're putting great pressure on them through the air, through the air strikes, well over 330 total now in the operation that we've impeded their ability to move. we've changed the way they operate. we certainly helped restrict their communications and their ability to coordinate with one another. we know we're putting a kricrimn them and it takes time, not done through air strikes alone. >> absolutely, that's why the turks figure so largely with the recent commitment to put ground troops in. the faster that happens the better. communication on the ground and
5:11 am
all of the necessary ground elements come into place that way. certainly not in place now. admiral thank you for joining us, two very important issues facing you today. >> great to be with you, thank you. >> a lot of other news as well, let's get to john. another huge cyber security breach this one affecting tens of millions of customers of banking giant jpmorgan chase. the company says the accounts of some 76 million personal customers in 7 million small businesses were compromised in this attack. the officials insist there's no evidence that personal account information was stolen by hackers, still though a big, big security break-in. breaking this morning, isis entered the key city of kobani on the border between syria and turkey. they control the southwest corner of that city. kurdish fighters are trying to push them back, this after turkey voted to authorize military action against isis both in iraq and syria. australia also joining the u.s.-led coalition with strikes now in iraq. this is an interesting development the white house easing an arms embargo on
5:12 am
vietnam that has been in place for nearly four decades. the move announced thursday by leaders from both countries only applies to maritime surveillance and security-related symptoms. seems to be designed to help vietnam contend with possible aggression from china. the state department also said it's easing the arms ban because of the relatively modest improvements in vietnam's human rights record. >> look at this wild high-speed chase out of southern california. police say the man behind the wheel, 53-year-old steven bartlett, was wanted for a series of bank robberies in orange county in santa barbara. during the pursuit which was about 90 minutes, went over four counties bartlett hit another car head-on and drove the wrong way before pulling a u-turn. the incident ended when he lost control and went barreling down an embankment. >> i do not miss that sight, all too familiar covering the news in los angeles sadly. >> nobody seriously hurt from the situation. it is fair to say getaway
5:13 am
vehicles not at the top of the list, flatbed trucks. >> or tow trucks or any big hauler. >> luckily he picked one because he was more easily captured. let's turn to weather, going into the weekend but not without thundershowers. >> traveling yesterday, chicago, dallas, these major hubs yesterday had a severe line of storms making its way through and this morning we're still watching that exact same system. look at the lightning we have continuing to really develop here, so what are we looking today? today the hot spot around the ohio valley but anywhere from the ohio valley straight down through the gulf you are starting to see more of these showers. keep in mind as we go through tomorrow, same system. it is still here, guys, except we'll see the emphasis around the northeast, we'll start to get about an inch or two of rain, a soggy weekend will be out there. other side of it, you may or may not like depending on who you are but the first snow flurries will be out there for the upper midwest, yes, the cold air is definitely moved in, and even if you're not getting the snow you're going to feel the chill.
5:14 am
there's a huge difference out there this weekend for so many of you. chicago, talking about highs in the 40s. that is a big change and any of that cool air is going to be pushing off into the northeast as well. keep in mind highs maybe in the 40s, talk about morning lows down to the 30s in through chicago. by the way, if you're in the northeast, that also means about 25-degree temperature difference from last weekend, so that's not exactly gradual. i have to defend myself somewhere. >> the clock changed to fall. >> no one saw fall coming. >> no. >> i think what john is touching on you do seem a little shocked by seasonal change. >> always. it's only year two, guys and last year that was rough, for the record. >> we'll walk you through it this year. >> the seasons existed while you were in california. >> not for me. >> science. from science to dallas, where we know that city is certainly on high alert right now, concern growing about the potential spread of ebola at
5:15 am
other public areas and schools. we're going to talk with the health director of dallas county about the situation on the ground in his city. ups is a global company, but most of our employees live in the same communities that we serve. people here know that our operations have an impact locally. we're using more natural gas vehicles than ever before. the trucks are reliable, that's good for business. but they also reduce emissions, and that's good for everyone. it makes me feel very good about the future of our company. ♪
5:16 am
5:17 am
trying to mislead you about the effects of proposition 46.
5:18 am
well here's the truth: 46 will save lives. it will save money too. i'm bob pack, and i'm fighting for prop 46 because i lost my two children to preventable medical errors and i don't want anyone else to lose theirs. the three provisions in 46 will reduce medical errors and protect patients. save money and save lives. yes on 46. welcome back to "new day." one of the tasks is to put the epaola threat in perspective. right now there is no outbreak anywhere in the united states, social not in dallas. thomas eric duncan is in isolation, and his family is under quarantine and not yet showing any symptoms. those are the facts. however, it's not stopping the concern about how the situation's being handled and
5:19 am
what could it lead to? cnn's martin savidge reports. >> reporter: in dallas, there is no sign ebola is spreading, but the fear of ebola definitely is. >> stay with krbingcbs 11 for continuing coverage -- >> reporter: it dominates on tv and radio. and online. everyone in dallas better get to their nearest hospital and quick. i don't care if if you feel fine. i want this thing contained. news that several children had been in contact with the ebola victim and attended area schools has frightened many parents. >> i'm heading towards not letting him go to school today. >> reporter: she's not alone. attendance at the affected schools is down. >> for those five schools 86% attendance, usually around 95%, 96%. >> reporter: you might expect ebola fear, concern of an ebola outbreak would have people flooding emergency rooms and clinics. health officials say that hasn't happened so far.
5:20 am
>> i'm worried of the spread pause kids go to schools, everybody goes to market. >> reporter: this place close to the patient being treated mostly immigrants their fears are what if there's a stigma attached to the disease, what if if they were banished or quarantined? how would they go to work? how would they pay their bills? how would they survive? to try to calm concerns and provide answers dallas activated its emergency operations center normally reserved for disasters but it got off to a rough start with frustrated reporters. >> reporter: wouldn't you want to keep them all in one place, not in the apartment complex? >> reporter: martin savidge, cnn, dallas. >> texas health presbyterian hospital says even though a nurse documented duncan's travel history from liberia, the electronic records system wasn't set up to relay that to doctors.
5:21 am
we want to turn to the man you just saw a short time ago zachary thompson director of dallas county health and human services. good morning to you, sir. >> good morning. >> i first want to get your reaction to martin savidge's conversation about your city, dallas, being on edge. is your county health department on top of it? >> well, i hear a lot of discussions about who's on top and how it's been handled. let's be very clear, ebola virus as we know it should be a healthy fear but what we're dealing here at this point in dallas county is that we have the situation under control, it is contained, and we're following cdc recommendations. i want to commend dr. frieden for his staff coming down and assisting dallas county, the state health department and our medical director dr. christopher perkins. in this process, we understand that most people see the ebo laoutbreak in africa, and therefore the fear that it could happen here in the united states specifically in dallas is
5:22 am
understandable, but at this point, the family has been monitored. there is no outbreak and so therefore everyone should ease their fears and allow the public health officials in this state and from the cdc and the local health department to respond to this issue. >> i hear what you're saying but you can also understand why people are going to say fear is manageable but the fact is, there was a vital step missed when this patient's travel history was not taken. he was then released back into society. you are now monitoring up to 100 people, we're told. that is concerning, sir. help us understand when you say you're monitoring 100 people, what does that entail? >> let's put that in perspective, as most people would have to understand, we're not monitoring 100 people, we're doing contact investigation on 100 people. the family members are the ones
5:23 am
that we're doing monitoring on at this point. the other individuals are possible contacts. this is basic public health follow-up that we do day in and day out, if you go to a restaurant and somebody reports a food illness, if there is one person who reports that, and there are 49 other people that ate at that restaurant, we're going to follow up on these other people. this is a circle that we have to look at anyone who has possible contact and then come in and reduce down to the specific area. >> fair enough. was it basic health monitoring to have the family that is quarantined, the four family members essentially stuck in an apartment with the sweat-soaked sheets and towels from the sickened ebola patient left in the apartment with them, and no answers on what they should do with those items? >> so let's put this in perspective. this is called a control order,
5:24 am
and basically this control order was put into place to just ensure compliance. in terms of the recommendation as it relates to the one area of the room that is of concern, family members are not in that area, and i believe they were given that information, i'm hearing that they were saying that they were not, but i believe they were given that information, but again, at this point, the situation is contained. we only have one confirmed case. the real issue at this point right now is to reduce that circle of 100 possible contacts and so we can be focused on recovery, and i think that's where we're moving. again, cdc has done a great job, our state health department has done a great job. america has to be prepared for third world viruses in a 21st century country and we're seeing a situation right now that is being handled, there may be debate later or i'm assuming it's debate how it should be
5:25 am
handled. it's being handled in the most appropriate way. >> you might feel that way but the optics of things might seem different to many. for example the missionaries returned back from africa, we saw men in white suits, bubble suits. we didn't see those at the apartment complex. we understand that the family didn't feel as though they were given answers in had a quick enough fashion when time is of the essence, sir, and i know you appreciate that. >> um-hum, and i think what i really appreciate is that this will be a dialogue as an afteraction that we can evaluate how this overall situation happened. but it happened very quickly, and i believe it's a lesson learned as we move forward. i agree there are changes that could be developed in case we have another case here in america. but again, i think everyone has put their best foot forward to ensure that the safety of the family and the safety of dallas county and the north texas area is being done. >> the question of safety is one thing.
5:26 am
the question of did they get the dignity and compassion they deserve as well is another question many are asking. last question to you, do you feel confident dallas county is prepared, should there be an outbreak, should there be another infectious disease in a larger scale fashion than the one we're seeing? >> i think what i'm confident in is the public health system in place, we have great hospitals, great clinicians. in terms of our belief we're able to address issues that may arise here in dallas county and throughout the nation. i think again this will be a test case as we move forward for other emerging diseases whether we're talking west nile virus, chikungunya, this is a best example of our public health system able to respond and learn from this response to enhance our services in the future. >> hopefully you can quell the fears in your city because we know there is great concern, parents, teachers, schools, athletics, et cetera, the
5:27 am
hospital employees et cetera have concerns and hopefully you can address those. zachary thompson from the dallas county health and human services department thanks for your time today. ahead we have a panel of experts that will answer your questions. also the september jobs report is set to be released in just minutes. we'll bring them to you as soon as they are hot off the presses. . that would be my daughter -- hi dad. she's a dietitian. and back when i wasn't eating right, she got me drinking boost. it's got a great taste, and it helps give me the nutrition i was missing. helping me stay more like me. [ female announcer ] boost complete nutritional drink has 26 essential vitamins and minerals, including calcium and vitamin d to support strong bones and 10 grams of protein to help maintain muscle. all with a delicious taste. grandpa! [ female announcer ] stay strong, stay active with boost. faster than d-con. what will we do with all of these dead mice? tomcat presents dead mouse theatre. hey, ulfrik!
5:28 am
hey, agnar! what's up with you? funny you ask. i'm actually here to pillage your town. [ villagers screaming ] but we went to summer camp together. summer camp is over. ♪ [ male announcer ] tomcat. [ cat meows ] [ male announcer ] engineered to kill.
5:29 am
5:30 am
[ male announcer ] tomcat. [ cat meows ] ameriprise asked people a simple question: in retirement, will you outlive your money? uhhh. no, that can't happen. that's the thing, you don't know how long it has to last. everyone has retirement questions. so ameriprise created the exclusive..
5:31 am
confident retirement approach. now you and your ameripise advisor can get the real answers you need. well, knowing gives you confidence. start building your confident retirement today. welcome back everyone. time for the five things you need to know for your new day. breaking moments ago the pentagon will announce an additional 600 troops will be sent to west africa for engineering and logistics support in the fight against ebola on top of the 3,000 troops already headed there. computer hackers targeting jpmorgan chase in one of the biggest security breaches ever, the information of more than 80 million american households and small businesses was compromised. isis pushed into the key city of kobani on the border between syria and turkey. the terror group controls the southwest corner of the city but kurdish fighters are trying to push them back. clashes have erunned in hong
5:32 am
kong between pro-democracy demonstrators and people who do not support the week-long protests. the chief executive said his deputy would meet with the protesters but he would not resign. president obama will choose a success yar to julia pierson who resigned after a series of troubling security lapses. we're always updating the five things to know, go to newdaycnn.com for the latest. chris? all right my friend, we do have breaking news, september jobs report has just been released by the labor department, chief business correspondent christine romans is here. what have you got? >> i got a strong report for you, a strong jobs report for the month of september. you look at the number of jobs added, chris, if if you hit that yellow bar the forecast was for 215,000. 248,000 jobs created. we were concerned remember in august about only 142 >> yes. >> look pack at the trend. we love the numbers above 200. we want to see that continue.
5:33 am
here's another interesting part of this report, i want you to look at how the jobless rate has been declining and then hit that little red button there, and it will show you the jobless rate was 5.9%, the lowest since july of 2008. below 6% is important progress for the labor market. it's been slow and steady the recovery has been. some people would say too steady and too slow, but this is what it looks like that jobless rate coming town. that's what you want to see continuing. when i look within the numbers i see professional business services, higher paid jobs, lawyers, architects, i.t. specialists, retail jobs as well, health jobs no surprise there, but you want to see that broad based jobs growth. digging further in the numbers still have an underemployment rate that's too high, still have too many people sidelined by the recovery but the headline numbers show a resumption of that strength we saw in the labor market in the summer. >> are you okay with the yo-yoing, one month it doesn't, and next month it's relevant?
5:34 am
>> you want to see a trend. i see a pullpack in august but a trend above 200,000 you want to see continuous. 200, 250, you want to get new people in the economy, people graduating from college, immigrants who want to get at least population growth jobs added that's what you do when you get above 200,000. >> christine romans bringing positive news i like it. >> happy friday. >> thank you for bringing that to us. a lot of questions about ebola and we get to the most important ones, yours. we have a pam of experts answering your ebola questions next. plus he's crisscrossed the globe, had unforgettable culinary adventures and taken all of us along the way. anthony bourdain joins us to talk about the most exciting season yet of "parts unknown."
5:35 am
♪ want to change the world? create things that help people. design safer cars. faster computers. smarter grids and smarter phones. think up new ways to produce energy. ♪ be an engineer. solve problems the world needs solved. what are you waiting for? changing the world is part of the job description. [ male announcer ] join the scientists and engineers of exxonmobil in inspiring america's future engineers. energy lives here.
5:36 am
5:37 am
i take prilosec otc each morning for my frequent heartburn. because it gives me... zero heartburn! prilosec otc. the number 1 doctor-recommended frequent heartburn medicine for 9 straight years. one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. you need to see this. show 'em the curve. ♪ do you know what this means? the greater the curvature, the bigger the difference. [sci-fi tractor beam sound] ...sucked me right in... it's beautiful. gotta admit one thing... ...can't beat the view. ♪ introducing the world's first curved ultra high definition television from samsung.
5:38 am
welcome back. the ebola diagnosis in texas has prompted so many questions. we have great medical minds lined up that can help with providing more insight. we pulled your questions from social media. here is my panel, look at them they're good looking. dr. sanjay gupta, cnn chief medical correspondent, dr. sima jasmine, former cdc disease detective and professor of public health at the university of dallas texas and retired lieutenant general russel honore, who helped in the
5:39 am
emergency response from hurricane katrina. question from twitter, with an aspirin mask a fever and enable a symptomatic ebola individual to board a plane? very good question. >> i've been asking the same question to my friends who are experts in infectious diseases, the consensus seems to be firstly you would not want to give aspirin to a patient with ebola because of the risk of bleeding but potentially or theoretically it could mask some of the symptoms. there are many other symptoms of ebola disease such as a rash, vomiting and diarrhea that could be a lot harder to conceal. >> next question doctor -- i almost made you a doctor, general. if it's found duncan lied to get into the united states could he face prosecution? does it change the game if he intentionally traveled here in case he got sick? >> yes, i think whether it will enforce that law we've seen statements from his own country and they intend to prosecute him
5:40 am
but if he intentionally did this, that could be under some form of bioterrorism if the country decides to prosecute that. i am pretty much doubt it will happen but let's hope right now he'll live and the incident is contained in dallas. >> first thing's first, right. question from twitter for you, dr. gupta, we have a situation in dallas very well that we know, four people contained in this apartment, that was shared by mr. duncan. this person wants to know what becomes of the personal effects what happens to their home, are all of those personal items destroyed or are they decontaminated somehow? >> you can decontaminate some things and keep in mind the virus can live outside the body, but for a few days, if it's exposed to heat or cleaning solutions, it will become deactivated. keep in mind his bed sheets, the towels, things he was using when he was sick it sounds like in that apartment still in that apartment remarkably, but i
5:41 am
imagine that you'll take that out, put it in my biocontainment bag and some of that stuff will be burned, that's certainly what they do at the hospitals when patients are being cared for there. >> brings me to my next request he to tee off of that, a lot of people wondering about the e.r., if if you feel sick, head to an e.r., what about those services, can they become infected and what do they do then? >> it's the same sort of situation there. obviously they can be decontaminated and as far as the safety of the people in the e.r., i know e.r.s can be crowded, i spent a lot of time in them but still it's a question of getting bodily fluids from someone who is sick with ebola onto somebody else, your skin. if there's a suspicion of ebola, if there's suspicion during the testing that person should be separated from other patients so that scenario doesn't help. >> general honore this from facebook, how can you control a
5:42 am
u.s. citizen traveling to france, coming into contact with a french citizen into liberia in two weeks, are international countries and international hospitals, are they following the same kind of guidelines and following the same procedures we are here in the u.s.? >> well, the only ones we can control is what we could here in the united states as far as entry into our country based on where people have come through. the potential of people going from one country to the next will continue to exist, but right now, the protocol will be followed with the united states immigration services based on the guidance from the cdc on whether we continue to allow people to enter through that way of conveyance, then to get them screened when they arrive, isolated because people can be put in waiting rooms or held for days if need to, if suspected.
5:43 am
>> that's a question what the airport guidance will be. dr. jasminejasmine, something w wondered about, sanjay will remember this when we first saw nancy writebol and kent brantly coming back to the states. if you have had ebola, can you get it again, is it like the chicken pox or the flu? >> when we have those cases with nancy writebol and kent brantly who were treated, doctors say these guys survived ebola infection, they're immune to ebola but only the particular strain of the virus they were infected with. there are five strains. you can get immunity to the specific strain you were infected with. >> how do we know how this virus will behave? will it change and morph and will it become something more lethal, less lethal, those are the questions we don't know. sanjay one for you, why not since we've got time. this is what a lot of people are thinking about as we head into the holiday season in a couple months, this person wants to
5:44 am
know they're traveling abroad in december, wants to know the best way to take care of himself in the air and in those international airports. >> well i think some of the basic advice that we talk about in general for infectious disease applies here. you want to obviously wash your hands, things like that very often. the good news about ebola if that's the particular concern is that it's not airborne so there's less of a concern in that regard. you also want to avoid sick people. it sounds very obvious, very basic, you want to avoid sick people and if you are sick you should stay home. one thing about ebola is when people become symptomatic and start to be able to shed the virus, they're pretty sick. they don't want to usually get up. they're usually in bed or in a hospital. hopefully as whoever wrote that question is traveling they won't come in contact with somebody. >> great questions from you at home, great panel. thank you to lieutenant general russel honore, dr. sima jasmine
5:45 am
and dr. sanjay gupta always a pleasure. thank you guys. chris? >> from their heroic efforts to cnn's heroes, we here at cnn are proud to be honoring our cnn heroes every year, certainly this one. as you know the top ten get revealed, anderson cooper did it yesterday here on our show, and anderson has more on how you can decide who takes the top prize as cnn hero of the year, remember that comes with a $100,000 prize for their cause. >> now that we've aunnoed the top ten cnn heroes of 2014 i want to show you how you can choose who should be cnn hero of the year and receive $100,000 for their cause. this is the main page of cnnheroes.com, you see the top ten and you can learn more about each one of them. here's how you can vote for your favorite. once you decided who inspires you the most click down here on "vote" and a new page comes up. it shows you all of the top ten heroes.
5:46 am
choose the person to vote for, i'm going to randomly select say ned norton, just an example. his photo shows up under your selection and just enter your e-mail address, type in the security code and click on the vote button right down there. it's even easier to vote on facebook, make your selection and click over here. you can vote once a day every day through sunday, november 16th through e-mail and facebook. go to cnnhee heroes.com. rally your friends to vote on facebook or twitter. we'll unveil it during an all-star tribute. >> i don't know why we wouldn't be allowed to vote. >> i want to vote. >> remember the rule is you vote only once a day but you can vote every day and do it at cnnheroes.com and one will be named hero of the year, cnn heroes aall-star tribute hosted by anderson cooper airing december 7th.
5:47 am
you can vote every day once a day. anthony bourdain and his crew up the stakes in the new season of "parts unknown." he'll be here with us telling us about the new season and the boogie down bronx. stay with us. could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. everybody knows that. well, did you know you that former pro football player ickey woods will celebrate almost anything? unh-uh. number 44... whoooo! forty-four, that's me! get some cold cuts... get some cold cuts... get some cold cuts! whooo! gimme some! geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. whoo! forty-four ladies, that's me!
5:48 am
whoo...gonna get some cold cuts today! ♪ ♪ [ female announcer ] with five perfectly sweetened whole grains...
5:49 am
you can't help but see the good.
5:50 am
trying to mislead you about the effects of proposition 46. whole grains... well here's the truth: 46 will save lives. it will save money too. i'm bob pack, and i'm fighting for prop 46 because i lost my two children to preventable medical errors and i don't want anyone else to lose theirs. the three provisions in 46 will reduce medical errors and protect patients. save money and save lives. yes on 46.
5:51 am
the south bronx sounds familiar as a bad thing and the bronx at one time was said to be burning, wasn't it? for the most part the bronx is overlooked, the never visited burrough in new york city, which is a shame, because the brompgs is a magical place with its open energy, its own food, vibe, and rhythm. you've been to brooklyn. maybe it's time you took a look at the bronx. >> you know that voice and now he's in the boogie down bronx, just one of the unique locations visited by our resident food connoisseur mr. anthony bourdain for the fourth season of "parts unknown" the show returns sunday taking viewers into the culinary landscapes of tanzania, jamaica, iran, so who better to help us
5:52 am
preview the new season than the man himself. how'd you find yourself in the bronx, brother, get lazy and didn't want to travel? >> i know so shamefully little about it. it's right next door. i could see it from my window. hipsters have been rushing to brooklyn and all over queens. why not the bronx? i sort of confront my own ignorance of this very important burrough, you watch me learn a little bit about a massive and awesome part of our city. >> what does bronx culture mean? >> well, in this case we were looking at the soundtrack to the entire world hip-hop now, whether it's commercials, films, children's shows, it's fully penetrated just about everywhere we go on earth. hip-hop can be traced right back to essentially three people and one housing project in the bronx
5:53 am
and it came from from place else and we go back and meet with all three of them, none of whom really got paid. >> and you explored jamaican food, you explored what else, puerto rican food? >> bangladesh. the food is great. it's a wonderland of communities from all over the world who brought their food and drinking practices. >> oh really, did we experience a little bit of that? >> yes, there's -- breakfast with the jamaican community can get interesting. >> do you understand it better now? >> he's got some of that going on. you know what's interesting to me watching this, is that when i've seen new far out places that would be mind blowing to people you seem to take it in stride and yet this episode when you're in the bronx you seem a little wowed, but what does it take you by surprise you figure you know your own backyard? >> i think i like it when i'm made to feel stupid on camera, in the sense that --
5:54 am
>> welcome to my world. >> this was here all along, and i'm 20 minutes from this all my life, and i didn't know, so i think you so he that on my face. >> you also coming up in this season are going to far flung places not so much on our back door. i don't want to give it away but talk about the people that you toured iran or parts of iran with. very significant. >> the correspondent for "the washington post" and his wife who showed us around, dual citizen in one case, a full citizen in the other. lovely people who were sort of sidekick guide showed me around tehran were arrested and detained and have really not been heard from since the show, and for no reason that can be possibly discerned, they were lovely people, very supportive of better understanding of their
5:55 am
country, i felt very close, they identified with and proud of iran, and i think people are going to be stunned and confused as i was to see that the difference between the iran we know from outside looking in and from the foreign policy, military aspect, and what it's like just walking down the street and talking to ordinary people in iran, which is as far from that experience as could be imaginable. >> but it does show you these people who showed you that different world opened up that world have since been closed off and shut down completely. >> i think we felt when we were there that a window was opening, and that it was going to open possibly for good, and there was a sense of optimism and a yearning that you could feel. it appears that maybe that window closed and that we were there for just sort of a blip. >> we look forward to all the places that you'll take us, where many of us will never be
5:56 am
able to go, and if you're starting in the bronx for the new yorkers, a place with he'd never thought to go. maybe nice lunch recommendation for a field trip. you don't have to come, tony, just give us the recommendation. "anthony bourdain: parts unknown" airing this sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern and pacific. thanks for being with us. we'll be right back. going to ma? discover a new energy source. turn ocean waves into power. design cars that capture their emissions. build bridges that fix themselves. get more clean water to everyone. who's going to take the leap? who's going to write the code? who's going to do it? engineers. that's who. that's what i want to do. be an engineer. ♪ [ male announcer ] join the scientists and engineers of exxonmobil in inspiring america's future engineers. energy lives here.
5:57 am
dad,thank you mom for said this oftprotecting my future.you. thank you for being my hero and my dad. military families are uniquely thankful for many things, the legacy of usaa auto insurance could be one of them. if you're a current or former military member or their family, get an auto insurance quote and see why 92% of our members plan to stay for life.
5:58 am
5:59 am
while we wish you a good weekend, your day is far from
6:00 am
over. there's a lot of news so let's get you to "the newsroom" and ms. carol costello. >> happy friday. >> happy friday. that includes good economic news, what could be better than that? have a great weekend. "newsroom" starts now. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com happening now, looking for work. >> breaking this morning a new snapshot of our economy, as chase comes clean about this summer's cyber breach, 76 million households affected, your name, e-mail, phone number, street address, all compromised. er who lives here, this, this place should be blocked. everybody inside should be screened. >> fear of ebola in dallas, breaking new detail this is morning, cleaning crews turned away from the patient's part. the

136 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on